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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Thermodynamics Resource for Gas-Phase and Condensed Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... They include thermodynamic data (heats of formation, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities) for gas and condensed-phase species, ...

2

Thermodynamics Resource: Gas-Phase Database and the Condensed-Phase Data File  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Thermodynamics Resource provides thermochemistry for gas-phase and condensed species relevant to a wide range of high-temperature processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), catalysis, combustion, materials corrosion, and aerosol processing. Thermochemistry is the foundation for understanding chemical reactions and as such is essential to the development of predictive models for many high-temperature processes. The database includes thermodynamic data (heats of formation, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities) for gas and condensed-phase species, thermodynamic models for specific condensed-phase material systems that account for non-ideal behavior in those systems, and a wide range of calculated molecular properties for gas-phase species. (Specialized Interface)

Allendorf, Mark D.; Besmann, Theodore M.

3

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to locate and bring into production. To help meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Fossil Energy over the years has amassed wide ranging expertise in areas related to deepwater resource location, production, safety and environmental protection.

4

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources Deepwater Oil & Gas Resources The United States has significant natural gas and oil reserves. But many of these resources are increasingly harder to...

5

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Savings Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy...

6

Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

none

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Primer on gas integrated resource planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: gas resource planning: need for IRP; gas integrated resource planning: methods and models; supply and capacity planning for gas utilities; methods for estimating gas avoided costs; economic analysis of gas utility DSM programs: benefit-cost tests; gas DSM technologies and programs; end-use fuel substitution; and financial aspects of gas demand-side management programs.

Goldman, C.; Comnes, G.A.; Busch, J.; Wiel, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Unconventional gas outlook: resources, economics, and technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report explains the current and potential of the unconventional gas market including country profiles, major project case studies, and new technology research. It identifies the major players in the market and reports their current and forecasted projects, as well as current volume and anticipated output for specific projects. Contents are: Overview of unconventional gas; Global natural gas market; Drivers of unconventional gas sources; Forecast; Types of unconventional gas; Major producing regions Overall market trends; Production technology research; Economics of unconventional gas production; Barriers and challenges; Key regions: Australia, Canada, China, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States; Major Projects; Industry Initiatives; Major players. Uneconomic or marginally economic resources such as tight (low permeability) sandstones, shale gas, and coalbed methane are considered unconventional. However, due to continued research and favorable gas prices, many previously uneconomic or marginally economic gas resources are now economically viable, and may not be considered unconventional by some companies. Unconventional gas resources are geologically distinct in that conventional gas resources are buoyancy-driven deposits, occurring as discrete accumulations in structural or stratigraphic traps, whereas unconventional gas resources are generally not buoyancy-driven deposits. The unconventional natural gas category (CAM, gas shales, tight sands, and landfill) is expected to continue at double-digit growth levels in the near term. Until 2008, demand for unconventional natural gas is likely to increase at an AAR corresponding to 10.7% from 2003, aided by prioritized research and development efforts. 1 app.

Drazga, B. (ed.)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources - GIS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources - GIS and Well data The California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources contains oil, gas, and geothermal data for the...

10

Nanoparticle Gas-Phase Electrophoresis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Nanoparticle Gas-Phase Electrophoresis ... L f d f ? = L f /d f , f is the fraction of diffuse gas collisions with the cylinder -V + and where ? ? ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Resources on Greenhouse Gas Resources on Greenhouse Gas October 7, 2013 - 2:30pm Addthis Many helpful resources about greenhouse gases (GHG) are available. Also see Contacts. GHG Reporting and Accounting Tools Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report: Lists resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist agencies with completing comprehensive GHG inventory reporting requirements under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514. General Services Administration (GSA) Carbon Footprint and Green Procurement Tool: Voluntary tool developed by GSA to assist agencies in managing GHGs as required by E.O. 13514. Also see Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning Data and Tools.

12

WEB RESOURCE: Gas Welding Magnesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 20, 2007 ... This webpage offers advice on gas welding of magnesium. Launch Site SOURCE: "Gas Welding Magnesium". Weldwell Corporate Website.

13

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

14

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Greenhouse Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources on Greenhouse Gas to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Greenhouse Gas on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

15

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

proved natural gas reserves (3) 2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR,

17

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics The Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Group is dedicated to developing and applying spectroscopic and theoretical tools to challenging problems in chemical physics related to reactivity, structure, dynamics and kinetics of transient species. Recent theoretical work has included advances in exact variational solution of vibrational quantum dynamics, suitable for up to five atoms in systems where large amplitude motion or multiple strongly coupled modes make simpler approximations inadequate. Other theoretical work, illustrated below, applied direct dynamics, quantum force trajectory calculations to investigate a series of reactions of the HOCO radical. The potential energy surface for the OH + CO/ H + CO2 reaction, showing two barriers (TS1 and TS2) and the deep HOCO well along the minimum energy pathway. The inset figure shows the experimental and calculated reactivity of HOCO with selected collision partners. See J.S. Francisco, J.T. Muckerman and H.-G. Yu, "HOCO radical chemistry,"

18

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

19

Federal Energy Management Program: Resources on Greenhouse Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist...

20

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States APRIL 2011 in this overview is based on the report "World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment," which was prepared | World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment 1 Background The use of horizontal drilling

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

22

NETL: Natural Gas Resources, Enhanced Oil Recovery, Deepwater Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Natural Gas Projects and Natural Gas Projects Index of Research Project Summaries Use the links provided below to access detailed DOE/NETL project information, including project reports, contacts, and pertinent publications. Search Natural Gas and Oil Projects Current Projects Natural Gas Resources Shale Gas Environmental Other Natural Gas Resources Ehanced Oil Recovery CO2 EOR Environmental Other EOR & Oil Resources Deepwater Technology Offshore Architecture Safety & Environmental Other Deepwater Technology Methane Hydrates DOE/NETL Projects Completed Projects Completed Natural Gas Resources Completed Enhanced Oil Recovery Completed Deepwater Technology Completed E&P Technologies Completed Environmental Solutions Completed Methane Hydrates Completed Transmission & Distribution

23

Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase II: Resource Exploration and Confirmation GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

24

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase IV: Resource Production and Power Plant Construction GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation

25

Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Resource Procurement and Identification - Resource Procurement and Identification Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase I: Resource Procurement and Identification GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

26

DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development July 30, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays. Operators can use the data on the websites to expand natural gas recovery in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico and the central Appalachian Basin of West Virginia and Pennsylvania. As production from conventional natural gas resources declines, natural gas from tight-gas sandstone formations is expected to contribute a growing percentage to the nation's energy supply. "Tight gas" is natural gas

27

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

28

Stationary Phases in Gas Chromatographic Retention Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... lists below contain names of stationary phases found in the gas chromatography retention ... CP Sil 2; Nonpolar; LM-5; JXR; Vacuum Grease Oil (VM-4) ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0575(94) Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan) December 1994 Energy Information Administration

30

WEB RESOURCE: Platinum Plating of Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 25, 2008 ... This web resource describes the process by which gas turbine components are coated at SIFCO's Carrigtwohill plant and the effects of platinum ...

31

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Germany 51 254 700 ... June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 18

32

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Minnesota Energy Resources provides rebates to their residential customers for the purchase of energy efficient natural gas equipment and set-back thermostats. Rebates are available for furnaces,...

33

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

priority challenges associated with safely and prudently developing unconventional shale gas and tight oil resources. Implementation Plan The Program Consortium will...

34

oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia 29 Appendix A Petroleum Geology The petroleum geology discussion is copied ...

35

Unconventional gas resources in the U.S.A.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unconventional gas accounts for more than 40% of U.S. domestic gas production and more than 10% of world output. The amount of resources available is still uncertain and estimates vary to a large degree. In this paper

Jon Schumann; Shapour Vossoughi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A New Global Unconventional Natural Gas Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1997, Rogner published a paper containing an estimate of the natural gas in place in unconventional reservoirs for 11 world regions. Rogner's work was assessing the unconventional gas resource base, and is now considered to be very conservative. Very little is known publicly about technically recoverable unconventional gas resource potential on a global scale. Driven by a new understanding of the size of gas shale resources in the United States, we estimated original gas in place (OGIP) and technically recoverable resource (TRR) in highly uncertain unconventional gas reservoirs, worldwide. We evaluated global unconventional OGIP by (1) developing theoretical statistic relationships between conventional hydrocarbon and unconventional gas; (2) fitting these relationships to North America publically available data; and (3) applying North American theoretical statistical relationships to evaluate the volume of unconventional gas resource of the world. Estimated global unconventional OGIP ranges from 83,300 (P10) to 184,200 (P90) Tcf. To assess global TRR from unconventional gas reservoirs, we developed a computer program that we call Unconventional Gas Resource Assessment System (UGRAS). In the program, we integrated a Monte Carlo technique with an analytical reservoir simulator to estimate the original volume of gas in place and to predict production performance. We used UGRAS to evaluate the probabilistic distribution of OGIP, TRR and recovery factor (RF) for the most productive unconventional gas formations in the North America. The P50 of recovery factor for shale gas, tight sands gas and coalbed methane is 25%, 79% and 41%, respectively. Finally, we applied our global OGIP assessment and these distributions of recovery factor gained from our analyses of plays/formations in the United States to estimate global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource. Global technically recoverable unconventional gas resource is estimated from 43,000 (P10) to 112,000 (P90) Tcf.

Dong, Zhenzhen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Integrated resource planning Electric and gas utilities in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acquisitions will be the important criteria. Resource planning at gas utilities IRP is just beginning to be applied to the natural gas industry. At gas utilities, called local distribution companies (LDCs and regulated differently. Natural gas is produced, transported, and distributed by three different sets

38

Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

support to assess the economic viability of new tough gas plays (tight gas, shale gas, CBM). Project are illustrated using the US shale gas plays as case templates. Discounted cash flow models are applied1 Project Title Economic Modeling & Unconventional Gas Resource Appraisal Program Line Tough Gas

Santos, Juan

39

Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

Komar, C.A. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gas-Phase Ion Thermochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If the mobility of an ion in a gas ... ionization onset determination made with an electron beam where the energy spread of the electrons is broad ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Russian gas resource base large, overstated, costly to maintain  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas resources of the Former Soviet Union are immense, with an officially estimated initial recoverable endowment of 250.7 trillion cu m (8,852 trillion cu ft). Of this volume, 85% is located in the Russian Federation, which will be the dominant world supplier of gas through 2015. Although Russia possesses an amazing gas resource base, official figures overstate both the recovery factor for gas in place and appear to systematically overestimate volumes of recoverable gas in undiscovered fields. Production and transportation of gas from the Yamal peninsula and the new discoveries in the Kara and Barents seas will cost many times the current average cost of gas production in Russian. The paper discusses resources and reserves and examines the reliability of Soviet-vintage data.

Grace, J.D. (Troika Energy Services, Dallas, TX (United States))

1995-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Low-Income New Construction Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: 500 Integrated Space and Water Heating System: 900 Electronic Programmable Set-Back Thermostat: 100 Water Heater: 100 Drain Water Heat Recovery Device: 300 Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources is now offering rebates for non-profits servicing low-income communities. New construction organizations can take advantage of rebates for efficient technologies if the low-income homes are

43

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For Builders Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Energy Star New Homes Program For Builders < Back Eligibility Construction Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 500, 1,000, or 5/MCF saved Provider Minnesota Energy Resources Minnesota Energy Resources offers the Home Energy Excellence Program to encourage builders to build energy efficient homes. As part of the program, Minnesota Energy Resources will review the home blueprints and make recommendations prior to construction; perform up to three on-site inspections with more recommendations and improvements during construction;

44

Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) Regulation of Oil and Gas Resources (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Transportation Utility Program Info State Florida Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection It is the public policy of the state to conserve and control the natural resources of oil and gas, and their products; to prevent waste of oil and gas; to provide for the protection and adjustment of the rights of landowners, producers, and interested parties; and to safeguard the health,

45

Bistability in Interstellar Gas-Phase Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of "bistability" in gas-phase chemical models of dark interstellar clouds. We identify the chemical mechanisms that allow high- and low-ionization solutions to the chemical rate-equations to coexist. We derive simple analytic scaling relations for the gas densities and ionization rates for which the chemistry becomes bistable. We explain why bistability is sensitive to the H3+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient, and why it is damped by gas-grain neutralization.

Gai I. Boger; Amiel Sternberg

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Projected natural gas prices depend on shale gas resource ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because shale gas production is projected to be a large proportion of U.S. and North American gas production, changes in the cost and productivity of U.S. shale gas ...

47

Quantum dynamics of elementary reactions in the gas phase and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum dynamics of elementary reactions in the gas phase and on surfaces Quantum Dynamics of Elementary Reactions in the Gas Phase and on Surfaces Key Challenges: This research...

48

Natural Gas Distributed Resource Fuel Pressure and Delivery Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many emerging distributed resource (DR) technologies will be developed to operate on natural gas. However, increased reliance on natural gas as an energy source raises issues with regard to its availability and delivery capacity. In addition, some DR technologies may require specific pressure levels to operate properly. This report discusses the natural gas distribution infrastructure as well as the availability and suitability of DR gas booster technologies.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

49

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Greenhouse Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2008 ... This European Environment Agency webpage includes links to a downloadable report entitled Greenhouse Gas Emission Trends and ...

50

oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

IOIP 7758 (1 S w) Bo IGIP 7758 (1 Sw) B g VO IOIP A h 1,000,000 VG IGIP A h 1,000,000 Energy Information Administration Oil and Gas Resources of the West ...

51

oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia 139 Appendix D Field Summaries Tables 1D and 2D lists the fields of the West

52

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

natural gas equipment and set-back thermostats. Rebates are available for furnaces, boilers, integrated space and water heating systems, programmable thermostats, water heaters...

53

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Greenhouse Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 25, 2008 ... This U. S. EPA webpage gives an overview of greenhouse gases and a description of greenhouse gas inventories. It provides emission trends ...

54

WEB RESOURCE: Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... Chromalloy Gas Turbine Corporation is a pioneer in the high temperature coating of jet aircraft engine vanes and blades. Through ...

55

Projected natural gas prices depend on shale gas resource ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Quarterly Coal Report › Monthly Energy Review › Residential Energy ... Solar › Energy in Brief. What's ... to test the influence of shale gas ...

56

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA  

SciTech Connect

Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

2003-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

58

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Minnesota Energy Resources (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Level II Audit (For-profit organizations): $400 Level I Audit (For-profit organizations): $250 Programmable Thermostat: 50% of cost Steam Traps: $250 Boiler Tune Up: $500 Vent Damper: $500 O2 Trim Control: $5,000 Gas boiler 300,000 to 9,999,999 Btu/hr output: $750 - $5,000

59

oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. DOE/EIA - 0617 Distribution Category UC-950 Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia November 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia iii Preface Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia is part of the Energy Information Administration's

60

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS RESOURCES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Task 222.01.01 Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas A Promising Future or an Area in Decline? DOENETL-20071279 Full Report August 2007 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Resource Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

risks Schematic representation of offshore spill risk profile % of recorded spills & drilling phase in the GOM & North Sea -Source: SINTEF Database * Cementing Failures *...

62

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources Projects Selected to Boost Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources September 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Ten projects focused on two technical areas aimed at increasing the nation's supply of "unconventional" fossil energy, reducing potential environmental impacts, and expanding carbon dioxide (CO2) storage options have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The projects include four that would develop advanced computer simulation and visualization capabilities to enhance understanding of ways to improve production and minimize environmental impacts associated with unconventional energy development; and six seeking to further next

63

Pore-scale characterization and modeling of two-phase flow in tight gas sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unconventional natural gas resources, particularly tight gas sands, constitute a significant percentage of the natural gas resource base and offer abundant potential for future reserves… (more)

Mousavi, Maryam Alsadat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Accounting for Depletion of Oil and Gas Resources in Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since oil and gas are non-renewable resources, it is important to identify the extent to which they have been depleted. Such information will contribute to the formulation and evaluation of appropriate sustainable development policies. This paper provides an assessment of the changes in the availability of oil and gas resources in Malaysia by first compiling the physical balance sheet for the period 2000-2007, and then assessing the monetary balance sheets for the said resource by using the Net Present Value method. Our findings show serious reduction in the value of oil reserves from 2001 to 2005, due to changes in crude oil prices, and thereafter the depletion rates decreased. In the context of sustainable development planning, albeit in the weak sustainability sense, it will be important to ascertain if sufficient reinvestments of the estimated resource rents in related or alternative capitals are being attempted by Malaysia. For the study period, the cumulative resource rents were to the tune of RM61 billion. Through a depletion or resource rents policy, the estimated quantum may guide the identification of a reinvestment threshold (after considering needed capital investment for future development of the industry) in light of ensuring the future productive capacity of the economy at the time when the resource is exhausted.

Othman, Jamal, E-mail: jortman@ukm.my; Jafari, Yaghoob, E-mail: yaghoob.jafari@gmail.com [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Faculty of Economics and Management (Malaysia)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nonextensive Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study an effective relativistic mean-field model of nuclear matter with arbitrary proton fraction at finite temperature in the framework of nonextensive statistical mechanics, characterized by power-law quantum distributions. We investigate the presence of thermodynamic instability in a warm and asymmetric nuclear medium and study the consequent nuclear liquid-gas phase transition by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number and electric charge fraction. We show that nonextensive statistical effects play a crucial role in the equation of state and in the formation of mixed phase also for small deviations from the standard Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics.

A. Lavagno; D. Pigato

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

67

ALASKA NORTH SLOPE OIL AND GAS RESOURCES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FFf Task 222.01.01 FFf Task 222.01.01 ADDENDUM REPORT Alaska North Slope Oil and Gas A Promising Future or an Area in Decline? DOE/NETL-2009/1385 April 2009 ii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe probably owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

68

Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Resource Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Complementary Program Research Complementary Program Research Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory September 26 th , 2012 EPAct Complementary Program- Extreme Offshore 2 The NETL Complementary Program - Targeting top offshore/UDW spill risks Schematic representation of offshore spill risk profile % of recorded spills & drilling phase in the GOM & North Sea -Source: SINTEF Database * Cementing Failures * Equipment & Casing Failures * Higher risk targets, "exploratory" systems -Izon et al. 2007 IAM Tools for GOM Barriers & Controls - Cements Barriers & Controls - Metals Multiphase flow HPHT Fluids/EOS Risk & Impacts 3 Initial risk assessment requires a firm basis of materials behavior in extreme environments.

70

The Resource Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complementary Program Research Complementary Program Research Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory EPAct Complementary Program- Extreme Offshore 2 The NETL Complementary Program - Targeting top offshore/UDW spill risks Schematic representation of offshore spill risk profile % of recorded spills & drilling phase in the GOM & North Sea -Source: SINTEF Database * Cementing Failures * Equipment & Casing Failures * Higher risk targets, "exploratory" systems -Izon et al. 2007 IAM Tools for GOM Barriers & Controls - Cements Barriers & Controls - Metals Multiphase flow HPHT Fluids/EOS Risk & Impacts 3 Initial risk assessment requires a firm basis of materials behavior in extreme environments.

71

gas phase interactions as sources of contamination in solar silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, GAS PHASE INTERACTIONS AS ...

72

Enterprise Integration Functions for Distributed Energy Resources: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2012, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has facilitated a focus group of industry experts working to develop standard functions for enterprise integration of distributed energy resources (DER). The activity is aimed at advancing industry efforts to bring inverter-connected distributed energy storage and generation into use as a grid resource. This report presents the results of the first phase of developments by this work group, addressing DER management in aggregate groups, ...

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Other Resources Other Resources Pew Center on Global Climate Change Pew Center brings together major organizations with critical scientific, economic, and technological expertise focused on global climate change and educates the public on associated risks, challenges, and solutions. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) The MIT joint program on the science and policy of global change provides research, independent policy analysis, and public education in global environmental change. IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme The IEA greenhouse gas R&D program (IEA GHG) aims to identify and evaluate fossil fuel-based GHG reduction technologies, disseminate results, and identify target technologies for appropriate and practical R&D. Nature Conservancy The Nature Conservancy sponsors projects that protect ecosystems and

74

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Plan Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2011 U.S. Department of ENERGY United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 2011 Annual Plan | Page i Message from the Secretary As we take steps to create the clean energy economy of the future, prudent development of domestic oil and natural gas resources will continue to be part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security for decades to come. These operations have to be conducted responsibly, ensuring that communities are safe and that the environment is protected. As industry tackles the challenge of developing an increasingly difficult reserve base - in ultra-deepwater offshore and unconventional plays onshore - we must ensure through scientific

75

Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual Plan 2 Annual Plan Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Research and Development Program Report to Congress August 2012 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy I August 2012 Message from the Secretary Fueling our Nation's economy by making the most of America's natural gas and oil resources continues to be an important part of our Nation's overall strategy for energy security and a clean energy economy. The Department continues its work toward safe and responsible · development of fossil fuels, while giving American families and communities high confidence that air and water quality, and public health and safety will not be compromised. The EPACT Section 999 program (including the NETL Complementary Research program)

76

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources: An Assessment of 137 Shale Formations in 41 Countries Outside the United States June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources 1 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

77

Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sediment Capping Resource Guide for Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes tools and techniques applicable to design and implementation of sediment capping remedies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. It includes a number of practical case studies describing cap designs and cap construction experience. The report is intended as a sediment capping resource guide to be used with EPRI's 2007 Handbook of Remedial Alternatives for MGP Sites with Contaminated Sediments (EPRI report 1012592).

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Resources Geothermal Resources Jump to: navigation, search State California Name California Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (CDOGGR) Address 801 K Street, MS 20-20 City, State Sacramento, CA Zip 95814-3530 Website http://www.consrv.ca.gov/dog/O Coordinates 38.580104°, -121.496008° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.580104,"lon":-121.496008,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

PHASE TRANSITION NEAR A LIQUID-GAS COEXISTENCE EQUILIBRIUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE TRANSITION NEAR A LIQUID-GAS COEXISTENCE EQUILIBRIUM XINFU CHEN AND XIAO-PING WANG SIAM J. Effects of small perturbations from a liquid-gas coexistence equilibrium (the Maxwell states) is studied for an isothermal (or isentropic) gas-liquid phase transition in a sealed one- dimensional finite length tube

Wang, Xiao-Ping

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gas phase 129Xe NMR imaging and spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 l l Dynamic NMR microscopy of gas phase Poiseuille flowmetal vapors and noble gases can be used to efficientlypolarize the nuclei ofthe noble-gas atoms. As a result, the

Kaiser, Lana G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

MOISTURE CONTROL METHODOLOGY FOR GAS PHASE COMPOST BIOFILTERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas phase biofilters are used for controlling odors from animal facilities. Some characteristics can affect their performance and moisture content is one very important. A… (more)

Dutra de Melo, Lucas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called "standard model of solar system formation", which is incorrect and leads to the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores. By contrast, that prognosis is considerably enhanced (i) by the new vision I have disclosed of Earth formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant; (ii) by core formation contemporaneous with raining out from within a giant gaseous protoplanet rather than through subsequent whole-Earth re-melting after loss of gases; (iii) by the consequences of whole-Earth decompression dynamics, which obviates the unfounded assumption of mantle convection, and; (iv) by the process of mantle decompression thermal-tsunami. The latter, in addition to accounting for much of the heat leaving the Earth's surface, for the geothermal gradient observ...

Herndon, J M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This evaluation of the hydrothermal resources of North Dakota is based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the Phase II study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples is being done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those hole-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Gamma-ray spectra of hexane in gas phase and liquid phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Surko et al, 1997) and liquid (Kerr et al, 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane exhibit the same probability to annihilate a positron. Only the positrophilic electrons in the valence space dominate the gamma-ray spectra, which are in good agreement with the gas phase measurement. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an averaged contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of the positrophilic electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

Xiaoguang Ma; Feng Wang

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Gamma-ray spectra of hexane in gas phase and liquid phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Surko et al, 1997) and liquid (Kerr et al, 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane exhibit the same probability to annihilate a positron. Only the positrophilic electrons in the valence space dominate the gamma-ray spectra, which are in good agreement with the gas phase measurement. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an averaged contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of the positrophilic electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

Ma, Xiaoguang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

88

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20585The information presented in this overview is based on the report “World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment, ” which

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Evaluation and Prediction of Unconventional Gas Resources in Underexplored Basins Worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As gas production from conventional gas reservoirs in the United States decreases, industry is turning more attention to the exploration and development of unconventional gas resources (UGR). This trend is expanding quickly worldwide. Unlike North America where development of UGRs and technology is now mature and routine, many countries are just beginning to develop unconventional gas resources. Rogner (1996) estimated that the unconventional gas in place, including coalbed methane, shale gas and tight-sand gas, exceeds 30,000 Tcf worldwide. As part of a research team, I helped to develop a software package called Unconventional Gas Resource Advisory (UGRA) System which includes the Formation Analog Selection Tool (FAST) and Basin Analog Investigations (BASIN) to objectively and rapidly identify and rank mature North American formations and basins that may be analogous to nascent international target basins. Based on BASIN and FAST results, the relationship between mature and underexplored basins is easily accessed. To quantify the unconventional resource potential in typical gas basins, I revised and used a computer model called the Petroleum Resources Investigation Summary and Evaluation (PRISE) (Old, 2008). This research is based on the resource triangle concept, which implies that all natural resources, including oil and gas, are distributed log-normally. In this work, I describe a methodology to estimate values of technically recoverable resources (TRR) for unconventional gas reservoirs by combining estimates of production, reserves, reserves growth, and undiscovered resources from a variety of sources into a logical distribution. I have also investigated mature North American unconventional gas resources, and predict unconventional resources in underexplored basins worldwide for case study. Based on the results of testing BASIN and PRISE, we conclude that our evaluation of 24 North American basins supports the premise that basins analysis can be used to estimate UGRs.

Cheng, Kun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gas and billion barrels (Bbbl) of shale oil for each major shale formation. Risked Recoverable Gas and Oil, reported in trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of shale gas and

91

Enhanced Prognosis for Abiotic Natural Gas and Petroleum Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prognosis for potential resources of abiotic natural gas and petroleum depends critically upon the nature and circumstances of Earth formation. Until recently, that prognosis has been considered solely within the framework of the so-called "standard model of solar system formation", which is incorrect and leads to the contradiction of terrestrial planets having insufficiently massive cores. By contrast, that prognosis is considerably enhanced (i) by the new vision I have disclosed of Earth formation as a Jupiter-like gas giant; (ii) by core formation contemporaneous with raining out from within a giant gaseous protoplanet rather than through subsequent whole-Earth re-melting after loss of gases; (iii) by the consequences of whole-Earth decompression dynamics, which obviates the unfounded assumption of mantle convection, and; (iv) by the process of mantle decompression thermal-tsunami. The latter, in addition to accounting for much of the heat leaving the Earth's surface, for the geothermal gradient observed in the crust, for substantial volcanism, and possibly for earthquake generation as well, also might enhance the prognosis for future abiotic energy supplies by pressurizing and heating the base of the crust, a potential collection point for abiotic mantle methane or other mantle-derived carbon-containing matter.

J. Marvin Herndon

2006-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Nuclear Equation of State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A canonical ensemble model is used to describe a caloric curve of nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Allowing a discontinuity in the freeze out density from one spinodal density to another for a given initial temperature, the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition can be described as first order. Averaging over various freeze out densities of all the possible initial temperatures for a given total reaction energy, the first order characteristics of liquid-gas phase transition is smeared out to a smooth transition. Two experiments, one at low beam energy and one at high beam energy show different caloric behaviors and are discussed.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Externality Regulation in Oil and Gas Chapter 56 Encyclopedia of Energy, Natural Resource regulating well spacing, preventing of flaring or venting of natural gas, regulating production from wells oil/gas and oil/water ratios, and no-flaring and venting rules for natural gas. 1 Introduction

Garousi, Vahid

94

Project: Advanced Gas-Phase Fire Retardants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at understanding the condensed-phase chemistry related to ... Center) on the fundamental mechanisms of ... for the SFPE Handbook: Chemical Kinetics ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fission and Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the liquid-drop fission barrier is considered, the critical temperature for the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter being a parameter. Experimental and calculated data on the fission probability are compared for highly excited $^{188}$Os. The calculations have been made in the framework of the statistical model. It is concluded that the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid--gas phase transition is higher than 16 MeV.

E. A. Cherepanov; V. A. Karnaukhov

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of an Improved Methodology to Assess Potential Unconventional Gas Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the important role played today by unconventional gas resources in North America and their enormous potential for the future around the world, it is vital to both policy makers and industry that the volumes of these resources and the impact of technology on these resources be assessed. To provide for optimal decision making regarding energy policy, research funding, and resource development, it is necessary to reliably quantify the uncertainty in these resource assessments. Since the 1970s, studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources have been conducted by various private and governmental agencies, the most rigorous of which was by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS employed a cell-based, probabilistic methodology which used analytical equations to calculate distributions of the resources assessed. USGS assessments have generally produced distributions for potential unconventional gas resources that, in our judgment, are unrealistically narrow for what are essentially undiscovered, untested resources. In this article, we present an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. Our methodology is a stochastic approach that includes Monte Carlo simulation and correlation between input variables. Application of the improved methodology to the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado with USGS data validates the means and standard deviations of resource distributions produced by the USGS methodology, but reveals that these distributions are not right skewed, as expected for a natural resource. Our investigation indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the gas resource distributions are caused by the use of narrow triangular input parameter distributions. The stochastic methodology proposed here is more versatile and robust than the USGS analytic methodology. Adoption of the methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input distributions, should allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar, Jesus; McVay, Duane A., E-mail: mcvay@pe.tamu.edu; Lee, W. John [Texas A and M University, Department of Petroleum Engineering, 3116 TAMU (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

A Methodology to Determine both the Technically Recoverable Resource and the Economically Recoverable Resource in an Unconventional Gas Play  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past decade, the worldwide demand for energy has continued to increase at a rapid rate. Natural gas has emerged as a primary source of US energy. The technically recoverable natural gas resources in the United States have increased from approximately 1,400 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) to approximately 2,100 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) in 2010. The recent declines in gas prices have created short-term uncertainties and increased the risk of developing natural gas fields, rendering a substantial portion of this resource uneconomical at current gas prices. This research quantifies the impact of changes in finding and development costs (FandDC), lease operating expenses (LOE), and gas prices, in the estimation of the economically recoverable gas for unconventional plays. To develop our methodology, we have performed an extensive economic analysis using data from the Barnett Shale, as a representative case study. We have used the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the values of the Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for all the wells in a given gas play, to determine the values of the P10 (10th percentile), P50 (50th percentile), and P90 (90th percentile) from the CDF. We then use these probability values to calculate the technically recoverable resource (TRR) for the play, and determine the economically recoverable resource (ERR) as a function of FandDC, LOE, and gas price. Our selected investment hurdle for a development project is a 20 percent rate of return and a payout of 5 years or less. Using our methodology, we have developed software to solve the problem. For the Barnett Shale data, at a FandDC of 3 Million dollars, we have found that 90 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 46 dollars/Mcf, 50 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 9.2 dollars/Mcf, and 10 percent of the Barnet shale gas is economically recoverable at a gas price of 5.2 dollars/Mcf. The developed methodology and software can be used to analyze other unconventional gas plays to reduce short-term uncertainties and determine the values of FandDC and gas prices that are required to recover economically a certain percentage of TRR.

Almadani, Husameddin Saleh A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of oil and gas related programs with relevance to the Climate VISION program: Deep Trek Water, Air, and Soil Protection Natural Gas Infrastructure Methane Hydrates Hydrogen...

100

Zipf's Law in the Liquid Gas Phase Transition of Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zipf's law in the field of linguistics is tested in the nuclear disassembly within the framework of isospin dependent lattice gas model. It is found that the average cluster charge (or mass) of rank $n$ in the charge (or mass) list shows exactly inversely to its rank, i.e., there exists Zipf's law, at the phase transition temperature. This novel criterion shall be helpful to search the nuclear liquid gas phase transition experimentally and theoretically. In addition, the finite size scaling of the effective phase transition temperature at which the Zipf's law appears is studied for several systems with different mass and the critical exponents of $\

Y. G. Ma

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate Deposits DOE Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate Deposits May 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established that gas hydrate can and does occur at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the Gulf of Mexico. NETL--in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Minerals Management Service, an industry research consortium led by Chevron, and others--recently completed a landmark 21-day gas hydrate drilling expedition that discovered highly saturated hydrate-bearing sands in two of three sites drilled. Gas hydrate is a unique substance comprised of natural gas (almost

102

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition within the lattice gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition on the basis of a two-component lattice gas model. A Metropolis type of sampling method is used to generate microscopic states in the canonical ensemble. The effective equation of state and fragment mass distributions are evaluated in a wide range of temperatures and densities. A definition of the phase coexistence region appropriate for mesoscopic systems is proposed. The caloric curve resulting from different types of freeze-out conditions are presented.

J. Borg; I. N. Mishustin; J. P. Bondorf

1998-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Freeze drying for gas chromatography stationary phase deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to methods for deposition of gas chromatography (GC) stationary phases into chromatography columns, for example gas chromatography columns. A chromatographic medium is dissolved or suspended in a solvent to form a composition. The composition may be inserted into a chromatographic column. Alternatively, portions of the chromatographic column may be exposed or filled with the composition. The composition is permitted to solidify, and at least a portion of the solvent is removed by vacuum sublimation.

Sylwester, Alan P. (Livermore, CA)

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

Shale oil and shale gas resources are globally abundant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

105

Application of Information Theory in Nuclear Liquid Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information entropy and Zipf's law in the field of information theory have been used for studying the disassembly of nuclei in the framework of the isospin dependent lattice gas model and molecular dynamical model. We found that the information entropy in the event space is maximum at the phase transition point and the mass of the cluster show exactly inversely to its rank, i.e. Zipf's law appears. Both novel criteria are useful in searching the nuclear liquid gas phase transition experimentally and theoretically.

Yu-Gang Ma

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

Saturation properties and liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturation properties and liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus are analysed in the framework of Hatree-Fock theory. We modify Hill-Wheller formula with a finite-size-effect parameter by fitting the zero-temperature properties of nucleus. Employing Gogny effective interaction and phenomenological expression of Coulomb energy, we give the critical temperature of liquid-gas phase transition of nucleus being about 12 MeV, which agrees with the result extracted from heavy-ion collision experiments. It is pointed out that a phenomenological formula of surface energy of hot nucleus is not avaliable in the region where nucleon density is far away from the normal density.

Fu-Guang Cao; Shan-de Yang

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate in Gulf of Mexico Results from DOE Expedition Confirm Existence of Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate in Gulf of Mexico March 30, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Gas hydrate, a potentially immense energy resource, occurs at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the Gulf of Mexico, according to reports released by the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Initial findings from the May 2009 expedition of the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Joint Industry Project (JIP) have just been released by NETL. These reports detail the extremely valuable and advanced datasets on the various gas hydrate occurrences that were discovered in the deepwater Gulf

108

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of U.S. Oil and Gas Resources (on CD-ROM) (Petroleum Geology, Atlas of Oil and Gas Fields, Structuraland logging conventional oil and gas wells. The ability to

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

The nuclear liquid gas phase transition and phase coexistence: A review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk we will review the different signals of liquid gas phase transition in nuclei. From the theoretical side we will first discuss the foundations of the concept of equilibrium, phase transition and critical behaviors in infinite and finite systems. From the experimental point of view we will first recall the evidences for some strong modification of the behavior of hot nuclei. Then we will review quantitative detailed analysis aiming to evidence phase transition, to define its order and phase diagram. Finally, we will present a critical discussion of the present status of phase transitions in nuclei and we will draw some lines for future development of this field.

Ph. Chomaz

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

links provide a listing of recent publications and software by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO): Key Natural Gas and...

111

Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

Y. G. Ma

2006-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Critical Temperature for the Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The charge distribution of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p (8.1 GeV) + Au collisions is analyzed in the framework of the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition $T_c$ as a free parameter. It is found that $T_c=20\\pm3$ MeV (90% CL).

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; E. V. Duginova; V. K. Rodionov; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; O. V. Bochkarev; E. A. Kuzmin; L. V. Chulkov; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Reductive Dehalogenation of Gas-Phase Chlorinated Solvents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ethene, and ethane standards were purchased (Aldrich). Other gas- phase standards were developed, Arizona, and Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology of a second. Under the same reactor conditions, CCl4 transformation was faster than CHCl3, and TCE reduction

Betterton, Eric

114

Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

BPL Global

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple pointof the solid phases (hydrate and ice) as tantamount to thealong the 3-phase (aqueous + hydrate + gas, or ice + hydrate

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter including strangeness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply the chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of strange hadronic matter at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition is studied as a function of the strangeness fraction. The pressure of the system cannot remain constant during the phase transition, since there are two independent conserved charges (baryon and strangeness number). In a range of temperatures around 15 MeV (precise values depending on the model used) the equation of state exhibits multiple bifurcates. The difference in the strangeness fraction $f_s$ between the liquid and gas phases is small when they coexist. The critical temperature of strange matter turns out to be a non-trivial function of the strangeness fraction.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter is studied utilizing an extended Furnstahl-Serot-Tang model with nucleons and hyperons. The system is treated as of two components. The phase transition is analyzed by investigating the stability of the system and Gibbs conditions for phase equilibrium. A two-dimensional binodal surface resulted from the two-phase equilibrium, namely the phase boundary, is obtained. For each temperature ranging from T = 8 MeV to T = 12 MeV, a limit pressure on the binodal surface section is found, while a critical point is spotted for the temperature around T = 13 MeV. The Maxwell constructions are also illustrated to give a vivid description of the course of the phase transition. Moreover, the entropy per baryon and heat capacity per baryon as functions of temperature are examined. The entropy is continuous during the phase transition but the heat capacity is discontinuous, indicating that the phase transition is of second order. By these efforts, the L-G phase transition can be concluded to exist in the strange hadronic matter.

Li Yang; Wei Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su; Hong Qiu Song

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Resource planning for gas utilities: Using a model to analyze pivotal issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of wellhead price decontrols that began in the late 1970s and the development of open access pipelines in the 1980s and 90s, gas local distribution companies (LDCs) now have increased responsibility for their gas supplies and face an increasingly complex array of supply and capacity choices. Heretofore this responsibility had been share with the interstate pipelines that provide bundled firm gas supplies. Moreover, gas supply an deliverability (capacity) options have multiplied as the pipeline network becomes increasing interconnected and as new storage projects are developed. There is now a fully-functioning financial market for commodity price hedging instruments and, on interstate Pipelines, secondary market (called capacity release) now exists. As a result of these changes in the natural gas industry, interest in resource planning and computer modeling tools for LDCs is increasing. Although in some ways the planning time horizon has become shorter for the gas LDC, the responsibility conferred to the LDC and complexity of the planning problem has increased. We examine current gas resource planning issues in the wake of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636. Our goal is twofold: (1) to illustrate the types of resource planning methods and models used in the industry and (2) to illustrate some of the key tradeoffs among types of resources, reliability, and system costs. To assist us, we utilize a commercially-available dispatch and resource planning model and examine four types of resource planning problems: the evaluation of new storage resources, the evaluation of buyback contracts, the computation of avoided costs, and the optimal tradeoff between reliability and system costs. To make the illustration of methods meaningful yet tractable, we developed a prototype LDC and used it for the majority of our analysis.

Busch, J.F.; Comnes, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

Munday, E.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development of the Natural Gas Resources in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remove Exotics Manually or Chemically Air Quality X X Speed Limits Water Roads & Pads Flare Gas (Rather with drilling and pipeline compression operations. The main pollutant of concern is nitrogen oxides (NOx), which

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

122

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

easy to operate, and produce high quality heat that can be used to generate steam for combined heat and power and combined-cycle applications. About 75% of all gas...

123

Isospin Lattice-Gas Model and Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Asymmetric Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An isospin lattice-gas model, which is a spin-1 Ising model, is employed to investigate the liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter. We consider nuclear matter as a lattice where each lattice site can be either empty or occupied by a proton or a neutron, with a nearest-neighbor interaction among the nucleons. With the Bragg-Williams mean field approximation, we calculate various thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter for different densities and different proton-neutron asymmetry parameter s. Our model exhibits liquidgas phase transition below a critical temperature Tc, and predicts a monotonic decreasing of Tc as the magnitude of s is increased. The dependence of the nuclear matter isotherms on the asymmetry parameter s is discussed. Ray, Shamanna and Kuo / Liquid-gas phase transition in Nuclear matter 2 1.

S. Ray; J. Shamanna; T. T. S. Kuo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface, and Photo-induced reaction pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Elemental Mercury by Chlorine: Gas Phase, Surface, andthe oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics wasoxidation of Hg 0 by chlorine (Cl 2 ). The three concurrent

Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Liquid-gas phase transition in a two-components isospin lattice gas model for asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-components isospin lattice gas model has been employed to study the liquid-gas phase transition for asymmetric nuclear matter. An additional degree of freedom, namely, the asymmetry parameter alpha has been considered carefully for studying the phase transition. We have shown that under the mean field approximation, the liquid-gas phase transition given by this model is of second order. The entropy continues at the phase transition point. The binodal surface is addressed.

Wei Liang Qian; Ru-Keng Su

2002-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources in North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, various private and governmental agencies have conducted studies to assess potential unconventional gas resources, particularly those resources contained in tight sands, fractured shales, and coal beds. The US Geological Survey (USGS) has assessed the amount of unconventional gas resources in North America, and its estimates are used by other government agencies as the basis for their resource estimates. While the USGS employs a probabilistic methodology, it is apparent from the resulting narrow ranges that the methodology underestimates the uncertainty of these undiscovered, untested, potential resources, which in turn limits the reliability and usefulness of the assessments. The objective of this research is to develop an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources that better accounts for the uncertainty in these resources. This study investigates the causes of the narrow ranges generated by the USGS analyticprobabilistic methodology used to prepare the 1995 national oil and gas assessment and the 2000 NOGA series, and presents an improved methodology to assess potential unconventional gas resources. The new model improves upon the USGS method by using a stochastic approach, which includes correlation between the input variables and Monte Carlo simulation, representing a more versatile and robust methodology than the USGS analytic-probabilistic methodology. The improved methodology is applied to the assessment of potential unconventional gas resources in the Uinta-Piceance province of Utah and Colorado, and compared to results of the evaluation performed by the USGS in 2002. Comparison of the results validates the means and standard deviations produced by the USGS methodology, but shows that the probability distributions generated are rather different and, that the USGS distributions are not skewed to right, as expected for a natural resource. This study indicates that the unrealistic shape and width of the resulting USGS probability distributions are not caused by the analytic equations or lack of correlation between input parameters, but rather the use of narrow triangular probability distributions as input variables. Adoption of the improved methodology, along with a careful examination and revision of input probability distributions, will allow a more realistic assessment of the uncertainty surrounding potential unconventional gas resources.

Salazar Vanegas, Jesus

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a finite temperature Thomas-Fermi framework, we calculate density distributions of hot nuclei enclosed in a freeze-out volume of few times the normal nuclear volume and then construct the caloric curve, with and without inclusion of radial collective flow. In both cases, the calculated specific heats $C_v$ show a peaked structure signalling a liquid-gas phase transition. Without flow, the caloric curve indicates a continuous phase transition whereas with inclusion of flow, the transition is very sharp. In the latter case, the nucleus undergoes a shape change to a bubble from a diffuse sphere at the transition temperature.

J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; S. Shlomo

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Industry Associations Industry Associations American Petroleum Institute The oil and natural gas industry provides the fuel for American life, warming our homes, powering our businesses and giving us the mobility to enjoy this great land. As the primary trade association of that industry, API represents more than 400 members involved in all aspects of the oil and natural gas industry. Our association draws on the experience and expertise of our members and staff to support a strong and viable oil and natural gas industry. International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association The International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA) is comprised of petroleum companies and associations from around the world. Founded in 1974 following the establishment of the United

129

Liquid-Gas phase transition in Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of a repulsive three-body interaction on a system of trapped ultra-cold atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensed state. The corresponding $s-$wave non-linear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is solved numerically and also by a variational approach. A first-order liquid-gas phase transition is observed for the condensed state up to a critical strength of the effective three-body force.

A. Gammal; T. Frederico; L. Tomio; Ph. Chomaz

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI); Hill, Jr., Charles G. (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A Research of Material Balance Equation Applied to Shale Gas Reservoir Considering Adsorption Phase Volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of shale gas reserves is the current hotspot of oil and gas exploration and development at home and abroad. Correctly estimated reserves of gas reservoir has become increasingly urgent. The estimated of shale gas reservoir dynamic reserves ... Keywords: shale gas, adsorbed gas reservoir, isothermal adsorbed, adsorbed phase volume, material balance

Yang Haolong, Li Long

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconventional resources will play an important role in filling the gap between supply and demand for future world energy. In North America, the impact of unconventional resources on energy supplies is growing continuously. However, around the world they have yet to serve as a major contributor to the energy supply, partly due to the scarcity of information about the exploration and development technologies required to produce them. Basin analogy can be used to estimate the undiscovered petroleum potential in a target basin by finding a geological analog that has been explored enough that its resource potential is fully understood. In 2006, Singh developed a basin analog system BASIN (Basin Analog Systems INvestigation) in detail that could rapidly and consistently identify analogous reference basins for a target basin. My research focused on continuing that work, comprehensively improving the basin analog system in four areas: the basin analog method; the database; the software functionality; and the validation methods. The updated system compares basins in terms of probability distributions of geological parameters. It compensates for data that are sparse or that do not represent basin-level geological parameters, and it expands the system's ability to compare widely varying quantitative parameters. Because the updated BASIN database contains more geologic and petroleum systems information on reference (existing) basins, it identifies analog basins more accurately and efficiently. The updated BASIN software was developed by using component-based design and data visualization techniques that help users better manage large volumes of information to understand various data objects and their complicated relationships among various data objects. Validation of the improved BASIN software confirms its accuracy: if a basin selected as the target basin appears in the reference basin list with other basins, the target basin is 100% analogous only to itself. Furthermore, when a target basin is analyzed by both BASIN and PRISE (Petroleum Resources Investigation and Summary Evaluation) software, results of the improved BASIN closely matched the PRISE results, which provides important support for using BASIN and PRISE together to quantitatively estimate the resource potential in frontier basins.

Wu, Wenyan 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Impact of Varying Natural Gas Prices on the Potential Distributed Resources Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the potential market for distributed resources (DR) have typically assumed that long-term gas rates will increase in a gradual and uniform fashion; however, natural gas rates can peak at very high rates as they did in late 2000 and early 2001. This project studied the response of the DR market to changes in future gas prices in a range of plausible scenarios. It suggests that relatively high natural gas prices and non-uniform annual price fluctuations may strongly affect the size and character...

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Clean and Highly-Ordered Graphene Synthesized in the Gas-Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean and Highly-Ordered Graphene Synthesized in the Gas-Phase Title Clean and Highly-Ordered Graphene Synthesized in the Gas-Phase Publication Type Journal Article Year of...

135

Isospin Lattice-Gas Model and Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Asymmetric Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An isospin lattice-gas model, which is a spin-1 Ising model, is employed to investigate the liquid-gas phase transition in asymmetric nuclear matter. We consider nuclear matter as a lattice where each lattice site can be either empty or occupied by a proton or a neutron, with a nearest-neighbor interaction among the nucleons. With the Bragg-Williams mean field approximation, we calculate various thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter for different densities and different proton-neutron asymmetry parameter $s$. Our model exhibits liquid-gas phase transition below a critical temperature $T_c$, and predicts a monotonic decreasing of $T_c$ as the magnitude of $s$ is increased. The dependence of the nuclear matter isotherms on the asymmetry parameter $s$ is discussed.

S. Ray; J. Shamanna; T. T. S. Kuo

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

2012 CERTS LAAR Program Peer Review - Load as a Regulation Resource, Phase 2 - Sila Kiliccote, LBNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Distributed Resources Department  Grid Integration Group and Distributed Resources Department  Grid Integration Group Load as a Regulation Resource Sila Kiliccote, Jason MacDonald, Livio Fenga and Dave Watson Demand Response Research Center Grid Integration Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory http://drrc.lbl.gov CERTS review September 20, 2012 Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Department  Grid Integration Group Outline  Phase 1 summary - Overview of OpenADR - Major Phase 1 accomplishments  Project objectives  Tasks and major technical accomplishments completed  Deliverables and schedule  Risk Factors  Follow-on Work Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Department  Grid Integration Group What is OpenADR and how does it work? Signaling- continuous, 2-way, secure messaging system for dynamic prices, emergency and

137

Anadarko's Proposed Acquisition of Kerr-McGee and Western Gas Resources, June 23, 2006, Background  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Aspects of Anadarko's Acquisition of Kerr-McGee Aspects of Anadarko's Acquisition of Kerr-McGee Corp. and Western Gas Resources Background On June 23, 2006, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported that Anadarko Petroleum Corp had agreed to acquire Kerr-McGee Corp. and Western Gas Resources Inc. for $21.1 billion of cash (see "Anadarko to Buy Kerr-McGee, Western Gas for $21.1 Billion" (June 23, 2006)). Anadarko also will assume $2.2 billion of debt from the two companies. Anadarko will pay $16.4 billion ($70.50 per share) and assume $1.6 billion of debt to acquire Kerr-McGee and pay $4.7 billion ($61 per share) and assume $600 million of debt to acquire Western Gas. Additional information is available on Anadarko's web site. According to the WSJ, Anadarko's president and chief executive officer Jim Hacket noted that the

138

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations M dimensional two-phase (liquid and gas) flows. The main goal is to improve the mod- eling of kinetic imbalance between the phases. We present a method that solves the mix- ture (liquid-gas) mass and enthalpy equations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

139

Liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble of asymmetric nuclear matter K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract New calculus of the liquid-gas phase transition is developed. The appearance of the retrograde condensation is also proved. The liquid-gas phase transition in warm nuclear

140

Liquid-gas phase transition in canonical and micro-canonical ensembles of strange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-gas phase transition in canonical and micro-canonical ensembles of strange hadronic matter K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro@rio.odn.ne.jp Abstract New calculus of the liquid-gas phase transition The author has recently developed a new calculus [1,2] of the liquid-gas phase transition [3-6] in asymmetric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Models, Simulators, and Data-driven Resources for Oil and Natural Gas Research  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NETL provides a number of analytical tools to assist in conducting oil and natural gas research. Software, developed under various DOE/NETL projects, includes numerical simulators, analytical models, databases, and documentation.[copied from http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/Software_main.html] Links lead users to methane hydrates models, preedictive models, simulators, databases, and other software tools or resources.

142

Analysis of gas-phase condensation of nickel nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-phase condensation of 8000 nickel atoms is examined by molecular dynamics simulation with a tight-binding potential. A detailed study of the evolution of the system cooled at a constant rate from 1000 K to 77 K is presented. The results are used to identify four distinct stages of the evolution from a hot atomic gas to a few synthesized particles. An analysis of possible nanoparticle formation mechanisms suggests that cluster-cluster aggregation is the dominant one. The simulation shows that there two stages of cluster formation are of primary importance with regard to aggregation. At the first stage, spherical liquid clusters nucleate with uniform size distribution. The second stage is characterized by a distinct transition from uniform to bimodal size distribution due to aggregation of relatively large clusters. The particles obtained by gas-phase synthesis are analyzed by the CNA method [25]. It is found that most nanoparticles produced in the simulation have either icosahedral or mixed FCC/HCP structure.

Gafner, S. L.; Gafner, Yu. Ya. [Khakassian State University (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ygafner@khsu.ru

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Phase transition or Maxwell's demon in Granular gas?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of vibro-fluidised granular gas is investigated experimentally using the transfer of grains from a compartment through a horizontal slit at a given height h . It is demonstrated that the transfer rate j varies linearly with the grain number N in the box when N remains small; however j(N) becomes strongly non linear as soon as the number n of layers is larger than 0.3; dj/dN becomes negative for n>0.4.It is found also that the maximum of j(N) increases slightly with the acceleration af_ of the vibration which excites the granular gas. Using dynamical system theory, dynamics equations are written, and a critical bifurcation is found, which explains the existence of a condensation and of a phase transition. This explains how the pseudo " Maxwell's demon" works in granular gases. This experiments contradicts recent modeling . Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

P. Jean; H. Bellenger; P. Burban; L. Ponson; P. Evesque

2005-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition and supernovae evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the large density fluctuations appearing at the onset of the first order nuclear liquid-gas phase transition can play an important role in the supernovae evolution. Due to these fluctuations, the neutrino gas may be trapped inside a thin layer of matter near the proto-neutron star surface. The resulting increase of pressure may induce strong particle ejection a few hundred milliseconds after the bounce of the collapse, contributing to the revival of the shock wave. The Hartree-Fock+RPA scheme, with a finite-range nucleon-nucleon effective interaction, is employed to estimate the effects of the neutrino trapping due to the strong density fluctuations, and to discuss qualitatively the consequences of the suggested new scenario.

Jerome Margueron; Jesus Navarro; Patrick Blottiau

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effect of Cluster Formation on Isospin Asymmetry in the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear matter within the liquid-gas phase transition region is investigated in a mean-field two-component Fermi-gas model. Following largely analytic considerations, it is shown that: (1) Due to density dependence of asymmetry energy, some of the neutron excess from the high-density phase could be expelled into the low-density region. (2) Formation of clusters in the gas phase tends to counteract this trend, making the gas phase more liquid-like and reducing the asymmetry in the gas phase. Flow of asymmetry between the spectator and midrapidity region in reactions is discussed and a possible inversion of the flow direction is indicated.

L. Shi; P. Danielewicz

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state of nuclear matter suggests that at suitable beam energies the disassembling hot system formed in heavy ion collisions will pass through a liquid-gas coexistence region. Searching for the signatures of the phase transition has been a very important focal point of experimental endeavours in heavy ion collisions, in the last fifteen years. Simultaneously theoretical models have been developed to provide information about the equation of state and reaction mechanisms consistent with the experimental observables. This article is a review of this endeavour.

S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjian; M. B. Tsang

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays Review of Emerging Resources: July 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Depa rtment of Energy W ashington, DC 20585 This page inTenTionally lefT blank The information presented in this overview is based on the report Review of Emerging Resources: U.S. Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays, which was prepared by INTEK, Inc. for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The full report is attached. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

149

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogeneous Species in Gas Turbine Exhaust, from Conkle, et82) Percent of Organic Gas Turbine Emissions which containnitrogen dioxide from gas turbines (from the data presented

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transuranic actinide reactions with simple gas-phase molecules.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this research is to conduct an experimental study of f-element chemistry fo r the purpose of identifying reaction trends and mechanisms of the early actinide metals with simple gas phase molecules . Previous research has elucidated some of the fundamenta l chemistry of the 4f elements,1-5 however, more complex chemistry is expected for the 5f serie s due to the inclusion of the 5f electrons in the valence shell . The matrix isolation approach, which is well-suited to the experimental study of transient species, will be used for sample collection, and IR/NIR/VIS spectroscopy will be employed to interrogate deposited matrices . The strength of this method lies in the use of isotopes of reactants, which permits the identification of guest molecules in a noble gas matrix by observation of vibrational frequenc y shifts and patterns upon isotopic substitution . Using this technique at the University of Virginia, the first noble gas-actinide bond has recently been identified, a weak U-Ar bond on the CUO molecule.6 Uranium has similarly been observed to bond to krypton and xenon, whereas thoriu m and the lanthanides have not exhibited this activity . It is expected that plutonium will be even more reactive in this respect . We will extend the body of actinide experimental evidence t o include the transuranic elements neptunium, plutonium, and americium reacted with isotopes o f oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide .

Willson, S. P. (Stephen P.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Baiardo, J. P. (Joseph P.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of gaseous diffusion equipment  

SciTech Connect

The five buildings at the K-25 Site formerly involved in the gaseous diffusion process contain 5000 gaseous diffusion stages as well as support facilities that are internally contaminated with uranium deposits. The gaseous diffusion facilities located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant also contain similar equipment and will eventually close. The decontamination of these facilities will require the most cost-effective technology consistent with the criticality, health physics, industrial hygiene, and environmental concerns; the technology must keep exposures to hazardous substances to levels as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). This report documents recent laboratory experiments that were conducted to determine the feasibility of gas-phase decontamination of the internal surfaces of the gaseous diffusion equipment that is contaminated with uranium deposits. A gaseous fluorinating agent is used to fluorinate the solid uranium deposits to gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}), which can be recovered by chemical trapping or freezing. The lab results regarding the feasibility of the gas-phase process are encouraging. These results especially showed promise for a novel decontamination approach called the long-term, low-temperature (LTLT) process. In the LTLT process: The equipment is rendered leak tight, evacuated, leak tested, and pretreated, charged with chlorine trifluoride (ClF{sub 3}) to subatmospheric pressure, left for an extended period, possibly > 4 months, while processing other items. Then the UF{sub 6} and other gases are evacuated. The UF{sub 6} is recovered by chemical trapping. The lab results demonstrated that ClF{sub 3} gas at subatmospheric pressure and at {approx} 75{degree}F is capable of volatilizing heavy deposits of uranyl fluoride from copper metal surfaces sufficiently that the remaining radioactive emissions are below limits.

Munday, E.B.; Simmons, D.W.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources / Related Web Sites Resources / Related Web Sites Buildings-Related Resources Windows & Glazing Resources Energy-Related Resources International Resources Telephone Directories Buildings-Related Resources California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) Center for Building Science (CBS) at LBNL Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Energy Efficiency home page Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Clearinghouse Fact sheets in both HTML for standard web browsers and PDF format using Adobe Acrobat Reader (free). National Fenestration Rating Council home page Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EREN) back to top... Windows & Glazing Resources National Glass Association (NGA) LBNL Building Technologies Fenestration R&D news LBNL Center for Building Science (CBS) Newsletter

153

Hawaii Geothermal Resource Assessment Program: western state cooperative direct heat resource assessment, Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional geothermal resource assessment has been conducted for the major islands in the Hawaiian chain. The assessment was made through the compilation and evaluation of the readily accessible geological, geochemical, and geophysical data for the Hawaiian archipelago which has been acquired during the last two decades. The geologic criteria used in the identification of possible geothermal reservoirs were: age and location of most recent volcanism on the island and the geologic structure of each island. The geochemical anomalies used as traces for geothermally altered ground water were: elevated silica concentrations and elevated chloride/magnesium ion ratios. Geophysical data used to identify subsurface structure which may have geothermal potential were: aeromagnetic anomalies, gravity anomalies, and higher than normal well and basal spring discharge temperatures. Geophysical and geochemical anomalies which may be the result of subsurface thermal effects have been identified on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Molokai and Oahu.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

LIQUID-GAS PHASE TRANSITION IN 3He M. Barranco, A. Polls and S. Stringari+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

911 LIQUID-GAS PHASE TRANSITION IN 3He M. Barranco, A. Polls and S. Stringari+ Departament d ligne de coexistence. Abstract.- A mean field approach is used to investigate the liquid-gas phase of températures. The prédictions for the critical point and the température dependence of the liquid and gas

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Dynamic Transition Theory and its Application to Gas-Liquid Phase Transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Transition Theory and its Application to Gas-Liquid Phase Transitions Tian Ma, Shouhong close links to the physics. In return the theory is applied to the physical problems. 2 #12;liquid gas #12;Objective: To study the types and the mechanisms of liquid-gas transitions. The phases correspond

Wang, Shouhong

157

Phase separation in a polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling  

SciTech Connect

We study the phase separation of a spin-polarized Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling near a wide Feshbach resonance. As a result of the competition between spin-orbit coupling and population imbalance, the phase diagram for a uniform gas develops a rich structure of phase separation involving topologically nontrivial gapless superfluid states. We then demonstrate the phase separation induced by an external trapping potential and discuss the optimal parameter region for the experimental observation of the gapless superfluid phases.

Yi, W.; Guo, G.-C. [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, CAS, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessment of the Mexican Eagle Ford Shale Oil and Gas Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the 2011 Energy Information Agency (EIA) global assessment, Mexico ranks 4th in shale gas resources. The Eagle Ford shale is the formation with the greatest expectation in Mexico given the success it has had in the US and its liquids-rich zone. Accurate estimation of the resource size and future production, as well as the uncertainties associated with them, is critical for the decision-making process of developing shale oil and gas resources. The complexity of the shale reservoirs and high variability in its properties generate large uncertainties in the long-term production and recovery factors of these plays. Another source of uncertainty is the limited production history. Given all these uncertainties, a probabilistic decline-curve analysis approach was chosen for this study, given that it is relatively simple, it enables performing a play-wide assessment with available production data and, more importantly, it quantifies the uncertainty in the resource size. Analog areas in the US Eagle Ford shale were defined based on available geologic information in both the US and Mexico. The Duong model coupled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology was used to analyze and forecast production of wells located in the previously defined analog sectors in the US Eagle Ford shale. By combining the results of individual-well analyses, a type curve and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) distribution for each of the defined analog sectors was obtained. These distributions were combined with well-spacing assumptions and sector areas to generate the prospective-resources estimates. Similar probabilistic decline-curve-analysis methodology was used to estimate the reserves and contingent resources of existing wells. As of March 2013, the total prospective resources (P90-P50-P10) for the Eagle Ford shale in Mexico (MX-EFS) are estimated to be 527-1,139-7,268 MMSTB of oil and 17- 37-217 TSCF of gas. To my knowledge, this is the first oil estimate published for this formation in Mexico. The most attractive sectors based on total estimated resources as well as individual-well type curves are located in the southeast of the Burgos Basin and east-west of the Sabinas basin. Because there has been very little development to date, estimates for reserves and contingent resources are much lower than those for prospective resources. Estimated reserves associated with existing wells and corresponding offset well locations are 18,375-34,722-59,667 MMSCF for gas and zero for oil. Estimated contingent resources are 14-64-228 MSTB of oil and 8,526-13,327- 25,983MMSCF of gas. The results of this work should provide a more reliable assessment of the size and uncertainties of the resources in the Mexican Eagle Ford shale than previous estimates obtained with less objective methodologies.

Morales Velasco, Carlos Armando

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Simulations of strongly phase-separated liquid-gas systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann simulations of liquid-gas systems are believed to be restricted to modest density ratios of less than 10. In this article we show that reducing the speed of sound and, just as importantly, the interfacial contributions to the pressure allows lattice Boltzmann simulations to achieve high density ratios of 1000 or more. We also present explicit expressions for the limits of the parameter region in which the method gives accurate results. There are two separate limiting phenomena. The first is the stability of the bulk liquid phase. This consideration is specific to lattice Boltzmann methods. The second is a general argument for the interface discretization that applies to any diffuse interface method.

A. J. Wagner; C. M. Pooley

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Echos of the liquid-gas phase transition in multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general discussion is made concerning the ways in which one can get signatures about a possible liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Microcanonical temperature, heat capacity and second order derivative of the entropy versus energy formulas have been deduced in a general case. These formulas are {\\em exact}, simply applicable and do not depend on any model assumption. Therefore, they are suitable to be applied on experimental data. The formulas are tested in various situations. It is evidenced that when the freeze-out constraint is of fluctuating volume type the deduced (heat capacity and second order derivative of the entropy versus energy) formulas will prompt the spinodal region through specific signals. Finally, the same microcanonical formulas are deduced for the case when an incomplete number of fragments per event are available. These formulas could overcome the freeze-out backtracking deficiencies.

Al. H. Raduta; Ad. R. Raduta

2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and system.

Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gas phase chromatography of halides of elements 104 and 105  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-line isothermal gas phase chromatography was used to study halides of {sup 261}104 (T{sub {1/2}} = 65 s) and {sup 262,263}105 (T{sub {1/2}} = 34 s and 27 s) produced an atom-at-a time via the reactions {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) and {sup 249}Bk({sup 18}O, 5n, 4n), respectively. Using HBr and HCl gas as halogenating agents, we were able to produce volatile bromides and chlorides of the above mentioned elements and study their behavior compared to their lighter homologs in Groups 4 or 5 of the periodic table. Element 104 formed more volatile bromides than its homolog Hf. In contrast, element 105 bromides were found to be less volatile than the bromides of the group 5 elements Nb and Ta. Both 104 and Hf chlorides were observed to be more volatile than their respective bromides. 31 refs., 8 figs.

Tuerler, A.; Gregorich, K.E.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Hannink, N.J.; Henderson, R.A.; Hoffman, D.C.; Kacher, C.D.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Kreek, S.A.; Lee, D.M.; Leyba, J.D.; Nurmia, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Kovacs, J.; Scherer, U.W.; Vermeulen, D.; Weber, A. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Barth, H.; Gober, M.K.; Kratz, J.V. (Philipps-Univ., Marburg

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of two power plants operating on natural gas. The N ofindings in a natural fired power of gas plant consisting of

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Phase-Field Simulation of Void and Fission-Gas Bubble Evolution in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Mechanical Performance for Current and Next-Generation Nuclear Reactors. Presentation Title, Phase-Field Simulation of Void and Fission-Gas ...

165

Gas Phase Chemical Physics | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Gas Phase Chemical Physics Gas Phase Chemical Physics Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Scientific Highlights Reports & Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Gas Phase Chemical Physics Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Gas Phase Chemical Physics (GPCP) research emphasizes studies of the dynamics and rates of chemical reactions at energies characteristic of combustion, and the chemical and physical properties of key combustion intermediates. The overall aim is the development of a fundamental understanding of chemical reactivity enabling validated theories, models and computational tools for predicting rates, products, and dynamics of

166

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

CONTENTS BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BOEM Releases Assessment of BOEM Releases Assessment of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources of the Lower 48 United States Outer Continental Shelf ..............1 Re-examination of Seep Activity at the Blake Ridge Diapir ............6 Field Data from 2011/2012 ConocoPhillips-JOGMEC-DOE Iġnik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial Now Available .......................9 Announcements .......................11 * Norwegian Center of Excellence to Receive Ten Years of Arctic Research Funding * Release of Mallik 2007-2008 Results * Goldschmidt Conference * 2012 Methane Hydrate Research Fellowship Awarded to Jeffrey James Marlow Spotlight on Research........... 16 Bjørn Kvamme CONTACT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov

168

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Gas-Phase Diffusion in Porous Media: Comparison of Models Stephen W. Webb Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87 185 ABSTRACT Two models are commonly used to analyze gas- phase diffusion in porous media in the presence of advection, the Advective-Dispersive Model (ADM) and the Dusty-gas Model (DGM). The ADM, which is used in TOUGH2, is based on a simple linear addition of advection calculated by Darcy's law and ordinary diffusion using Fick's law with a porosity- tortuosity-gas saturation multiplier to account for the porous medium. Another approach for gas-phase transport in porous media is the Dusty-Gas Model. This model applies the kinetic theory of gases to the gaseous components and the porous media (or "dust") to combine transport due to diffusion and

169

Long-range assessment of R and D policy for gas-related conversion technologies and unconventional natural gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes the energy impacts on the US energy-economy system on a set of successful R and D programs. These programs are presumed to have led to the commercialization of innovative technologies that increase the US gaseous fuels resource base and promote the development of advanced natural gas conversion technologies for residential/commercial uses. The GRI and its principal subcontractor, TRW Incorporated, provided the detailed specifications of the energy conditions for both a Base Case and an R and D Policy Case. These conditions can be broadly categorized in terms of key energy resource price assumptions, energy resource availabilities, technology characterizations and market penetration guidelines for all energy technologies. Dale W. Jorgenson Associates (DJA) developed a set of demographic and economic projections including population, employment, and real GNP growth rates. The GRI and TRW staff provided the technology characterizations for most of the gas-related technologies and a number of other technologies. The data for the remaining technology characterizations were taken, for the most part, from Bhagat et al. This report presents the energy results from the BNL/DJA energy-economy system as executed under GRI specifications. It is intended to serve as a complement to the DJA report on the macro-economic consequences of these specifications. Certain assumption incorporated in the R and D and Base scenarios relating to market penetration were identified as particularly sensitive. In light of the uncertainty inherent in them, an additional set of sensitivity runs were requested by GRI and are presented in Appendix B.

Kydes, A.S.; Rabinowitz, J.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were explored in the framework of the relativistic mean-field hadronic model in three statistical ensembles: canonical, grand canonical and isobaric. We have found that the liquid-gas phase transition, i.e., the first order phase transition which is defined by the plateau in the isotherms, cannot contain the plateau in the caloric curves in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles. The plateau in the isotherms is incompatible with the plateau in the caloric curves at fixed baryon density. Moreover, for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition the caloric curve has a plateau only at fixed pressure or chemical potential. The results of the statistical multifragmentation models for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition were reanalyzed. It was revealed that one class of statistical multifragmentation models do indeed predict the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition for the nuclear multifragmentation. However, there is another class o...

Parvan, A S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Resource Characterization and Quantification of Natural Gas-Hydrate and Associated Free-Gas Accumulations in the Prudhoe Bay - Kuparuk River Area on the North Slope of Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates have long been considered a nuisance by the petroleum industry. Hydrates have been hazards to drilling crews, with blowouts a common occurrence if not properly accounted for in drilling plans. In gas pipelines, hydrates have formed plugs if gas was not properly dehydrated. Removing these plugs has been an expensive and time-consuming process. Recently, however, due to the geologic evidence indicating that in situ hydrates could potentially be a vast energy resource of the future, research efforts have been undertaken to explore how natural gas from hydrates might be produced. This study investigates the relative permeability of methane and brine in hydrate-bearing Alaska North Slope core samples. In February 2007, core samples were taken from the Mt. Elbert site situated between the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk oil fields on the Alaska North Slope. Core plugs from those core samples have been used as a platform to form hydrates and perform unsteady-steady-state displacement relative permeability experiments. The absolute permeability of Mt. Elbert core samples determined by Omni Labs was also validated as part of this study. Data taken with experimental apparatuses at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, ConocoPhillips laboratories at the Bartlesville Technology Center, and at the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation's facilities in Anchorage, Alaska, provided the basis for this study. This study finds that many difficulties inhibit the ability to obtain relative permeability data in porous media-containing hydrates. Difficulties include handling unconsolidated cores during initial core preparation work, forming hydrates in the core in such a way that promotes flow of both brine and methane, and obtaining simultaneous two-phase flow of brine and methane necessary to quantify relative permeability using unsteady-steady-state displacement methods.

Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Gas Phase Moleculer Dynamics (GPMD) Group | Chemistry Department |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Program Research Program The research within the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics program spans spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics, with input from both experiment and theory. The broad topics of recent and current focus are Development of new spectroscopic methods to probe transient molecules of importance to combustion Application of these methods to collisional dynamics and kinetics Theoretical predictions of vibrational spectra of small molecules and radicals Development and use of computational methods in reaction kinetics and dynamics, optimizing accuracy and efficiency to the size of the problem The group has long experience in the application of transient frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy methods for probing radicals, and using this method for polarized photofragment Doppler spectroscopy and kinetics. More recently, FM applications in double resonance have been developed for spectral simplification and assignments, and for saturation recovery and transfer kinetics to study collisional energy and polarization transfer. Sub-Doppler saturation methods with FM probing have recently been applied to a variety of nuclear hyperfine structure problems in spectroscopy and dynamics. Frequency comb-stabilized diode lasers in the near infrared have been used for highly precise frequency-domain measurements of pressure broadening and line shape studies of collision effects.

173

Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.  

SciTech Connect

Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Nuclear symmetry energy effects on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated within relativistic mean-field model using the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy constrained from the measured neutron skin thickness of finite nuclei. We find symmetry energy has a significant influence on several features of liquid-gas phase transition. The boundary and area of the liquid-gas coexistence region, the maximal isospin asymmetry and the critical values of pressure and isospin asymmetry all of which systematically increase with increasing softness in the density dependence of symmetry energy. The critical temperature below which the liquid-gas mixed phase exists is found higher for a softer symmetry energy.

Bharat K. Sharma; Subrata Pal

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The DOE Information Center's current collection has more than 40,000 documents consisting of technical reports and historical materials that relate to DOE operations....

177

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Progress continues to be made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. Significant progress was made in development of the draft program solicitations. In addition, RPSEA personnel continued an aggressive program of outreach to engage the industry and ensure wide industry participation in the research award solicitation process.

Russell E. Fray

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources  

SciTech Connect

RPSEA is currently in its first year of performance under contract DE-AC26-07NT42677, Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Administration. Significant progress has been made in establishing the program administration policies, procedures, and strategic foundation for future research awards. RPSEA has concluded an industry-wide collaborative effort to identify focus areas for research awards under this program. This effort is summarized in the RPSEA Draft Annual Plan, which is currently under review by committees established by the Secretary of Energy.

Russell E. Fray

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5(94) 5(94) Oil and Gas Resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan) December 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts Information General information regarding preparation of this report may be obtained from Craig H. Cranston at 202/586-6023, in Washington, D.C. Specific information regarding the contents of the report may be obtained from the authors: Jack S.

182

Integrated resource planning for local gas distribution companies: A critical review of regulatory policy issues  

SciTech Connect

According to the report, public utility commissions (PUCs) are increasingly adopting, or considering the adoption of integrated resource planning (IRP) for local gas distribution companies (LDCs). The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires PUCs to consider IRP for gas LDCs. This study has two major objectives: (1) to help PUCs develop appropriate regulatory approaches with regard to IRP for gas LDCs; and (2) to help PUCs respond to the EPAct directive. The study finds that it is appropriate for PUCs to pursue energy efficiency within the traditional regulatory framework of minimizing private costs of energy production and delivery; and PUCs should play a limited role in addressing environmental externalities. The study also finds that in promoting energy efficiency, PUCs should pursue policies that are incentive-based, procompetitive, and sensitive to rate impacts. The study evaluates a number of traditional and nontraditional ratemaking mechanisms on the basis of cost minimization, energy efficiency, competitiveness, and other criteria. The mechanisms evaluated include direct recovery of DSM expenses, lost revenue adjustments for DSM options, revenue decoupling mechanisms, sharing of DSM cost savings, performance-based rate of return for DSM, provision of DSM as a separate service, deregulation of DSM service, price caps, and deregulation of the noncore gas market. The study concludes with general recommendations for regulatory approaches and ratemaking mechanisms that PUCs may wish to consider in advancing IRP objectives.

Harunuzzaman, M.; Islam, M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

Liang Hu

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Biomass Cofiring with Natural Gas in California: Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report by EPRI for the California Energy Commission presents the major cost and performance parameters of systems that enable natural gas to be augmented by 10 percent biomass fuel. The basic natural gas fired power plant is taken to be a 400 MWe natural gas-turbine/combined-cycle (NGCC). The biomass component is to generate 40 MWe from biomass fuel. Two forms of the biomass section of the power plant are considered: (1) biomass gasification with the gas derived from the biomass combined with the na...

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Supply curve impacts of Quick Start projects in Phase 1 of the Resource Supply Expansion Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this report under contract to the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville), as part of the Resource Supply Expansion Project (RSEP). RSEP is a regional program instituted by Bonneville to expand conservation and renewable generation options available to resource planners and utilities. Resource alternatives are increased by RSEP through demonstration projects designed in a collaborative process that targets specific barriers to resource development including institutional, market, and reliability barriers. RSEP was launched with several projects that were designed and implemented quickly in 1992 to lay a foundation for future collaboration. The purpose of this report is to introduce the goal and structure of RSEP and to describe the so-called ``Quick Start`` RSEP projects in Phase One of RSEP. This description includes a preliminary estimate of the energy savings and/or other expected impacts of RSEP projects funded in FY 1992 and 1993. Similar estimates are also included for Bonneville projects to confirm wind and geothermal generation potential. Bonneville`s Geothermal Confirmation Agenda preceded implementation of RSEP, although it has a similar objective and collaborative approach.

Wright, G.A.; Warwick, W.M.; Durfee, D.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Evolution of the Normal State of a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas from a Pseudogap Phase to a Molecular Bose Gas  

SciTech Connect

Wave-vector resolved radio frequency spectroscopy data for an ultracold trapped Fermi gas are reported for several couplings at T{sub c}, and extensively analyzed in terms of a pairing-fluctuation theory. We map the evolution of a strongly interacting Fermi gas from the pseudogap phase into a fully gapped molecular Bose gas as a function of the interaction strength, which is marked by a rapid disappearance of a remnant Fermi surface in the single-particle dispersion. We also show that our theory of a pseudogap phase is consistent with a recent experimental observation as well as with quantum Monte Carlo data of thermodynamic quantities of a unitary Fermi gas above T{sub c}.

Perali, A.; Palestini, F.; Pieri, P.; Strinati, G. C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Stewart, J. T.; Gaebler, J. P.; Drake, T. E.; Jin, D. S. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0449 (United States)

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF UNREGULATED GAS PHASE NITROGENEOUS SPECIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of amines from coal and oil fired power plants. estimateof 100 ppm from coal, oil, and gas fired stationary powerin the which used fuel oil. Craig emissions from confirmed a

Matthews, Ronald D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Isospin dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using the Furnstahl, Serot and Tang's model, the effect of density dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon-rho-meson (NN-rho) coupling on the liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is investigated. A limit pressure p_lim has been found. We found that the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place if p>p_lim. The binodal surface for density dependent NN-rho coupling situation is addressed.

W. L. Qian; Ru-Keng Su; Ping Wang

2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

The Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Q.E.D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past decade, intense experimental effort has been devoted to the search for a liquid-gas phase transition in highly excited nuclei. Now, synthesis of the large body of existing multifragmentation data provides a strong case for identification of this phenomenon. In this presentation we discuss several salient features of the data that support their interpretation in terms of a spinodal liquid-gas phase transition.

V. E. Viola

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Liquid-gas phase transition and its order in finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei is studied in a heated liquid-drop model where the drop is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with the vapour emanated from it. Changing pressure along the liquid-gas coexistence line of the systems, symmetric or asymmetric, suggests that the phase transition is a continuous one. This is further corroborated from the study of the thermal evolution of the entropy at constant pressure.

Tapas Sil; S. K. Samaddar; J. N. De; S. Shlomo

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species  

SciTech Connect

This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

Hall, G.E.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species  

SciTech Connect

This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species  

SciTech Connect

This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase Transformation and Surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SGP-TR-177 Liquid-Gas Relative Permeabilities in Fractures: Effects of Flow Structures, Phase) the liquid-gas relative permeabilities in fractures can be modeled by characterizing the flow structures permeabilities in both smooth and rough fractures. For the theoretical analysis of liquid-vapor relative

Stanford University

195

Non-congruence of liquid-gas phase transition of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first explore the liquid-gas mixed phase in a bulk calculation, where two phases coexist without the geometrical structures. In the case of symmetric nuclear matter, the system behaves congruently, and the Maxwell construction becomes relevant. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium is no more attained by the Maxwell construction since the liquid and gas phases are non-congruent; the particle fractions become completely different with each other. One of the origins of such non-congruence is attributed to the large symmetry energy. Subsequently we explore the charge-neutral nuclear matter with electrons by fully applying the Gibbs conditions to figure out the geometrical (pasta) structures in the liquid-gas mixed phase. We emphasize the effects of the surface tension and the Coulomb interaction on the pasta structures. We also discuss the thermal effects on the pasta structures.

Toshiki Maruyama; Toshitaka Tatsumi

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

196

Non-congruence of liquid-gas phase transition of asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We first explore the liquid-gas mixed phase in a bulk calculation, where two phases coexist without the geometrical structures. In the case of symmetric nuclear matter, the system behaves congruently, and the Maxwell construction becomes relevant. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium is no more attained by the Maxwell construction since the liquid and gas phases are non-congruent; the particle fractions become completely different with each other. One of the origins of such non-congruence is attributed to the large symmetry energy. Subsequently we explore the charge-neutral nuclear matter with electrons by fully applying the Gibbs conditions to figure out the geometrical (pasta) structures in the liquid-gas mixed phase. We emphasize the effects of the surface tension and the Coulomb interaction on the pasta structures. We also discuss the thermal effects on the pasta structures.

Maruyama, Toshiki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources  

SciTech Connect

Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ceramic stationary gas turbine development. Final report, Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Solar Turbines Inc. and its subcontractors during the period September 25, 1992 through April 30, 1993. The objective of the work is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through implementation of selected ceramic components.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot nuclei studied with INDRA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thanks to the high detection quality of the INDRA array, signatures related to the dynamics (spinodal decomposition) and thermodynamics (negative microcanonical heat capacity) of a liquid-gas phase transition have been simultaneously studied in multifragmentation events in the Fermi energy domain. The correlation between both types of signals strongly supports the existence of a first order phase transition for hot nuclei.

B. Borderie; R. Bougault; P. Desesquelles; E. Galichet; B. Guiot; Ph. Lautesse; N. Le Neindre; J. Marie; M. Parlog; M. Pichon. M. F. Rivet; E. Rosato; G. Tabacaru; M. Vigilante; J. P. Wieleczko

2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Human resource needs and development for the gas industry of the future  

SciTech Connect

The natural gas industry will confront many challenges in the 1990s and beyond, one of which is the development of human resources to meet future needs. An efficient, trained work force in this era of environmental concern, high technology, and alternative fuels is essential for the industry to continue to meet the competition and to safely deliver our product and service to all customers. Unfortunately, during this period there will be an increasing shortfall of technical personnel to replace those lost to attrition and a steady decline in the availability of new employees who are able to read, write, and perform simple math. Technological and government developments that will impact the industry and the skill levels needed by the industry employees are reviewed. In-house and external training of professional and nonprofessional personnel and the benefits and disadvantages of selected advanced training methods are discussed. Recommendations are presented that can help improve the training of gas industry employees to meet future needs. 22 refs.

Klass, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Gas-liquid phase separation in oppositely charged colloids: stability and interfacial tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the phase behavior and the interfacial tension of the screened Coulomb (Yukawa) restricted primitive model (YRPM) of oppositely charged hard spheres with diameter s using Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the gas-liquid and gas-solid phase transition using free energy calculations and grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations for varying inverse Debye screening length k. We find that the gas-liquid phase separation is stable for k s gas-liquid interfacial tension using grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The interfacial tension decreases upon increasing the range of the interaction. In particular, we find that simple scaling can be used to relate the interfacial tension of the YRPM to that of the restricted primitive model, where particles interact with bare Coulomb interactions.

Andrea Fortini; Antti-Pekka Hynninen; Marjolein Dijkstra

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

The Liquid-Gas Phase Transitions in a Multicomponent Nuclear System with Coulomb and Surface Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multi-component nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Muller and Serot which uses relativistic mean field without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistance binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and cause another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with less protons in liquid phase and more protons in gas phase.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

204

Possible links between the liquid-gas and deconfinement-hadronization phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly accepted that strongly interacting matter has several phase transitions in different domains of temperature and baryon density. In this contribution I discuss two most popular phase transitions which in principle can be accessed in nuclear collisions. One of them, the liquid-gas phase transition, is well established theoretically and studied experimentally in nuclear multifragmentation reactions at intermediate energies. The other one, the deconfinement-hadronization phase transition, is at the focus of present and future experimental studies with relativistic heavy-ion beams at SPS, RHIC and LHC. Pssible links between these two phase transitions are identified from the viewpoint of their manifestation in violent nuclear collisions.

I. N. Mishustin

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Disappearance of the Gas-Liquid Phase Transition for Highly Charged Colloids A.-P. Hynninen and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disappearance of the Gas-Liquid Phase Transition for Highly Charged Colloids A.-P. Hynninen and A in a uniform dielectric continuum. We show that the gas-liquid critical point becomes metastable with respect the primitive model, like-charge attraction has been shown to give rise to a gas-liquid phase coexistence [5

206

Third-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical Tian Ma and Shouhong Wang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Third-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical point Tian Ma-order gas-liquid phase transition and the nature of Andrews critical point Tian Ma1 and Shouhong Wang2 1 is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical

Wang, Shouhong

207

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Lewan (2002) concluded that much of the thermogenic gas produced in this basin is the result of cracking of oil to gas in deeply buried reservoirs. The efficiency of expulsion, migration and trapping has been estimated to range from 0.5 to 10 percent for certain basins (Schmoker, 1994: Zimmerman, 1999). The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin is 910 billion barrels using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated is 1,540 billion barrels using the Platte River software application. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 3,130 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 4,050 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Seventy-five percent of the gas is estimated to be from late cracking of oil in the source rock. Claypool and Mancini (1989) report that the conversion of oil to gas in reservoirs is a significant source of thermogenic gas in this basin. The Manila and Conecuh Subbasins are oil-prone. Although these subbasins are thermally mature for oil generation and expulsion, they are not thermally mature for secondary, non-associated gas generation and expulsion. The gas produced from the highly productive gas condensate fields (Big Escambia Creek and Flomaton fields) in these subbasins has been interpreted to be, in part, a product of the cracking of oil to gas and thermochemical reduction of evaporite sulfate in the reservoirs (Claypool and Mancini, 1989). The areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior Salt Basins with high potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs (>15,000 ft) have been identified. In the North Louisiana Salt Basin, these potential reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous facies, especially the Smackover, Cotton Valley, Hosston, and Sligo units. The estimate of the secondary, non-associated gas generated from cracking of oil in the source rock from depths below 12,000 feet in this basin is 4,800 TCF. Assuming an expul

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Phase diagrams in the lattice RPM model: from order-disorder to gas-liquid phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase behavior of the lattice restricted primitive model (RPM) for ionic systems with additional short-range nearest neighbor (nn) repulsive interactions has been studied by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. We obtain a rich phase behavior as the nn strength is varied. In particular, the phase diagram is very similar to the continuum RPM model for high nn strength. Specifically, we have found both gas-liquid phase separation, with associated Ising critical point, and first-order liquid-solid transition. We discuss how the line of continuous order-disorder transitions present for the low nn strength changes into the continuum-space behavior as one increases the nn strength and compare our findings with recent theoretical results by Ciach and Stell [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 91}, 060601 (2003)].

Alexandre Diehl; Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development and Demonstration of Mobile, Small Footprint Exploration and Development Well System for Arctic Unconventional Gas Resources (ARCGAS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, oil and gas field technology development in Alaska has focused on the high-cost, high-productivity oil and gas fields of the North Slope and Cook Inlet, with little or no attention given to Alaska's numerous shallow, unconventional gas reservoirs (carbonaceous shales, coalbeds, tight gas sands). This is because the high costs associated with utilizing the existing conventional oil and gas infrastructure, combined with the typical remoteness and environmental sensitivity of many of Alaska's unconventional gas plays, renders the cost of exploring for and producing unconventional gas resources prohibitive. To address these operational challenges and promote the development of Alaska's large unconventional gas resource base, new low-cost methods of obtaining critical reservoir parameters prior to drilling and completing more costly production wells are required. Encouragingly, low-cost coring, logging, and in-situ testing technologies have already been developed by the hard rock mining industry in Alaska and worldwide, where an extensive service industry employs highly portable diamond-drilling rigs. From 1998 to 2000, Teck Cominco Alaska employed some of these technologies at their Red Dog Mine site in an effort to quantify a large unconventional gas resource in the vicinity of the mine. However, some of the methods employed were not fully developed and required additional refinement in order to be used in a cost effective manner for rural arctic exploration. In an effort to offset the high cost of developing a new, low-cost exploration methods, the US Department of Energy, National Petroleum Technology Office (DOE-NPTO), partnered with the Nana Regional Corporation and Teck Cominco on a technology development program beginning in 2001. Under this DOE-NPTO project, a team comprised of the NANA Regional Corporation (NANA), Teck Cominco Alaska and Advanced Resources International, Inc. (ARI) have been able to adapt drilling technology developed for the mineral industry for use in the exploration of unconventional gas in rural Alaska. These techniques have included the use of diamond drilling rigs that core small diameter (< 3.0-inch) holes coupled with wireline geophysical logging tools and pressure transient testing units capable of testing in these slimholes.

Paul Glavinovich

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Liquid-gas mixed phase in nuclear matter at finite temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the geometrical structure of Liquid-gas (LG) mixed phase which is relevant to nuclear matter in the crust region of compact stars or supernovae. To get the equation of state (EOS) of the system, the Maxwell construction is found to be applicable to symmetric nuclear matter, where protons and neutrons behave simultaneously. For asymmetric nuclear matter, on the other hand, the phase equilibrium can be obtained by fully solving the Gibbs conditions since the components in the L and G phases are completely different. We also discuss the effects of surface and the Coulomb interaction on the mixed phase.

Toshiki Maruyama; Toshitaka Tatsumi

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

Test plan for phase II of the Retained Gas Sampler system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is being developed to permit characterization of the gas phase component of waste tank core samples. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted which have affirmed the proof-of-principle for separating the gas phase materials from waste tank material in a quantitative manner. However, experiments conducted thus far have dealt only with representative materials and simulated hardware mock-ups. This test plan deals with the operation and testing of actual devices in the hot cell environment. This test plan coves all aspects of the RGS system including: sampler load-in, extrusion, gas extraction, quantitative separation, sample collection, and quantitative analysis. Sample material used in this test plan will be waste tank simulants and will not be radioactive. The work environment, however, will be an operating hot cell facility and will have radioactive contaminated surfaces. Operation of the system will therefore require an official radiation work permit (RWP).

Hey, B.E.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

217

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluationof Technology and Potential  

SciTech Connect

Gas hydrates are a vast energy resource with global distribution in the permafrost and in the oceans. Even if conservative estimates are considered and only a small fraction is recoverable, the sheer size of the resource is so large that it demands evaluation as a potential energy source. In this review paper, we discuss the distribution of natural gas hydrate accumulations, the status of the primary international R&D programs, and the remaining science and technological challenges facing commercialization of production. After a brief examination of gas hydrate accumulations that are well characterized and appear to be models for future development and gas production, we analyze the role of numerical simulation in the assessment of the hydrate production potential, identify the data needs for reliable predictions, evaluate the status of knowledge with regard to these needs, discuss knowledge gaps and their impact, and reach the conclusion that the numerical simulation capabilities are quite advanced and that the related gaps are either not significant or are being addressed. We review the current body of literature relevant to potential productivity from different types of gas hydrate deposits, and determine that there are consistent indications of a large production potential at high rates over long periods from a wide variety of hydrate deposits. Finally, we identify (a) features, conditions, geology and techniques that are desirable in potential production targets, (b) methods to maximize production, and (c) some of the conditions and characteristics that render certain gas hydrate deposits undesirable for production.

Reagan, Matthew; Moridis, George J.; Collett, Timothy; Boswell, Ray; Kurihara, M.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Koh, Carolyn; Sloan, E. Dendy

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

218

Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

Tang, Keqi (Richland, WA); Shvartsburg, Alexandre A. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

219

Hydrocarbons in Soil Gas as Pathfinders in Geothermal Resource Surveys in Indonesia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A surface geochemical technique utilizing normal paraffin (C{sub 7+}) and aromatic (C{sub 8}) hydrocarbons in soil gas has been successfully used as pathfinders in surveys for geothermal resources in Indonesia. The Dieng field was used to test the technique. The result shows the paraffin anomalies to be near and over productive wells. Because productive wells usually lie over upflow zones it reinforces our hypothesis that paraffins define the upflow of geothermal systems. The aromatic hydrocarbon alkylbenzene C{sub 8} was found near and around productive wells in the southeast quadrant of the Dieng field (Sikidang-Merdada area) but they are more spread out and more diffuse than the paraffins. The shape of their anomaly seems to suggest a tendency of spreading into the direction of lower elevations. It is thought that the aromatics, which are much more soluble than their corresponding paraffins, express at the surface as anomalies not only of locations of the upflow but also of the outflow of the geothermal system as well. Therefore the combined paraffin and aromatic anomalies, and topography, may be used as an indicator for the direction of the outflow or the flow of the under ground waters. The scarcity of the aromatics in the northwest quadrant of the Dieng field (Sileri area) is unique. A hypothesis has been proposed which could explain this unique feature.

Pudjianto, R.; Suroto, M.; Higashihara, M.; Fukuda, M.; Ong, Akhadiana and Jan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Gas phase water in the surface layer of protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of the ground state transition of HDO at 464 GHz towards the protoplanetary disk of DM Tau have detected the presence of water vapor in the regions just above the outer disk midplane (Ceccarelli et al 2005). In the absence of non-thermal desorption processes, water should be almost entirely frozen onto the grain mantles and HDO undetectable. In this Letter we present a chemical model that explores the possibility that the icy mantles are photo-desorbed by FUV (6eV water vapor above the disk midplane over the entire disk. Assuming a photo-desorption yield of 10^{-3}, the water abundance in this layer is predicted to be ~ 3 x 10^{-7} and the average H2O column density is ~ 1.6x 10^{15} cm^{-2}. The predictions are very weakly dependent on the details of the model, like the incident FUV radiation field, and the gas density in the disk. Based on this model, we predict a gaseous HDO/H2O ratio in DM Tau of ~1%. In addition, we predict the ground state transition of water at 557 GHz to be undetectable with ODIN and/or HSO-HIFI.

C. Dominik; C. Ceccarelli; D. Hollenbach; M. Kaufman

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Liquid-gas Phase Transition in Strange Hadronic Matter with Weak Y-Y Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in strange hadronic matter is reexamined by using the new parameters about the $\\Lambda - \\Lambda$ interaction deduced from recent observation of $^{6}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}He$ double hypernucleus. The extended Furnstahl-Serot-Tang model with nucleons and hyperons is utilized. The binodal surface, the limit pressure, the entropy, the specific heat capacity and the Caloric curves are addressed. We find that the liquid-gas phase transition can occur more easily in strange hadronic matter with weak Y-Y interaction than that of the strong Y-Y interaction.

Li Yang; Shao Yu Yin; Wei Liang Qian; Ru-keng Su

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Time-dependent gas phase kinetics in a hydrogen diluted silane plasma  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase kinetics in a high-pressure hydrogen diluted silane plasma has been studied at time scales of 10{sup -2}-6x10{sup 2} s. The time-resolved gas phase composition shows the following kinetics at different time scales: silane decomposition and polysilane generation in < or approx. 2x10{sup -1} s, nanoparticle formation and plasma density reduction in 10{sup -1}-10{sup 0} s, polysilane accumulation in 10{sup 0}-10{sup 2} s, and silane depletion and electrode heating in > or approx. 10{sup 1} s. Disilane radicals are implied to be the dominant film precursors in addition to silyl radicals.

Nunomura, S.; Kondo, M. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Yoshida, I. [Research Center for Photovoltaics, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Advanced Photovoltaics Development Center, Advanced Energy Research Center, Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd., 108 Ohmori, Anpachi-cho, Anpachi-gun, Gifu 503-0195 (Japan)

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Nuclear Liquid-Gas Phase Transition: Present Status and Future Perspectives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than two decades ago, the van der Waals behavior of the nucleon - nucleon force inspired the idea of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter. Heavy-ion reactions at relativistic energies offer the unique possibility for studying this phase transition in a finite, hadronic system. A general overview of this subject is given emphasizing the most recent results on nuclear calorimetry.

J. Pochodzalla; ALADIN collaboration

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multifragmentation and nuclear phase transitions (liquid-fog and liquid-gas)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal multifragmentation of hot nuclei is interpreted as the nuclear liquid-fog phase transition. The charge distributions of the intermediate mass fragments produced in p(3.6 GeV) + Au and p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions are analyzed within the statistical multifragmentation model with the critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition Tc as a free parameter. The analysis presented here provides strong support for a value of Tc > 15 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; S. P. Avdeyev; V. K. Rodionov; A. V. Simomenko; V. V. Kirakosyan; A. Budzanowski; W. Karcz; I. Skwirczynska; E. A. Kuzmin; E. Norbeck; A. S. Botvina

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Correlations between signals of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite systems such as atomic nuclei present at phase transition specific features different from those observed at the thermodynamic limit. Several characteristic signals were found in samples of events resulting from heavy ion collisions at and above the Fermi energy. The concomitant observation of different signatures of a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei on a given sample strongly supports the occurrence of this transition.

Marie-France Rivet; N. Le Neindre; J. P. Wieleczko; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; M. Parlog; M. Pichon; B. Tamain; the INDRA; ALADIN Collaboration

2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

227

Isospin and momentum dependence of liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using different interactions with or without isospin and/or momentum dependence. The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy as well as the isospin and momentum dependence of the nuclear interaction.

Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Hong-Ru Ma

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Constraints to leasing and development of federal resources: OCS oil and gas and geothermal. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chapter I identifies possible technological, economic, and environmental constraints to geothermal resource development. Chapter II discusses constraints relative to outer continental shelf and geothermal resources. General leasing information for each resource is detailed. Chapter III summarizes the major studies relating to development constraints. 37 refs. (PSB)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Using Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount of isoprene in the gas phase (mols)1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure 101,000 (Pa)2. Volume of the liquid phase3. Things you need to know Math Amount of isoprene in gas = ideal gas constant 8.314 J mol-1 K-1 T = temperature of liquid phase units °K (which is 273.1 + °C) CUsing Henry's Constant for Determining the Amount of Isoprene in the Liquid Phase The amount

Last, Robert L.

231

Key Institutional Design Considerations and Resources Required to Develop a Federal Greenhouse Gas Offsets Program in the United Sta tes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions offsets have emerged as a critical element of evolving U.S. climate policy and a critical factor in determining the future price of CO2 emissions and the economic costs of proposed policies. This report evaluates the governmental institutional requirements and resources needed to develop a large-scale national domestic GHG emissions offset program. It also describes potential institutional barriers that might limit the ability of the evolving carbon market to generate signi...

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

232

Alteration of gas phase ion polarizabilities upon hydration in high dielectric liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the modification of gas phase ion polarizabilities upon solvation in polar solvents and ionic liquids. To this aim, we develop a classical electrostatic theory of charged liquids composed of solvent molecules modeled as finite size dipoles, and embedding polarizable ions that consist of Drude oscillators. In qualitative agreement with ab-initio calculations of polar solvents and ionic liquids, the hydration energy of a polarizable ion in both type of dielectric liquid is shown to favor the expansion of its electronic cloud. Namely, the ion carrying no dipole moment in the gas phase acquires a dipole moment in the liquid environment, but its electron cloud also reaches an enhanced rigidity. We find that the overall effect is an increase of the gas phase polarizability upon hydration. In the specific case of ionic liquids, it is shown that this hydration process is driven by a collective solvation mechanism where the dipole moment of a polarizable ion induced by its interaction with surrounding ions self-consistently adds to the polarization of the liquid, thereby amplifying the dielectric permittivity of the medium in a substantial way. We propose this self-consistent hydration as the underlying mechanism behind the high dielectric permittivities of ionic liquids composed of small charges with negligible gas phase dipole moment. Hydration being a correlation effect, the emerging picture indicates that electrostatic correlations cannot be neglected in polarizable liquids.

Sahin Buyukdagli; Tapio Ala-Nissila

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 20 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually, and the quantity is expected to increase as utilities institute further controls to comply with Clean Air Act requirements. This report presents the results of the second phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gas-phase reaction study of disilane pyrolysis: Applications to low pressure chemical vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

The gas-phase thermal reactions during disilane decomposition at low pressure chemical vapor deposition conditions were studied from 300 to 1,000 K using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI). REMPI of gas-phase Si, mass 28, was detected from 640 to 840 K and 1 to 10 Torr, with a maximum signal intensity between 700 to 720 K. During disilane decomposition, no SiH (427.8 nm), SiH[sub 2] (494-515 nm), or SiH[sub 3] (419.0 nm) was detected. MPI of higher silanes, silenes, and silylenes were detected through mass fragments 2, 32, and 60; these species reached a maximum signal intensity 20 degrees prior to the mass-28 maximum. Modeling studies that included a detailed low pressure gas-phase kinetic scheme predict relative gas-phase partial pressures generated during disilane pyrolysis. The model predicted experimental trends in the Si partial pressure and the higher silane, silene, and silylene partial pressures.

Johannes, J.E.; Ekerdt, J.G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The influence of Coulomb on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the obervables space. A multi-canonical formalism allows to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the non saturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the effect of Coulomb as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; Al. H. Raduta; Ad. R. Raduta

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Kerr-AdS analogue of tricritical point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d=6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q=J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the `every day thermodynamics' of simple substances. For q=0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0liquid' phase transition. Furthermore, for 0.00905liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q>0.0985 we observe the `standard liquid/gas behavior' of the Van der Waals fluid.

Natacha Altamirano; David Kubiznak; Robert B. Mann; Zeinab Sherkatghanad

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Nuclear liquid-gas phase transition studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition of the system in ideal thermal equilibrium is studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The time evolution of a many-nucleon system confined in a container is solved for a long time to get a microcanonical ensemble of a given energy and volume. The temperature and the pressure are extracted from this ensemble and the caloric curves are constructed. The present work is the first time that a microscopic dynamical model which describes nuclear multifragmentation reactions well is directly applied to get the nuclear caloric curve. The obtained constant pressure caloric curves clearly show the characteristic feature of the liquid-gas phase transition, namely negative heat capacity (backbending), which is expected for the phase transition in finite systems.

Takuya Furuta; Akira Ono

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Effect of Cluster Formation on Isospin Asymmetry in the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition Region Effect of Cluster Formation on Isospin Asymmetry in the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Nuclear matter within the liquid-gas phase transition region is investigated in a mean-field two-component Fermi-gas model. Following largely analytic considerations, it is shown that: (1) Due to density dependence of asymmetry energy, some of the neutron excess from the high-density phase could be expelled into the low-density region. (2) Formation of clusters in the gas phase tends to counteract this trend, making the gas phase more liquid-like and reducing the asymmetry in the gas phase. Flow of asymmetry between the spectator and midrapidity region in reactions is discussed and a possible inversion of the flow direction is indicated. PACS. 25.70.Mn- Projectile and target fragmentation. PACS. 25.70.Pq- Multifragment emission and correlations.

L. Shi; P. Danielewicz

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Statement of Mark J. Mazur Acting Administrator Energy Information Administration Department of Energy before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources U.S. Senate December 12, 2000

Information Center

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

240

Rising Gasoline Prices and the Role of Available Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Resources  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Richard G. Newell, Administrator, U.S. Energy Information Administration, to: Committee on Natural Resources, United States House of Representatives; Washington, DCMarch 17, 2011

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

242

The geology of natural gas resources - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

243

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, Ram S.; Shoham, Ovadia

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.

Mohan, R.S.; Shoham, O.

2001-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Third-Order Gas-Liquid Phase Transition and the Nature of Andrews Critical Point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this article is to study the nature of the Andrews critical point in the gas-liquid transition in a physical-vapor transport (PVT) system. A dynamical model, consistent with the van der Waals equation near the Andrews critical point, is derived. With this model, we deduce two physical parameters, which interact exactly at the Andrews critical point, and which dictate the dynamic transition behavior near the Andrews critical point. In particular, it is shown that 1) the Andrews critical point is a switching point where the phase transition changes from the first order to the third order, 2) the gas-liquid co-existence curve can be extended beyond the Andrews critical point, and 3) the liquid-gas phase transition going beyond Andrews point is of the third order. This clearly explains why it is hard to observe the gas-liquid phase transition beyond the Andrews critical point. Furthermore, the analysis leads naturally the introduction of a general asymmetry principle of fluctuations and the preferred transition mechanism for a thermodynamic system.

Tian Ma; Shouhong Wang

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in which flow regime transition occurs.

X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previously conducted preliminary investigations within the deep Delaware and Val Verde sub-basins of the Permian Basin complex documented bottom hole temperatures from oil and gas wells that reach the 120-180C temperature range, and occasionally beyond. With large abundances of subsurface brine water, and known porosity and permeability, the deep carbonate strata of the region possess a good potential for future geothermal power development. This work was designed as a 3-year project to investigate a new, undeveloped geographic region for establishing geothermal energy production focused on electric power generation. Identifying optimum geologic and geographic sites for converting depleted deep gas wells and fields within a carbonate environment into geothermal energy extraction wells was part of the project goals. The importance of this work was to affect the three factors limiting the expansion of geothermal development: distribution, field size and accompanying resource availability, and cost. Historically, power production from geothermal energy has been relegated to shallow heat plumes near active volcanic or geyser activity, or in areas where volcanic rocks still retain heat from their formation. Thus geothermal development is spatially variable and site specific. Additionally, existing geothermal fields are only a few 10’s of square km in size, controlled by the extent of the heat plume and the availability of water for heat movement. This plume radiates heat both vertically as well as laterally into the enclosing country rock. Heat withdrawal at too rapid a rate eventually results in a decrease in electrical power generation as the thermal energy is “mined”. The depletion rate of subsurface heat directly controls the lifetime of geothermal energy production. Finally, the cost of developing deep (greater than 4 km) reservoirs of geothermal energy is perceived as being too costly to justify corporate investment. Thus further development opportunities for geothermal resources have been hindered. To increase the effective regional implementation of geothermal resources as an energy source for power production requires meeting several objectives. These include: 1) Expand (oil and gas as well as geothermal) industry awareness of an untapped source of geothermal energy within deep permeable strata of sedimentary basins; 2) Identify and target specific geographic areas within sedimentary basins where deeper heat sources can be developed; 3) Increase future geothermal field size from 10 km2 to many 100’s km2 or greater; and 4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

248

Shear viscosity of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within a relaxation time approach using free nucleon-nucleon cross sections modified by the in-medium nucleon masses that are determined from an isospin- and momentum-dependent effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, we investigate the specific shear viscosity ($\\eta/s$) of neutron-rich nucleonic matter near its liquid-gas phase transition. It is found that as the nucleonic matter is heated at fixed pressure or compressed at fixed temperature, its specific shear viscosity shows a valley shape in the temperature or density dependence, with the minimum located at the boundary of the phase transition. Moreover, the value of $\\eta/s$ drops suddenly at the first-order liquid-gas phase transition temperature, reaching as low as $4\\sim5$ times the KSS bound of $\\hbar/4\\pi$. However, it varies smoothly for the second-order liquid-gas phase transition. Effects of the isospin degree of freedom and the nuclear symmetry energy on the value of $\\eta/s$ are also discussed.

Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Che Ming Ko; Bao-An Li; Yu-Gang Ma

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling and phase transitions of the Feynman-Wilson gas  

SciTech Connect

The implications of Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling on the thermodynamic properties of the Feynman-Wilson gas are discussed. Consequences of the existence of a thermodynamic limit as a fundamental demand on hadronic physics at asymptotic energies are deduced. It is generally found that the Feynman-Wilson gas undergoes a phase transition at infinite energies. First-order transitions lead to average multiplicity growth like the rapidity Y, while higher-order transitions correspond to the behavior suggested by the absorptive-model cutting rules in Pomeron calculus. Possible links with the critical phenomena obtained in Reggeon field theories are conjectured. (AIP)

Antoniou, N.G.; Poulopoulos, P.N.; Vlassopulos, S.D.P.; Kouris, C.B.

1976-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter from realistic many-body approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of a liquid-gas phase transition for hot nuclear systems at subsaturation densities is a well established prediction of finite temperature nuclear many-body theory. In this paper, we discuss for the first time the properties of such phase transition for homogeneous nuclear matter within the Self-Consistent Green's Functions approach. We find a substantial decrease of the critical temperature with respect to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approximation. Even within the same approximation, the use of two different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions gives rise to large differences in the properties of the critical point.

A. Rios; A. Polls; A. Ramos; H. Müther

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Equation of state for finite nuclei and liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct the equation of state (EOS) of finite nuclei including surface and Coulomb effects in a Thomas-Fermi framework using a finite range, momentum and density dependent two-body interaction. We identify critical temperatures for nuclei below which the EOS so constructed shows clear signals for liquid-gas phase transition in these finite systems. Comparison with the EOS of infinite nuclear matter shows that the critical density and temperature of the phase transition in nuclei are influenced by the mentioned finite size effects.

J. N. De; B. K. Agrawal; S. K. Samaddar

1998-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Experimental evidence for a liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear systems  

SciTech Connect

At certain combinations of temperature and density, nuclear matter may exist as a liquid-gas mixture exhibiting phase instabilities, a characteristic signature of which may be found in the emission of intermediate-mass fragments in nuclear collisions. The present analysis of fragment distributions from proton-- and heavy-ion--induced reactions, in the framework of a theory of condensation, is suggestive of the occurrence of such phase transitions with a critical exponent kapprox.1.7 and a critical temperature T/sub C/approx.12 MeV.

Panagiotou, A.D.; Curtin, M.W.; Toki, H.; Scott, D.K.; Siemens, P.J.

1984-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quantum dynamics of elementary reactions in the gas phase and on surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantum Quantum dynamics of elementary reactions in the gas phase and on surfaces Quantum Dynamics of Elementary Reactions in the Gas Phase and on Surfaces Key Challenges: This research addresses several important dynamics issues in elementary chemical reactions. One of the major obstacles in such studies is the quantum nature of the reactions, where the zero-point energy, mode selectivity, dynamical resonances, non-adiabatic transitions, and tunneling play an important role. The calculations are very challenging because of the large number of quantum states involved, and because of the large number of partial waves. The work required development of new methods and new, highly-efficient codes to calculate the total and state-resolved reaction probabilities. Numerically, the calculations are based on sparse

256

Arctic oil and natural gas resources - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas hydrates can pose operational problems for drilling wells in both onshore and offshore ... Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and the United ...

257

Liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) a quantal nuclear system with only 16 nucleons shows a clearly visible liquid-gas phase transition. The FMD model is an approximation to the many-body problem which describes the system by antisymmetrized many-body states in which each nucleon is occupying a Gaussian shaped time-dependent wave-packet. The statistical ensemble is obtained by time averaging.

H. Feldmeier; J. Schnack

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Solid-Phase Biotreatment Technology Studies Using Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry has been conducting site investigations to assess the presence of tar residuals at manufactured gas plant sites and to determine appropriate remediation actions. Tars typically contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. This report evaluates the feasibility of remediating such tarry materials using a patented solid-phase bioremediation technology to target PAH degradation. Bench- and pilot scale treatability trials det...

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States -- a quantity that is expected to increase as utilities apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents results of the third and final phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications for these by-products.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

260

Moving Character Observation of Bubble Rising in Vertical Gas?Liquid Two?Phase Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of bubble motion in water is a basic subject in gas?liquid two?phase flow research. A suit of visualized experimental device was designed and set up. Bubble rising in stagnant liquid in a vertical translucent rectangular tank was studied using the high?speed video system combined with digital image process methods. Several bubble parameters were calculated base on the processed images. Bubble track

H. Y. Wang; F. Dong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Resource Assessment Of Geothermal Energy Resources For Converting Deep Gas Wells In Carbonate Strata Into Geothermal Extraction Wells: A Permian Basin Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

4) Increase the productive depth range for economic geothermal energy extraction below the current 4 km limit by converting deep depleted and abandoned gas wells and fields into geothermal energy extraction wells. The first year of the proposed 3-year resource assessment covered an eight county region within the Delaware and Val Verde Basins of West Texas. This project has developed databases in Excel spreadsheet form that list over 8,000 temperature-depth recordings. These recordings come from header information listed on electric well logs recordings from various shallow to deep wells that were drilled for oil and gas exploration and production. The temperature-depth data is uncorrected and thus provides the lower temperature that is be expected to be encountered within the formation associated with the temperature-depth recording. Numerous graphs were developed from the data, all of which suggest that a log-normal solution for the thermal gradient is more descriptive of the data than a linear solution. A discussion of these plots and equations are presented within the narrative. Data was acquired that enable the determination of brine salinity versus brine density with the Permian Basin. A discussion on possible limestone and dolostone thermal conductivity parameters is presented with the purpose of assisting in determining heat flow and reservoir heat content for energy extraction. Subsurface maps of temperature either at a constant depth or within a target geothermal reservoir are discusse

Erdlac, Richard J., Jr.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr{sub 4}, HfBr{sub 4}, RfBr{sub 4}, NbBr{sub 5}, TaOBr{sub 3}, HaCl{sub 5}, WBr{sub 6}, FrBr, and BiBr{sub 3}. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub a}) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} was observed: RfBr{sub 4} > ZrBr{sub 4} > HfBr{sub 4}. The {Delta}H{sub a} values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of {sup 261}Rf was performed. {sup 261}Rf was produced via the {sup 248}Cm({sup 18}O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74{sub -6}{sup +7} seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78{sub -6}{sup +11} seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75{+-}7 seconds for {sup 261}Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant temperature) gas phase chromatography instrument to a thermochromatographic (variable temperature) instrument have been completed. Thermochromatography is a technique that can be used to study the volatility and {Delta}H{sub a} of longer-lived isotopes off-line, Future work will include a comparison between the two techniques and the use of thermochromatography to study isotopes in a wider range of half-lives and molecular structures.

Sylwester, Eric Robert

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions backbending of the caloric curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct experimental evidence for a negative heat capacity in the liquid-to-gas like phase transitionin hydrogen cluster ions

Gobet, F; Farizon, M; Gaillard, M J; Buchet, J P; Carré, M; Schreier, P; Märk, T D

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter with density-dependent relativistic mean-field models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter is studied within density-dependent relativistic mean-field models where the density dependence is introduced according to the Brown-Rho scaling and constrained by available data at low densities and empirical properties of nuclear matter. The critical temperature of the liquid-gas phase transition is obtained to be 15.7 MeV in symmetric nuclear matter falling on the lower edge of the small experimental error bars. In hot asymmetric matter, the boundary of the phase-coexistence region is found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy. The critical pressure and the area of phase-coexistence region increases clearly with the softening of the symmetry energy. The critical temperature of hot asymmetric matter separating the gas phase from the LG coexistence phase is found to be higher for the softer symmetry energy.

Guang-Hua Zhang; Wei-Zhou Jiang

2012-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

266

Statistical issues in the assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to his untimely death, my friend Dave Wood gave me wise counsel about how best to organize a paper describing uses of statistics in oil and gas exploration. A preliminary reconnaissance of the literature alerted me ...

Kaufman, Gordon M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system Hiroshi Watanabe, Nobuyasu Ito, and Chin-Kun Hu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid system Hiroshi Watanabe, Nobuyasu JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 136, 204102 (2012) Phase diagram and universality of the Lennard-Jones gas-liquid; published online 23 May 2012) The gas-liquid phase transition of the three-dimensional Lennard

268

Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase I, Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation is based on an analysis of existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies. The principle source of data used was the oil and gas well files maintained by the NDGS. A computer library was created containing all the necessary oil and gas well data in the North Dakota Geological Survey oil and gas well files. Stratigraphic data, bottomhole-temperature data, and chemical data are presented in map form to show the geothermal gradient, temperature, and depth of potential hydrothermal aquifers and the chemical characteristics of potential hydrothermal aquifers.

Harris, K.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Caloric curve for nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in relativistic mean-field hadronic model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main thermodynamical properties of the first order phase transition of the relativistic mean-field (RMF) hadronic model were explored in the isobaric, the canonical and the grand canonical ensembles on the basis of the method of the thermodynamical potentials and their first derivatives. It was proved that the first order phase transition of the RMF model is the liquid-gas type one associated with the Gibbs free energy $G$. The thermodynamical potential $G$ is the piecewise smooth function and its first order partial derivatives with respect to variables of state are the piecewise continuous functions. We have found that the energy in the caloric curve is discontinuous in the isobaric and the grand canonical ensembles at fixed values of the pressure and the chemical potential, respectively, and it is continuous, i.e. it has no plateau, in the canonical and microcanonical ensembles at fixed values of baryon density, while the baryon density in the isotherms is discontinuous in the isobaric and the canonical ensembles at fixed values of the temperature. The general criterion for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition in the canonical ensemble was identified.

A. S. Parvan

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

World Shale Gas Resources: An Initial Assessment of 14 Regions Outside the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Background The use of horizontal drilling in conjunction with hydraulic fracturing has greatly expanded the ability of producers to profitably produce natural gas from low permeability geologic formations, particularly shale formations. Application of fracturing techniques to stimulate oil and gas production began to grow rapidly in the 1950s, although experimentation dates back to the 19 th century. Starting in the mid-1970s, a partnership of private operators, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) endeavored to develop technologies for the commercial production of natural gas from the relatively shallow Devonian (Huron) shale in the Eastern United States. This partnership helped foster technologies that eventually became crucial to producing natural gas from shale rock, including horizontal wells, multi-stage fracturing, and slick-water fracturing. 1 Practical application of horizontal drilling to oil production began in the early 1980s, by which time the advent of improved downhole drilling motors and the invention of other necessary supporting equipment, materials, and technologies, particularly downhole telemetry equipment, had brought some applications within the realm of

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The effect of surface and Coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition of finite nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By means of the Furnstahl, Serot and Tang's model, the effects of surface tension and Coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition for finite nuclei are investigated. A limit pressure p-lim above which the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place has been found. It is found that comparing to the Coulomb interaction, the contribution of surface tension is dominate in low temperature regions. The binodal surface is also addressed.

W. L. Qian; Ru-Keng Su; H. Q. Song

2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, Northwestof Depressurization for Gas Production from Gas Hydrate5L-38 Gas Hydrate Thermal Production Test Through Numerical

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NPDES permit compliance and enforcement: A resource guide for oil and gas operators  

SciTech Connect

During the fall of 1996, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission sponsored sessions for government and industry representatives to discuss concerns about the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program under the Clean Water Act. In January 1997, the NPDES Education/Communication/Training Workgroup (ECT Workgroup) was established with co-leaders from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and industry. The ECT Workgroup`s purpose was to develop ideas that would improve communication between NPDES regulators and the oil and gas industry regarding NPDES compliance issues. The Workgroup focused on several areas, including permit compliance monitoring and reporting, enforcement activity and options, and treatment technology. The ECT Workgroup also discussed the need for materials and information to help NPDES regulatory agency personnel understand more about oil and gas industry exploration and extraction operations and treatment processes. This report represents a compendium of the ECT Workgroup`s efforts.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availability and methodology, resulting in a reservoir-level assessment of ultimate recovery for both oil and gas. Ultimate recovery, as used here, is the sum of cumulative production and remaining Proved plus Probable reserves as of the end of 1987. Reasonable results were obtained when aggregating reservoir-level values to the basin level, and in determining general but important distributions of across-basin reservoir and fluid parameters. Currently, this report represents the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas in the Fergana Basin. This full report provides additional descriptions, discussions and analysis illustrations that are beneficial to those considering oil and gas investments in the Fergana Basin. 57 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enzyme and Microbial Technology 36 (2005) 911–916 Structured fiber supports for gas phase biocatalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pseudomonas cepaciae lipase adsorbed onto non-porous structured fiber supports in the form of woven fabrics, was used to catalyze hydrolysis and transesterification reactions in the gas phase. The enzyme adsorbed onto carbon fiber support exhibited much higher catalytic activity compared to the enzyme immobilized onto glass fiber carrier. The effect of temperature and relative humidity on reactions catalyzed by P. cepaciae lipase adsorbed onto structured fiber carbon support was studied in the gas system. Under the conditions investigated (up to 60 ? C and 80 % relative humidity), the immobilized enzyme showed a high thermostability and could be efficiently used to catalyze hydrolytic and transesterification reactions in continuous mode. Structured fiber supports, with a high specific surface area and a high mechanical resistance, showed a low-pressure drop during the passage of reactants through a reactor. The approach proposed in this study could be suitable for immobilization of a wide variety of enzymes.

Takoua Debeche A; Cynthia Marmet A; Lioubov Kiwi-minsker B; Albert Renken B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper estimates the quantity of hydrogen that could be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power by county in the United States. The study estimates that more than 72 million tonnes of hydrogen can be produced from coal, natural gas, nuclear, and hydro power per year in the country (considering only 30% of their total annual production). The United States consumed about 396 million tonnes of gasoline in 2007; therefore, the report suggests the amount of hydrogen from these sources could displace about 80% of this consumption.

Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Of teapot dome, Wind river and Fort chaffee: Federal oil and gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The move from a location system to a leasing system for the development of federally owned oil and gas was a controversial and hard fought step. Like most programs for commercial use of public lands, the oil and gas leasing system has been the target of criticism for fraud. A review of the decisions of the US DOI disclose that DOI`s role has evolved from one largely developed to resolving disputes between competing applicants for a lease to one more concerned with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This article presents a review of decisions.

Lindley, L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

280

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Title On-Road Measurement of Gas and Particle Phase Pollutant Emission Factors for Individual Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Dallmann, Timothy R., Steven J. DeMartini, Thomas W. Kirchstetter, Scott C. Herndon, Timothy B. Onasch, Ezra C. Wood, and Robert A. Harley Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 46 Issue 15 Pagination 8511-8518 Abstract Pollutant concentrations in the exhaust plumes of individual diesel trucks were measured at high time resolution in a highway tunnel in Oakland, CA, during July 2010. Emission factors for individual trucks were calculated using a carbon balance method, in which pollutants measured in each exhaust plume were normalized to measured concentrations of carbon dioxide. Pollutants considered here include nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, ethene, and black carbon (BC), as well as optical properties of emitted particles. Fleet-average emission factors for oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and BC respectively decreased 30 ± 6 and 37 ± 10% relative to levels measured at the same location in 2006, whereas a 34 ± 18% increase in the average NO2 emission factor was observed. Emissions distributions for all species were skewed with a small fraction of trucks contributing disproportionately to total emissions. For example, the dirtiest 10% of trucks emitted half of total NO2 and BC emissions. Emission rates for NO2 were found to be anticorrelated with all other species considered here, likely due to the use of catalyzed diesel particle filters to help control exhaust emissions. Absorption and scattering cross-section emission factors were used to calculate the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, at 532 nm) for individual truck exhaust plumes, which averaged 0.14 ± 0.03.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear Chemical and Mechanical Instability and the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermodynamic properties of nuclei are studied in a mean field model using a Skryme interaction. Properties of two component systems are investigated over the complete range of proton fraction from a system of pure neutrons to a system of only protons. Besides volume, symmetry, and Coulomb effects we also include momentum or velocity dependent forces. Applications of the results developed are then given which include nuclear mechanical and chemical instability and an associated liquid/gas phase transition in two component systems. The velocity dependence leads to further changes in the coexistence curve and nuclear mechanical and chemical instability curves.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Liquid-gas phase transition and Coulomb instability of asymmetric nuclear systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a chiral SU(3) quark mean field model to study the properties of nuclear systems at finite temperature. The liquid-gas phase transition of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. For two formulations of the model the critical temperature, $T_c$, for symmetric nuclear matter is found to be 15.8 MeV and 17.9 MeV. These values are consistent with those derived from recent experiments. The limiting temperatures for finite nuclei are in good agreement with the experimental points.

P. Wang; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas; A. G. Williams

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

In-medium properties of nuclear fragments at the liquid-gas phase coexistence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactions of nuclear multifragmentation of excited finite nuclei can be interpreted as manifestation of the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. During this process the matter at subnuclear density clusterizes into hot primary fragments, which are located in the vicinity of other nuclear species. In recent experiments there were found evidences that the symmetry and surface energies of primary fragments change considerably as compared to isolated cold or low-excited nuclei. The new modified properties of primary fragments should be taken into account during their secondary de-excitation.

A. S. Botvina

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical temperature Tc for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is stimated both from the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case,the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the IMF yields in p(8.1 GeV)+Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation (SMM). In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited 188Os is compared with the calculated one with Tc as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 16 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; A. Budzanowski; S. P. Avdeyev; A. S. Botvina; E. A. Cherepanov; W. Karcz; V. V. Kirakosyan; P. A. Rukoyatkin; I. Skwirczynska; E. Norbeck

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Liquid-Gas Phase Transition and Instabilities in Asymmetric Two Component Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition and associated instability in two component systems are investigated using a mean field theory. The importance of the role of both the Coulomb force and symmetry energy terms are studied. The addition of the Coulomb terms bring asymmetry into a mean field and thus result in important differences with previous approaches which did not include such terms. The Coulomb effects modify the chemical instability and mechanical instability domains shifting many features away from proton fraction point y=1/2 to a value closer to the valley of \\beta stability. These features are discussed in detail.

S. J. Lee; A. Z. Mekjian

2002-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Gas-phase and Solution-phase Peptide Conformations Studied by Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates ions on the basis of ion-neutral collision cross-sections (CCS, [omega]), which are determined by the geometry or conformation of the ions. The size-based IM separation can be extended to distinguish conformers that have different shapes in cases where shape differences influence the accessible surface area of the molecule. In recent years, IM has rapidly evolved as a structural characterization technique, which has applied on various structural biology problems. In this work, IMS is combined with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS), specially the integrated tempering sampling molecular dynamics simulation (ITS-MDS) to explore the gas-phase conformation space of two molecular systems (i) protonated tryptophan zipper 1 (trpzip1) ions and its six derivatives (ii) alkali metal ion (Na, K and Cs) adducts of gramicidin A (GA). The structural distributions obtained from ITS-MDS are compared well with results obtained from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MALDI-IM-MS) for trpzip 1 series and electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) for alkali metal ion adducts of GA. Furthermore, the solvent dependence on conformational preferences of the GA dimer is investigated using a combination of mass spectrometry techniques, viz. ESI-IM-MS and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX)-MS, and MDS. The IM experiments reveal three distinct gramicidin A species, detected as the sodium ion adduct ions, [2GA + 2Na]²?, and the equilibrium abundances of the dimer ions varies with solvent polarity. The solution phase conformations are assigned as the parallel and anti-parallel [beta]-helix dimer, and the anti-parallel dimer is the preferred conformation in non-polar organic solvent. The calculated CCS profiles by ITS-MDS agree very well with the experimentally measured CCS profiles, which underscore the utility of the method for determining candidate structures as well as the relative abundances of the candidate structures. The benefit of combining ion mobility measurements with solution-phase H/D exchange is allowing identifications and detail analysis of the solution-phase subgroup conformations, which cannot be uncovered by one method alone.

Chen, Liuxi

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bimodality as a signal of Liquid-Gas phase transition in nuclei?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the HIPSE (Heavy-Ion Phase-Space Exploration) Model to discuss the origin of the bimodality in charge asymmetry observed in nuclear reactions around the Fermi energy. We show that it may be related to the important angular momentum (spin) transferred into the quasi-projectile before secondary decay. As the spin overcomes the critical value, a sudden opening of decay channels is induced and leads to a bimodal distribution for the charge asymmetry. In the model, it is not assigned to a liquid-gas phase transition but to specific instabilities in nuclei with high spin. Therefore, we propose to use these reactions to study instabilities in rotating nuclear droplets.

Olivier Lopez; Denis Lacroix; Emmanuel Vient

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

289

Liquid-Gas phase transition in Bose-Einstein Condensates with time evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of a repulsive three-body interaction on a system of trapped ultra-cold atoms in Bose-Einstein condensed state. The stationary solutions of the corresponding $s-$wave non-linear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation suggest a scenario of first-order liquid-gas phase transition in the condensed state up to a critical strength of the effective three-body force. The time evolution of the condensate with feeding process and three-body recombination losses has a new characteristic pattern. Also, the decay time of the dense (liquid) phase is longer than expected due to strong oscillations of the mean-square-radius.

A. Gammal; T. Frederico; Lauro Tomio; Ph. Chomaz

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Liquid-Gas Phase Transition of Supernova Matter and Its Relation to Nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the liquid-gas phase transition of dense matter in supernova explosion by the relativistic mean field approach and fragment based statistical model. The boiling temperature is found to be high (T_{boil} >= 0.7 MeV for rho_B >= 10^{-7} fm^{-3}), and adiabatic paths are shown to go across the boundary of coexisting region even with high entropy. This suggests that materials experienced phase transition can be ejected to outside. We calculated fragment mass and isotope distribution around the boiling point. We found that heavy elements at the iron, the first, second, and third peaks of r-process are abundantly formed at rho_B = 10^{-7}, 10^{-5}, 10^{-3} and 10^{-2} fm^{-3}, respectively.

C. Ishizuka; A. Ohnishi; K. Sumiyoshi

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10^16 W/cm^2. In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

Marcos Dantus

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2  

SciTech Connect

Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Delineation of Coal Tar Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid and Groundwater Plumes at a Former Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field investigation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site in the Midwest. The focus of the investigation was delineating the distribution of coal tar (a dense nonaqueous phase liquid) and the associated dissolved-phase constituents in groundwater using a combination of analysis methodologies. The results will be used to determine remediation needs at the site.

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reasons for decision in the matter of Imperial Oil Resources Limited and Boston Gas Company application pursuant to Part VI of the National Energy Board Act for a license to export natural gas: GH-1-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Reasons for Decision in the matter of Hearing Order GH-1-99, heard in Halifax, NS on May 4 and 5, 1999. The proceeding concerns an application for a gas export license from Imperial Oil Resources Ltd. (IORL) and Boston Gas for a proposed export for sale to Boston Gas for the period 1 Nov 1999 to 31 Mar 2007. The natural gas will be produced from the Sable Offshore Energy Project and replace IORL's Alberta natural gas supplies sold to Boston Gas. The document includes a discussion of the market-based procedure used by the Board to assess the merits of an application to obtain a gas export license.

Not Available

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Two phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in porous media: application to gas migration in a nuclear waste repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological repository for radioactive waste. This model includes capillary effects and the gas high diffusivity. Moreover, it is written in variables (total hydrogen mass density and liquid pressure) chosen in order to be consistent with gas appearance or disappearance. We discuss the well possedness of this model and give some computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas generation in a water saturated repository.

Alain Bourgeat; Mladen Jurak; Farid Smaï

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Natural Gas Organization of Thailand will begin the first phase of its $400-$500 million project  

SciTech Connect

The project consists of collecting, transmitting, and treating facilities for 500-600 million cu ft/day of gas. It will include onshore and offshore pipelines, compressor stations, offshore platforms, a receiving terminal, and gas-treating and processing units to recover propane, butane, and possibly ethane. A large-diameter, 355 mi submarine line will carry gas from offshore fields to onshore facilities at Sattahip, southeast of Bangkok. Treated gas will be transported through a 110 mi onshore line to Bangkok. A letter of intent has been signed with Fluor Corp., which will begin the first phase of the project.

1978-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Barrow Gas Fields - North Slope Borough, Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 Phase 2- Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential associated with the Barrow Gas Fields Last Reviewed 04/06/2010 DE-FC26-06NT42962 Goal The goal of this project is to evaluate, design, drill, log, core and production test methane hydrate resources in the Barrow Gas Fields near Barrow, Alaska to determine its impact on future free gas production and its viability as an energy source. Photo of Barrow welcome sign Performers North Slope Borough, Barrow, Alaska 99723 Petrotechnical Resources Alaska (PRA), Fairbanks, AK 99775 University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 Background Phase 1 of the Barrow Gas Fields Hydrate Study provided very strong evidence for the existence of hydrates updip of the East Barrow and Walakpa Gas Fields. Full-field history matched reservoir modeling supported the

299

Dependence of Gas Phase Abundances in the ISM on Column Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sightlines through high- and intermediate-velocity clouds allow measurements of ionic gas phase abundances, A, at very low values of HI column density, N(HI). Present observations cover over 4 orders of magnitude in N(HI). Remarkably, for several ions we find that the A vs N(HI) relation is the same at high and low column density and that the abundances have a relatively low dispersion (factors of 2-3) at any particular N(HI). Halo gas tends to have slightly higher values of A than disk gas at the same N(HI), suggesting that part of the dispersion may be attributed to the environment. We note that the dispersion is largest for NaI; using NaI as a predictor of N(HI) can lead to large errors. Important implications of the low dispersions regarding the physical nature of the ISM are: (a) because of clumping, over sufficiently long pathlengths N(HI) is a reasonable measure of the_local_ density of_most_ of the H atoms along the sight line; (b) the destruction of grains does not mainly take place in catastrophic events such as strong shocks, but is a continuous function of the mean density; (c) the cycling of the ions becoming attached to grains and being detached must be rapid, and the two rates must be roughly equal under a wide variety of conditions; (d) in gas that has a low average density the attachment should occur within denser concentrations.

B. P. Wakker; J. S. Mathis

2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Shale Gas Production in the United States: Environmental and Economic Resource Challenges and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shale gas production has rapidly expanded in the United States over the past decade, largely as a result of the combination of hydraulic fracturing with horizontal drilling, and is already influencing a dramatic change in fuel supply. Production in the U.S. has increased fifteen-fold between 2000 and 2010 to 4.5 trillion cubic feet, and is expected by the Energy Information Administration to more than triple between 2009 and 2035. Numerous studies point to potential environmental impacts from shale ...

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/Exploration priorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In Thewww.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/publications/Hydrates/

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

Duffey, J

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Oil and Gas: Resources & Links  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Federal/State Programs Federal/State Programs DOE/Office of Fossil Energy Programs As America's need for energy grows, DOE is meeting the challenge by developing clean fuel initiatives to make the most of traditional fossil fuels and investing in cutting edge research to identify new energy sources like hydrogen fuels and fusion technologies. Fossil fuels - coal, oil, and natural gas - currently provide more than 85% of all the energy consumed in the United States, nearly two-thirds of our electricity, and virtually all of our transportation fuels. Moreover, it is likely that the Nation's reliance on fossil fuels to power an expanding economy will actually increase over at least the next two decades even with aggressive development and deployment of new renewable and nuclear

304

Characterization of the geothermal resource at Lackland AFB, San Antonio, Texas. Phase I report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal resource under Lackland Air Force Base (AFB), San Antonio, Texas was studied. It is the conclusion of the investigators that a geothermal well drilled at the site recommended by this study has a high probability of delivering geothermal fluids in sufficient quantity and at adequate temperatures to support a projected space and domestic hot water heating system. An exploratory production well location is recommended in the southwest sector of the base, based upon geologic conditions and the availability of sufficient open space to support the drilling operation. It is projected that a production well drilled at the recommended location would produce geothermal fluid of 130 to 145/sup 0/F at a rate of approximately 1000 gpm with reasonable fluid drawdowns. The Environmental Assessment for the drilling portion of the project has been completed, and no irreversible or irretrievable impacts are anticipated as a result of this drilling program. The permitting process is proceeding smoothly.

Lawford, T.W.; Malone, C.R.; Allman, D.W.; Zeisloft, J.; Foley, D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas hydrate concentrations previously unseen in shale-gas hydrate, generally found encased in fine-grained muds and shales.

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Pacific Gas and Electric Company’s Comments on the State Water Resources Control Board’s Proposed Policy Water Quality Control Policy on the Use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) supports the protection of California’s marine resources through development of a consistent statewide policy implementing Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. As we have previously stated, we support efforts to transition away from once through cooling and have clearly demonstrated that support through the

Estuarine Waters; Power Plant Cooling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Launching a Cornell Examination of the Marcellus System The issues related to the development of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Marcellus Shale unconventional gas resource are emblematic of a whole family of extremely complicated Energy. The development plans for the Marcellus Shale are unfolding immediately in our backyards and require of different ways of developing the Marcellus Shale and the economics of not developing the Marcellus Shale. We

Angenent, Lars T.

308

Liquid-gas phase transition in nuclei in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equation of state (EOS) of finite nuclei is constructed in the relativistic Thomas-Fermi theory using the non-linear $\\sigma-\\omega -\\rho$ model. The caloric curves are calculated by confining the nuclei in the freeze-out volume taken to be a sphere of size about 4 to 8 times the normal nuclear volume. The results obtained from the relativistic theory are not significantly different from those obtained earlier in a non-relativistic framework. The nature of the EOS and the peaked structure of the specific heat $C_v$ obtained from the caloric curves show clear signals of a liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei. The temperature evolution of the Gibbs potential and the entropy at constant pressure indicate that the characteristics of the transition are not too different from the first-order one.

Tapas Sil; B. K. Agrawal; J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effective interaction dependence of the liquid-gas phase transition in symmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition for homogeneous symmetric nuclear matter is studied in the mean-field approximation. Critical properties are computed using a comprehensive group of Skyrme and Gogny forces in an effort to elucidate the effective interaction dependence of the results. Analytical models for the thermodynamical and critical properties are discussed and compared to an extensive set of mean-field data. In agreement with these models, a tight correlation is found between the flashing and the critical points. Accurate predictions for the critical temperature, based on saturation properties, can only be obtained after the density dependence of the effective mass is properly taken into account. While the thermodynamical properties coming from different mean-fields do not follow a law of corresponding states, the critical exponents for all the mean-fields have been found to be the same. Their values coincide with those predicted by the Landau mean-field theory of critical phenomena.

A. Rios

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of the liquid-gas phase transition and cluster formation on the symmetry energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various definitions of the symmetry energy are introduced for nuclei, dilute nuclear matter below saturation density and stellar matter, which is found in compact stars or core-collapse supernovae. The resulting differences are exemplified by calculations in a theoretical approach based on a generalized relativistic density functional for dense matter. It contains nucleonic clusters as explicit degrees of freedom with medium dependent properties that are derived for light clusters from a quantum statistical approach. With such a model the dissolution of clusters at high densities can be described. The effects of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear matter and of cluster formation in stellar matter on the density dependence of the symmetry energy are studied for different temperatures. It is observed that correlations and the formation of inhomogeneous matter at low densities and temperatures causes an increase of the symmetry energy as compared to calculations assuming a uniform uncorrelated spatial distribution of constituent baryons and leptons.

S. Typel; H. H. Wolter; G. Röpke; D. Blaschke

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

GAS-PHASE ELECTRONIC SPECTRA OF POLYACETYLENE CATIONS: RELEVANCE OF HIGHER EXCITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transitions to higher electronic states of polyacetylene cations (HC{sub 2n}H{sup +}, n = 4, 5, 6) have been measured in the gas phase at {approx}20 K. The absorption spectra were obtained using a resonant two-color, two-photon fragmentation technique in an ion trap, allowing a direct comparison between laboratory and astrophysical data. The purpose was to investigate the relevance of such transitions to astronomical observations because the general expectation is that the bands could be too broad due to fast intramolecular processes. It is shown that the origin bands are still narrow enough (1-10 cm{sup -1}) to be considered, especially as the higher-lying transitions often possess large oscillator strengths.

Rice, C. A.; Rudnev, V.; Dietsche, R.; Maier, J. P., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Activation of catalyst for gas-phase combustion by electrochemical pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic activity of an IrO{sub 2} catalyst used as an electrode on a YSZ solid electrolyte cell for the gas-phase combustion of ethylene can be increased by electrochemical pretreatment. Thus, the polarization of the IrO{sub 2} electrode during 90 min at 300 {micro}A, relative to a gold electrode, both deposited on YSZ, increases the activity of the IrO{sub 2} catalyst after current interruption by a factor of 3. In situ catalyst work function measurements showed that after the electrochemical pretreatment the IrO{sub 2} catalyst obtains higher work function. The activation of the catalyst is explained through the formation of a higher oxide, IrO{sub 2+{delta}}.

Nicole, J.; Wodiunig, S.; Comninellis, C. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Tsiplakides, D. [Univ. of Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

314

Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Investigation of Internal Cleaning Effects in Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pressure waves in a gas-liquid medium with a stratifiedDynamics of Gas and Vapor-Liquid Media, Energoatomizdat,the pressure waves in a gas liquid medium with a stratified

Garg, Saurabh; Dornfeld, David; Klaus Berger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.

Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Multifragmentation and the liquid-gas phase transition: an experimental overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two roads are presently being followed in order to establish the existence of a liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclear systems from nuclear reactions at high energy. The clean experiment of observing the thermodynamic properties of a finite number of nucleons in a container is presently only possible with the computer. Performed with advanced nuclear transport models, it has revealed the first-order character of the transition and allowed the extraction of the pertinent thermodynamic parameters. The validity of the applied theory is being confirmed by comparing its predictions for heavy-ion reactions with exclusive experiments. The second approach is experimentally more direct. Signals of the transition are searched for by analysing reaction data within the framework of thermodynamics of small systems. A variety of potential signals has been investigated and found to be qualitatively consistent with the expectations for the phase transition. Many of them are well reproduced with percolation models which places the nuclear fragmentation into the more general context of partitioning phenomena in finite systems. A wealth of new data on this subject has been obtained in recent experiments, some of them with a new generation of multi-detector devices aiming at higher resolutions, isotopic identification of the fragments, and the coincident detection of neutrons. Isotopic effects in multifragmentation were addressed quite intensively, with particular attention being given to their relation to the symmetry energy and its dependence on density.

W. Trautmann

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

Strategies for gas production from oceanic Class 3 hydrate accumulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase, and hydrate phase. AHydrate; V: Vapor (gas phase); I: Ice; Q 1 : Quadruple point

Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

Olea, Ricardo A., E-mail: olea@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey (United States); Cook, Troy A. [Denver Federal Center (United States); Coleman, James L. [U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Unconventional Natural Gas Los Alamos scientists are committed to the efficient and environmentally-safe development of major U.S. natural gas and oil resources....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Investigation of the effect of intra-molecular interactions on the gas-phase conformation of peptides as probed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry, gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and molecular mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange ion molecule reactions and molecular modeling provide complimentary information and are used here for the characterization of peptide ion structure, including fine structure detail (i.e., cation-? interactions, ?-turns, and charge solvation interactions). IM-MS experiments performed on tyrosine containing tripeptides show that the collision cross-sections of sodiated, potassiated and doubly sodiated species of gly-gly-tyr are smaller than that of the protonated species, while the cesiated and doubly cesiated species are larger. Conversely, all of the alkali-adducted species of try-gly-gly have collision cross-sections that are larger than that of the protonated species. The protonated and alkali metal ion adducted (Na+, K+ and Cs+) species of bradykinin and bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6, 1-7, 1-8, 2-7, 5-9 and 2-9 were also studied using IM-MS and the alkali metal ion adducts of these species were found to have cross-sections very close to those of the protonated species. Additionally, multiple peak features observed in the ATDs of protonated bradykinin fragments 1-5, 1-6 and 1-7 are conserved upon alkali metal ion adduction. It was observed from gas-phase H/D ion molecule reactions that alkali adducted species exchange slower and to a lesser extent than protonated species in the tyrosine- and arginine-containing peptides. Experimental and computational results are discussed in terms of peptide ion structure, specifically the intra-molecular interactions present how those interactions change upon alkali salt adduction, as well as with the sequence of the peptide. Additionally, IM-MS data suggests the presence of a compact conformation of bradykinin fragment 1-5 (RPPGF) when starting from organic solvent conditions. As water is added stepwise to methanolic solutions, a more extended conformation is populated. When the starting solution is composed of ?90% water, two distinct mobility profiles are observed as well as a shoulder, indicating the presence of three gas-phase conformations for RPPGF. Gas-phase H/D exchange of [M+H]+ ions prepared from aqueous solvents show a bi-exponential decay, whereas samples prepared from organic solvents show a single exponential decay. The effect of solvent on gas-phase peptide ion structure, i.e., solution-phase memory effects, is discussed and gas-phase structures are compared to know solution-phase structures.

Sawyer, Holly Ann

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. “Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource TechnologyATIONAL L ABORATORY Distributed Energy Resources for CarbonFirestone 5128 Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Journal of Distributed Energy Resources, 1 (Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resources Characterizations.Firestone, R. (2004) Distributed Energy Resources Customer

Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect

AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

Nick Soelberg

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations and flood control. Tasks accomplished in Phase II include the complete migration of the Project Website and related databases to the ArcIMS software, which provides a better spatial query capacity. The database was enhanced by incorporating more gauge stations, limited groundwater data (well information, water levels, water quality, and pumpage) and other new data, and strengthened data sharing by implementing FGDC classic metadata. Protocols were explored for data sharing and spatial queries and opportunities for more active participation of volunteer regional data providers in the Project. The linkage of the PdNWC database with future groundwater and surface water model development was also assessed. Based on the experiences gained in the Project, the following recommendations for future Project work include: * Continued compilation of new data sources not yet included in the Project to enhance data sharing, * Installation of additional new monitoring stations and equipment and inclusion of these monitoring sites in future ArcIMS map products to fill data gaps and provide additional real-time data, * Strengthening the links with the Upper Rio Grande Water Operations Model (URGWOM) being advanced by the USACE. Special focus will be given to serving DEM and orthophoto data recently transferred from the USACE to NMWRRI and enhancing direct Web linkages with USACE and URGWOM project activities to improve model development capacity and enhance sharing of modeling results, * Development and implementation of a user needs survey focusing on new data sets of interest, enhanced access mechanisms, and other suggestions to improve the Project Website, * Development and making available online for download a Microsoft Access database of Project water resource data to provide search and query functions, * Development of an online help tutorial that would support online searches of the database, making the site easier for end users to navigate and utilize, and * Continuity in the exploration of future funding opportunities for Project activities, especially through linkages with other regional data compilation and modeling projects. Part I of this report presents major historical and technical components of the Phase II development of the Database and GIS prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon. Groundwater elements of interest, relevant to the development of the coordinated database and to the integral comprehension of the watershed’s mission and planning are also included as Part II of this report. This part, prepared by Z. Sheng and others, presents the sources of regional groundwater resources data compiled by different federal and state entities and outlines suggestions for regional groundwater data to be implemented with an ArcIMS interface so that this data can be shared and accessed by all Paso del Norte Watershed Council stakeholders. Part III, prepared by R. Srinivasan, presents the technical challenges posed to data sharing by multiple data collectors and sources and summarizes the different protocols available for an effective transfer and sharing of data through a GIS ArcIMS interface. Part IV, prepared by Z. Sheng and D. Zhang, explores the possibility to link the Database Project to a comprehensive development of regional hydrological models within the Rio Grande reach between Elephant Butte Dam, in New Mexico, and Fort Quitman, Texas. Finally, Part V, prepared by C. Brown, Z. Sheng, and M. Bourdon, presents closing comments as well as a summary of the recommendations made throughout the document. Dr. Hanks provided assistance in summarizing preliminary user survey results

Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I. The pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 9. Plant Section 800: product gas compression and drying  

SciTech Connect

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. This design effort has been completed. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 9 which reports the design of Plant Section 800 - Product Gas Compression and Drying. Plant Section 800 compresses, cools, and drys the SNG product to conditions and specifications required for pipeline use. A conventional triethylene glycol (TEG) gas drying unit is employed to reduce the moisture content of the SNG to less than 7 pounds per million standard cubic feet. The product SNG has a minimum pressure of 800 psig and a maximum temperature of 100/sup 0/F. This section also includes the product gas analysis, metering, and totalizing instruments. It is designed to remove 3144 pounds of water from 19 million SCFC of SNG product. Volume 9 contains the following design information: process operation; design basis; heat and material balance; stream compositions; utility, chemical and catalyst summary; major equipment and machinery list; major equipment and machinery requisitions; instrument list; instrument requisitions; line lists; process flow diagram; engineering flow diagrams; and section plot plan.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Geothermal resource assessment of Mt. Hood volcano, Oregon, Phase I study. Technical progress report No. 2, October 1, 1977--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several phases of the Mt. Hood geothermal resource assessment project are nearing completion. Most of the field work has been completed for the geologic study, gravity survey, and water sampling portions of the project. Thermal modelling, water analyses, rock analyses and age dating, and preparation of a complete Bouguer gravity map are in progress.

Hull, D.A.

1978-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals-Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP)--conversion of coal to methane--is being developed through NETL with a DOE Grant and has successfully completed its first phase of development. The results so far are encouraging and have led to commitment by DOE/NETL to begin a second phase--bench scale reactor vessel testing, expanded engineering analysis and economic perspective review. During the next decade new means of generating electricity, and other forms of energy, will be introduced. The members of the AHP Team envision a need for expanded sources of natural gas or substitutes for natural gas, to fuel power generating plants. The initial work the team has completed on a process to use hydrogen to convert coal to methane (pipeline ready gas) shows promising potential. The Team has intentionally slanted its efforts toward the needs of US electric utilities, particularly on fuels that can be used near urban centers where the greatest need for new electric generation is found. The process, as it has evolved, would produce methane from coal by adding hydrogen. The process appears to be efficient using western coals for conversion to a highly sought after fuel with significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Utilities have a natural interest in the preservation of their industry, which will require a dramatic reduction in stack emissions and an increase in sustainable technologies. Utilities tend to rank long-term stable supplies of fuel higher than most industries and are willing to trade some ratio of cost for stability. The need for sustainability, stability and environmentally compatible production are key drivers in the formation and progression of the AHP development. In Phase II, the team will add a focus on water conservation to determine how the basic gasification process can be best integrated with all the plant components to minimize water consumption during SNG production. The process allows for several CO{sub 2} reduction options including consumption of the CO{sub 2} in the original process as converted to methane. The process could under another option avoid emissions following the conversion to SNG through an adjunct algae conversion process. The algae would then be converted to fuels or other products. An additional application of the algae process at the end use natural gas fired plant could further reduce emissions. The APS team fully recognizes the competition facing the process from natural gas and imported liquid natural gas. While we expect those resources to set the price for methane in the near-term, the team's work to date indicates that the AHP process can be commercially competitive, with the added benefit of assuring long-term energy supplies from North American resources. Conversion of coal to a more readily transportable fuel that can be employed near load centers with an overall reduction of greenhouses gases is edging closer to reality.

Raymond Hobbs

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of the Messoyakha field demonstrates that gas hydrates are a readily producible source of natural

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Molecular uranates - laser synthesis of uranium oxide anions in the gas phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser ablation of solid UO{sub 3} or (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} yielded in the gas phase molecular uranium oxide anions with compositions ranging from [UO{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 2-4) to [U{sub 14}O{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 32-35), as detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The cluster series [U{sub x}O{sub 3x}]{sup -} for x {le} 6 and various [U{sub x}O{sub 3x-y}]{sup -}, in which y increased with increasing x, could be identified. A few anions with H atoms were also present, and their abundance increased when hydrated UO{sub 3} was used in place of anhydrous UO{sub 3}. Collision-induced dissociation experiments with some of the lower m/z cluster anions supported extended structures in which neutral UO{sub 3} constitutes the building block. Cationic uranium oxide clusters [U{sub x}O{sub n}]{sup +} (x = 2-9; n = 3-24) could also be produced and are briefly discussed. Common trends in the O/U ratios for both negative and positive clusters could be unveiled.

Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Gibson, John K

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

334

Gas-liquid two phase flow through a vertical 90 elbow bend  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop data are reported for two phase air-water flow through a vertical to horizontal 90 elbow bend set in 0.026 m i.d. pipe. The pressure drop in the vertical inlet tangent showed some significant differences to that found for straight vertical pipe. This was caused by the elbow bend partially choking the inflow resulting in a build-up of pressure and liquid in the vertical inlet riser and differences in the structure of the flow regimes when compared to the straight vertical pipe. The horizontal outlet tangent by contrast gave data in general agreement with literature even to exhibiting a drag reduction region at low liquid rates and gas velocities between 1 and 2 m s{sup -1}. The elbow bend pressure drop was best correlated in terms of l{sub e}/d determined using the actual pressure loss in the inlet vertical riser. The data showed a general increase with fluid rates that tapered off at high fluid rates and exhibited a negative pressure region at low rates. The latter was attributed to the flow being smoothly accommodated by the bend when it passed from slug flow in the riser to smooth stratified flow in the outlet tangent. A general correlation was presented for the elbow bend pressure drop in terms of total Reynolds numbers. A modified Lockhart-Martinelli model gave prediction of the data. (author)

Spedding, P.L.; Benard, E. [School of Aeronautical Engineering, Queen's University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Selective Removal of Ethylene, a Deposit Precursor, from a "Dirty" Synthesis Gas Stream via Gas-Phase Partial Oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The process is based on Fischer- Tropsch technology in which the shale gas is reformed with steam, while and industry; e.g. ExxonMobil announced a $600 million program [10-12]. However, the use of Fischer-Tropsch the gap between current fuels and biofuels by using Fischer-Tropsch (FT) technology with a hybrid source

Dean, Anthony M.

336

Kinetics of the Gas-Phase Reactions of OH Radicals, NO3 Radicals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

J. BAKER ET AL. all-glass, gas-tight syringes and transferred via a 1 cm3 stainless steel loop and gas sampling valve onto a 30 m DB-5 megabore column held ...

337

Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development  

SciTech Connect

The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 OCS have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis was updated for AEO2009: Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental ShelfThe OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, Federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the States of Alaska and Virginia have asked the Federal Government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Well-posedness for a multi-dimensional viscous gas-liquid two-phase flow model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cauchy problem of a multi-dimensional ($d\\geqslant 2$) compressible viscous gas-liquid two-phase flow model is concerned in this paper. We investigate the global existence and uniqueness of the strong solution for the initial data close to an equilibrium and the local in time existence and uniqueness of the solution with general initial data in the framework of Besov spaces. In both cases, the possible vacuum state is included in the equilibrium state for the gas component at spatial far field. A continuation criterion is also obtained for the local solution.

Hao, Chengchun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Assessment of potential domestic fossil-fuel resources for SNG (substitute natural gas) production. Final report, February 1983-August 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality and availability of naturally occurring resources and industrial by-products which could be gasified and thereby serve as feedstock for SNG plants were studied to identify those resources with the greatest potential for exploitation in this regard. KRSI accumulated information from a large number of literature sources relative to the resources identified by GRI for study. To the extent possible, KRSI then organized this information to highlight for each resource the grades available, typical chemical compositions, quantities and locations of reserves, recovery methods and rates of production and consumption. This information clearly shows that coal is the most practical source of long-term feedstock for SNG in the contiguous USA. Coal resources amount to 84% (by quads) of the energy resources which were studied. In comparison, peat, shale oil and tar sand contain about 11% of the total.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Koneru, P.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Emergence of Tricritical Point and Liquid-Gas Phase in the Massless 2+1 Dimensional Gross-Neveu Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete thermodynamical analysis of the 2+1 dimensional massless Gross-Neveu model is performed using the optimized perturbation theory. This is a non-perturbative method that allows us to go beyond the known large-N results already at lowest order. Our results, for a finite number of fermion species, N, show the existence of a tricritical point in the temperature and chemical potential phase diagram for discrete chiral phase transition allowing us to precisely to locate it. By studying the phase diagram in the pressure and inverse density plane, we also show the existence of a liquid-gas phase, which, so far, was unknown to exist in this model. Finally, we also derive N dependent analytical expressions for the fermionic mass, critical temperature and critical chemical potential.

Jean-Loic Kneur; Marcus Benghi Pinto; Rudnei O. Ramos; Ederson Staudt

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Franklin County Sanitary Landfill - Landfill Gas (LFG) to Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) - Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY FRANKLIN COUNTY SANITARY LANDFILL - LANDFILL GAS (LFG) TO LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS (LNG) - PROJECT January/February 2005 Prepared for: National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Table of Contents Page BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................1 SUMMARY OF EFFORT PERFORMED ......................................................................................2 Task 2B.1 - Literature Search and Contacts Made...................................................................2 Task 2B.2 - LFG Resource/Resource Collection System - Project Phase One.......................3 Conclusion.................................................................................................................................5

345

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, July 2006 (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Natural Gas

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil and gas reservoirs, or even to the large (and rapidly increasing) data-base of information on unconventional

Moridis, George J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effects of isospin and momentum dependent interactions on liquid-gas phase transition in hot asymmetric nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The liquid-gas phase transition in hot neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated within a self-consistent thermal model using an isospin and momentum dependent interaction (MDI) constrained by the isospin diffusion data in heavy-ion collisions, a momentum-independent interaction (MID), and an isoscalar momentum-dependent interaction (eMDYI). The boundary of the phase-coexistence region is shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy with a softer symmetry energy giving a higher critical pressure and a larger area of phase-coexistence region. Compared with the momentum-independent MID interaction, the isospin and momentum-dependent MDI interaction is found to increase the critical pressure and enlarge the area of phase-coexistence region. For the isoscalar momentum-dependent eMDYI interaction, a limiting pressure above which the liquid-gas phase transition cannot take place has been found and it is shown to be sensitive to the stiffness of the symmetry energy.

Jun Xu; Lie-Wen Chen; Bao-An Li; Hong-Ru Ma

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Project 5 -- Solution gas drive in heavy oil reservoirs: Gas and oil phase mobilities in cold production of heavy oils. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the authors present the results of their first experiment on a heavy crude of about 35,000 cp. A new visual coreholder was designed and built to accommodate the use of unconsolidated sand. From this work, several clear conclusions can be drawn: (1) oil viscosity does not decrease with the evolution of gas, (2) the critical gas saturation is in the range of 4--5%, and (3) the endpoint oil relative permeability is around 0.6. However, the most important parameter, gas phase mobility, is still unresolved. Gas flows intermittently, and therefore the length effect becomes important. Under the conditions that the authors run the experiment, recovery is minimal, about 7.5%. This recovery is still much higher than the recovery of the C{sub 1}/C{sub 10} model system which was 3%. After a duplicate test, they plan to conduct the experiment in the horizontal core. The horizontal core is expected to provide a higher recovery.

Firoozabadi, A.; Pooladi-Darvish, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Demonstration plant engineering and design. Phase I: the pipeline gas demonstration plant. Volume 7. Plant Section 500 - shift/methanation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the completion of the process design and the project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. A report of the design effort is being issued in 24 volumes. This is Volume 7 which reports the design of Plant Section 500 - Shift/Methanation. The shift/methanation process is used to convert the purified synthesis gas from the Rectisol unit (Plant Section 400) into the desired high-Btu SNG product. This is accomplished in a series of fixed-bed adiabatic reactors. Water is added to the feed gas to the reactors to effect the requisite reactions. A nickel catalyst is used in the shift/methanation process, and the only reaction products are methane and carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is removed from the SNG in Plant Sectin 600 - CO/sub 2/ Removal. After carbon dioxide removal from the SNG, the SNG is returned to Plant Section 500 for final methanation. The product from the final methanation reactor is an SNG stream having a gross heating value of approximately 960 Btu per standard cubic foot. The shift/methanation unit at design conditions produces 19 Million SCFD of SNG from 60 Million SCFD of purified synthesis gas.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Final Technical Report; Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definitioni (GRED) Program-Phases I, II, and III for the Animas Valley, NM Geothermal Resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a detailed summary of a methodical and comprehensive assessment of the potential of the Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal resource leasehold owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. Work described herein was completed under the auspices of the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC04-00AL66977, Geothermal Resource Evaluation and Definition (GRED) Program, and the work covers the time span from June 2001 through June 2004. Included in this new report are detailed results from the GRED Program, including: geophysical and geochemical surveys, reflection seismic surveys, aeromagnetic surveys, gravity and electrical resistivity surveys, soil thermal ion and soil carbon dioxide flux surveys, four temperature gradient holes, and one deep exploratory well.

Cunniff, Roy A.; Bowers, Roger L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

"1. Victor J Daniel Jr","Gas","Mississippi Power Co",1992 "2. Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1251  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "1. Victor J Daniel Jr","Gas","Mississippi Power Co",1992 "2. Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1251 "3. Baxter Wilson","Gas","Entergy Mississippi Inc",1176 "4. Jack Watson","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",998 "5. Magnolia Power Plant","Gas","Magnolia Energy LP",863 "6. Batesville Generation Facility","Gas","LSP Energy Ltd Partnership",858 "7. Reliant Energy Choctaw County","Gas","RRI Energy Wholesale Generation LLC",848 "8. TVA Southaven Combined Cycle","Gas","Tennessee Valley Authority",774

354

The effect of thermal treatment on the organization of copper and nickel nanoclusters synthesized from the gas phase  

SciTech Connect

The condensation of 85000 Cu or Ni atoms from the high-temperature gas phase has been simulated by molecular dynamics with the tight binding potential. The efect of the subsequent thermal treatment on the shape and structure of synthesized particles was studied by simulating their gradual heating in a range of 100-1200 K. Some tendencies are revealed that are characteristic of the influence of heat treatment on the nanoparticles synthesized from the gas phase. It is concluded that short-term heating leads to significant ordering of the internal structure in 70% of agglomerated nanoparticles with the predominant formation of spherical shapes. In order to explain this result, the main mechanisms of cluster formation from the gas phase have been analyzed and it is found that the agglomeration temperature plays the main role in the formation of clusters with unified shape and structure. This opens the fundamental possibility of obtaining Cu and Ni nanoclusters with preset size, shape, and structure and, hence, predictable physical properties.

Gafner, Yu. Ya., E-mail: ygafner@khsu.ru; Gafner, S. L.; Chepkasov, I. V. [Katanov Khakassian State University (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

Stone, Mark Lee

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: Stationary Combustion Guidance[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for stationary combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically

357

Laser system for natural gas detection. Phase I. Laboratory feasibility studies  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and field tests successfully proved the feasibility of laser remote sensing as a leak-survey tool in gas distribution systems. Using a pair of helium neon lasers to measure methane, the device exhibited at a 43-ft range a methane detection limit of 3 ppm in a gas plume with a 3.3-ft path length.

Grant, W.B.; Hinkley, E.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

SciTech Connect

Electricity markets in the United States have witnessed unprecedented instability over the last few years, with substantial volatility in wholesale market prices, significant financial distress among major industry organizations, and unprecedented legal, regulatory and legislative activity. These events demonstrate the considerable risks that exist in the electricity industry. Recent industry instability also illustrates the need for thoughtful resource planning to balance the cost, reliability, and risk of the electricity supplied to end-use customers. In balancing different supply options, utilities, regulators, and other resource planners must consider the unique risk profiles of each generating source. This paper evaluates the relative risk profiles of renewable and natural gas generating plants. The risks that exist in the electricity industry depend in part on the technologies that are used to generate electricity. Natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plant additions in the United States. To some, this emphasis on a single fuel source signals the potential for increased risk. Renewable generation sources, on the other hand, are frequently cited as a potent source of socially beneficial risk reduction relative to natural gas-fired generation. Renewable generation is not risk free, however, and also imposes certain costs on the electricity sector. This paper specifically compares the allocation and mitigation of risks in long-term natural gas-fired electricity contracts with the allocation and mitigation of these same risks in long-term renewable energy contracts. This comparison highlights some of the key differences between renewable and natural gas generation that decision makers should consider when making electricity investment and contracting decisions. Our assessment is relevant in both regulated and restructured markets. In still-regulated markets, the audience for this report clearly includes regulators and the utilities they regulate. In restructured markets, the role of regulatory oversight of resource planning is more limited. Nonetheless, even in restructured markets, it is increasingly recognized that regulators have a critical role to play in directing the resource planning of providers of last resort--electric suppliers that provide service to those customers who choose not to switch to a competitive supplier. Our review of electricity contracts may also have educational value for those unfamiliar with the typical contents of these agreements. Details of our findings are provided in the body of the paper, but this summary is written to provide a concise alternative to reading the full report.

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

359

PRUDENT DEVELOPMENT Realizing the Potential of North America’s Abundant Natural Gas and Oil Resources National Petroleum Council • 2011PRUDENT DEVELOPMENT Realizing the Potential of North America’s Abundant Natural Gas and Oil Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Petroleum Council is a federal advisory committee to the Secretary of Energy. The sole purpose of the National Petroleum Council is to advise, inform, and make recommendations to the Secretary of Energy on any matter requested by the Secretary relating to oil and natural gas or to the oil and gas industries.

A National; Petroleum Council; Steven Chu Secretary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Natural Resources in China Water resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Large reserves of coal, but natural gas and oil are becoming scarce. Import approximately the same, petroleum, natural gas, uranium, etc. Metallic mineral resources include iron, copper, tungsten, aluminum in the production of petrochemicals Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics

Pan, Feifei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Letter Report: Scoping Analysis of Gas Phase Transport from the Rulison Underground Nuclear Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report documents the results of a computer model to quantify the travel time of tritium (radioactive hydrogen) from an underground nuclear detonation in 1969 toward a proposed producing gas well located 1,500 feet (457 meters) away.

Clay Cooper

2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY  

SciTech Connect

DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

R.E. Rogers

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

THE PHOTOCHEMISTRY AND KINETICS OF GAS PHASE REACTIONS INVOLVING HO AND C1 RADICALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser Energy Measurements When using the Phase-R as the photolysis source, pulse energy measurements were obtained with a Gentec system.

Nelson, Herbert Hoffman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. The Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee advises DOE on its research in unconventional oil and natural gas resources, such as shale gas. Mission The Secretary of Energy, in response to provisions of Subtitle J, Sec. 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, must carry out a program of research, development, demonstration, and commercial application of technologies for ultra-deepwater and onshore unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production, as well as addressing the technology

365

MOLECULAR AND ATOMIC LINE SURVEYS OF GALAXIES. I. THE DENSE, STAR-FORMING GAS PHASE AS A BEACON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We predict the space density of molecular gas reservoirs in the universe and place a lower limit on the number counts of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecular, and [C II] atomic emission lines in blind redshift surveys in the submillimeter-centimeter spectral regime. Our model uses (1) recently available HCN spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs, L{sub IR} > 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), (2) a value for {epsilon}{sub *} = SFR/M{sub dense}(H{sub 2}) provided by new developments in the study of star formation feedback on the interstellar medium, and (3) a model for the evolution of the infrared luminosity density. Minimal 'emergent' CO SLEDs from the dense gas reservoirs expected in all star-forming systems in the universe are then computed from the HCN SLEDs since warm, HCN-bright gas will necessarily be CO-bright, with the dense star-forming gas phase setting an obvious minimum to the total molecular gas mass of any star-forming galaxy. We include [C II] as the most important of the far-infrared cooling lines. Optimal blind surveys with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) could potentially detect very distant (z {approx} 10-12) [C II] emitters in the {>=}ULIRG galaxy class at a rate of {approx}0.1-1 hr{sup -1} (although this prediction is strongly dependent on the star formation and enrichment history at this early epoch), whereas the (high-frequency) Square Kilometer Array will be capable of blindly detecting z > 3 low-J CO emitters at a rate of {approx}40-70 hr{sup -1}. The [C II] line holds special promise for detecting metal-poor systems with extensive reservoirs of CO-dark molecular gas where detection rates with ALMA can reach up to 2-7 hr{sup -1} in Bands 4-6.

Geach, James E. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Papadopoulos, Padelis P., E-mail: jimgeach@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: padelis@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Liquid-gas phase transition in hot nuclei: correlation between dynamical and thermodynamical signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics and thermodynamics of phase transition in hot nuclei are studied through experimental results on multifragmentation of heavy systems (A$geq$200) formed in central heavy ion collisions. Different signals indicative of a phase transition studied in the INDRA collaboration are presented and their consistency is stressed.

M. F. Rivet; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; P. Désesquelles; E. Galichet; B. Guiot; N. Le Neindre; M. Parlog; G. Tabacaru; J. P. Wieleczko; the INDRA Collaboration

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

367

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large $N_c$ in the Van der Waals approximation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition at large number of colors ($N_c$) within the framework of the Van Der Waals (VdW) model. We argue that the VdW equation is appropriate at describing inter-nucleon forces, and discuss how each parameter scales with $N_c$. We demonstrate that $N_c=3$ (our world) is not large with respect to the other dimensionless scale relevant to baryonic matter, the number of neighbors in a dense system $N_N$. Consequently, we show that the liquid-gas phase transition looks dramatically different at $N_c \\to \\infty$ with respect of our world: The critical point temperature becomes of the order of $\\lqcd$ rather than below it. The critical point density becomes of the order of the baryonic density, rather than an order of magnitude below it. These are precisely the characteristics usually associated with the "Quarkyonic phase". We therefore conjecture that quarkyonic matter is simply the large $N_c$ limit of the nuclear liquid, and the interplay between $N_c$ and $N_N$ is the reason why the nuclear liquid in our world is so different from quarkyonic matter. We conclude by suggesting ways our conjecture can be tested in future lattice measurements.

Giorgio Torrieri; Igor Mishustin

2010-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Infrastructure investments and resource adequacy in the restructured US natural gas market : is supply security at risk?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to analyze the development of US natural gas infrastructure over the last two decades and to discuss its perspectives. In particular, we focus on the relationship between the regulatory ...

Hirschhausen, Christian von

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Negative heat capacity in the critical region of nuclear fragmentation: an experimental evidence of the liquid-gas phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental indication of negative heat capacity in excited nuclear systems is inferred from the event by event study of energy fluctuations in $Au$ quasi-projectile sources formed in $Au+Au$ collisions at 35 A.MeV. The excited source configuration is reconstructed through a calorimetric analysis of its de-excitation products. Fragment partitions show signs of a critical behavior at about 5 A.MeV excitation energy. In the same energy range the heat capacity shows a negative branch providing a direct evidence of a first order liquid gas phase transition.

M. D'Agostino; F. Gulminelli; Ph. Chomaz; M. Bruno; F. Cannata; R. Bougault; N. Colonna; F. Gramegna; I. Iori; N. Le Neindre; G. V. Margagliotti; P. F. Mastinu; P. M. Milazzo; A. Moroni; G. Vannini

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

SeTES: A self-teaching expert system for the analysis, design, and prediction of gas production from unconventional gas resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SeTES is a self-teaching expert system that (a) can incorporate evolving databases involving any type and amount of relevant data (geological, geophysical, geomechanical, stimulation, petrophysical, reservoir, production, etc.) originating from unconventional ... Keywords: Bayesian networks, Expert system, Machine learning, Optimization, Simulation, Unconventional gas

George J. Moridis, Matthew T. Reagan, Heidi Anderson Kuzma, Thomas A. Blasingame, Y. Wayne Huang, Ralph Santos, Katie L. Boyle, Craig M. Freeman, Dilhan Ilk, Manuel Cossio, Srimoyee Bhattacharya, Michael Nikolaou

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Application of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Containment Barriers at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the status and use of containment technologies at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and provides a framework for a rigorous evaluation of containment technologies and applicability. It identifies the performance parameters that, through additional bench- or field-scale research, would promote increased understanding of the use and limitations of containment technologies at MGP sites.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

Proven reliability of the gas-turbine engine. BIPS Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The background, capabilities and experience of the Garrett Corp. in designing, developing, manufacturing and testing gas turbines and related systems are described, and the requirements for and components of the Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) for space vehicles are outlined. Data on the compressor and turbine, alternator, bearings, recuperator, radiator, heat source assembly, and control systems are presented. (LCL)

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Northwest Power Supply Adequacy/Reliability Study Phase 1 Report DATA AND ASSUMPTIONS USED FOR THE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Abbreviations AWEA American Wind Energy Association BRPU Biennial Resources Plan Update BWG Biogas Working Group policy proposal was required to answer a number of questions drafted by the #12;The Biogas Working Group by the Biogas Working Group (BWG)5 and would have provided additional funding to biogas generation via

375

The effect of a micro bubble dispersed gas phase on hydrogen isotope transport in liquid metals under nuclear irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present work intend to be a first step towards the understanding and quantification of the hydrogen isotope complex phenomena in liquid metals for nuclear technology. Liquid metals under nuclear irradiation in,e.g., breeding blankets of a nuclear fusion reactor would generate tritium which is to be extracted and recirculated as fuel. At the same time that tritium is bred, helium is also generated and may precipitate in the form of nano bubbles. Other liquid metal systems of a nuclear reactor involve hydrogen isotope absorption processes, e.g., tritium extraction system. Hence, hydrogen isotope absorption into gas bubbles modelling and control may have a capital importance regarding design, operation and safety. Here general models for hydrogen isotopes transport in liquid metal and absorption into gas phase, that do not depend on the mass transfer limiting regime, are exposed and implemented in OpenFOAMR CFD tool for 0D to 3D simulations. Results for a 0D case show the impact of a He dispersed phase of na...

Fradera, Jorge

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Spin states of para-water and ortho-water molecule in gas and liquid phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spin degrees of freedom of water molecule in gas and liquid state were investigated in order to provide a reasonable answer about the unsolved problem of a long-term behavior of water spin isomers. The approach used involves an assumption that molecules change their spin state from a pure state to a mixed one when they interact with some sorts of adsorbent surface. Some models and conceptions of the quantum information processing were used.

V. K. Konyukhov

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Phase completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the progress made to investigate the use of various catalysts and methods of incorporation for the gasification of forest residue materials. Catalyst effectiveness was determined by measuring the gasification rate directly in a differential reactor that utilized approximately one gram samples and by gasifying approximately 10 to 20 gram samples in a batch-solids fluid bed (BSFB) to determine the effect of catalysts on product gas composition. 2 refs., 24 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Gas fired advanced turbine system. Phase 1, System scoping and feasibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450{degrees}F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Variable pressure supercritical Rankine cycle for integrated natural gas and power production from the geopressured geothermal resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small-scale power plant cycle that utilizes both a variable pressure vaporizer (heater) and a floating pressure (and temperature) air-cooled condenser is described. Further, it defends this choice on the basis of classical thermodynamics and minimum capital cost by supporting these conclusions with actual comparative examples. The application suggested is for the geopressured geothermal resource. The arguments cited in this application apply to any process (petrochemical, nuclear, etc.) involving waste heat recovery.

Goldsberry, F.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Phased Construction of Natural Gas Combined-Cycle Plants with Coal Gasification and CO2 Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a brief review of technologies and key issues involved in a phased construction approach for a low-emission integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) plant where carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for use or sequestration can be added at a later date.

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

The nuclear liquid-gas phase transition within Fermionic Molecular Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time evolution of excited nuclei, which are in equilibrium with the surrounding vapour, is investigated. It is shown that the finite nuclear systems undergo a first oder phase transition. The caloric curve is presented for excited Oxygen, Magnesium, Aluminum and Calcium and the critical temperature is estimated for Oxygen.

J. Schnack; H. Feldmeier

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

The statistical multifragmentation model for liquid-gas phase transition with a compressible nuclear liquid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new formulation of the statistical multifragmentation model based on the analysis of the virial expansion for a system of the nuclear fragments of all sizes. The developed model not only enables us to account for short-range repulsion, but also to calculate the surface free energy which is induced by the interaction between the fragments. We propose a new parameterization for the liquid phase pressure which allows us to introduce a compressible nuclear liquid into the statistical multifragmentation model. The resulting model is exactly solvable and has no irregular behavior of the isotherms in the mixed phase region that is typical for mean-field models. The general conditions for the 1-st and 2-nd (or higher) order phase transitions are formulated. It is shown that all endpoints of the present model phase diagram are the tricritical points, if the Fisher exponent $\\tau$ is in the range $\\{3}{2} \\le \\tau \\le 2$. The treatment of nuclear liquid compressibility allows us to reduce the tricritical endpoint density of the statistical multifragmentation model to one third of the normal nuclear density. A specific attention is paid to of the fragment size distributions in the region of a negative surface tension at supercritical temperatures.

V. V. Sagun; A. I. Ivanytskyi; K. A. Bugaev; I. N. Mishustin

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

TWO-PHASE (GAS-LIQUID) SYSTEM: HEAT TRANSFER AND HYDRAULICS. An Annotated Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 2843 references in abstracted form is presented which covers the period l950 to 1962. The references are arranged under the following headings: books and review articles, boiling, bubble, condensation, evaporation, equations of state, interfacial characteristics, mass transfer across phase boundaries, measurement techniques, nuclear reactor heat removal, and twophase flow. An author index is included. (D.L.C.)

Kepple, R.R.; Tung, T.V.

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of United States oil and gas resources on CD-ROM:Assessment of United States Oil and Gas Resources conductedto assess conventional oil and gas resources. In order to

Moridis, G.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for approximately 65% of US petroleum consumption. Consumption for light-duty vehicles has stabilized in the last 10--15 years; however, consumption in the heavy-duty sector has continued to increase. For various reasons, the US must reduce its dependence on petroleum. One significant way is to substitute alternative fuels (natural gas, propane, alcohols, and others) in place of petroleum fuels in heavy-duty applications. Most alternative fuels have the additional benefit of reduced exhaust emissions relative to petroleum fuels, thus providing a cleaner environment. The best long-term technology for heavy-duty alternative fuel engines is the 4-stroke cycle, direct injected (DI) engine using a single fuel. This DI, single fuel approach maximizes the substitution of alternative fuel for diesel and retains the thermal efficiency and power density of the diesel engine. This report summarizes the results of the first year (Phase 1) of this contract. Phase 1 focused on developing a 4-stroke cycle, DI single fuel, alternative fuel technology that will duplicate or exceed diesel power density and thermal efficiency, while having exhaust emissions equal to or less than the diesel. Although the work is currently on a 3500 Series DING engine, the work is viewed as a basic technology development that can be applied to any engine. Phase 1 concentrated on DING engine component durability, exhaust emissions, and fuel handling system durability. Task 1 focused on identifying primary areas (e.g., ignition assist and gas injector systems) for future durability testing. In Task 2, eight mode-cycle-averaged NO{sub x} emissions were reduced from 11.8 gm/hp-hr (baseline conditions) to 2.5 gm/hp-hr (modified conditions) on a 3501 DING engine. In Task 3, a state-of-the-art fuel handling system was identified.

NONE

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Computer resources Computer resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer resources 1 Computer resources available to the LEAD group Cédric David 30 September 2009 #12;Ouline · UT computer resources and services · JSG computer resources and services · LEAD computers· LEAD computers 2 #12;UT Austin services UT EID and Password 3 https://utdirect.utexas.edu #12;UT Austin

Yang, Zong-Liang

388

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of synthesis gas consumption over a cobalt FischerTropsch catalyst was measured in a well-mixed, continuous-flow, slurry reactor at 220 to 240[degrees]C, 0.5 to 1.5 MPa, H[sub 2]/CO feed ratios of 1.5 to 3.5 and conversions of 7 to 68% of hydrogen and 11 to 73% of carbon monoxide. The inhibiting effect of carbon monoxide was determined quantitatively and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type equation of the following form was found to best represent the results: -R[sub H[sub 2+Co

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the second half year (April 1, 2001-September 30, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the first half year (October 1, 2000-March 31, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.

Dr. Ram S. Mohan; Dr. Ovadia Shoham

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

Nilpueng, Kitti [Department of Mechanical Engineering, South East Asia University, Bangkok 10160 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was operated simultaneously with a Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst in a slurry reactor for over 400 hours. The process conditions were held constant at a temperature of 240[degrees]C, a pressure of 0.79 MPa, and a 1.1 H[sub 2]/CO feed of 0.065 Nl/min-g.cat. The Fischer-Tropsch activity remained constant at the level predicted by the operation of the Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] catalyst alone. The water-gas-shift reaction was near equilibrium. The hydrocarbon product distribution of the combined catalyst system was stable and matched that of the CO/MgO/SiO[sub 2] operating alone under similar conditions. The combined catalyst system exhibited a high selectivity to n-alkanes. Neither catalysts's operation appeared to have a detrimental effect on that of the other, showing promise for future option.

Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst (CO/MgO/silica) was reduced and slurried in combination with reduced Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst. Combined catalyst system was run at fixed process conditions for more than 400 hours. The system showed stable selectivity. The Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst remained reasonably active in the presence of the cobalt catalyst. Hydrocarbon selectivity of the cobalt and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] catalyst system compared favorably to selectivity of iron-based catalysts. Methane selectivity was slightly higher for the cobalt-based system, but C[sub 5][sup +] selectivity was essentially the same. The hydrocarbon product distribution appeared to exhibit a double-a behavior. a[sub 1] was near 0.80 which is higher than that of iron catalysts, while a[sub 2] was calculated to be 0.86 which is somewhat lower than would be typical for an iron-based catalyst.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Isospin and symmetry energy effects on nuclear fragment production in liquid-gas type phase transition region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have demonstrated that the isospin of nuclei influences the fragment production during the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition. Calculations for Au197, Sn124, La124 and Kr78 at various excitation energies were carried out on the basis of the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM). We analyzed the behavior of the critical exponent tau with the excitation energy and its dependence on the critical temperature. Relative yields of fragments were classified with respect to the mass number of the fragments in the transition region. In this way, we have demonstrated that nuclear multifragmentation exhibits a 'bimodality' behavior. We have also shown that the symmetry energy has a small influence on fragment mass distribution, however, its effect is more pronounced in the isotope distributions of produced fragments.

N. Buyukcizmeci; R. Ogul; A. S. Botvina

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

BEC-BCS Crossover and the Liquid-Gas Phase Transition in Hot and Dense Nuclear Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nucleon-nucleon correlations in symmetric nuclear matter at finite temperature is studied beyond BCS theory. Starting from a Hartree-Fock description of nuclear matter with the Gogny effective interaction, we add correlations corresponding to the formation of preformed pairs and scattering states above the superfluid critical temperature within the in-medium T-matrix approach, which is analogous to the Nozieres-Schmitt-Rink theory. We calculate the critical temperature for a BEC superfluid of deuterons, of a BCS superfluid of nucleons, and in the crossover between these limits. The effect of the correlations on thermodynamic properties (equation of state, energy, entropy) and the liquid-gas phase transition is discussed. Our results show that nucleon-nucleon correlations beyond BCS play an important role for the properties of nuclear matter, especially in the low-density region.

Meng Jin; Michael Urban; Peter Schuck

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Resource utilization efficiency improvement of geothermal binary cycles, phase I. Semiannual progress report, June 15, 1975--December 15, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the research carried out prior to the start and during the first half of this project is presented. A description of the geothermal binary cycle and procedures for cycle thermodynamic analysis focusing on the question of resource utilization are discussed. General and specific criteria for preliminary selection of working fluids and operating conditions for binary cycles are considered in terms of equipment and working fluid costs and in terms of resource utilization efficiency. Steps are given for preliminary binary cycle design computations. Preliminary evaluations of alternative pure working fluid, ideal thermodynamic cycles are illustrated. The development of the working fluid mixture thermodynamic cycle, GEO 1, using the improved versions of previously developed thermodynamic properties routines was the first of several significant accomplishments during the first half of this project. Documentation of the thermodynamic properties program which can calculate densities, enthalpies, entropies, heat capacities, K-values for vapor and liquid mixtures (limited presently to hydrocarbons), flashes, dew and bubble points, isentropic and isenthalpic state changes, has been completed. Preliminary calculations using GEO 1 have indicated that mixture cycles yield greater net power output than either pure propane, isobutane, or isopentane cycles when equal heat exchanger log mean temperature differences are considered and also when optimized ideal cycles are compared. Steps to upgrade GEO 1 with equipment sizing and economics routines to produce GEO 2 and GEO 3 simulators were begun.

Starling, K.E.; Fish, L.W.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Yieh, D.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC). 2000. California Natural Gas Analysis and Issues.2002. Average Price of Natural Gas Sold to Electric Utilityfor investments in natural gas and renewables to complement

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Potential of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles as Grid Resources: the Case of a Gas and Petroleum Oriented Elecricity Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of a gas - and petroleum –oriented electricityon natural gas and petroleum-fired combustion turbineon natural gas and petroleum for electricity generation than

Greer, Mark R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Against Volatile Natural Gas Prices." Proceedings: ACEEEM W h . Appendix C. California Natural Gas Price ForecastScenarios California Natural Gas Price Forecast Scenarios

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

The influence of strange quarks on QCD phase diagram and chemical freeze-out: Results from the hadron resonance gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We confront the lattice results on QCD phase diagram for two and three flavors with the hadron resonance gas model. Taking into account the truncations in the Taylor-expansion of energy density $\\epsilon$ done on the lattice at finite chemical potential $\\mu$, we find that the hadron resonance gas model under the condition of constant $\\epsilon$ describes very well the lattice phase diagram. We also calculate the chemical freeze-out curve according to the entropy density $s$. The $s$-values are taken from lattice QCD simulations with two and three flavors. We find that this condition is excellent in reproducing the experimentally estimated parameters of the chemical freeze-out.

A. Tawfik

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX Background A significant portion of U.S. natural gas production comes from unconventional gas resources such as tight gas sands. Tight gas sands...

405

Research projects needed for expediting development of domestic oil and gas resources through arctic, offshore, and drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the research projects which were identified at an industry-government workshop on Arctic, Offshore, and Drilling Technology (AODT) held at Bartlesville Energy Technology Center, January 5-7, 1981. The purpose of the workshop was to identify those problem areas where government research could provide technology advancement that would assist industry in accelerating the discovery and development of US oil and gas resouces. The workshop results are to be used to guide an effective research program. The workshop identified and prioritized the tasks that need to be implemented. All of the projects listed in the Arctic and Offshore sections were selected as appropriate for a Department of Energy (DOE) research role. The drilling projects identified as appropriate only for industry research have been separated in the Drilling section of this report.

Canja, S.; Williams, C.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ANALYTICAL STUDY OF SOME ASPECTS OF VORTEX TUBES FOR GAS-PHASE FISSION HEATING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several problems connected with vortex cavity reactors were studied analytically. They include, the generation of high-strength vortices by utilization of bleed through a porous tube wall to stabilize the shear layer on the wall; the nuclear criticality problem; the suitability of various compounds of plutonium as gaseous fissionable materials; and the problem of retaining the fission fragments within the vortex tube. It is concluded that the shear layer on the vortex tube wall can be stabilized if a mass flow greater than or equal to the vortex through flow is bled through the porous wall, and that the tangential Mach numbers which can be obtained are then slightly more than one-half the inviscid values. Beryllium oxide or graphite-moderated reactors of reasonable size and weight can attain criticality if the product of the hydrogen pressure in the vortex core and the maximum value of the ratio of fissionable gas density to hydrogen density in the tube is greater than about 100 atm. The reactor weights are then in the order of 10,000 lb or less. Of the several compounds of plutonium considered as gaseous fuel carriers, plutonium trifluoride and plutonium tribromide appear to be the most promising. It is probable that they can be held in gaseous form in hydrogen, under the desired concentrations. The rate of loss of fission fragments from the vortex tube can be reduced to a small fraction of the rate of their generation by making the vortex tubes about twice the minimum size that is allowable for satisfactory retention of the fissionable material. (auth)

Kerrebrock, J.L.; Lafyatis, P.G.

1958-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Sector Specific Tools Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Industry, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Stationary Combustion[2] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources[3]

408

Liquid-gas and other unusual thermal phase transitions in some large-N magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much insight into the low temperature properties of quantum magnets has been gained by generalizing them to symmetry groups of order N, and then studying the large N limit. In this paper we consider an unusual aspect of their finite temperature behavior--their exhibiting a phase transition between a perfectly paramagetic state and a paramagnetic state with a finite correlation length at N = \\infty. We analyze this phenomenon in some detail in the large ``spin'' (classical) limit of the SU(N) ferromagnet which is also a lattice discretization of the CP^{N-1} model. We show that at N = \\infty the order of the transition is governed by lattice connectivity. At finite values of N, the transition goes away in one or less dimension but survives on many lattices in two dimensions and higher, for sufficiently large N. The latter conclusion contradicts a recent conjecture of Sokal and Starinets, yet is consistent with the known finite temperature behavior of the SU(2) case. We also report closely related first order paramagnet-ferromagnet transitions at large N and shed light on a violation of Elitzur's theorem at infinite N via the large q limit of the q-state Potts model, reformulated as an Ising gauge theory.

O. Tchernyshyov; S. L. Sondhi

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Bimodality: a possible experimental signature of the liquid-gas phase transition of nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have observed a bimodal behaviour of the distribution of the asymmetry between the charges of the two heaviest products resulting from the decay of the quasi-projectile released in binary Xe+Sn and Au+Au collisions from 60 to 100 MeV/u. Event sorting has been achieved through the transverse energy of light charged particles emitted on the quasi-target side, thus avoiding artificial correlations between the bimodality signal and the sorting variable. Bimodality is observed for intermediate impact parameters for which the quasi-projectile is identified. A simulation shows that the deexcitation step rather than the geometry of the collision appears responsible for the bimodal behaviour. The influence of mid-rapidity emission has been verified. The two bumps of the bimodal distribution correspond to different excitation energies and similar temperatures. It is also shown that it is possible to correlate the bimodality signal with a change in the distribution of the heaviest fragment charge and a peak in potential energy fluctuations. All together, this set of data is coherent with what would be expected in a finite system if the corresponding system in the thermodynamic limit exhibits a first order phase transition.

M. Pichon; B. Tamain; R. Bougault; F. Gulminelli; O. Lopez

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

410

Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

2013-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

412

Resource utilization efficiency improvement of geothermal binary cycles, Phase II. Final report, June 15, 1976--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phase II of this research program, the following elements of research have been performed: (1) improvement in the conventional geothermal binary cycle simulation computer program, (2) development of a direct contact brine heat exchanger algorithm for the cycle simulation program, (3) development of a preheater algorithm for the cycle simulation program, (4) modification of the basic simulation program to incorporate the staged flash binary cycle, (5) development of a parameter optimization algorithm to aid cycle evaluation studies, (6) sensitivity analysis of cost factors, (7) comparison of pure hydrocarbon and binary mixture cycles.

Starling, K.E.; West, H.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Hsu, C.C.; Malik, Z.I.; Fish, L.W.; Lee, C.O.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Potential for Microbial Stimulation in Deep Vadose Zone Sediments by Gas-Phase Nutrients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Viable microbial populations are low, typically 10{sup 4} cells per gram, in deep vadose zones in arid climates. There is evidence that microbial distribution in these environments is patchy. In addition, infiltration or injection of nutrient-laden water has the potential to spread and drive contaminants downward to the saturated zone. For these reasons, there are uncertainties regarding the feasibility of bioremediation of recalcitrant contaminants in deep vadose zones. The objectives of this study were to investigate the occurrence of denitrifying activity and gaseous carbon-utilizing activity in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments contaminated with, and/or affected by past exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (CT). These metabolisms are known to degrade CT and/or its breakdown product chloroform under anoxic conditions. A second objective was to determine if CT would be degraded in these sediments under unsaturated, bulk-phase aerobic incubation conditions. Both denitrifier population (determined by MPN) and microbial heterotrophic activity (measured by mineralization of 14-C labeled glucose and acetate) were relatively low and the sediments with greater in situ moisture (10-21% versus 2-7%) tended to have higher activities. When sediments were amended with gaseous nutrients (nitrous oxide and triethyl/tributyl phosphate) and gaseous C sources (a mixture of methane, ethane, propylene, propane, and butane) and incubated for 6 months, approximately 50% of the samples showed removal of one or more gaseous C sources, with butane most commonly used (44% of samples), followed by propylene (42%), propane (31%), ethane (22%), and methane (4%). Gaseous N and gaseous P did not stimulate removal of gaseous C substrates compared to no addition of N and P. CT and gaseous C sources were spiked into the sediments that removed gaseous C sources to determine if hydrocarbon-degraders have the potential to degrade CT under unsaturated conditions. In summary, gaseous C sources--particularly butane and propylene--have promise for increasing the numbers and activity of indigenous microbial populations in arid-climate deep vadose zone sediments.

Li, S.W.; Plymale, A. E.; Brockman, F.J.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport or Transport or Mobil Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Transport or Mobil Sources Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Transportation, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for mobile combustion is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator designed to calculate GHG emissions specifically from mobile combustion sources, including vehicles under the direct control

415

First Principle Study of the Anti--- and Syn---Conformers of Thiophene---2---Carbonyl Fluoride and Selenophene---2---Carbonyl Fluoride in the Gas and Solution Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anti- and syn-conformers of thiophene-2-carbonyl fluoride (A) and selenophene-2-carbonyl fluoride (B) have been studied in the gas phase. The transition states have also been obtained for the interconversion of the anti- and syn-conformers. ... Keywords: DFT/B3LYP, MP2, Selenophene-2-carbonyl fluoride, Thiophene-2-carbonyl fluoride, energy difference, rotational barrier, solvent effect

Hassan H. Abdallah; Ponnadurai Ramasami

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NETL: Oil and Natural Gas: Natural Gas Reources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Resources Research Project Summaries Reference Shelf O&G Document Archive The United States is endowed with an abundance of natural gas resources. Besides its use for...

417

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Tools & Resources: Resource Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that reduce air emissions. Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) A tool that provides data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric...

419

Publications & Resources, Human Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or approved by Brookhaven National Laboratory or the Human Resources Division. Manuals Scientific Staff Manual Supervisors Personnel Manual SBMS Subject Areas Compensation...

420

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Oil and Gas Supply...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Resources Table 46. Natural Gas Technically Recoverable Resources Alaskan Natural Gas The outlook for natural gas production from the North Slope of Alaska is affected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resource gas phase" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Combined Gas-Phase Photoelectron Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Zeise's Anion and Its Bromine and Iodine Analogues  

SciTech Connect

We report the first photoelectron spectroscopic study of Zeise’s anion, [PtCl3(C2H4)], and its Br- and I- analogs in the gas phase. Well-resolved and rich spectral features are obtained for each species, yielding detailed electronic structure information, which is assigned with the aid of highlevel electronic structure calculations at the Coupled Cluster (CC) level of theory. The electron binding energies of [PtX3(C2H4)] are found to decrease with the size of halogen (4.57, 4.51, and 4.18 eV for X = Cl, Br, and I, respectively). The calculations indicate a synergistic ?2 interaction [with interaction strengths of 1.54 (Cl), 1.37 (Br) and 1.10 eV (I)] between the perpendicular C2H4 fragment and the nearly horizontal planar PtX3- anions, resulting in activating the ethylene molecule. The detailed insights of the chemical bonding and underlying electronic structure can be used to benchmark interactions between olefins and transition metal complexes, which are crucial to a wide range of catalytic processes.

Hou, Gaolei; Wen, Hui; Lopata, Kenneth A.; Zheng, Weijun; Kowalski, Karol; Govind, Niranjan; Wang, Xue B.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

Implementation and evaluation of online gas-phase chemistry within a regional climate model (RegCM-CHEM4)  

SciTech Connect

The RegCM-CHEM4 is a new online climate-chemistry model based on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) regional climate model (RegCM4). Tropospheric gas-phase chemistry is integrated into the climate model using the condensed version of the Carbon Bond Mechanism (CBM-Z; Zaveri and Peters, 1999) with a fast solver based on radical balances. We evaluate the model over Continental Europe for two different time scales: (1) an event-based analysis of the ozone episode associated with the heat wave of August 2003 and (2) a climatological analysis of a sixyear simulation (2000-2005). For the episode analysis, model simulations show good agreement with European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP) observations of hourly ozone over different regions in Europe and capture ozone concentrations during and after the August 2003 heat wave event. For long-term climate simulations, the model captures the seasonal cycle of ozone concentrations with some over prediction of ozone concentrations in non-heat wave summers. Overall, the ozone and ozone precursor evaluation shows the feasibility of using RegCM-CHEM4 for decadal-length simulations of chemistry-climate interactions.

Shalaby, A. K.; Zakey, A. S.; Tawfik, A. B.; Solmon, F.; Giorgi, Filippo; Stordal, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Steiner, A. L.

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reproducible Preparation of Au/TS-1 with High Reaction Rate for Gas Phase Epoxidation of Propylene  

SciTech Connect

A refined and reliable synthesis procedure for Au/TS-1(Si/Ti molar ratio {approx}100) with high reaction rate for the direct gas phase epoxidation of propylene has been developed by studying the effects of pH of the gold slurry solution, mixing time, and preparation temperature for deposition precipitation (DP) of Au on TS-1 supports. Au/TS-1 catalysts prepared at optimal DP conditions (pH {approx} 7.3, mixing for 9.5 h, room temperature) showed an average PO rate {approx} 160 g{sub PO} h{sup -1} kg{sub Cat}{sup -1} at 200 C at 1 atm. A reproducibility better than {+-}10% was demonstrated by nine independent samples prepared at the same conditions. These are the highest rates yet reported at 200 C. No visible gold particles were observed by the HRTEM analysis in the fresh Au/TS-1 with gold loading up to {approx}0.1 wt%, indicating that the gold species were smaller than 1 nm. Additionally, the rate per gram of Au and the catalyst stability increased as the Au loading decreased, giving a maximum value of 500 g{sub PO} h{sup -1} g{sub Au}{sup -1}, and Si/Ti molar ratios of {approx}100 gave the highest rates.

Lee W. S.; Stach E.; Akatay, M.C.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, N.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gas Phase Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the long-wave IR using Quartz Tuning Forks and Amplitude Modulated Quantum Cascade Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A paper to accompany a 20 minute talk about the progress of a DARPA funded project called LPAS. ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the performance of a novel long-wave infrared photoacoustic laser absorbance spectrometer for gas-phase species using an amplitude modulated (AM) quantum cascade (QC) laser and a quartz tuning fork microphone. Photoacoustic signal was generated by focusing the output of a Fabry-Perot QC laser operating at 8.41 micron between the legs of a quartz tuning fork which served as a transducer for the transient acoustic pressure wave. The QC laser was modulated at the resonant frequency of the tuning fork (32.8 kHz). This sensor was calibrated using the infrared absorber Freon-134a by performing a simultanious absorption measurement using a 35 cm absorption cell. The NEAS of this instrument was determined to be 2 x 10^-8 W cm^-1 /Hz^1/2 and the fundamental sensitivity of this technique is limited by the noise floor of the tuning fork itself.

Wojcik, Michael D.; Phillips, Mark C.; Cannon, Bret D.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase reactivity of doubly-charged lanthanide cations, Ln2+ (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu), with alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) was studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The reaction products consisted of different combinations of doubly-charged organometallic ions?adducts or species formed via metal-ion-induced hydrogen, dihydrogen, alkyl, or alkane eliminations from the hydrocarbons?and singly-charged ions that resulted from electron, hydride, or methide transfers from the hydrocarbons to the metal ions. The only lanthanide cations capable of activating the hydrocarbons to form doubly-charged organometallic ions were La2+, Ce2+, Gd2+, and Tb2+, which have ground-state or low-lying d1 electronic configurations. Lu2+, with an accessible d1 electronic configuration but a rather high electron affinity, reacted only through transfer channels. The remaining Ln2+ reacted via transfer channels or adduct formation. The different accessibilities of d1 electronic configurations and the range of electron affinities of the Ln2+ cations allowed for a detailed analysis of the trends for metal(2+) reactivity and the conditions for occurrence of bond activation, adduct formation, and electron, hydride, and methide transfers.

Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Haire, Richard G.

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Shale Gas and the Outlook for U.S. Natural Gas Markets and Global Gas Resources ... Associated with oil Coalbed methane Net imports Non-associated ...

427

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term contract for natural gas supply, by agreeing with thethe risk of a "normal" natural gas supply or transportationinterruption of natural gas supply to a power plant (e.g. an

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amount of new natural gas power plants, which willconstruction of new natural-gas power plants, and perhapsrisk that a new natural-gas power plant will not be built on

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new natural gas power plants, which will presumablyof new natural-gas power plants, and perhaps notrisk that a new natural-gas power plant will not be built on

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Unconventional Energy Resources: 2007-2008 Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes five 2007-2008 resource commodity committee reports prepared by the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Current United States and global research and development activities related to gas hydrates, gas shales, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources are included in this review. These commodity reports were written to advise EMD leadership and membership of the current status of research and development of unconventional energy resources. Unconventional energy resources are defined as those resources other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks. Gas hydrate resources are potentially enormous; however, production technologies are still under development. Gas shale, geothermal, oil sand, and uranium resources are now increasing targets of exploration and development, and are rapidly becoming important energy resources that will continue to be developed in the future.

NONE

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Natural Gas and Other Petroleum Resources Program The...

432

Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal prices are also less variable than natural gas prices,coal-fired power plants are more often fixed-price than contracts for natural gas-

Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Resource-full Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author discusses the development of natural gas in Australia. In 1981, a two-phased project was begun to develop offshore natural gas for both domestic consumption and for export as liquefied natural gas (LNG). The author explains the progress of this project.

Kennedy, L.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.  

SciTech Connect

The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

1999-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Protecting against physical resource monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of resource monitoring. We consider the scenario where an adversary is physically monitoring on the resource access, such as the electricity line or gas pipeline, of a user in order to learn private information about ... Keywords: differential privacy, resource monitoring, smart grids, smart metering

Gergely Acs; Claude Castelluccia; William Lecat

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)  

SciTech Connect

The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Sedimentation of a two-dimensional colloidal mixture exhibiting liquid-liquid and gas-liquid phase separation: a dynamical density functional theory study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present dynamical density functional theory results for the time evolution of the density distribution of a sedimenting model two-dimensional binary mixture of colloids. The interplay between the bulk phase behaviour of the mixture, its interfacial properties at the confining walls, and the gravitational field gives rise to a rich variety of equilibrium and non-equilibrium morphologies. In the fluid st