Sample records for resolution laser imaging

  1. Laser Doppler field sensor for high resolution flow velocity imaging without camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voigt, Andreas; Bayer, Christian; Shirai, Katsuaki; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

    2008-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a laser sensor for highly spatially resolved flow imaging without using a camera. The sensor is an extension of the principle of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Instead of a parallel fringe system, diverging and converging fringes are employed. This method facilitates the determination of the tracer particle position within the measurement volume and leads to an increased spatial and velocity resolution compared to conventional LDA. Using a total number of four fringe systems the flow is resolved in two spatial dimensions and the orthogonal velocity component. Since no camera is used, the resolution of the sensor is not influenced by pixel size effects. A spatial resolution of 4 {mu}m in the x direction and 16 {mu}m in the y direction and a relative velocity resolution of 1x10{sup -3} have been demonstrated up to now. As a first application we present the velocity measurement of an injection nozzle flow. The sensor is also highly suitable for applications in nano- and microfluidics, e.g., for the measurement of flow rates.

  2. Analysis of high resolution scatter images from laser damage experiments performed on KDP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runkel, M.; Woods, B.; Yan, M. [and others

    1996-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in producing high damage threshold KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and (D{sub x}H{sub 1-x}){sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KD*P, DKDP) for optical switching and frequency conversion applications is being driven by the system requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). Historically, the path to achieving higher damage thresholds has been to improve the purity of crystal growth solutions. Application of advanced filtration technology has increased the damage threshold, but gives little insight into the actual mechanisms of laser damage. We have developed a laser scatter diagnostic to better study bulk defects and laser damage mechanisms in KDP and KD*P crystals. This diagnostic consists of a cavity doubled, kilohertz class, Nd:YLF laser (527 nm) and high dynamic range CCD camera which allows imaging of bulk scatter signals. With it, we have performed damage tests at 355 nm on four different {open_quotes}vintages{close_quotes} of KDP crystals, concentrating on crystals produced via fast growth methods. We compare the diagnostic`s resolution to LLNL`s standard damage detection method of 100X darkfield microscopy and discuss its impact on damage threshold determination. We have observed the disappearance of scatter sites upon exposure to subthreshold irradiation. In contrast, we have seen scatterers appear where none previously existed. This includes isolated, large (high signal) sites as well as multiple small scatter sites which appear at fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2} (fine tracking). However, we have not observed a strong correlation of preexisting scatter sites and laser damage sites. We speculate on the connection between the laser-induced disappearance of scatter sites and the observed increase in damage threshold with laser conditioning.

  3. Speckle-free laser imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

  4. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Abstract: The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can...

  5. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  6. Blind assessment of localisation microscope image resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees, Eric J; Erdelyi, Miklos; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Knight, Alex; Metcalf, Daniel; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    localisation precisions and densities. Methods By analysing localisation microscopy as a statistical method of Density Estimation, we present a method that produces a blind estimate of the resolution in a super-resolved image. This estimate is derived directly...

  7. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core-Shell Photoswitching Nanoparticles and their Self-Assemblies . Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to...

  9. An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MSMS experiments enabled...

  10. Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

  11. Isotope specific resolution recovery image reconstruction in high resolution PET imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotasidis, Fotis A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom)] [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland and Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, M20 3LJ, Manchester (United Kingdom); Angelis, Georgios I. [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia)] [Faculty of Health Sciences, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Sydney (Australia); Anton-Rodriguez, Jose; Matthews, Julian C. [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom)] [Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Reader, Andrew J. [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)] [Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal QC H3A 2B4, Canada and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Habib [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland) [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Centre, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30 001, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Measuring and incorporating a scanner-specific point spread function (PSF) within image reconstruction has been shown to improve spatial resolution in PET. However, due to the short half-life of clinically used isotopes, other long-lived isotopes not used in clinical practice are used to perform the PSF measurements. As such, non-optimal PSF models that do not correspond to those needed for the data to be reconstructed are used within resolution modeling (RM) image reconstruction, usually underestimating the true PSF owing to the difference in positron range. In high resolution brain and preclinical imaging, this effect is of particular importance since the PSFs become more positron range limited and isotope-specific PSFs can help maximize the performance benefit from using resolution recovery image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: In this work, the authors used a printing technique to simultaneously measure multiple point sources on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT), and the authors demonstrated the feasibility of deriving isotope-dependent system matrices from fluorine-18 and carbon-11 point sources. Furthermore, the authors evaluated the impact of incorporating them within RM image reconstruction, using carbon-11 phantom and clinical datasets on the HRRT. Results: The results obtained using these two isotopes illustrate that even small differences in positron range can result in different PSF maps, leading to further improvements in contrast recovery when used in image reconstruction. The difference is more pronounced in the centre of the field-of-view where the full width at half maximum (FWHM) from the positron range has a larger contribution to the overall FWHM compared to the edge where the parallax error dominates the overall FWHM. Conclusions: Based on the proposed methodology, measured isotope-specific and spatially variant PSFs can be reliably derived and used for improved spatial resolution and variance performance in resolution recovery image reconstruction. The benefits are expected to be more substantial for more energetic positron emitting isotopes such as Oxygen-15 and Rubidium-82.

  12. Image Forgery Detection Using Multi-Resolution Weber Local Descriptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebis, George

    Image Forgery Detection Using Multi-Resolution Weber Local Descriptors Muhammad Hussain1 , Ghulam * ghulam@ksu.edu.sa Abstract-- In this paper, a multi-resolution Weber law descriptors (WLD) based image of the images. Keywords: image forgery detection, Weber local descriptor, splicing forgery, copy-move forgery

  13. High-resolution imaging and target designation through clouds or smoke

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Downy, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of combining gated intensifiers and advances in solid-state, short-pulse laser technology, compact systems capable of producing high resolution (i.e., approximately less than 20 centimeters) optical images through a scattering medium such as dense clouds, fog, smoke, etc. may be achieved from air or ground based platforms. Laser target designation through a scattering medium is also enabled by utilizing a short pulse illumination laser and a relatively minor change to the detectors on laser guided munitions.

  14. Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

  15. Optics -Laser Doppler Imaging. As the name suggests,LDI,Laser Doppler Imaging exploits the Doppler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Optics - Laser Doppler Imaging. As the name suggests,LDI,Laser Doppler Imaging exploits the Doppler effect to generate images,in this case of red blood cells moving within the microcirculatory system the Doppler shifted light we obtain information on all the red cells moving in the illuminated tissue,hence we

  16. High-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar for industrial inspection and measurement applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Williams, R.J.; Matthews, J.D.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development and testing of a high-frequency scannerless imaging laser radar system to evaluate its viability as an industrial inspection and measurement sensor. We modified an existing 5.5-Mhz scannerless laser radar to operate at 150 Mhz, and measured its performance including its spatial resolution and range resolution. We also developed new algorithms that allow rapid data reduction with improved range resolution. The resulting 150-Mhz ladar system demonstrated a range resolution of better than 3 mm, which represents nearly a factor-of-100 improvement in range resolution over the existing scannerless laser radar system. Based on this work, we believe that a scannerless range imager with 1- to 2-mm range resolution is feasible. This work was performed as part of a small-business CRADA between Sandia National Laboratories and Perceptron, Inc.

  17. atomic resolution imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annular dark-field STEM Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. 6 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  18. atomic resolution images: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annular dark-field STEM Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. 6 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  19. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  20. Ultrafast imaging interferometry at femtosecond-laser-excited surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temnov, Vasily V.; Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Zhou Ping; Linde, Dietrich von der [Experimentelle Physik IIb, Universitaet Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple and robust setup for femtosecond time-resolved imaging interferometry of surfaces is described. The apparatus is capable of measuring both very small phase shifts ({approx}3x10{sup -2} rad) and amplitude changes ({approx}1%) with micrometer spatial resolution ({approx}1 {mu}m). Interferograms are processed using a 2D-Fourier transform algorithm. We discuss the image formation and the physical interpretation of the measured interferograms. The technique is applied to measure transient changes of a GaAs surface irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses with fluences near the ablation threshold.

  1. High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

    1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

  2. A low-cost, high-resolution, video-rate imaging optical radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackos, J.T.; Nellums, R.O.; Lebien, S.M.; Diegert, C.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grantham, J.W.; Monson, T. [Air Force Research Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a unique type of portable low-cost range imaging optical radar (laser radar or LADAR). This innovative sensor is comprised of an active floodlight scene illuminator and an image intensified CCD camera receiver. It is a solid-state device (no moving parts) that offers significant size, performance, reliability, and simplicity advantages over other types of 3-D imaging sensors. This unique flash LADAR is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is well suited for many government and commercial uses. This paper presents an update of Sandia`s development of the Scannerless Range Imager technology and applications, and discusses the progress that has been made in evolving the sensor into a compact, low, cost, high-resolution, video rate Laser Dynamic Range Imager.

  3. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  4. High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens M. S, representing the highest resolution subsurface thermography to date. Keywords: thermal imaging, high

  5. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L. [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Pravica, L. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institute of Electron Physics, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  6. HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

    2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    John Cowley and his group at Arizona State University pioneered the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for high-resolution imaging. Images were achieved three decades ago showing the crystal unit cell content at better than 4 Angstrom resolution. This achievement enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the unit cell. Lighter atoms appear as resolution is improved to sub-Angstrom levels. Currently, advanced microscopes can image the columns of the light atoms (carbon, oxygen, nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures, and even the lithium atoms present in some battery materials. Sub-Angstrom imaging, initially achieved by focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave, will become common place for next-generation electron microscopes with CS-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams. Resolution can be quantified in terms of peak separation and inter-peak minimum, but the limits imposed on the attainable resolution by the properties of the micro-scope specimen need to be considered. At extreme resolution the ''size'' of atoms can mean that they will not be resolved even when spaced farther apart than the resolution of the microscope.

  7. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  8. Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution, and accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, David

    Diffuse optical imaging of brain activation: approaches to optimizing image sensitivity, resolution States Available online 11 September 2004 Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse optical imaging currently being made and issues to consider for improving optical image quality. These include the optimal

  9. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  10. Towards wide-field high-resolution retinal imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive optical correction is an efficient technique to obtain high-resolution images of the retinal surface. A main limitation of adaptive optical correction, however, is the small size of the corrected image. For medical purposes it is important to increase the size of the corrected images. This can be done through composite imaging, but a major difficulty is then the introduction of reconstruction artifacts. Another approach is multi-conjugate adaptive optics. MCAO comes in two flavors. The star- oriented approach has been demonstrated on the eye and allows to increase the diameter of the corrected image by a factor of approximately 2-3. Difficulties in the tomographic reconstruction precludes the correction of larger fields. Here we have investigate the possibility to apply a layer-oriented MCAO approach to retinal imaging.

  11. Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

  12. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  13. High resolution laser spectroscopy of cesium and rubidium molecules with optically induced coherence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hui

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to the study of the quantum coherent effects in diatomic molecular systems by using high resolution laser spectroscopy. In particular, we have studied the rubidium diatomic molecular gaseous medium's absorption spectrum...

  14. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

  15. Laser radiography forming bremsstrahlung radiation to image an object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D.; Sefcik, Joseph A.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of imaging an object by generating laser pulses with a short-pulse, high-power laser. When the laser pulse strikes a conductive target, bremsstrahlung radiation is generated such that hard ballistic high-energy electrons are formed to penetrate an object. A detector on the opposite side of the object detects these electrons. Since laser pulses are used to form the hard x-rays, multiple pulses can be used to image an object in motion, such as an exploding or compressing object, by using time gated detectors. Furthermore, the laser pulses can be directed down different tubes using mirrors and filters so that each laser pulse will image a different portion of the object.

  16. Simultaneous High-Resolution 2-Dimensional Spatial and 1-Dimensional Picosecond Streaked X-ray Pinhole Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broad-band filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 {micro}m diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of <13 {micro}m.

  17. High resolution coherent diffractive imaging with a table-top extreme ultraviolet source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vu Le, Hoang, E-mail: vuhoangle@swin.edu.au; Ba Dinh, Khuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap [Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a resolution of 45?nm with a sample size down to 3??m × 3??m is achieved in a short exposure time of 2?s, from the diffraction pattern generated by a table-top high harmonic source at around 30?nm. By using a narrow-bandwidth focusing mirror, the diffraction pattern's quality is improved and the required exposure time is significantly reduced. In order to obtain a high quality of the reconstructed image, the ratio of the beam size to the sample size and the curvature of the focused beam need to be considered in the reconstruction process. This new experimental scheme is very promising for imaging sub-10?nm scale objects with a table-top source based on a small inexpensive femtosecond laser system.

  18. A Steerable Laser System for Atmospheric Monitoring at the High Resolution Flys Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and radiometer . The energy 2 released into the sky is determined by multiplying this measurementOG 4.5.10 A Steerable Laser System for Atmospheric Monitoring at the High Resolution Flys Eye J. R. Mumford , R. C. Gray , L. R. Wiencke for the 1 1 1 High Resolution Flys Eye Collaboration 1. Physics

  19. Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Jian-min (University of Illinois) [University of Illinois

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

  20. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Stanley W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution.

  1. Imaging System With Confocally Self-Detecting Laser.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Robert H. (Lincoln, MA); Rogomentich, Fran J. (Concord, MA)

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a confocal laser imaging system and method. The system includes a laser source, a beam splitter, focusing elements, and a photosensitive detector. The laser source projects a laser beam along a first optical path at an object to be imaged, and modulates the intensity of the projected laser beam in response to light reflected from the object. A beam splitter directs a portion of the projected laser beam onto a photodetector. The photodetector monitors the intensity of laser output. The laser source can be an electrically scannable array, with a lens or objective assembly for focusing light generated by the array onto the object of interest. As the array is energized, its laser beams scan over the object, and light reflected at each point is returned by the lens to the element of the array from which it originated. A single photosensitive detector element can generate an intensity-representative signal for all lasers of the array. The intensity-representative signal from the photosensitive detector can be processed to provide an image of the object of interest.

  2. Imaging of semiconductors using a flying laser spot scanning system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas William

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in silicon p-n junctions was a direct result of this research. Verification of the experimental findings include analysis using other characterization techniques such as X-ray topo- graphy, electrical testing and preferential chemical etching... Image (I. R. Radiation) . . 22 Flying Spot Scanner Photo Image (Visible Radiation) . 23 15 Photo Image Showing Crystal Defects 24 16 Sirtl Etch Photomicrograph of Lattice Crystal Defects 25 17 Photo Image Showing Laser Induced Lifetime Changes 26...

  3. Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

  4. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  5. Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position.

  6. 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt distribution in 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. High resolution imaging of the melt;© 2013 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Abstract We determine the 3-D melt geometry

  7. Higher Resolution VLBI Imaging with Fast Frequency Switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Middelberg; A. L. Roy; R. C. Walker; H. Falcke; T. P. Krichbaum

    2002-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimetre-VLBI is an important tool in AGN astrophysics, but it is limited by short atmospheric coherence times and poor receiver and antenna performance. We demonstrate a new kind of phase referencing for the VLBA, enabling us to increase the sensitivity in mm-VLBI by an order of magnitude. If a source is observed in short cycles between the target frequency, nu_t, and a reference frequency, nu_ref, the nu_t data can be calibrated using scaled-up phase solutions from self-calibration at nu_ref. We have demonstrated the phase transfer on 3C 279, where we were able to make an 86 GHz image with 90 % coherence compared to self-calibration at nu_t. We have detected M81, our science target in this project, at 86 GHz using the same technique. We describe scheduling strategy and data reduction. The main impacts of fast frequency switching are the ability to image some of the nearest, but relatively weak AGN cores with unprecedented high angular resolution and to phase-reference the nu_t data to the nu_ref core position, enabling the detection of possible core shifts in jets due to optical depth effects. This ability will yield important constraints on jet properties and might be able to discriminate between the two competing emission models of Blandford-Konigl jets and spherical advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) in low-luminosity AGNs.

  8. High resolution neutron imaging of water in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal water management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to improving the performance and durability of fuel cell systems especially during transient, start-up and shut-down operations. For example, while a high water content is desirable for improved membrane and catalyst ionomer conductivity, high water content can also block gas access to the triple-phase boundary resulting in lowered performance due to catalyst and gas diffusion layer (GDL) flooding. Visualizing liquid water by neutron imaging has been used over the past decade to study the water distribution inside operating fuel cells. In this paper, the results from our imaging at NIST using their recently installed higher resolution ({approx} 25 mm) Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector with a pixel pitch of 14.7 mm are presented. This detector is capable of quantitatively imaging the water inside the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly)/GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) of working fuel cells and can provide the water profiles within these various components in addition to the channel water. Specially designed fuel cells (active area = 2.25 cm{sup 2}) have been used in order to take advantage of the full detector resolution. The cell design is illustrated in a figure where one of the current collector/end plates is shown. The serpentine pattern was machined into a block of aluminum and plated with nickel and then gold to form the flow field. The measurements were performed using beam no. 1 and aperture no. 2 with a fluence rate of 1.9 x 10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. The cells were assembled with Gore{sup TM} Primea{sup R} MEAs and SGL Sigracet {sup R} 24 series GDLs (PRIMEA, GORE-SELECT and GORE are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc). All the cells were tested at 80 {sup o}C with 1.2 stoichiometry H{sub 2} and 2.0 stoichiometry air flows.

  9. High resolution imaging and lithography using interference of light and surface plasmon waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yang-Hyo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resolution of optical imaging and lithography is limited by the wave nature of light. Studies have been undertaken to overcome the diffraction limit for imaging and lithography. In our lab, the standing wave surface ...

  10. SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE HUMAN CONNECTOME: 4-TESLA HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION DIFFUSION IMAGING (HARDI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE HUMAN CONNECTOME: 4-TESLA HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION DIFFUSION IMAGING (HARDI diffusion imaging at 4 Tesla, we scanned 234 young adult twins and siblings (mean age: 23.4 ± 2.0 SD years

  11. High-resolution three-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of kidney microanatomy ex vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology that enables high-resolution, noninvasive, cross-sectional imaging of microstructure in biological tissues in situ and in real time. When combined ...

  12. Sub 400 nm spatial resolution extreme ultraviolet holography with a table top laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    . J. E. Trebes, S. B. Brown, E. M. Campbell, D. L. Matthews, D. G. Nilson, G. F. Stone, and D. A Society of America OCIS codes: (090.0090) Holography; (100.2960) Image analysis References and Links 1. D, C. Jacobsen, E. Anderson, M. R. Howells, and D. P. Kern, "High resolution imaging by Fourier

  13. Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

  14. Short Communication Automated computation of functional vascular density using laser speckle imaging in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Short Communication Automated computation of functional vascular density using laser speckle Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA c Edwards: Laser speckle imaging Functional vascular density Dorsal window chamber Blood flow We report

  15. Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves A thesis Rights Reserved #12;ABSTRACT Sea Ice Mapping Using Enhanced Resolution Advanced Scatterometer Images Steven Reeves Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Master of Science Sea ice is of great

  16. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors conclude that Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron is promising for proton therapy.

  17. Atomic Resolution Imaging and Quantification of Chemical Functionality of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Udo [Yale University

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The work carried out from 2006-2014 under DoE support was targeted at developing new approaches to the atomic-scale characterization of surfaces that include species-selective imaging and an ability to quantify chemical surface interactions with site-specific accuracy. The newly established methods were subsequently applied to gain insight into the local chemical interactions that govern the catalytic properties of model catalysts of interest to DoE. The foundation of our work was the development of three-dimensional atomic force microscopy (3D-AFM), a new measurement mode that allows the mapping of the complete surface force and energy fields with picometer resolution in space (x, y, and z) and piconewton/millielectron volts in force/energy. From this experimental platform, we further expanded by adding the simultaneous recording of tunneling current (3D-AFM/STM) using chemically well-defined tips. Through comparison with simulations, we were able to achieve precise quantification and assignment of local chemical interactions to exact positions within the lattice. During the course of the project, the novel techniques were applied to surface-oxidized copper, titanium dioxide, and silicon oxide. On these materials, defect-induced changes to the chemical surface reactivity and electronic charge density were characterized with site-specific accuracy.

  18. Table-top Extreme Ultraviolet Laser Aerial Imaging of Lithographic Masks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizuela, F.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table-top Extreme Ultraviolet Laser Aerial Imaging ofmasks realized using a table-top aerial imaging systembased on a table-top X=\\3.2 laser. © 2 0 0 9 Optical Society

  19. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy images in a family with the mitochondrial DNA T8993C mutation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    imaging with adaptive optics in patients with inheritedAdaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Images in aof cone structure using adaptive optics scanning laser

  20. Technique Recovers Atomic Resolution in Spectrum Images | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Spectrum Images April 08, 2015 Raw Fe L-shell spectrum image data, which indicate magnetic properties of the material, were acquired using scanning transmission electron...

  1. Direct laser additive fabrication system with image feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hofmeister, William H. (Nashville, TN); Knorovsky, Gerald A. (Albuquerque, NM); MacCallum, Danny O. (Edgewood, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Smugeresky, John E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed-loop, feedback-controlled direct laser fabrication system is disclosed. The feedback refers to the actual growth conditions obtained by real-time analysis of thermal radiation images. The resulting system can fabricate components with severalfold improvement in dimensional tolerances and surface finish.

  2. Time-Resolved Imaging and Manipulation of H{sub 2} Fragmentation in Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Feuerstein, B.; Zrost, K.; Schroeter, C.D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the experimental realization of time-resolved coincident Coulomb explosion imaging of H{sub 2} fragmentation in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser fields. Combining a high-resolution 'reaction microscope' and a fs pump-probe setup, we map the motion of wave packets dissociating via one- or two-photon channels, respectively, and observe a new region of enhanced ionization. The long-term interferometric stability of our system allows us to extend pump-probe experiments into the region of overlapping pulses, which offers new possibilities for the manipulation of ultrafast molecular fragmentation dynamics.

  3. Ultrafast imaging of complex systems in 3-D at near atomic resolution...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on ultrafast timescales using extremely intense X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. One important step toward ultrafast imaging of samples with a single X-ray shot is...

  4. Effect of Measurement Precision on Super-resolution Image Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, Dinesh

    University Dallas, Texas 75275 mpc@engr.smu.edu, rajand@engr.smu.edu Abstract: Low-resolution 8-bit and 14

  5. Cellular delivery and site-specific targeting of organic fluorophores for super-resolution imaging in living cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uttamapinant, Chayasith

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have pushed the spatial resolution of biological imaging down to a few nanometers. The key element to the development of such imaging modality is synthetic organic ...

  6. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  7. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  8. The design and construction of a high-resolution velocity-map imaging apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    León, Iker; Yang, Zheng; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wang, Lai-Sheng, E-mail: Lai-Sheng-Wang@brown.edu [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new velocity-map imaging apparatus equipped with a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source and a time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy studies of size-selected cluster anions. Vibrationally cold anion clusters are produced using a laser-vaporization supersonic cluster source, size-selected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and then focused co-linearly into the interaction zone of the high-resolution velocity-map imaging (VMI) system. The multilens VMI system is optimized via systematic simulations and can reach a resolution of 1.2 cm{sup ?1} (FWHM) for near threshold electrons while maintaining photoelectron kinetic energy resolutions (?KE/KE) of ?0.53% for higher energy electrons. The new VMI lens has superior focusing power over a large energy range, yielding highly circular images with distortions no larger than 1.0025 between the long and short radii. The detailed design, simulation, construction, testing, and performance of the high-resolution VMI apparatus are presented.

  9. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  10. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  11. High resolution PET breast imager with improved detection efficiency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient PET breast imager for detecting lesions in the entire breast including those located close to the patient's chest wall. The breast imager includes a ring of imaging modules surrounding the imaged breast. Each imaging module includes a slant imaging light guide inserted between a gamma radiation sensor and a photodetector. The slant light guide permits the gamma radiation sensors to be placed in close proximity to the skin of the chest wall thereby extending the sensitive region of the imager to the base of the breast. Several types of photodetectors are proposed for use in the detector modules, with compact silicon photomultipliers as the preferred choice, due to its high compactness. The geometry of the detector heads and the arrangement of the detector ring significantly reduce dead regions thereby improving detection efficiency for lesions located close to the chest wall.

  12. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  13. Mapping daily snow//ice shortwave broadband albedo from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS): The improved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Shunlin

    and global energy balances when snow coverage is variable. In the polar regions, the high surface albedo acts the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite data in polar regions [De Abreu et al., 1994 variable in surface energy balance calculations. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS

  14. ATTEMPT OF ALPINE GLACIER FLOW MODELING BASED ON CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ATTEMPT OF ALPINE GLACIER FLOW MODELING BASED ON CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR In this paper, an attempt of Alpine glacier flow modeling is performed based on a series of high resolution TerraSAR-X SAR images and a Digital Elevation Model. First, a glacier flow model is established

  15. Range imaging: a new method for high-resolution topographic measurements in small-and medium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Range imaging: a new method for high-resolution topographic measurements in small- and medium is a useful complement or alternative to existing methods for high-resolution measurements in small- to medium has led to a dramatic increase in terrain information and opened up new opportunities for hydro- logic

  16. High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Resolution Backside Imaging and Thermography using a Numerical Aperture Increasing Lens Shawn inspection alone, it is necessary to develop techniques, such as thermography, with the capability ­solid immersion lens microscopy and thermography. Standard non-contact optical resolution is limited

  17. Holographic laser Doppler imaging of pulsatile blood flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bencteux, Jeffrey; Kostas, Thomas; Bayat, Sam; Atlan, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile motion induced by blood flow using heterodyne holographic interferometry on the thumb of a healthy volunteer, in real-time. Optical Doppler images were measured with green laser light by a frequency-shifted Mach-Zehnder interferometer in off-axis configuration. The recorded optical signal was linked to local instantaneous out-of-plane motion of the skin at velocities of a few hundreds of microns per second, and compared to blood pulse monitored by plethysmoraphy during an occlusion-reperfusion experiment.

  18. A global forest canopy height map from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and the Geoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    - radiometer and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L15401, doi:10.1029/2010GL, is sensitive throughout the range of biomass [Lefsky et al., 2005a, 2005b]. Each lidar waveform is a high spatial resolution record of the energy returned when a shortduration pulse of light is returned from

  19. High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olivier, Scot S. (Livermore, CA); Werner, John S. (Davis, CA); Zawadzki, Robert J. (Sacramento, CA); Laut, Sophie P. (Pasedena, CA); Jones, Steven M. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

  20. Note: Spatial resolution of Fuji BAS-TR and BAS-SR imaging plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiksel, G.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Rd., Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial resolution of two types of imaging plates, Fuji BAS-TR and Fuji BAS-SR, has been measured using a knife-edge x-ray source of 8-keV Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. The values for the spatial resolution, defined as the distance between 10% and 90% levels of the edge spread function, are 94 {mu}m and 109 {mu}m, respectively. The resolution values are important for quantitative analysis of x-ray and particle imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics.

  1. Supplementary Information Super-resolution imaging reveals eightfold symmetry of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieger, Bernd

    around the nuclear pore complex and resolves the central channel with nanometer resolution Anna to M.S. (m.sauer@uni-wuerzburg.de). #12; 2 Figure S1. Alexa647 labeled gp210 protein in the nuclear bar 5 µm. #12; 3 Figure S2. Nuclear envelope resolved by two different microscopy methods. (a

  2. High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard, E-mail: gwysocki@princeton.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Soskind, Michael G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersy 08901 (United States)

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (?15?MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing.

  3. High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Yoshimura, Shinji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tanaka, Masayoshi Y. [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

  4. Time-resolved imaging with OKE-based time-gate: enhancement in spatial resolution using low-coherence ultra-short illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a collinear optical Kerr effect (OKE) based time-gate configuration with low coherence illumination source, derived from the supercontinuum (SC) generated by focusing the femtosecond laser pulses inside water. At first the spectral broadening in SC generation and corresponding changes in its coherence properties are studied and then a narrow band of wavelengths is extracted to use as the probe beam in the OKE-based time-gate configuration. The gate timings and spatial resolution of the time-gated images are also investigated. The low coherence of the probe ensures that the artifacts due to speckles from the laser are reduced to a minimum. To illustrate this a comparison of the time-resolved images of the fuel sprays obtained with this configuration has been made with the images obtained with the collinear, dual color configuration of the optical gate with coherent illumination.

  5. Collimator selection for SPECT brain imaging: the advantage of high resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S.P.; Polak, J.F.; Kijewski, M.F.; Holman, B.L.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compared a prototype long-bore (LB) high-resolution collimator with a low-energy, general-purpose collimator (LEGP) using 99mTc and /sup 123/I. The LB collimator provided a 56% improvement in tomographic resolution (autocorrelation width) over the LEGP for 99mTc; for /sup 123/I, the gain was 79%, providing substantially improved contrast for small structures. The sensitivity of the LB collimator, however, is only 32% of that of the LEGP. The imaging tasks to be performed on (/sup 123/I)IMP brain scans involve localization and discrimination of small, high-contrast brain structures and detection of abnormalities in shape, size, or uptake, rather than simple detection of lesions. Observer performance in such higher-order imaging tasks is known to depend on high spatial resolution, even at the cost of sensitivity. Patient studies confirmed that, for resolution-limited tasks, the increase in resolution outweighs the increased noise due to a loss in sensitivity. When the tomographic resolution of the LB collimator was degraded by smoothing to that of the LEGP, the noise in the LB images was lower than that of the LEGP by a factor of 2.9 for the same imaging time, demonstrating the advantage of high-resolution detectors and a smooth reconstruction filter over low-resolution detectors without smoothing. Therefore, collimators designed for high resolution, even at substantial cost in sensitivity, are expected to yield significant improvements for brain SPECT. Geometric calculations show that commercially available low-energy, high-resolution cast collimators promise to meet these requirements.

  6. Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

  7. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  8. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Electro-Optic and Infrared Signals for High Resolution Visible Images: Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of high resolution and low noise level, but they cannot reflect information about the temperature the properties of low resolution and high noise level, but IR images can reflect information about temperature variation of objects in the daytime via high-resolution EO images. The proposed novel framework

  9. Chandra High Resolution Camera Imaging of GRS 1758-258

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Heindl; D. M. Smith

    2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the "micro-quasar" GRS 1758-258 four times with Chandra. Two HRC-I observations were made in 2000 September-October spanning an intermediate-to-hard spectral transition (identified with RXTE). Another HRC-I and an ACIS/HETG observation were made in 2001 March following a hard-to-soft transition to a very low flux state. Based on the three HRC images and the HETG zero order image, the accurate position (J2000) of the X-ray source is RA = 18h 01m 12.39s, Dec = -25d 44m 36.1s (90% confidence radius = 0".45), consistent with the purported variable radio counterpart. All three HRC images are consistent with GRS 1758-258 being a point source, indicating that any bright jet is less than ~1 light-month in projected length, assuming a distance of 8.5 kpc.

  10. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hui, E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bitter, M., E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  11. Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

  12. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA); Hartemann, Frederic V. (San Ramon, CA); McNabb, Dennis P. (Alameda, CA); Pruet, Jason A. (Brentwood, CA)

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  13. High-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope with multiple deformable mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Diana C. (Fremont, CA); Olivier, Scot S. (Livermore, CA); Jones; Steven M. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopes is introduced to produce non-invasive views of the human retina. The use of dual deformable mirrors improved the dynamic range for correction of the wavefront aberrations compared with the use of the MEMS mirror alone, and improved the quality of the wavefront correction compared with the use of the bimorph mirror alone. The large-stroke bimorph deformable mirror improved the capability for axial sectioning with the confocal imaging system by providing an easier way to move the focus axially through different layers of the retina.

  14. Monitoring plant growth using high resolution micro-CT images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquit, Vincent C [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidisciplinary research conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims at understanding the molecular controls of partitioning, transport and fate of carbon xed by photosynthesis in plants and its correlation with other measured plant system properties. Ultimately, we intend to develop a modeling framework to assess, correlate and predict as to which spatiotemporal changes in system dynamics are key to predicting emergent properties of system. Within this research, this paper relates to the quantitative morphological imaging of the main structures forming a plant (stem, roots, and leaves), their internal sub-structures, and changes occurring overtime.

  15. High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

  16. Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Society of North America. Luminance ratio limits; ch. 11,range photography as a luminance mapping Technique. Lawrenceusing High Resolution Luminance Images Kyle Konis Lawrence

  17. SPECT imaging with the long bore collimator: Loss in sensitivity vs improved contrast resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, S.; Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Eisner, R.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long bore (LB) collimator (16 cm thick) was compared with the standard low energy all purpose (LEAP) collimator for SPECT imaging. Line spread functions at various depths were measured in scatter material (planar imaging). Both collimators have similar full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) values yet the LB has less resolution loss with distance and consistently lower full-width-at-tenth-maximum (FWTM) values. An assessment of overall performance was made by planar imaging of the Rollo phantom with both collectors. Performance was judged by calculating the chi-square for the observed and expected contrasts of spherical cold targets (2.54, 1.91, 1.27 and 0.95 cm diameter). In all cases, LB scored consistently better than the LEAP. SPECT imaging of a bar phantom (spacing 2.25 cm) filled with I-123 (p,2n) confirmed the superior contrast resolution of the LB. Using SPECT data from 5 clinical I-123 IMP brain studies and from measurements of % rms noise as a function of total slice counts in a cylindrical phantom, the authors calculate that LB images would have a % rms noise of 8.7% compared to 5.7% for LEAP images acquired over the same time interval. The authors conclude that SPECT of the brain with the LB would lead to improved contrast resolution and a minimal increase in % rms noise despite a significant loss in sensitivity.

  18. High-Resolution 3 T MR Microscopy Imaging of Arterial Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sailer, Johannes, E-mail: johannes.sailer@univie.ac.at; Rand, Thomas [University of Vienna, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Austria); Berg, Andreas [University of Vienna, Institute for Medical Physics (Austria); Sulzbacher, Irene [University of Vienna, Clinical Institute of Pathology (Austria); Peloschek, P. [University of Vienna, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Austria); Hoelzenbein, Thomas [University of Vienna, Department of Surgery (Austria); Lammer, Johannes [University of Vienna, Department of Angiography and Interventional Radiology (Austria)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To achieve a high spatial resolution in MR imaging that allows for clear visualization of anatomy and even histology and documentation of plaque morphology in in vitro samples from patients with advanced atherosclerosis. A further objective of our study was to evaluate whether T2-weighted high-resolution MR imaging can provide accurate classification of atherosclerotic plaque according to a modified American Heart Association classification. Methods. T2-weighted images of arteries were obtained in 13 in vitro specimens using a 3 T MR unit (Medspec 300 Avance/Bruker, Ettlingen, Germany) combined with a dedicated MR microscopy system. Measurement parameters were: T2-weighted sequences with TR 3.5 sec, TE 15-120 msec; field of view (FOV) 1.4 x 1.4; NEX 8; matrix 192; and slice thickness 600 {mu}m. MR measurements were compared with corresponding histologic sections. Results. We achieved excellent spatial and contrast resolution in all specimens. We found high agreement between MR images and histology with regard to the morphology and extent of intimal proliferations in all but 2 specimens. We could differentiate fibrous caps and calcifications from lipid plaque components based on differences in signal intensity in order to differentiate hard and soft atheromatous plaques. Hard plaques with predominantly intimal calcifications were found in 7 specimens, and soft plaques with a cholesterol/lipid content in 5 cases. In all specimens, hemorrhage or thrombus formation, and fibrotic and hyalinized tissue could be detected on both MR imaging and histopathology. Conclusion. High-resolution, high-field MR imaging of arterial walls demonstrates the morphologic features, volume, and extent of intimal proliferations with high spatial and contrast resolution in in vitro specimens and can differentiate hard and soft plaques.

  19. 2D and 3D high-resolution imaging to reconstruct the microstructure of clay media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2D and 3D high-resolution imaging to reconstruct the microstructure of clay media J.C. Robinet1 & S compacted clay (illite) system, considered to be an analogy for the clay matrix constituting clay-rocks, and three different clayrocks (Callovo-Oxfordian argilites (FR), Opalinus Clay (CH), Boom Clay (BE)). Part

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    CLASSIFICATION OF BIOMEDICAL HIGH-RESOLUTION MICRO-CT IMAGES FOR DIRECT VOLUME RENDERING Maite L,cerquide,davidm,anna}@maia.ub.es ABSTRACT This paper introduces a machine learning approach into the process of direct volume rendering that generates the classification func- tion within the optical property function used for rendering. Briefly

  1. Isolation of transport mechanisms in PEFCs using high resolution neutron imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    imaging has developed into an important tool for fuel cell diagnostics over the past six years. The advent November 2013 Accepted 2 December 2013 Available online xxx Keywords: Proton exchange membrane fuel cell profiles were determined using high resolution neutron radiog- raphy for commercially available fuel cell

  2. SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE Operating Instructions On How To Get Atomic Resolution Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SCANNING TUNNELING MICROSCOPE Operating Instructions On How To Get Atomic Resolution Images Do: STM Set-Up: Use either a scanning tip from the tip wire box (skip to the "While holding the tip wire a 45-degree cut on one end of the tip wire, which becomes the scanning tip. Hold the tip wire

  3. Multi-Resolution K-Means Clustering of Time Series and Application to Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jessica

    Multi-Resolution K-Means Clustering of Time Series and Application to Images Michail Vlachos using orthonormal decompositions, we present an anytime version of the k-Means algorithm. The algorithm centers for k-Means is mitigated by assigning the final centers at each approximation level as the initial

  4. High-resolution velocity field imaging around a borehole: Excavation Damaged Zone characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .balland@ineris.fr, vincent.renaud@ineris.fr ABSTRACT The excavation of a deep underground structure induces a stress field of a material. In the case of underground storage, rock damage will affect the rock capacity to confine1 High-resolution velocity field imaging around a borehole: Excavation Damaged Zone

  5. Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation using CALIOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Global Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud detection and height evaluation using CALIOP, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D00A19, doi:10] with plans to continue the cloud record using the next generation of polar orbiting sensors. A ``Climate

  6. Structural analysis of Herpes Simplex Virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ARTICLE Received 30 Sep 2014 | Accepted 27 Nov 2014 | Published 22 Jan 2015 Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging Romain F. Laine1,*, Anna Albecka2,*, Sebastian van de Linde3, Eric J. Rees1, Colin M. Crump2...

  7. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  8. Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Super-resolution in incoherent optical imaging using synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements Barak the Rayleigh limit of the system is obtained by tiling digitally several Fresnel holographic elements into a complete Fresnel hologram of the observed object. Each element is acquired by the limited-aperture system

  9. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution on ?CT-based morphological analysis. • Surface properties influence accuracy of ?CT-based morphology of porous structures. • Total porosity was the least sensitive to surface complexity and scan voxel size. • The beam thickness analysis was overestimated by the surface roughness. • Voxel size customization can significantly reduce a cost of the ?CT-based analysis.

  10. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Braun; Butler Burton

    1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Six examples of the compact, isolated high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs) identified by Braun and Burton (1999) have been imaged with the WSRT. The 65 confirmed objects in this class define a dynamically cold system, with a global minimum for the velocity dispersion of only 70 km/s, found in the Local Group Standard of Rest, while in-falling at 100 km/s toward the LG barycenter. These objects have a characteristic morphology, in which several compact cores are embedded in a diffuse halo. The compact cores typically account for 40% of the HI line flux while covering some 15% of the source area. The cores are the cool condensed phase of HI, the CNM, with temp. near 100 K, while the halos appear to be a shielding column of warm diffuse HI, the WNM, with temp. near 8000 K. We detect a core with one of the narrowest HI emission lines ever observed, with intrinsic FWHM of 2 km/s and 75 K brightness. From a comparison of column and volume densities we derive a distance in the range 0.5 to 1 Mpc. We determine a metallicity for this same object of 0.04 to 0.07 solar. Comparably high distances are implied by demanding the stability of objects with multiple cores, which show relative velocities as large as 70 km/s on 30 arcmin scales. Many compact cores show systematic velocity gradients along the major axis of their elliptical extent which are consistent with circular rotation. Several of the derived rotation curves are well-fit by Navarro, Frenk, and White (1997) cold dark matter profiles. These kinematic signatures imply a high dark-to-visible mass ratio of 10-50, for D=0.7Mpc, which scales as 1/D. The implied dark matter halos dominate the mass volume density within the central 2 kpc (10 arcmin) of each source, providing a sufficent hydrostatic pressure to allow local CNM condensation. (abridged)

  11. Imaging laser analysis of building materials - practical examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilsch, G.; Schaurich, D.; Wiggenhauser, H. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is supplement and extension of standard chemical methods and SEM- or Micro-RFA-applications for the evaluation of building materials. As a laboratory method LIBS is used to gain color coded images representing composition, distribution of characteristic ions and/or ingress characteristic of damaging substances. To create a depth profile of element concentration a core has to be taken and split along the core axis. LIBS was proven to be able to detect all important elements in concrete, e. g. Chlorine, Sodium or Sulfur, which are responsible for certain degradation mechanisms and also light elements like lithium or hydrogen. Practical examples are given and a mobile system for on-site measurements is presented.

  12. Laser-sheet imaging of HE-driven interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, R.F.; Rightley, P.M.; Kinkead, S.; Martin, R.A.; Critchfield, R.; Sandoval, D.L.; Holmes, R.; Gorman, T.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors made substantial progress in developing the MILSI (Multiple Imaging of Laser-Sheet Illumination) technique for high explosive (HE)-driven fluid interfaces. They observed the instability, but have not yet measured the instability growth rate. They developed suitable sample containers and optical systems for studying the Rightmyer-Meshkov instability of perturbed water/bromoform interfaces and they successfully fielded the new MILSI diagnostic at two firing-site facilities. The problem continues to be of central importance to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and weapons physics communities.

  13. Animals In Synchrotrons: Overcoming Challenges For High-Resolution, Live, Small-Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelley, Martin [Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Parsons, David [Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Women's and Children's Health Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Department of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Department of Paediatircs Centre for Stem Cell Research, University of Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Morgan, Kaye [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siu, Karen [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Monash Centre for Synchrotron Science, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Physiological studies in small animals can be complicated, but the complexity is increased dramatically when performing live-animal synchrotron X-ray imaging studies. Our group has extensive experience in high-resolution live-animal imaging at the Japanese SPring-8 synchrotron, primarily examining airways in two-dimensions. These experiments normally image an area of 1.8 mmx1.2 mm at a pixel resolution of 0.45 {mu}m and are performed with live, intact, anaesthetized mice.There are unique challenges in this experimental setting. Importantly, experiments must be performed in an isolated imaging hutch not specifically designed for small-animal imaging. This requires equipment adapted to remotely monitor animals, maintain their anesthesia, and deliver test substances while collecting images. The horizontal synchrotron X-ray beam has a fixed location and orientation that limits experimental flexibility. The extremely high resolution makes locating anatomical regions-of-interest slow and can result in a high radiation dose, and at this level of magnification small animal movements produce motion-artifacts that can render acquired images unusable. Here we describe our experimental techniques and how we have overcome several challenges involved in performing live mouse synchrotron imaging.Experiments have tested different mouse strains, with hairless strains minimizing overlying skin and hair artifacts. Different anesthetics have also be trialed due to the limited choices available at SPring-8. Tracheal-intubation methods have been refined and controlled-ventilation is now possible using a specialized small-animal ventilator. With appropriate animal restraint and respiratory-gating, motion-artifacts have been minimized. The animal orientation (supine vs. head-high) also appears to affect animal physiology, and can alter image quality. Our techniques and image quality at SPring-8 have dramatically improved and in the near future we plan to translate this experience to the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron.Overcoming these challenges has permitted increasingly sophisticated imaging of animals with synchrotron X-rays, and we expect a bright future for these techniques.

  14. Active laser frequency stabilization and resolution enhancement of interferometers for the measurement of gravitational waves in space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Herz

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser frequency stabilization is notably one of the major challenges on the way to a space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is presently under development in an ESA, NASA collaboration. We present a novel method for active laser stabilization and phase noise suppression in such a gravitational wave detector. The proposed approach is a further evolution of the "arm locking" method, which in essence consists of using an interferometer arm as an optical cavity, exploiting the extreme long-run stability of the cavity size in the frequency band of interest. We extend this method by using the natural interferometer arm length differences and existing interferometer signals as additional information sources for the reconstruction and active suppression of the quasi-periodic laser frequency noise, enhancing the resolution power of space-borne gravitational wave detectors.

  15. High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C. G. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, J. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany) [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Germany; Hofmann, G.; Grunwaldt, J.-D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Damsgaard, C. D. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L{sub 3} absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

  16. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  17. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  18. A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

  19. Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

  20. High Spatial Resolution Fast-Neutron Imaging Detectors for Pulsed Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mor, I; Bar, D; Feldman, G; Goldberg, M B; Katz, D; Sayag, E; Shmueli, I; Cohen, Y; Tal, A; Vagish, Z; Bromberger, B; Dangendorf, V; Mugai, D; Tittelmeier, K; Weierganz, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber scintillator screen and single- or multiple-gated intensified camera systems (ICCD). This detector is designed for energy-selective neutron radiography with nanosecond-pulsed broad-energy (1 - 10 MeV) neutron beams. Utilizing the Time-of-Flight (TOF) method, such a detector is capable of simultaneously capturing several images, each at a different neutron energy (TOF). In addition, a gamma-ray image can also be simultaneously registered, allowing combined neutron/gamma inspection of objects. This permits combining the sensitivity of the fast-neutron resonance method to low-Z elements with that of gamma radiography to high-Z materials.

  1. Pump-probe imaging of laser-induced periodic surface structures after ultrafast irradiation of Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Ryan D. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, Ben [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Adams, David P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Yalisove, Steven M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy has been used to investigate laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) formation on polished Si surfaces. A crater forms on the surface after irradiation by a 150 fs laser pulse, and a second, subsequent pulse forms LIPSS within the crater. Sequentially delayed images show that LIPSS with a periodicity slightly less than the fundamental laser wavelength of 780 nm appear on Si surfaces ?50 ps after arrival of the second pump laser pulse, well after the onset of melting. LIPSS are observed on the same timescale as material removal, suggesting that their formation involves material ejection.

  2. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  3. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  4. High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

  5. Morphological Characteristics of Compact High-Velocity Clouds Revealed by High-Resolution WSRT Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; Robert Braun

    1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of compact, isolated high-velocity clouds which plausibly represents a homogeneous subsample of the HVC phenomenon in a single physical state was objectively identified by Braun and Burton (1999). Six examples of the CHVCs, unresolved in single-dish data, have been imaged with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The high-resolution imaging reveals the morphology of these objects, including a core/halo distribution of fluxes, signatures of rotation indicating dark matter, and narrow linewidths constraining the kinetic temperature of several opaque cores. In these regards, as well as in their kinematic and spatial deployment on the sky, the CHVC objects are evidently a dynamically cold ensemble of dark-matter-dominated HI clouds accreting onto the Local Group in a continuing process of galactic evolution.

  6. Compact low resolution spectrograph, an imaging and long slit spectrograph for robotic telescopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabaza, O., E-mail: ovidio@ugr.es [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Granada, Severo Ochoa Str. s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain); Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Jelinek, M.; Cunniffe, R.; Ruedas-Sánchez, J. [Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain)] [Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain) [Institute of Astrophysics of Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Department of Systems and Automatic Engineering, University of Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Zeman, J. [Astronomical Institute of the Academic of Sciences, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute of the Academic of Sciences, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Hudec, R. [Astronomical Institute of the Academic of Sciences, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic) [Astronomical Institute of the Academic of Sciences, Fricova 298, 25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University, Technicka 2, Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Sabau-Graziati, L. [National Institute of Aerospace Technology, Carretera de Ajalvir, 28850 Madrid (Spain)] [National Institute of Aerospace Technology, Carretera de Ajalvir, 28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The COmpact LOw REsolution Spectrograph (COLORES) is a compact and lightweight (13 kg) f/8 imaging spectrograph designed for robotic telescopes, now installed and operating on the TELMA, a rapid-slewing 60 cm telescope of the BOOTES-2 observatory in Málaga (Spain). COLORES is a multi-mode instrument that enables the observer to seamlessly switch between low-dispersion spectroscopy and direct imaging modes during an observation. In this paper, we describe the instrument and its development, from the initial scientific requirements through the optical design process to final configuration with theoretical performance calculations. The mechanical and electronic design is described, methods of calibration are discussed and early laboratory and scientific results are shown.

  7. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    of the first laser-powered particle accel- erators "on a chip" [1,2]. These devices are specifically designed present a new concept for a beam position monitor with the unique ability to map particle beam position, this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012

  8. 2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of permeability will result from images between 2 and 4 lm resolution. To reduce permeability underestimation from analyses of high-resolu- tion images, a resolution threshold between 3 and 15 lm was found to be effective, but it is not known whether this range is applicable beyond the samples studied here.

  9. Phys. Med. Biol. 43 (1998) 10011013. Printed in the UK PII: S0031-9155(98)90627-3 High-resolution 3D Bayesian image reconstruction using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leahy, Richard M.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -resolution 3D Bayesian image reconstruction using the microPET small-animal scanner Jinyi Qi, Richard M Leahy of high-resolution 3D images from the microPET small-animal scanner. Resolution recovery is achieved 2 mm when using an analytic 3D reprojection (3DRP) method with a ramp filter. These results also

  10. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

  11. Invited Article: Coherent imaging using seeded free-electron laser pulses with variable polarization: First results and research opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capotondi, F.; Pedersoli, E.; Mahne, N.; Menk, R. H.; Passos, G.; Raimondi, L.; Svetina, C.; Sandrin, G.; Kiskinova, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Zangrando, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali - TASC, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Fleckenstein, H.; Chapman, H. N. [CFEL-DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Schulz, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bach, J.; Froemter, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Schleitzer, S.; Mueller, L.; Gutt, C. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI-Elettra, the first vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) using by default a 'seeded' scheme, became operational in 2011 and has been opened to users since December 2012. The parameters of the seeded FERMI FEL pulses and, in particular, the superior control of emitted radiation in terms of spectral purity and stability meet the stringent requirements for single-shot and resonant coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments. The advantages of the intense seeded FERMI pulses with variable polarization have been demonstrated with the first experiments performed using the multipurpose experimental station operated at the diffraction and projection imaging (DiProI) beamline. The results reported here were obtained with fixed non-periodic targets during the commissioning period in 2012 using 20-32 nm wavelength range. They demonstrate that the performance of the FERMI FEL source and the experimental station meets the requirements of CDI, holography, and resonant magnetic scattering in both multi- and single-shot modes. Moreover, we present the first magnetic scattering experiments employing the fully circularly polarized FERMI pulses. The ongoing developments aim at pushing the lateral resolution by using shorter wavelengths provided by double-stage cascaded FERMI FEL-2 and probing ultrafast dynamic processes using different pump-probe schemes, including jitter-free seed laser pump or FEL-pump/FEL-probe with two color FEL pulses generated by the same electron bunch.

  12. High-resolution heterodyne spectroscopy using a tunable quantum cascade laser around 3.5 THz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Y.

    A frequency tunable terahertz heterodynespectrometer, based on a third-order distributed feedback quantum cascade laser as a local oscillator, has been demonstrated by measuring molecular spectral lines of methanol ...

  13. Attosecond Resolution Timing Jitter Characterization of Diode Pumped Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    Two diode pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers are synchronized using a balanced nonlinear optical cross correlator. An integrated timing jitter of less than 156 as in the 10 kHz to 10 MHz range is measured.

  14. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M., E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, Jian [Department of Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L?{sub 1}- and L?{sub 2}-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

  15. Fully-automatic laser welding and micro-sculpting with universal in situ inline coherent imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Paul J L; Ji, Yang; Galbraith, Christopher M; Kinross, Alison W; Van Vlack, Cole; Fraser, James M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though new affordable high power laser technologies make possible many processing applications in science and industry, depth control remains a serious technical challenge. Here we show that inline coherent imaging, with line rates up to 312 kHz and microsecond-duration capture times, is capable of directly measuring laser penetration depth in a process as violent as kW-class keyhole welding. We exploit ICI's high speed, high dynamic range and robustness to interference from other optical sources to achieve fully automatic, adaptive control of laser welding as well as ablation, achieving micron-scale sculpting in vastly different heterogeneous biological materials.

  16. Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving C. elegans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals poses a major challenge for studying neural coding of animal behavior. We present a new instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from every neuron in the head of a freely behaving C. elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture and locomotion. We employ spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 5 head-volumes per second. Two cameras simultaneously monitor the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real-time and adjusts a motorized stage to keep it within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from 78 neurons and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. Across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior correspo...

  17. Compact, high-resolution, gamma ray imaging for scintimammography and other medical diagostic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA); Wojcik, Randolph F. (Yorktown, VA); Steinbach, Daniela (Williamsburg, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution gamma ray imaging device includes an aluminum housing, a lead screen collimator at an opened end of the housing, a crystal scintillator array mounted behind the lead screen collimator, a foam layer between the lead screen collimator and the crystal scintillator array, a photomultiplier window coupled to the crystal with optical coupling grease, a photomultiplier having a dynode chain body and a base voltage divider with anodes, anode wire amplifiers each connected to four anodes and a multi pin connector having pin connections to each anode wire amplifier. In one embodiment the crystal scintillator array includes a yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) crystal array. In an alternate embodiment, the crystal scintillator array includes a gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO) crystal array.

  18. Multiple hot images from an obscuration in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Youwen; Wen Shuangchun; You Kaiming; Tang Zhixiang; Deng Jianqin; Zhang Lifu; Fan Dianyuan

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical investigation on the formation of hot images in an intense laser beam through cascaded Kerr medium disks, to disclose the distribution and intensity of hot images in high-power disk amplifiers. It is shown that multiple hot images from an obscuration may be formed, instead of one hot image as reported previously in the literature. This gives a clear explanation for the curious damage pattern of hot images, namely, damage sites appearing on alternating optics in periodic trains. Further analysis demonstrates that the distribution and intensity of hot images depend closely on the number of Kerr medium disks, the distance from the obscuration to the front of the first disk downstream, the space between two neighboring disks, and the thickness and B integral of each disk. Moreover, we take two cascaded Kerr medium disks for example to detail multiple hot images from an obscuration and confirm the theoretical results by numerical simulations.

  19. High-resolution imaging of compact high-velocity clouds (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. de Heij; R. Braun; W. B. Burton

    2002-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have imaged five compact high-velocity clouds in HI with arcmin angular- and km/s spectral-resolution using the WSRT. Supplementary total-power data, which is fully sensitive to both the cool and warm components of HI, is available for comparison for all the sources, albeit with angular resolutions that vary from 3' to 36'. The fractional HI flux in compact CNM components varies from 4% to 16% in our sample. All objects have at least one local peak in the CNM column which exceeds about 10^19 cm^-2 when observed with arcmin resolution. It is plausible that a peak column density of 1-2x10^19 cm^-2 is a prerequisite for the long-term survival of these sources. One object in our sample, CHVC120-20-443 (Davies' cloud), lies in close projected proximity to the disk of M31. This object is characterized by exceptionally broad linewidths in its CNM concentrations (more than 5 times greater than the median value). These CNM concentrations lie in an arc on the edge of the source facing the M31 disk, while the diffuse HI component of this source has a position offset in the direction of the disk. All of these attributes suggest that CHVC120-20-443 is in a different evolutionary state than most of the other CHVCs which have been studied. Similarly broad CNM linewidths have only been detected in one other object, CHVC111-07-466, which also lies in the Local Group barycenter direction and has the most extreme radial velocity known. A distinct possibility for Davies' cloud seems to be physical interaction of some type with M31. The most likely form of this interaction might be the ram-pressure or tidal- stripping by either one of M31's visible dwarf companions, M32 or NGC205, or else by a dark companion with an associated HI condensation.

  20. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  1. Optimised low-loss multilayers for imaging with sub-wavelength resolution in the visible wavelength range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastuszczak, Anna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We optimise the effective skin-depth and resolution of Ag-TiO2, Ag-SrTiO3, and Ag-GaP multilayers for imaging with sub-wavelength resolution. In terms of transmission and resolution the optimised multilayers outperform simple designs based on combined use of effective medium theory, impedance matching and Fabry-Perot resonances. For instance, an optimised Ag-GaP multilayer consisting of only 17 layers, operating at the wavelength of 490 nm and having a total thickness equal to one wavelength, combines 78% intensity transmission with a resolution of 60 nm. It is also shown that use of the effective medium theory leads to sub-optimal multilayer designs with respect to the trade-off between the skin depth and resolution already when the period of the structure is on the order of 40 nm or larger.

  2. Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OF CO IN A z = 4.05 PROTO-CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Daddi, E. [CEA, Laboratoire AIM-CNRS, Université Paris Diderot, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Riechers, D., E-mail: hodge@mpia.de [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the formation of clustered, massive galaxies at large look-back times via spectroscopic imaging of CO in the unique GN20 proto-cluster at z = 4.05. Existing observations show that this is a dense concentration of gas-rich, very active star forming galaxies, including multiple bright submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). Using deep, high-resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array CO(2-1) observations, we image the molecular gas with a resolution of ?1 kpc just 1.6 Gyr after the big bang. The SMGs GN20.2a and GN20.2b have deconvolved sizes of ?5 kpc × 3 kpc and ?8 kpc × 5 kpc (Gaussian FWHM) in CO(2-1), respectively, and we measure gas surface densities up to ?12,700/1700 × (sin i) (?{sub CO}/0.8) M{sub ?} pc{sup –2} for GN20.2a/GN20.2b in the highest-resolution maps. Dynamical mass estimates allow us to constrain the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to ?{sub CO} = 1.7 ± 0.8 M{sub ?} (K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}){sup –1} for GN20.2a and ?{sub CO}= 1.1±{sup 1.5}{sub 1.1} M{sub ?} (K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}){sup –1} for GN20.2b. We measure significant offsets (0.''5-1'') between the CO and optical emission, indicating either dust obscuration on scales of tens of kiloparsecs or that the emission originates from distinct galaxies. CO spectral line energy distributions imply physical conditions comparable to other SMGs and reveal further evidence that GN20.2a and GN20.2b are in different merging stages. We carry out a targeted search for CO emission from the 14 known B-band Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the field, tentatively detecting CO in a previously undetected LBG and placing 3? upper limits on the CO luminosities of those that may lie within our bandpass. A blind search for emission-line sources down to a 5? limiting CO luminosity of L{sup ?}{sub CO(2-1)} = 8 x 10{sup 9} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2} and covering ?z = 0.0273 (?20 comoving Mpc) produces no other strong contenders associated with the proto-cluster.

  4. Advances in lasers, optics, and imaging for the life sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    Molecular Imaging Congress BioOpto Japan BioOpticsWorld.com "Invisible" molecules glow with new label- free possibilities for biomedical imaging, such as label- free mapping drug distributions and blood vessels on and off at 5 MHz. The spectrally filtered stimulation beam is detected by a large area photodiode

  5. Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henn, T.; Kiessling, T., E-mail: tobias.kiessling@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W. [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universität Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universität Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, 10117 Berlin (Germany)] [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  6. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Adams, Elisabeth R. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kalas, Paul, E-mail: gillil@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  7. Terahertz imaging and quantum cascade laser based devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Alan Wei Min

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terahertz (THz) frequency range (f=0.3-10 THz, [lambda]=30-1000 lam) is much less technologically developed that the adjacent microwave and infrared frequency ranges, but offers several advantages for imaging applications: ...

  8. advanced high resolution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) to calibrate advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS)...

  9. Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Aerosols in the Caribbean MidAtlantic Region as Observed with the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging the year, changes in precipitation patterns and greater health risks for the Caribbean region during the spring months. Keywords: MODIS, MODIS Conversion Toolkit, aerosols, Caribbean region INTRODUCTION

  10. High Resolution Imaging using 325 GHz and 1.5 THz Transceivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    the complex scatterer back-reflection components (R, ) or (I, Q) to be collected. Recently, terahertz laser the attainable frequency and power output of solid-state multiplier-chain devices is improving signal and mixes it with the terahertz laser frequency to produce a new frequency at the base laser

  11. Systems and methods for imaging using radiation from laser produced plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Renard-Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Cowan, Thomas E. (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Rassuchine, Jennifer (Reno, NV)

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides systems and methods for imaging a subject using radiation emitted from a laser produced plasma generating by irradiating a target with a laser. In particular examples, the target includes at least one radiation enhancing component, such as a fluor, cap, or wire. In further examples, the target has a metal layer and an internal surface defining an internal apex, the internal apex of less than about 15 .mu.m, such as less than about 1 .mu.m. The targets may take a variety of shapes, including cones, pyramids, and hemispheres. Certain aspects of the present disclosure provide improved imaging of a subject, such as improved medical images of a radiation dose than typical conventional methods and systems.

  12. Laser speckle-imaging of blood microcirculation in the brain cortex of laboratory rats in stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilensky, M A; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V; Timoshina, P A; Kuznetsova, Jana V; Semyachkin-Glushkovskii, I A; Agafonov, Dmitry N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of experimental approbation of the method of laser full-field speckle-imaging for monitoring the changes in blood microcirculation state of the brain cortex of laboratory rats under the conditions of developing stroke and administration of vasodilating and vasoconstrictive agents are presented. The studies aimed at the choice of the optimal conditions of speckle-image formation and recording were performed and the software implementing an adaptive algorithm for processing the data of measurements was created. The transfer of laser radiation to the probed region of the biotissue was implemented by means of a silica-polymer optical fibre. The problems and prospects of speckle-imaging of cerebral microcirculation of blood in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  13. Laser radar VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 23-25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becherer, R.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics presented include lidar wind shear detection for commercial aircraft, centroid tracking of range-Doppler images, an analytic approach to centroid performance analysis, simultaneous active/passive IR vehicle detection, and resolution limits for high-resolution imaging lidar. Also presented are laser velocimetry applications, the application of laser radar to autonomous spacecraft landing, 3D laser radar simulation for autonomous spacecraft landing, and ground based CW atmospheric Doppler lidar performamce modeling.

  14. 95The Apollo-11 Landing Area at High-Resolution The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently imaged the Apollo-11 landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    95The Apollo-11 Landing Area at High-Resolution The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) recently imaged the Apollo-11 landing area at high-resolution and obtained the image above (top left of the Apollo-11 lander is 8mm in diameter, or 8 mm x (4.8 meters/mm) = 24 meters in diameter. The smallest

  15. Collimator design for neutron imaging of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommargren, G.E.; Lerche, R.A.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several pinhole collimator geometries for use in neutron imaging experiments have been modeled and compared. Point spread functions are shown for a cylinder, hyperbola, intersecting cones, and a five-zone approximation to the intersecting cones. Of the geometries studied, the intersecting cones appear the most promising with respect to neutron efficiency, field of view, and isoplanatism.

  16. High-Resolution Radio Imaging of Gravitational Lensing Candidates in the 1 Jansky BL Lac Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Rector; J. T. Stocke

    2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.

  17. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS37-B332, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  18. Design of the high-resolution soft X-ray imaging system on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianchao; Ding, Yonghua, E-mail: yhding@mail.hust.edu.cn; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Xiao, Zhengyu; Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new soft X-ray diagnostic system has been designed on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) aiming to observe and survey the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities. The system consists of five cameras located at the same toroidal position. Each camera has 16 photodiode elements. Three imaging cameras view the internal plasma region (r/a < 0.7) with a spatial resolution about 2 cm. By tomographic method, heat transport outside from the 1/1 mode X-point during the sawtooth collapse is found. The other two cameras with a higher spatial resolution 1 cm are designed for monitoring local MHD activities respectively in plasma core and boundary.

  19. Monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light from in situ generated particles in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hareland, W.A.; Buss, R.J.; Brown, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Collins, S.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the behavior of particles in plasmas because of the negative economic impact of contamination during processing of silicon for microelectronics manufacture. Here, spatially resolved images of particle distributions are measured in steady-state plasmas in a GEC (gaseous electronics conference) plasma reactor. Images are obtained by monochromatic imaging of scattered laser light using a microchannel plate (MCP) image intensifier and a high-speed video camera. The observed distributions of particulates generated by adding small quantities of CHF{sub 3} to an argon plasma are extremely complex and diverse. The patterns observed are temporally varying, and rarely as simple as domes and rings observed in other reactors. The forces acting on the particles are sufficiently complex that reproducing specific spatial patterns by controlling processing parameters if often impossible.

  20. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF.

  1. Denoising of PET images by combining wavelets and curvelets for improved preservation of resolution and quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Denoising of PET images by combining wavelets and curvelets for improved preservation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images is a challenging task due to the inherent low signal evaluation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images often involve pre- processing steps. As PET images

  2. The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Leisawitz; Charles Baker; Amy Barger; Dominic Benford; Andrew Blain; Rob Boyle; Richard Broderick; Jason Budinoff; John Carpenter; Richard Caverly; Phil Chen; Steve Cooley; Christine Cottingham; Julie Crooke; Dave DiPietro; Mike DiPirro; Michael Femiano; Art Ferrer; Jacqueline Fischer; Jonathan P. Gardner; Lou Hallock; Kenny Harris; Kate Hartman; Martin Harwit; Lynne Hillenbrand; Tupper Hyde; Drew Jones; Jim Kellogg; Alan Kogut; Marc Kuchner; Bill Lawson; Javier Lecha; Maria Lecha; Amy Mainzer; Jim Mannion; Anthony Martino; Paul Mason; John Mather; Gibran McDonald; Rick Mills; Lee Mundy; Stan Ollendorf; Joe Pellicciotti; Dave Quinn; Kirk Rhee; Stephen Rinehart; Tim Sauerwine; Robert Silverberg; Terry Smith; Gordon Stacey; H. Philip Stahl; Johannes Staguhn; Steve Tompkins; June Tveekrem; Sheila Wall; Mark Wilson

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.

  3. Direct Observation of Cosmic Strings via their Strong Gravitational Lensing Effect: I. Predictions for High Resolution Imaging Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Alice Gasparini; Phil Marshall; Tommaso Treu; Eric Morganson; Florian Dubath

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension Gmu/c^2 can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0.14"), it is sufficient to survey of order a few square degrees -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime Gmu/c^2 ~ 10^{-7}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by a factor of two over that available from the cosmic microwave background. Future high resolution imaging surveys, covering a few hundred square degrees or more, either from space in the optical or from large-format radio telescopes on the ground, would be able to further lower this limit to Gmu/c^2 < 10^{-8}.

  4. Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Labbe, Nicole [ORNL; Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

  5. Investigation of a high spatial resolution method based on polar coordinate maximum entropy method for analyzing electron density fluctuation data measured by laser phase contrast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuo, K. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Iguchi, H.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser phase contrast is a powerful diagnostic method to determine the spatial distribution of electron density fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas, although its applicability depends on magnetic field configurations. The spatial resolution of fluctuations is linked with the resolution of the propagation direction that is derived from the two-dimensional spectral analysis of the wavenumber for the fluctuations. The method was applied to fluctuation measurements in a compact helical system. In order to improve the resolution of the propagation direction with a relatively small number of data points, the maximum entropy method with polar coordinates was employed. A spatial resolution of the order of 1 cm was obtained, which is satisfactory in a plasma with a 20 cm minor radius.

  6. High-speed high-resolution plasma spectroscopy using spatial-multiplex coherence imaging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    , laser Thomson scattering and infrared thermography [1­3] . When the spectral content of a scene can, thermography, bremsstrahlung, Thomson scattering), it is often the case that these parameters can be recovered

  7. Low-spatial coherence electrically-pumped semiconductor laser for speckle-free full-field imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, B; Huang, X; Lee, M L; Stone, A D; Choma, M A; Cao, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial coherence of laser sources has limited their application to parallel imaging and projection due to coherent artifacts, such as speckle. In contrast, traditional incoherent light sources, such as thermal sources or light emitting diodes (LEDs), provide relatively low power per independent spatial mode. Here, we present a chip-scale, electrically-pumped semiconductor laser based on a novel design, demonstrating high power per mode with much lower spatial coherence than conventional laser sources. The laser resonator was fabricated with a chaotic, D-shaped cavity optimized to achieve highly multimode lasing. Lasing occurs simultaneously and independently in ~1000 modes, and hence the total emission exhibits very low spatial coherence. Speckle-free full-field imaging is demonstrated using the chaotic cavity laser as the illumination source. The power per mode of the sample illumination is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a LED or thermal light source. Such a compact, low-cost source, wh...

  8. Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, James G.

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

  9. D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter...

  10. LIF-imaging and gas-phase diagnostics of laser desorbed MALDI-matrix plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puretzky, A.A.; Geohegan, D.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first gated LIF-imaging and absorption spectroscopy has been performed on laser desorbed plumes from organic crystals which are commonly used as MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) matrices. These plasma diagnostic techniques, including ion probe measurements were employed to investigate the desorbed products, densities, fractional ionization, and velocity distributions of the plume of ejecta which is typically employed as the main desorption product in the mass spectrometry analysis of large biomolecules. Ultraviolet pulsed 193-nm and 248-nm irradiation of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA) crystals were studied to understand the effect of very different gas-phase absorption cross sections measured here for this material. In both cases, LIF imaging revealed two plume components: a fast (maximum {approximately} 0.1 cm/{micro}s) low-intensity component which appear to be 3-HPA fragments, and a slower component of 3-HPA expanding at 0.05 cm/{micro}s. In the case of ArF-laser irradiation, optical absorption spectroscopy indicated a breaking of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in the gas-phase matrix material.

  11. High resolution telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA); Oster, Yale (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  12. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyoohyun

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed ...

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; et al

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  14. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  15. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  16. Spectroscopic characterization and imaging of laser- and unipolar arc-induced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aussems, Damien U. B., E-mail: d.aussems@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER—Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Nieuwegein, NL-3430 BE (Netherlands); Nishijima, Daisuke; Brandt, Christian; Doerner, Russell P. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Cardozo, Niek J. Lopes [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven 5612 AZ (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten plasmas induced by unipolar arcs were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy and imaging, and compared with laser-induced tungsten plasmas. The unipolar arcs were initiated in the linear-plasma simulator PISCES-A at UCSD under fusion relevant conditions. The electron temperature and density of the unipolar arc plasmas were in the range 0.5–0.7?eV and 0.7–2.0?×?10{sup 20?}m{sup ?3}, respectively, and increased with increasing negative bias voltage, but did not correlate with the surface temperature. In comparison, the electron temperature and density of the laser-induced plasmas were in the range 0.6–1.4?eV and 7?×?10{sup 19}–1?×?10{sup 22?}m{sup ?3}, respectively.

  17. Direct Observation of Cosmic Strings Via Their Strong Gravitational Lensing Effect. 1. Predictions for High Resolution Imaging Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasparini, Maria Alice; Marshall, Phil; Treu, Tommaso; /UC, Santa Barbara; Morganson, Eric; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dubath, Florian; /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We use current theoretical estimates for the density of long cosmic strings to predict the number of strong gravitational lensing events in astronomical imaging surveys as a function of angular resolution and survey area. We show that angular resolution is the single most important factor, and that interesting limits on the dimensionless string tension G{mu}/c{sup 2} can be obtained by existing and planned surveys. At the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope (0'.14), it is sufficient to survey of order a square degree -- well within reach of the current HST archive -- to probe the regime G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -8}. If lensing by cosmic strings is not detected, such a survey would improve the limit on the string tension by an order of magnitude on that available from the cosmic microwave background. At the resolution (0'.028) attainable with the next generation of large ground based instruments, both in the radio and the infra-red with adaptive optics, surveying a sky area of order ten square degrees will allow us to probe the G{mu}/c{sup 2} {approx} 10{sup -9} regime. These limits will not be improved significantly by increasing the solid angle of the survey.

  18. Deep Illumination Angular Domain Imaging within Highly Scattering Media Enhanced by Image Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    tissue damage and increasing cancer risks proportionate to the cumulative dose of radiation applied [2 techniques to enhance the spatial image resolution and image contrast and to reduce noise. Keywords: Optical tomography, Angular Domain Imaging, Deep Illumination, Lasers, Tissue Optics, angular filter, Silicon

  19. Digital Image Processing "Cookbook": A method to derive bathymetric data from high spatial resolution multi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Digital Image Processing "Cookbook": A method to derive bathymetric data from high spatial;Processing Method: Overview 1) Viewing of Images Software: ENVI, ArcGIS 2) Data Conversion from DN (digital by step outline, with comments concerning processing methods and accuracy issues, for a methodology

  20. CHANGE DETECTION FOR HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES, BASED ON SIFT DESCRIPTORS AND AN A CONTRARIO APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    promising results. Index Terms-- SAR image, SIFT, change detection, lo- cal descriptors, RANSAC, a contrario-registration step and works on pairs of either optical or SAR images. 2. CHANGE DETECTION FOR MULTI here to use a feature-based approach with no need for prior regis- tration and calibration. This method

  1. HIGH SPATIAL-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF TE INCLUSIONS IN CZT MATERIAL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAMARDA, G.S.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CARINI, G.A.; CUI, Y.; KOHMAN, K.T.; LI, L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2006-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new results from our studies of defects in current single-crystal CdZnTe material. Our previous measurements, carried out on thin ({approx}1 mm) and long (>12 mm) CZT detectors, indicated that small (1-20 {micro}m) Te inclusions can significantly degrade the device's energy resolution and detection efficiency. We are conducting detailed studies of the effects of Te inclusions by employing different characterization techniques with better spatial resolution, such as quantitative fluorescence mapping, X-ray micro-diffraction, and TEM. Also, IR microscopy and gamma-mapping with pulse-shape analysis with higher spatial resolution generated more accurate results in the areas surrounding the micro-defects (Te inclusions). Our results reveal how the performance of CdZnTe detectors is influenced by Te inclusions, such as their spatial distribution, concentration, and size. We also discuss a model of charge transport through areas populated with Te inclusions.

  2. Quantum Mechanical Resolution Limits to Imaging and Spectroscopy in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , advances in CCD detectors and increased computer power have allowed efficient diagnosis of aberrations completely different contrast, resolution limits, and sensitivity to individual atoms. This is true even measurement system, and that the view of the specimen does depend on how you look at it (Pennycook, 2002). #12

  3. Digital phase tightening for improved spatial resolution in millimeter-wave imaging systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Ke, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging systems using millimeter-wave frequencies allow for the possibilities of vehicular radar and concealed weapons detection. By using silicon technology, the integration of millimeter-wave circuits can reach new levels ...

  4. Application of L1 Minimization Technique to Image Super-Resolution and Surface Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talavatifard, Habiballah

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface reconstruction and image enhancement non-linear finite element technique based on minimization of L1 norm of the total variation of the gradient is introduced. Since minimization in the L1 norm is computationally expensive, we seek...

  5. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 ?m, respectively.

  6. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

  7. Background and Scattered Light Subtraction in the High-Resolution Echelle Modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk; Kenneth R. Sembach

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple, effective approach for estimating the on-order backgrounds of spectra taken with the highest-resolution modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scheme for determining the on-order background spectrum uses polynomial fits to the inter-order scattered light visible in the two-dimensional STIS MAMA images. We present a suite of high-resolution STIS spectra to demonstrate that our background subtraction routine produces the correct overall zero point, as judged by the small residual flux levels in the centers of strongly-saturated interstellar absorption lines. Although there are multiple sources of background light in STIS echelle mode data, this simple approach works very well for wavelengths longward of Lyman-alpha. At shorter wavelengths, the smaller order separation and generally lower signal-to-noise ratios of the data can reduce the effectiveness of our background estimation procedure. Slight artifacts in the background-subtracted spectrum can be seen in some cases, particularly at wavelengths <1300 Ang. Most of these are caused by echelle scattering of strong spectral features into the inter-order light. We discuss the limitations of high-resolution STIS data in light of the uncertainties associated with our background subtraction procedure. We compare our background-subtracted STIS spectra with GHRS Ech-A observations of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B and GHRS first-order G160M observations of the early-type star HD 218915. We find no significant differences between the GHRS data and the STIS data reduced with our method in either case.

  8. High resolution imaging with Fresnel interferometric arrays: suitability for exoplanet detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Koechlin; D. Serre; P. Duchon

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new kind of interferometric array that yields images of high dynamic range and large field. The numerous individual apertures in this array form a pattern related to a Fresnel zone plate. This array can be used for astrophysical imaging over a broad spectral bandwidth spanning from the U.V. (50 nanometers) to the I.R. (20 microns). Due to the long focal lengths involved, this instrument requires formation-flying of two space borne vessels. We present the concept and study the S/N ratio in different situations, then apply these results to probe the suitability of this concept to detect exoplanets.

  9. High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the distribution of vessels in the rat brain. Angiography is able to use the blood flow in the brain of the living into a test tube filled with fluorocarbon fluid for susceptibility matching. MR Images were acquired at a horizontal 16.4 T scanner with a homemade microstrip volume coil, using gradient echo sequences

  10. High-resolution, rapid image acquisition for studying biological structures and dynamic cellular processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    can be fully integrated with their IX (inverted) and BX (upright) microscopes. The combination) with online analysis. The advanced autofocus gives consistently clear images, and TTL pulse triggering to specific functions are simply selected and linked together in the order required.These command icons

  11. Image resolution analysis: a new, robust approach to seismic survey design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzimeas, Constantinos

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    to optimize o?set and azimuth coverage are prone to fail (especially in complex geological or structural settings) in their imaging predictions. The reason for the potential failure of these commonly used approaches derives from the fact that they do not take...

  12. High spatial resolution mapping of deposition layers on plasma facing materials by laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Qingmei; Li, Cong; Hai, Ran; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin, E-mail: hding@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optical Electronic Technology, Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams, Chinese Ministry of Education, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhou, Yan; Yan, Longwen; Duan, Xuru [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, No. 3 South Section 3, Circle Road 2, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser ablation microprobe time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (LAM-TOF-MS) system with high spatial resolution, ?20 nm in depth and ?500 ?m or better on the surface, is developed to analyze the composition distributions of deposition layers on the first wall materials or first mirrors in tokamak. The LAM-TOF-MS system consists of a laser ablation microprobe combined with a TOF-MS and a data acquisition system based on a LabVIEW program software package. Laser induced ablation combined with TOF-MS is an attractive method to analyze the depth profile of deposited layer with successive laser shots, therefore, it can provide information for composition reconstruction of the plasma wall interaction process. In this work, we demonstrate that the LAM-TOF-MS system is capable of characterizing the depth profile as well as mapping 2D composition of deposited film on the molybdenum first mirror retrieved from HL-2A tokamak, with particular emphasis on some of the species produced during the ablation process. The presented LAM-TOF-MS system provides not only the 3D characterization of deposition but also the removal efficiency of species of concern.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, fluorescence-based imaging system was developed for identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer-matrix composites (PMCs). PMCs have important applications where low weight and high mechanical strength are needed. One concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to high temperatures. Traditional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are capable of detecting physical flaws, such as cracks and delaminations, but have not proven effective for detecting initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting thermal damage on large, irregularly shaped surfaces. This paper describes instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite/epoxy components.

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  15. High-resolution imaging of latch-up sites in CMOS IC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Mayank

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in well. This P value is still too high to eliminate latch-up susceptibility. In a P-well or twin-tub technology forming a vertical NPN parasitic transistor, the P value is even higher because of the higher mobility of the minority carriers in the base... by this electron beam technique is highly sensitive to even a small electric field. The voltage applied to the device is an alternating signal with high frequency synchronized with a multiple of the SEM line scan rate. Comparing an image of a unlatched circuit...

  16. arecibo high resolution: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84 Using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) to calibrate advanced very high resolution radiometer Geosciences Websites Summary: Using Moderate Resolution Imaging...

  17. Laser induced fluorescence imaging of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, W.G.; Meyer, K.E.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Perl, D.R. [N.A.S. North Island, San Diego, CA (United States). Naval Aviation Depot; Kulowitch, P.J. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Patuxent River, MD (United States). Aircraft Div.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, fluorescence based imaging system has been developed that is capable of identifying regions of thermal damage in polymer matrix composites (PMCs). These materials are playing an increasingly important role in the production of high performance vehicles and aircraft, where their low weight and high mechanical strength, combined with advancements in manufacturing technology, ensure increased use for a variety of applications. Of particular concern in the aerospace industry is the tendency of some PMC materials to become irreversibly damaged when exposed to elevated temperatures. Traditional nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques are capable of detecting physical anomalies such as cracks and delaminations but cannot detect initial heat damage, which occurs on a molecular scale. Spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced fluorescence provide an attractive means for detecting this type of damage and are amenable to imaging large, irregularly shaped surfaces. In this report the authors describe instrumentation capable of rapidly detecting thermal damage in graphite epoxy components and suggest improvements which will enable this technology to make quantitative judgments concerning the mechanical strength properties of heat damaged specimens.

  18. A Super-high Angular Resolution Principle for Coded-mask X-ray Imaging Beyond the Diffraction Limit of Single Pinhole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Zhang; Shuang Nan Zhang

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High angular resolution X-ray imaging is always demanded by astrophysics and solar physics, which can be realized by coded-mask imaging with very long mask-detector distance in principle. Previously the diffraction-interference effect has been thought to degrade coded-mask imaging performance dramatically at low energy end with very long mask-detector distance. In this work the diffraction-interference effect is described with numerical calculations, and the diffraction-interference cross correlation reconstruction method (DICC) is developed in order to overcome the imaging performance degradation. Based on the DICC, a super-high angular resolution principle (SHARP) for coded-mask X-ray imaging is proposed. The feasibility of coded mask imaging beyond the diffraction limit of single pinhole is demonstrated with simulations. With the specification that the mask element size of 50* 50 square micrometers and the mask-detector distance of 50 m, the achieved angular resolution is 0.32 arcsec above about 10 keV, and 0.36 arcsec at 1.24 keV where diffraction can not be neglected. The on-axis source location accuracy is better than 0.02 arcsec. Potential applications for solar observations and wide-field X-ray monitors are also shortly discussed.

  19. Single-shot 35 fs temporal resolution electron shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoby, C. M.; Li, R. K.; Threlkeld, E.; To, H.; Musumeci, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain single-shot time-resolved shadowgraph images of the electromagnetic fields resulting from the interaction of a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse with a metal surface. Using a high brightness relativistic electron beam and a high streaking speed radiofrequency deflector, we report <35 fs temporal resolution enabling a direct visualization of the retarded-time dominated field evolution which follows the laser-induced charge emission. A model including the finite signal propagation speed well reproduces the data and yields measurements of fundamental parameters in short pulse laser-matter interaction such as the amount of emitted charge and the emission time scale.

  20. High-resolution 25 \\mu m imaging of the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, M; Okamoto, Y K; Kataza, H; Yamashita, T; Miyata, T; Sako, S; Fujiyoshi, T; Sakon, I; Fujiwara, H; Kamizuka, T; Mulders, G D; Lopez-Rodriguez, E; Packham, C; Onaka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 \\mu m using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of equal numbers of objects belonging to the two categories defined by Meeus et al. (2001); 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (at disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is hard to be resolved with 8 meter class telescopes in Q-band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. It indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 \\mu m, we suggest that many, not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 \\mu m supports that group II disks have continuous at disk geometr...

  1. Development of a high-frame-rate high-resolution particle image velocimetry system and applications to the characterization of synthetic jet actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilarranz, Jose Luis

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 3,000 frames per second and a maximum image resolution of 512 by 512 pixels. The performance of these systems was demonstrated by utilizing them to experimentally characterize the flowfield generated by a synthetic jet actuator, operating at a...

  2. Infrared Scattering Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Using An External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser For Nanoscale Chemical Imaging And Spectroscopy of Explosive Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, Ian M.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Josberger, Erik E.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

    2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) is an apertureless superfocusing technique that uses the antenna properties of a conducting atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to achieve infrared spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. The instrument can be used either in imaging mode, where a fixed wavelength light source is tuned to a molecular resonance and the AFM raster scans an image, or in spectroscopy mode where the AFM is held stationary over a feature of interest and the light frequency is varied to obtain a spectrum. In either case, a strong, stable, coherent infrared source is required. Here we demonstrate the integration of a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) into an s-SNOM and use it to obtain infrared spectra of microcrystals of chemicals adsorbed onto gold substrates. Residues of the explosive compound tetryl was deposited onto gold substrates. s-SNOM experiments were performed in the 1260-1400 cm?1 tuning range of the ECQCL, corresponding to the NO2 symmetric stretch vibrational fingerprint region. Vibrational infrared spectra were collected on individual chemical domains with a collection area of *500nm2 and compared to ensemble averaged far-field reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) results.

  3. Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    electrical and industrial applications · Thumbnail Image Gallery -- Allows quick search of stored images Marker Function · Auto Hot/Cold spot marker function shows a spot within the area that automatically% of reading Image Storage (1GB micro SD card) 1000 Images 1000 Images 1000 Images Emissivity Table 0.1 to 1

  4. Scanning laser photoluminescence imaging system for nondestructive evaluation of direct bandgap materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Inchul

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optoelectronic device applications for light generators such as light emitting diodes (LED) and lasers. The use of LEDs in digital watches and calculators displays is well known. LEDs are also used as lamps and optoisolators. Semiconductor lasers...

  5. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  6. Two-dimensional imaging of gas-to-particle transition in flames by laser-induced nanoplasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiyang [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Reactor Engineering and Safety of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Shuiqing, E-mail: lishuiqing@tsinghua.edu.cn; Ren, Yihua; Yao, Qiang [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Law, Chung K. [Center for Combustion Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional imaging of gas/particle phase transition of metal oxides in their native high-temperature flow conditions, using laser-driven localized nanoplasmas, was obtained by utilizing the gap between the excitation energies of the gas and particle phases such that only the Ti atoms in the particle phase were selectively excited without detectable Bremsstrahlung background. These in situ images of the particle phase Ti distribution allow the quantitative visualization of the transition of the gas precursors to the nanoparticle phase across the flame sheet as well as diffusion of the particle concentration in the post-flame zone.

  7. Parallel self-mixing imaging system based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, John R.; Baque, Johnathon L.; Lim, Yah Leng; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Rakic, Aleksandar D

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the feasibility of a massively parallel self-mixing imaging system based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) to measure surface profiles of displacement,distance, velocity, and liquid flow rate. The concept of the system is demonstrated using a prototype to measure the velocity at different radial points on a rotating disk, and the velocity profile of diluted milk in a custom built diverging-converging planar flow channel. It is envisaged that a scaled up version of the parallel self-mixing imaging system will enable real-time surface profiling, vibrometry, and flowmetry.

  8. High-resolution imaging of the molecular outflows in two mergers: IRAS17208-0014 and NGC1614

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Burillo, S; Usero, A; Aalto, S; Colina, L; Alonso-Herrero, A; Hunt, L K; Arribas, S; Costagliola, F; Labiano, A; Neri, R; Pereira-Santaella, M; Tacconi, L J; van der Werf, P P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy evolution scenarios predict that the feedback of star formation and nuclear activity (AGN) can drive the transformation of gas-rich spiral mergers into ULIRGs, and, eventually, lead to the build-up of QSO/elliptical hosts. We study the role that star formation and AGN feedback have in launching and maintaining the molecular outflows in two starburst-dominated advanced mergers, NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, by analyzing the distribution and kinematics of their molecular gas reservoirs. We have used the PdBI array to image with high spatial resolution (0.5"-1.2") the CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) line emissions in NGC1614 and IRAS17208-0014, respectively. The velocity fields of the gas are analyzed and modeled to find the evidence of molecular outflows in these sources and characterize the mass, momentum and energy of these components. While most (>95%) of the CO emission stems from spatially-resolved (~2-3kpc-diameter) rotating disks, we also detect in both mergers the emission from high-velocity line wings that ex...

  9. Laser device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

  10. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  11. High resolution imaging of NGC 2346 with GSAOI/GeMS: disentangling the planetary nebula molecular structure to understand its origin and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchado, Arturo; Villaver, Eva; Garcia-Segura, Guillermo; Shaw, Richard A; Garcia-Hernandez, D A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high spatial resolution ($\\approx$ 60--90 milliarcseconds) images of the molecular hydrogen emission in the Planetary Nebula (PN) NGC 2346. The data were acquired during the System Verification of the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System + Gemini South Adaptive Optics Imager. At the distance of NGC 2346, 700 pc, the physical resolution corresponds to $\\approx$ 56 AU, which is slightly higher than that an [N II] image of NGC 2346 obtained with HST/WFPC2. With this unprecedented resolution we were able to study in detail the structure of the H$_2$ gas within the nebula for the first time. We found it to be composed of knots and filaments, which at lower resolution had appeared to be a uniform torus of material. We explain how the formation of the clumps and filaments in this PN is consistent with a mechanism in which a central hot bubble of nebular gas surrounding the central star has been depressurized, and the thermal pressure of the photoionized region drives the fragmentation of the swep...

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARE RIBBONS AND ITS IMPLICATION ON THE THICK-TARGET BEAM MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krucker, Saem; Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Jeffrey, N. L. S.; Battaglia, M.; Kontar, E. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Benz, A. O.; Csillaghy, A., E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.edu [Institute of 4D Technologies, School of Engineering, University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on high-resolution optical and hard X-ray observations of solar flare ribbons seen during the GOES X6.5 class white-light flare of 2006 December 6. The data consist of imaging observations at 430 nm (the Fraunhofer G band) taken by the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope with the hard X-rays observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. The two sets of data show closely similar ribbon structures, strongly suggesting that the flare emissions in white light and in hard X-rays have physically linked emission mechanisms. While the source structure along the ribbons is resolved at both wavelengths (length {approx} 30''), only the G-band observations resolve the width of the ribbon, with values between {approx}0.''5 and {approx}1.''8. The unresolved hard X-ray observations reveal an even narrower ribbon in hard X-rays (the main footpoint has a width perpendicular to the ribbon of <1.''1 compared to the G-band width of {approx}1.''8) suggesting that the hard X-ray emission comes from the sharp leading edge of the G-band ribbon. Applying the thick-target beam model, the derived energy deposition rate is >5 x 10{sup 12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} provided by an electron flux of 1 x 10{sup 20} electrons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} above 18 keV. This requires that the beam density of electrons above 18 keV be at least 1 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. Even if field lines converge toward the chromospheric footpoints, the required beam in the corona has too high a density to be described as a dilute tail population on top of a Maxwellian core. We discuss this issue and others associated with this extreme event, which poses serious questions to the standard thick target beam interpretation of solar flares.

  13. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  14. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  15. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  16. Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  17. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  18. Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

  19. Performance predictions for a laser intensified thermal beam for use in high resolution Focused Ion Beam instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouters, S H W; Notermans, R P M J W; Debernardi, N; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J; Vredenbregt, E J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-ionization of a laser-cooled and compressed atomic beam from a high-flux thermal source can be used to create a high-brightness ion beam for use in Focus Ion Beam (FIB) instruments. Here we show using calculations and Doppler cooling simulations that an atomic rubidium beam with a brightness of $2.1 \\times 10^7 A/(m^2\\,sr\\,eV)$ at a current of 1 nA can be created using a compact 5 cm long 2D magneto-optical compressor which is more than an order of magnitude better than the current state of the art Liquid Metal Ion Source.

  20. A new generic method for the semi-automatic extraction of river and road networks in low and mid-resolution satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzini, Jacopo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dillard, Scott [PNNL; Soille, Pierre [EC JRC

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the problem of semi-automatic extraction of road or hydrographic networks in satellite images. For that purpose, we propose an approach combining concepts arising from mathematical morphology and hydrology. The method exploits both geometrical and topological characteristics of rivers/roads and their tributaries in order to reconstruct the complete networks. It assumes that the images satisfy the following two general assumptions, which are the minimum conditions for a road/river network to be identifiable and are usually verified in low- to mid-resolution satellite images: (i) visual constraint: most pixels composing the network have similar spectral signature that is distinguishable from most of the surrounding areas; (ii) geometric constraint: a line is a region that is relatively long and narrow, compared with other objects in the image. While this approach fully exploits local (roads/rivers are modeled as elongated regions with a smooth spectral signature in the image and a maximum width) and global (they are structured like a tree) characteristics of the networks, further directional information about the image structures is incorporated. Namely, an appropriate anisotropic metric is designed by using both the characteristic features of the target network and the eigen-decomposition of the gradient structure tensor of the image. Following, the geodesic propagation from a given network seed with this metric is combined with hydrological operators for overland flow simulation to extract the paths which contain most line evidence and identify them with the target network.

  1. Design of a near-field coded aperture cameras for high-resolution medical and industrial gamma-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accorsi, Roberto, 1971-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coded Aperture Imaging is a technique originally developed for X-ray astronomy, where typical imaging problems are characterized by far-field geometry and an object made of point sources distributed over a mainly dark ...

  2. High-resolution wave-theory-based ultrasound reflection imaging using the split-step fourier and globally optimized fourier finite-difference methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Lianjie

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing ultrasonic reflection imaging are taught utilizing a split-step Fourier propagator in which the reconstruction is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wave number domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wave number domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the tissue being imaged (e.g., breast tissue). Results from various data input to the method indicate significant improvements are provided in both image quality and resolution.

  3. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  4. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  5. High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Bevin

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical advantages, when compared to P-wave profiling, such as high-resolution potential, greater sensitivities to lithologic changes and insensitivity to the water table and pore ...

  6. Seeing inside chips and cells: High-resolution subsurface imaging of integrated circuits, quantum dots and subcellular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques for IC failure analysis ­ solid immersion lens microscopy and solid immersion lens thermography improvement from >5µm to a resolution of 1.3µm, representing the best subsurface thermography to date

  7. Applicability of 2-D Time-Lapse High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Approach to Image Natural Salt-Dissolution and Subsidence in Central Kansas and Improved Post-Processed Vibroseis Data Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Daniel

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of 2-D time-lapse imaging for monitoring natural dissolution of the Hutchinson Salt in eastern Reno County, Kansas was shown to be restricted when comparing high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired ...

  8. TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Buizer, James M. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS N232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian, E-mail: jdebuizer@sofia.usra.edu [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

  9. Imaging the ultrafast Kerr effect, free carrier generation, relaxation and ablation dynamics of Lithium Niobate irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, Mario, E-mail: mario@io.cfmac.csic.es; Siegel, Jan, E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Solis, Javier [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of high-power single 130 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses with the surface of Lithium Niobate is experimentally investigated in this work. The use of fs-resolution time-resolved microscopy allows us to separately observe the instantaneous optical Kerr effect induced by the pulse and the generation of a free electron plasma. The maximum electron density is reached 550?fs after the peak of the Kerr effect, confirming the presence of a delayed carrier generation mechanism. We have also observed the appearance of transient Newton rings during the ablation process, related to optical interference of the probe beam reflected at the front and back surface of the ablating layer. Finally, we have analyzed the dynamics of the photorefractive effect on a much longer time scale by measuring the evolution of the transmittance of the irradiated area for different fluences below the ablation threshold.

  10. The linac coherent light source single particle imaging road map

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aquila, A.; Barty, A.; Bostedt, C.; Boutet, S.; Carini, G.; dePonte, D.; Drell, P.; Doniach, S.; Downing, K. H.; Earnest, T.; et al

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses from free-electron laser sources allow the imaging of individual particles in a single shot. Early experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have led to rapid progress in the field and, so far, coherent diffractive images have been recorded from biological specimens, aerosols, and quantum systems with a few-tens-of-nanometers resolution. In March 2014, LCLS held a workshop to discuss the scientific and technical challenges for reaching the ultimate goal of atomic resolution with single-shot coherent diffractive imaging. This paper summarizes the workshop findings and presents the roadmap toward reaching atomic resolution, 3D imaging at free-electronmore »laser sources.« less

  11. Synchronous Characterization of Semiconductor Microcavity Laser Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a high-resolution double-channel imaging method used to synchronously map the intensity- and optical-frequency-distribution of a laser beam in the plane orthogonal to the propagation direction. The synchronous measurement allows us to show that the laser frequency is an inhomogeneous distribution below threshold, but that it becomes homogeneous across the fundamental Gaussian mode above threshold. The beam's tails deviations from the Gaussian shape, however, are accompanied by sizeable fluctuations in the laser wavelength, possibly deriving from manufacturing details and from the influence of spontaneous emission in the very low intensity wings. In addition to the synchronous spatial characterization, a temporal analysis at any given point in the beam cross-section is carried out. Using this method, the beam homogeneity and spatial shape, energy density, energy center and the defects-related spectrum can also be extracted from these high-resolution pictures.

  12. Imaging latch-up sites in CMOS integrated circuits using laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenech, Jean-Francois

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nationale Superieure des Telecommunications, Paris, France Chairman of Advisory Committee: Or. Donald Parker A novel approach to analyze latch-up sites in CMOS integrated circuits using a laser scanner has been developed. A CW laser beam is scanned... of the n-tub is high enough to overcompensate the p substrate. Therefore, the p-channel device suffers from excessive doping effects. Another approach is to use two separate tubs (Fig. 5) implanted into very lightly doped n-type silicon. This "twin...

  13. Annual Scientific Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Henry C. Kapteyn

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we use coherent short-wavelength light generated using high-order harmonic generation as a probe of laser-plasma dynamics and phase transitions on femtosecond time-scales. The interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with materials and plasmas is relevant to stockpile stewardship, to understanding the equation of state of matter at high pressures and temperatures, and to plasma concepts such as the fast-ignitor ICF fusion concept and laser-based particle acceleration. Femtosecond laser technology makes it possible to use a small-scale setup to generate 20fs pulses with average power >10W at multiple kHz repetition rates, that can be focused to intensities in excess of 1017W/cm2. These lasers can be used either to rapidly heat materials to initiate phase transitions, or to create laser plasmas over a wide parameter space. These lasers can also be used to generate fully spatially coherent XUV beams with which to probe these materials and plasma systems. We are in process of implementing imaging studies of plasma hydrodynamics and warm, dense matter. The data will be compared with simulation codes of laser-plasma interactions, making it possible to refine and validate these codes.

  14. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  15. HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Z CANIS MAJORIS SYSTEM DURING QUIESCENCE AND OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas [Astrophysics Department, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Rice, Emily L. [Department of Engineering Science and Physics, College of Staten Island, City University of New York, 2800 Victory Bvld, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J. Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kraus, Adam L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Ireland, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, New South Wales, NSW 2109 (Australia); Beichman, Charles [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dekany, Richard [Caltech Optical Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Parry, Ian R. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young ({approx}<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, was gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high-resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determines that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly ({approx}30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 {mu}m CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings clarify previous analyses of the origin of the CO emission in this complex system.

  16. Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High Temporal Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High and is mainly limited by sensitivity. Here, signal-to-noise gains at high magnetic fields (7 Tesla

  17. Robust Bayesian super-resolution approach via sparsity enforcing a priori for near-field aeroacoustic source imaging $

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    manufacturing in wind tunnel tests, aeroacoustic comfort in transportation, performance of stator and rotor $Paper partly based on that accepted by 2012IEEE International Conference on Image Processing (ICIP), pp

  18. Chemical imaging at 30 nm spatial resolution in 2-d and 3-d with Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Frank

    sensitive imaging of environmental biofilms; speciation and quantitative mapping of metals in natural river in January 1997, after serving on the editorial board since 1986. He has worked with AFCC since 2008 on fuel

  19. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  20. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration-resolution scattering signals for such samples in conventional experiments11,12 . Damage is caused by energy deposited

  1. Tracking of the advance of the coagulation front in a laser irradiated tissue using ultrasound imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagathesan, Shoban Srikrishna

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical U~er irn. erl'ace ? Ilclp IX TRODI ETIO'U A. Photo-thermo chen. i al proce. , s ol' tiss!re coagulation Laser irradi"tion on thc tissue, causes the photons t, i peilp. rate into lhc!issue and rcsul!s in energy oistribution based on thc tissue.... 29 shorvs thc into?!siri&s a! the start, of laser irradi'!tion. A sig&fificant r:. hang& in thr tissue coagulation is indicatcxl in fig. 30 v I!ich i?dies!cs the final stage of coagulat!on, just bel'ore ablation. The contours Iiuki?g points oi...

  2. Imaging the foveal cone mosaic with a MEMS-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In: Porter J (ed), Adaptive optics for vision science:In: Black A (ed), Optics. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley; 113.Optical Society of America a-Optics Image Science and Vision

  3. Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S. (AMNH)

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

  4. Three-Dimensional Momentum Imaging of Electron Wave Packet Interference in Few-Cycle Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopal, R.; Simeonidis, K.; Moshammer, R.; Ergler, Th.; Duerr, M.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K.-U.; Tschuch, S.; Schroeter, C.-D.; Bauer, D.; Ullrich, J.; Rudenko, A.; Herrwerth, O.; Uphues, Th.; Schultze, M.; Goulielmakis, E.; Uiberacker, M.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a reaction microscope, three-dimensional (3D) electron (and ion) momentum (P) spectra have been recorded for carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) stabilized few-cycle (approx5 fs), intense (approx4x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses (740 nm) impinging on He. Preferential emission of low-energy electrons (E{sub e}<15 eV) to either hemisphere is observed as a function of the CEP. Clear interference patterns emerge in P space at CEPs with maximum asymmetry, interpreted as attosecond interferences of rescattered and directly emitted electron wave packets by means of a simple model.

  5. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  6. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S., E-mail: Sandra.VanAert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Dekker, A. J. den [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Delft Center for Systems and Control, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Rosenauer, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Bremen, Otto-Hahn-Allee NW1, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Sijbers, J. [iMinds-Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  7. Use of high resolution satellite images for tracking of changes in the lineament structure, caused by earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arellano-Baeza, A A; Trejo-Soto, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last decades strong efforts have been made to apply new spaceborn technologies to the study and possible forecast of strong earthquakes. In this study we use ASTER/TERRA multispectral satellite images for detection and analysis of changes in the system of lineaments previous to a strong earthquake. A lineament is a straight or a somewhat curved feature in an image, which it is possible to detect by a special processing of images based on directional filtering and or Hough transform. "The Lineament Extraction and Stripes Statistic Analysis" (LESSA) software package, developed by Zlatopolsy (1992, 1997). We assume that the lineaments allow to detect, at least partially, the presence ruptures in the Earths crust, and therefore enable one to follow the changes in the system of faults and fractures associated with strong earthquakes. We analysed 6 earthquakes occurred in the Pacific coast of the South America and XXX with the Richter scale magnitude >4.5. They were located in the regions with small season...

  8. Single particle microscopy with nanometer resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Jacob; Karin Groot-Berning; Sebastian Wolf; Stefan Ulm; Luc Couturier; Ulrich G. Poschinger; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate nanoscopic transmission microscopy relying on a deterministic single particle source. This increases the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to conventional microscopy methods, which employ Poissonian particle sources. We use laser-cooled ions extracted from a Paul trap, and demonstrate remote imaging of transmissive objects with a resolution of 8.6 $\\pm$ 2.0nm and a minimum two-sample deviation of the beam position of 1.5nm. Detector dark counts can be suppressed by 6 orders of magnitudes through gating by the extraction event. The deterministic nature of our source enables an information-gain driven approach to imaging. We demonstrate this by performing efficient beam characterization based on a Bayes experiment design method.

  9. High-resolution observations of the shock wave behavior for sunspot oscillations with the interface region imaging spectrograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, H.; DeLuca, E.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Golub, L.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Weber, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, B.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Kleint, L.; Cheung, M.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Tarbell, T. D.; Wuelser, J. P. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V., E-mail: hui.tian@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); and others

    2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results of sunspot oscillations from observations by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. The strongly nonlinear oscillation is identified in both the slit-jaw images and the spectra of several emission lines formed in the transition region and chromosphere. We first apply a single Gaussian fit to the profiles of the Mg II 2796.35 Å, C II 1335.71 Å, and Si IV 1393.76 Å lines in the sunspot. The intensity change is ?30%. The Doppler shift oscillation reveals a sawtooth pattern with an amplitude of ?10 km s{sup –1} in Si IV. The Si IV oscillation lags those of C II and Mg II by ?6 and ?25 s, respectively. The line width suddenly increases as the Doppler shift changes from redshift to blueshift. However, we demonstrate that this increase is caused by the superposition of two emission components. We then perform detailed analysis of the line profiles at a few selected locations on the slit. The temporal evolution of the line core is dominated by the following behavior: a rapid excursion to the blue side, accompanied by an intensity increase, followed by a linear decrease of the velocity to the red side. The maximum intensity slightly lags the maximum blueshift in Si IV, whereas the intensity enhancement slightly precedes the maximum blueshift in Mg II. We find a positive correlation between the maximum velocity and deceleration, a result that is consistent with numerical simulations of upward propagating magnetoacoustic shock waves.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

  11. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyu, B., E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, M. Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  12. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  13. Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G. Adriany, A. Shmuel, E. Yacoub, P.-F. van de Moortele, X. Hu, K. Ugurbil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G was made possible by signal-to-noise gains at the high magnetic field of 7 Tesla and by using a novel RF

  14. Viewable image size Max view area (W x H)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Power management Ergonomics Emission standards Environmental Preset resolutions Dual image resolution to portrait (requires image rotation support from graphics controller, do not support image rotation under

  15. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Weber, A.Z.; Hickner, M.A.

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-content profiles across the membrane electrode assembly of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell were measured using high-resolution neutron imaging and compared to mathematical-modeling predictions. It was found that the membrane held considerably more water than the other membrane-electrode constituents (catalyst layers, microporous layers, and macroporous gas-diffusion layers) at low temperatures, 40 and 60 C. The water content in the membrane and the assembly decreased drastically at 80 C where vapor transport and a heat-pipe effect began to dominate the water removal from the membrane-electrode assembly. In the regimes where vapor transport was significant, the through-plane water-content profile skewed towards the cathode. Similar trends were observed as the relative humidity of the inlet gases was lowered. This combined experimental and modeling approach has been beneficial in rationalizing the results of each and given insight into future directions for new experimental work and refinements to currently available models.

  16. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  17. Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier; Lacoste, Thilo D.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical ruler based on ultrahigh-resolution colocalization of single fluorescent probes is described. Two unique families of fluorophores are used, namely energy-transfer fluorescent beads and semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) quantum dots, that can be excited by a single laser wavelength but emit at different wavelengths. A novel multicolor sample-scanning confocal microscope was constructed which allows one to image each fluorescent light emitter, free of chromatic aberrations, by scanning the sample with nanometer scale steps using a piezo-scanner. The resulting spots are accurately localized by fitting them to the known shape of the excitation point-spread-function of the microscope.

  18. Complete Characterization of Molecular Dynamics in Ultrashort Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feuerstein, B.; Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Zrost, K.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Niederhausen, T.; Thumm, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany); James R. Macdonald Laboratory, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506-2604 (United States)

    2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction Microscope-based, complete, and time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging of vibrating and dissociating D{sub 2}{sup +} molecules with femtosecond time-resolution allowed us to perform an internuclear distance (R-)dependent Fourier analysis of the corresponding wave packets. Calculations demonstrate that the obtained two-dimensional R-dependent frequency spectra enable the complete characterization of the wave packet dynamics and directly visualize the field-modified molecular potential curves in intense, ultrashort laser pulses.

  19. Highly Nonlinear Luminescence Induced by Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Surfaces with Continuous-Wave Laser Illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on highly nonlinear luminescence being observed from individual spherical gold nanoparticles immobilized on a borosilicate glass surface and illuminated by continuous-wave (CW) lasers with relatively low power. The nonlinear luminescence shows optical super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit in three dimensions compared to the scatting of the excitation laser light. The luminescence intensity from most nanoparticles is proportional to the 5th--7th power of the excitation laser power and has wide excitation and emission spectra across the visible wavelength range. Strong nonlinear luminescence is only observed near the glass surface. High optical nonlinearity excited by low CW laser power is related to a long-lived dark state of the gold nanoparticles, where the excitation light is strongly absorbed. This phenomenon has potential biological applications in super-resolution and deep tissue imaging.

  20. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  1. Note: Design and construction of a multi-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-Ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertens, J. C. E.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh [Materials Science and Engineering, Security and Defense Systems Initiative, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, ISTB4, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5604 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Security and Defense Systems Initiative, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, ISTB4, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5604 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and construction of a high resolution modular x-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is described. The approach for meeting a specified set of performance goals tailored toward experimental versatility is highlighted. The instrument is unique in its detector and x-ray source configuration, both of which enable elevated optimization of spatial and temporal resolution. The process for component selection is provided. The selected components are specified, the custom component design discussed, and the integration of both into a fully functional XCT instrument is outlined. The novelty of this design is a new lab-scale detector and imaging optimization through x-ray source and detector modularity.

  2. Characterisation of deuterium spectra from laser driven multi-species sources by employing differentially filtered image plate detectors in Thomson spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alejo, A.; Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk; Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Green, A.; Jung, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Nersisyan, G. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Clarke, R.; Green, J. S.; Notley, M. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Fernandez, J. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Fuchs, J. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Morrison, J. T. [Propulsion Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Lab, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H. [Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for characterising the full spectrum of deuteron ions emitted by laser driven multi-species ion sources is discussed. The procedure is based on using differential filtering over the detector of a Thompson parabola ion spectrometer, which enables discrimination of deuterium ions from heavier ion species with the same charge-to-mass ratio (such as C{sup 6+}, O{sup 8+}, etc.). Commonly used Fuji Image plates were used as detectors in the spectrometer, whose absolute response to deuterium ions over a wide range of energies was calibrated by using slotted CR-39 nuclear track detectors. A typical deuterium ion spectrum diagnosed in a recent experimental campaign is presented, which was produced from a thin deuterated plastic foil target irradiated by a high power laser.

  3. angstrom resolution structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaged, but also allows each material Pennycook, Steve 8 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  4. Final Scientific/Technical Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Kapteyn

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop experimental techniques for using coherent extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation generated using the high-order harmonic generation technique, as an illumination source for studies of high-density plasmas relevant to the stockpile stewardship mission. In this project, we made considerable progress, including the first demonstration of imaging of dynamic processes using this coherent ultrashort pulse light. This work also stimulated considerable progress in the development of the required ultrashort EUV pulses, and in the development of new laser technologies that have been commercialized. We also demonstrated the first EUV sources that exhibit full intrinsic optical coherence. This work resulted in 12 publications.

  5. Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite Images from the 2003 Northern & evaluation · High-resolution satellite imagery · Images from Boumerdes, Algeria · Semi-automated damage are most damaged? ­ Effects in less populated areas · Earthquake reconnaissance time wasted "looking

  6. Injection-controlled laser resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

  7. Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buratto, Steven K. [UC Santa Barbara

    2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

  8. High resolution data acquisition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  9. High resolution data acquisition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Glenn W. (Los Alamos, NM); Fuller, Kenneth R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  10. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  11. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  12. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventyTechnologiesfacilityImaging

  13. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print The

  14. Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen StorageITERITERBuilding EnergyImaging Print

  15. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gourley, M.F. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  16. Image processing applications in NDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive examination (NDE) can be defined as a technique or collection of techniques that permits one to determine some property of a material or object without damaging the object. There are a large number of such techniques and most of them use visual imaging in one form or another. They vary from holographic interferometry where displacements under stress are measured to the visual inspection of an objects surface to detect cracks after penetrant has been applied. The use of image processing techniques on the images produced by NDE is relatively new and can be divided into three general categories: classical image enhancement; mensuration techniques; and quantitative sensitometry. An example is discussed of how image processing techniques are used to nondestructively and destructively test the product throughout its life cycle. The product that will be followed is the microballoon target used in the laser fusion program. The laser target is a small (50 to 100 ..mu..m - dia) glass sphere with typical wall thickness of 0.5 to 6 ..mu..m. The sphere may be used as is or may be given a number of coatings of any number of materials. The beads are mass produced by the millions and the first nondestructive test is to separate the obviously bad beads (broken or incomplete) from the good ones. After this has been done, the good beads must be inspected for spherocity and wall thickness uniformity. The microradiography of the glass, uncoated bead is performed on a specially designed low-energy x-ray machine. The beads are mounted in a special jig and placed on a Kodak high resolution plate in a vacuum chamber that contains the x-ray source. The x-ray image is made with an energy less that 2 keV and the resulting images are then inspected at a magnification of 500 to 1000X. Some typical results are presented.

  17. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

  18. A camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-X-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Alameda, J; Woods, B; Frank, M; Bogan, M J; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Hajdu, J; Shapiro, D

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser. The camera consists of a laterally-graded multilayer mirror which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter both for wavelength and angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from non-sample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates on to a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beamstop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the FLASH FEL (i.e. between 6 nm and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32 nm, 16 nm, 13.5 nm, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH free-electron laser with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance.

  19. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  20. Device for translating negative film image to a line scan

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, G.W.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A negative film reader records high-resolution optical density changes across negative film radiographic images to allow precise image dimensions to be determined. A laser light source capable of high-resolution focusing is passed through an intensity control filter, focused by a lens, and reflected off a mirror to focus in the plane of the negative film. The light transmitted through the film is collected by a second lens and directed to a photo diode detector which senses the transmitted intensity. The output of the photo diode signal amplifier is sent to the Y-axis input of an X-Y recorder. The film sample is transported in a plane perpendicular to the beam axis by means of a slide. The film position is monitored, with the signal amplified and recorded as the X-axis on the X-Y recorder. The linear dimensions and positions of image components can be determined by direct measurement of the amplified recording.

  1. A laser speckle based position sensing technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

  2. Laser transmissionbackscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano, Yoshihide

    of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective of cirrus clouds by use of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board National Oceanic and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission

  3. BNL | ICS Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    due to the phase-contrast effect. This method will be useful for quantitative computed tomography applications of Thomson sources. High-resolution radiographic image of a wasp...

  4. Monte Carlo study for optimal conditions in single-shot imaging with femtosecond x-ray laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jaehyun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense x-ray pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable the unveiling of atomic structure in material and biological specimens via ultrafast single-shot exposures. As the radiation is intense enough to destroy the sample, a new sample must be provided for each x-ray pulse. These single-particle delivery schemes require careful optimization, though systematic study to find such optimal conditions is still lacking. We have investigated two major single-particle delivery methods: particle injection as flying objects and membrane-mount as fixed targets. The optimal experimental parameters were searched for via Monte Carlo simulations to discover that the maximum single-particle hit rate achievable is close to 40%.

  5. OCDR guided laser ablation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasilva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Colston, Jr., Bill W. (Livermore, CA); James, Dale L. (Tracy, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guided laser ablation device. The device includes a mulitmode laser ablation fiber that is surrounded by one or more single mode optical fibers that are used to image in the vicinity of the laser ablation area to prevent tissue damage. The laser ablation device is combined with an optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) unit and with a control unit which initializes the OCDR unit and a high power laser of the ablation device. Data from the OCDR unit is analyzed by the control unit and used to control the high power laser. The OCDR images up to about 3 mm ahead of the ablation surface to enable a user to see sensitive tissue such as a nerve or artery before damaging it by the laser.

  6. Wavelength-Scale Imaging of Trapped Ions using a Phase Fresnel lens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Jechow; E. W. Streed; B. G. Norton; M. J. Petrasiunas; D. Kielpinski

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated phase Fresnel lens was used to image ytterbium ions trapped in a radio frequency Paul trap. The ions were laser cooled close to the Doppler limit on the 369.5 nm transition, reducing the ion motion so that each ion formed a near point source. By detecting the ion fluorescence on the same transition, near diffraction limited imaging with spot sizes of below 440 nm (FWHM) was achieved. This is the first demonstration of imaging trapped ions with a resolution on the order of the transition wavelength.

  7. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  8. Prostate Postbrachytherapy Seed Distribution: Comparison of High-Resolution, Contrast-Enhanced, T1- and T2-Weighted Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Versus Computed Tomography: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloch, B. Nicolas [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Department of Radiology, General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: nbloch@bidmc.harvard.edu; Lenkinski, Robert E. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Helbich, Thomas H. [Department of Radiology, General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ngo, Long [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Oismueller, Renee [Institute for Radio-Oncology, Danube Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Jaromi, Silvia; Kubin, Klaus [Department of Radiology, General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Hawliczek, Robert [Institute for Radio-Oncology, Danube Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Kaplan, Irving D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Rofsky, Neil M. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To compare contrast-enhanced, T1-weighted, three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (CEMR) and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2MR) with computed tomography (CT) for prostate brachytherapy seed location for dosimetric calculations. Methods and Materials: Postbrachytherapy prostate MRI was performed on a 1.5 Tesla unit with combined surface and endorectal coils in 13 patients. Both CEMR and T2MR used a section thickness of 3 mm. Spiral CT used a section thickness of 5 mm with a pitch factor of 1.5. All images were obtained in the transverse plane. Two readers using CT and MR imaging assessed brachytherapy seed distribution independently. The dependency of data read by both readers for a specific subject was assessed with a linear mixed effects model. Results: The mean percentage ({+-} standard deviation) values of the readers for seed detection and location are presented. Of 1205 implanted seeds, CEMR, T2MR, and CT detected 91.5% {+-} 4.8%, 78.5% {+-} 8.5%, and 96.1% {+-} 2.3%, respectively, with 11.8% {+-} 4.5%, 8.5% {+-} 3.5%, 1.9% {+-} 1.0% extracapsular, respectively. Assignment to periprostatic structures was not possible with CT. Periprostatic seed assignments for CEMR and T2MR, respectively, were as follows: neurovascular bundle, 3.5% {+-} 1.6% and 2.1% {+-} 0.9%; seminal vesicles, 0.9% {+-} 1.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.7%; periurethral, 7.1% {+-} 3.3% and 5.8% {+-} 2.9%; penile bulb, 0.6% {+-} 0.8% and 0.3% {+-} 0.6%; Denonvillier's Fascia/rectal wall, 0.5% {+-} 0.6% and 0%; and urinary bladder, 0.1% {+-} 0.3% and 0%. Data dependency analysis showed statistical significance for the type of imaging but not for reader identification. Conclusion: Both enumeration and localization of implanted seeds are readily accomplished with CEMR. Calculations with MRI dosimetry do not require CT data. Dose determinations to specific extracapsular sites can be obtained with MRI but not with CT.

  9. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  10. atomic resolution structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An axis of 3-fold symmetry runs through Blaber, Michael 8 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  11. atomic resolution structural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An axis of 3-fold symmetry runs through Blaber, Michael 8 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  12. atomic resolution structures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An axis of 3-fold symmetry runs through Blaber, Michael 8 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  13. Diagnostic probes for particle and molecule distributions in laser-generated plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, S.M.

    1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser microprobe analysis (LMA) offers good spatial and depth resolution for solid sampling of virtually any material. Coupled with numerous optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric detection methods, LMA is a powerful analytical tool. Yet, fundamental understanding of the interaction between the laser and the sample surface leading to the formation of the high temperature plasma (plume) is far from complete. To better understand the process of plume formation, an imaging method based on acousto-optic laser beam deflection has been coupled with light scattering methods and absorption methods to record temporal and spatial maps of the particle and molecule distributions in the plume with good resolution. Because particles can make up a major fraction of the vaporized material under certain operating conditions, they can reflect a large loss of atomic signal for elemental analysis, even when using auxiliary excitation to further vaporized the particles. Characterization of the particle size distributions in plumes should provide insight into the vaporization process and information necessary for studies of efficient particle transfer. Light scattering methods for particle size analysis based on the Mie Theory are used to determine the size of particles in single laser-generated plumes. The methods used, polarization ratio method and dissymmetry ratio method, provide good estimates of particle size with good spatial and temporal resolution for this highly transient system. Large particles, on the order of 0.02-0.2{mu}m in radius, were observed arising directly from the sample surface and from condensation.

  14. airborne laser mapping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provide such high resolution soil at 50m resolution with an L-band passive microwave radiometer, using data collected from the recent Walker, Jeff 6 SilviLaser 2008, Sept. 17-19,...

  15. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera's two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera's integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting.

  17. SU-D-9A-02: Relative Effects of Threshold Choice and Spatial Resolution Modeling On SUV and Volume Quantification in F18-FDG PET Imaging of Anal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Shandong Cancer Hospital and Insititute, Jinan, Shandong (China); Bowsher, J; Palta, M; Czito, B; Willett, C; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: PET imaging with F18-FDG is utilized for treatment planning, treatment assessment, and prognosis. A region of interest (ROI) encompassing the tumor may be determined on the PET image, often by a threshold T on the PET standard uptake values (SUVs). Several studies have shown prognostic value for relevant ROI properties including maximum SUV value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total glycolytic activity (TGA). The choice of threshold T may affect mean SUV value (SUVmean), MTV, and TGA. Recently spatial resolution modeling (SRM) has been introduced on many PET systems. SRM may also affect these ROI properties. The purpose of this work is to investigate the relative influence of SRM and threshold choice T on SUVmean, MTV, TGA, and SUVmax. Methods: For 9 anal cancer patients, 18F-FDG PET scans were performed prior to treatment. PET images were reconstructed by 2 iterations of Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM), with and without SRM. ROI contours were generated by 5 different SUV threshold values T: 2.5, 3.0, 30%, 40%, and 50% of SUVmax. Paired-samples t tests were used to compare SUVmean, MTV, and TGA (a) for SRM on versus off and (b) between each pair of threshold values T. SUVmax was also compared for SRM on versus off. Results: For almost all (57/60) comparisons of 2 different threshold values, SUVmean, MTV, and TGA showed statistically significant variation. For comparison of SRM on versus off, there were no statistically significant changes in SUVmax and TGA, but there were statistically significant changes in MTV for T=2.5 and T=3.0 and in SUVmean for all T. Conclusion: The near-universal statistical significance of threshold choice T suggests that, regarding harmonization across sites, threshold choice may be a greater concern than choice of SRM. However, broader study is warranted, e.g. other iterations of OSEM should be considered.

  18. Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

  19. Mapping DNAPL transport contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers with high resolution borehole seismic imaging Project No. SF11SS13 FY01 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geller, J.T.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E.; Williams, K.H.; Flexser, S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the work performed in the first year of a three-year project funded by the USDOE's Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA). The objectives of this project are to develop, demonstrate and evaluate, at appropriate field sites, the utility of high frequency seismic imaging methods to detect and characterize non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contamination in sedimentary and fractured rock aquifers. Field tests consist of crosswell seismic tomography acquired before, during and after any remediation action that would potentially affect fluid distributions. Where feasible, other characterization data is obtained, such as crosswell radar, borehole conductivity and cone penetration testing (CPT). Crosswell data are processed to obtain tomographic images, or two-dimensional distributions, of velocity and attenuation. The interpretation of the tomograms utilizes all available site characterization data to relate the geophysical attributes to lithology and fluid phase heterogeneities. Interpretations are validated by evaluation and testing of field cores. Laboratory tests on core retrieved from surveyed locations are performed to determine the relationships between geophysical parameters and solid and fluid phase composition. In the case of sedimentary aquifers, proof of principle has been demonstrated previously in homogeneous sand-packs at the centimeter and half-meter scale (Geller and Myer, 1995; Geller et al., 2000). The field tests will provide proof-of-principle at the field-scale, by working in an unconsolidated sand aquifer with known presence of NAPL. The ability to upscale from the laboratory to the field is evaluated by conducting field measurements over a range of frequencies that overlap the lowest frequencies used in the laboratory tests. In the fractured rock case, previous field work has shown that fracture zones can be detected by crosswell seismic tomography (Daley et al., 2001; Daley et al., 2000). Laboratory studies have demonstrated that the seismic wave signature is sensitive to the fracture stiffness, and that stiffness is affected by fracture-filling fluids (Pyrak-Nolte and Morris, 2000; Pyrak-Nolte, 1996). The field and laboratory experience provide a physical basis for the potential detection of fractures that would be the important flow paths for NAPL contaminants.

  20. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  1. Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

  2. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  3. Analysis of head pose, faces, and eye dynamics in images and videos : a multilevel framework and algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junwen

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resolution image from multiple low-resolution sam- ples,images can also be reconstructed using un-occluded training sam-

  4. Laser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    of electromagnetic fields in plasma, isotopes production or hadron therapy. The 100 TW class laser systemLaser-based proton acceleration on ultra-thin foil with a 100 TW class high intensity laser system. To characterize the plasma expansion, we monitor it with an imaging technique using a femtosecond laser probe

  5. Near-electrode imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

  6. High-resolution 18F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring response to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner during human imaging. Jhigh-resolution 18 F-FDG PET images (pseudocolor) overlaidMONTH High-resolution 18 F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING Sagi Filin1 , Amit@tau.ac.il Commission VIII/8 KEY WORDS: Airborne laser scanning, Geomorphology, Dead Sea, Land Degradation, Sinkholes of collapse sinkholes in high resolution using airborne laser scanning technology. As a study case, we use

  8. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  9. A fast microchannel plate-scintillator detector for velocity map imaging and imaging mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, B.; King, S. J.; Vallance, C., E-mail: claire.vallance@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Research Laboratory, University of Oxford, 12 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom); Brouard, M., E-mail: mark.brouard@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, South Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The time resolution achievable using standard position-sensitive ion detectors, consisting of a chevron pair of microchannel plates coupled to a phosphor screen, is primarily limited by the emission lifetime of the phosphor, around 70 ns for the most commonly used P47 phosphor. We demonstrate that poly-para-phenylene laser dyes may be employed extremely effectively as scintillators, exhibiting higher brightness and much shorter decay lifetimes than P47. We provide an extensive characterisation of the properties of such scintillators, with a particular emphasis on applications in velocity-map imaging and microscope-mode imaging mass spectrometry. The most promising of the new scintillators exhibits an electron-to-photon conversion efficiency double that of P47, with an emission lifetime an order of magnitude shorter. The new scintillator screens are vacuum stable and show no signs of signal degradation even over longer periods of operation.

  10. Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

  11. Page 1Laser Safety Training Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Laser Institute of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Page 1Laser Safety Training © Laser Institute of America 1 Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety: Hazards, Bioeffects, and Control Measures Laser Institute of America Gus Anibarro Education Manager 2Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Overview Laser Safety Accidents

  12. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  13. Imaging with Scattered Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

  14. Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays LEDs Accelerometer Vibration Buttons Laser & LEDs Unlike conventional input devices like mouse and keyboard, laser pointers do that are displayed on large high-resolution screens. The laser pointer technology was developed in cooperation

  15. Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

  16. Laser microphone

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

  17. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  18. Approaching attometer laser vibrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rembe, Christian; Kadner, Lisa; Giesen, Moritz [Research and Development, Polytec GmbH, Polytec Platz 1-7, 76337 Waldbronn (Germany)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The heterodyne two-beam interferometer has been proven to be the optimal solution for laser-Doppler vibrometry regarding accuracy and signal robustness. The theoretical resolution limit for a two-beam interferometer of laser class 3R (up to 5 mW visible measurement-light) is in the regime of a few femtometer per square-root Hertz and well suited to study vibrations in microstructures. However, some new applications of RF-MEM resonators, nanostructures, and surface-nano-defect detection require resolutions beyond that limit. The resolution depends only on the noise and the sensor sensitivity to specimen displacements. The noise is already defined in nowadays systems by the quantum nature of light for a properly designed optical sensor and more light would lead to an inacceptable influence like heating of a very tiny structure. Thus, noise can only be improved by squeezed-light techniques which require a negligible loss of measurement light which is impossible for almost all technical measurement tasks. Thus, improving the sensitivity is the only possible path which could make attometer laser vibrometry possible. Decreasing the measurement wavelength would increase the sensitivity but would also increase the photon shot noise. In this paper, we discuss an approach to increase the sensitivity by assembling an additional mirror between interferometer and specimen to form an optical cavity. A detailed theoretical analysis of this setup is presented and we derive the resolution limit, discuss the main contributions to the uncertainty budget, and show a first experiment proving the sensitivity amplification of our approach.

  19. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    objectives: Improve image resolution for microseismicimaging and time-lapse active seismic imaging; Enhance the prediction of fluid flow and temperature distributions and...

  20. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    novel imaging methods for monitoring EGS reservoirs. - Innovation: Use time-lapse seismic data and elastic-waveform inversion for high-resolution reservoir imaging; Improve...

  1. Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heise, T.W.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm{sup 2}. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

  2. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequenced pulses of light from an excitation laser with at least two resonator cavities with separate output couplers are directed through a light modulator and a first polarzing analyzer. A portion of the light not rejected by the first polarizing analyzer is transported through a first optical fiber into a first ignitor laser rod in an ignitor laser. Another portion of the light is rejected by the first polarizing analyzer and directed through a halfwave plate into a second polarization analyzer. A first portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer passes through the second polarization analyzer to a second, oscillator, laser rod in the ignitor laser. A second portion of the output of the second polarization analyzer is redirected by the second polarization analyzer to a second optical fiber which delays the beam before the beam is combined with output of the first ignitor laser rod. Output of the second laser rod in the ignitor laser is directed into the first ignitor laser rod which was energized by light passing through the first polarizing analyzer. Combined output of the first ignitor laser rod and output of the second optical fiber is focused into a combustible fuel where the first short duration, high peak power pulse from the ignitor laser ignites the fuel and the second long duration, low peak power pulse directly from the excitation laser sustains the combustion.

  3. Title: IKONOS Satellite Image of North York, Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a multispectral (colour) and a panchromatic (black and white). Specifications: Resampling: Nearest Neighbour and white) Image Resolution: 1 metre Multispectral (colour) image resolution: 4 metres Accuracy, 2009 Cloud Cover: 0% Dynamic Range Adjust: Off (maintains absolute radiometric accuracy. Data Type

  4. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be an important focus of laser-plasma acceleration researchfocus. In both cases, light regions of the image ionized and heated the plasma,

  5. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the collaboration's FEL experiment (image not actual size). Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon nanotubes By James Schultz January 27, 2003...

  6. Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma Junjie Li, Xuan Wang, Zhaoyang Chen, Richard Clinite, Samuel S. Mao et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianming

    , Beijing 100190, China and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China in the early stage of laser ablation of a copper target are investigated in real time by making ultrafast have been a subject of intensive investigation in recent years ow- ing to its importance in a wide

  7. Data disaggregation and evapotranspiration modeling: a synergism between multi-spectral/multi-resolution remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer), respectively. - SEB-1S is a mono-source surface energy balance model-resolution remote sensing data, United States (2013)" #12; transpiration (T). The surface albedo (SA) derived from shortwave reflectances modulates the available energy

  8. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

  9. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  10. Free-Electron Laser FLASH Injector Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH Injector Laser Laser 1 Laser 2 Next steps Siegfried | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Laser 1 System Overview fround trip A 541 (2005) 467­477 #12;Siegfried Schreiber | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser

  11. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  12. Protective laser beam viewing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

  13. ACIS Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer: detector on Chandra ASCA Advanced Satellite for Astronomy and Cosmology: Xray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ROSAT HRMA High Resolution Mirror Assembly: Chandra mirrors IPC Imaging Proportional Camera: detector

  14. ACIS Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer: detector on Chandra ASCA Advanced Satellite for Astronomy and Cosmology: X-ray telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and ROSAT HRMA High Resolution Mirror Assembly: Chandra mirrors IPC Imaging Proportional Camera: detector

  15. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  16. Short pulse laser train for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, J. L.; Shimada, T.; Johnson, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hegelich, B. M.; Esquibel, D. M.; Flippo, K. A.; Gonzales, R. P.; Hurry, T. R.; Reid, S. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiframe, high-time resolution pump-probe diagnostic consisting of a consecutive train of ultrashort laser pulses ({approx}ps) has been developed for use with a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system. A system of high quality windows is used to create a series of 1054 nm picosecond-laser pulses which are injected into the CPA system before the pulse stretcher and amplifiers. By adding or removing windows in the pulse train forming optics, the number of pulses can be varied. By varying the distance and thickness of the respective optical elements, the time in between the pulses, i.e., the time in between frames, can be set. In our example application, the CPA pulse train is converted to 527 nm using a KDP crystal and focused into a preformed plasma and the reflected laser light due to stimulated Raman scattering is measured. Each pulse samples different plasma conditions as the plasma evolves in time, producing more data on each laser shot than with a single short pulse probe. This novel technique could potentially be implemented to obtain multiple high-time resolution measurements of the dynamics of physical processes over hundreds of picoseconds or even nanoseconds with picosecond resolution on a single shot.

  17. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  18. atomic resolution crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  19. angstrom resolution crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Muller, David A; 10.1103PhysRevB.86.195415 2012-01-01 5 Crystal structure retrieval by maximum entropy analysis of atomic resolution incoherent images Materials Science Websites...

  20. High Resolution EELS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EELS EMSL's ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface chemistry-high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) system is designed to study the molecular-level chemistry...

  1. Conflict Resolution Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conflict Resolution Day takes a look at mediation, conciliation, negotiation, arbitration, the ombudsman, and facilitation to resolve conflict in the workplace. Employees and contractors are...

  2. 7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

  3. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uSXRD orientation map of the LCLS Photocathode. The field ofimage of the center of the LCLS photocathode. The horizontalsize of the laser spot in LCLS. The image was taken with a

  4. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  5. Using X-ray free-electron lasers for probing of complex interaction dynamics of ultra-intense lasers with solid matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluge, T., E-mail: t.kluge@hzdr.de; Huang, L. G.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Gutt, C. [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advance the understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. In this paper, we focus on XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions based on quantitative calculations using synthesized data and evaluate the feasibility of various imaging and scattering techniques with special focus on the small angle X-ray scattering technique.

  6. Application of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Shota; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We build an ultra-high-speed imaging system based on the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique in order to capture a laser-induced underwater shock wave. This BOS technique is able to provide two-dimensional density-gradient field of fluid and requires a simple setup. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high speed video camera, a laser stroboscope, and a patterned background. This system takes images every 0.2 $\\mu$s. Furthermore, since the density change of water disturbed by the shock is exceedingly small, the system has high spatial resolution $\\sim$ 10 $\\mu$m/pixel. Using this BOS system, we examine temporal position of a shock wave. The position agrees well with that measured by conventional shadowgraph, which indicates that the high-speed imaging system can successfully capture the instantaneous position of the underwater shock wave that propagates with the speed of about 1500 m/s. The local density gradient can be determined up to $O$(10$^3$ kg/m$^4$), which is confirmed by the gradient est...

  7. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

    1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

  8. High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norbert, Massie A. (San Ramon, CA); Yale, Oster (Danville, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

  9. area high-resolution ccd-based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCD-Based Thermoreflectance Techniques for High-Resolution Transient Thermal Imaging Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: on the small but detectable...

  10. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  11. High sensitivity imaging Thomson scattering for low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiden, H. J. van der; Al, R. S.; Barth, C. J.; Donne, A. J. H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Groot, B. de; Koppers, W. R.; Pol, M. J. van de; Prins, P. R.; Shumack, A. E.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Westerhout, J.; Wright, G. M.; Rooij, G. J. van [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Engeln, R. [Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kleyn, A. W. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Schram, D. C. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly sensitive imaging Thomson scattering system was developed for low temperature (0.1-10 eV) plasma applications at the Pilot-PSI linear plasma generator. The essential parts of the diagnostic are a neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser operating at the second harmonic (532 nm), a laser beam line with a unique stray light suppression system and a detection branch consisting of a Littrow spectrometer equipped with an efficient detector based on a ''Generation III'' image intensifier combined with an intensified charged coupled device camera. The system is capable of measuring electron density and temperature profiles of a plasma column of 30 mm in diameter with a spatial resolution of 0.6 mm and an observational error of 3% in the electron density (n{sub e}) and 6% in the electron temperature (T{sub e}) at n{sub e}=4x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. This is achievable at an accumulated laser input energy of 11 J (from 30 laser pulses at 10 Hz repetition frequency). The stray light contribution is below 9x10{sup 17} m{sup -3} in electron density equivalents by the application of a unique stray light suppression system. The amount of laser energy that is required for a n{sub e} and T{sub e} measurement is 7x10{sup 20}/n{sub e} J, which means that single shot measurements are possible for n{sub e}>2x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}.

  12. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  13. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Biocavity Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; Gourley, M.F.

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser technology has advanced dramatically and is an integral part of today's healthcare delivery system. Lasers are used in the laboratory analysis of human blood samples and serve as surgical tools that kill, burn or cut tissue. Recent semiconductor microtechnology has reduced the size o f a laser to the size of a biological cell or even a virus particle. By integrating these ultra small lasers with biological systems, it is possible to create micro-electrical mechanical systems that may revolutionize health care delivery.

  15. Laser ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

  16. Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

  17. DOE-Imaging grant FG02-06ER15829, entitled "Developing Laser-Induced Re-Collision Electron Self-Diffraction" Brief summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igor V. Litvinyuk, and Itzik Ben-Itzhak

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our principal goal was the experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Key steps along the development of this experimental technique have been accomplished and reported in the publications listed in this brief report. We started with measuring 3D electron momenta spectra in aligned nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Chakra Maharjan (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) was a lead researcher on this project. Although Chakra succeeded in obtaining those spectra, we were scooped by the publication of identical results in Science by the NRC Ottawa group. Our results were never published as a refereed article, but became a part of Chakra's Ph.D. dissertation. That Science paper was the first experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Chakra also worked on wavelength dependence of 3D ATI spectra of atoms and molecules using tunable OPA pulses. Another Ph.D. student, Maia Magrakvelidze (her GRA was funded by the grant), started working on COLTRIMS experiments using OPA pulses (1800 nm wavelength). After some initial experiments it became apparent that COLTRIMS did not yield sufficient count rates of electrons in the high-energy part of the spectrum to see diffraction signatures with acceptable statistics (unfavorable scaling of the electron yield with laser wavelength was partly to blame). Nevertheless, Maia managed to use COLTRIMS and OPA to measure the angular dependence of the tunneling ionization rate in D{sub 2} molecules. Following the initial trial experiments, the decision was made to switch from COLTRIMS to VMI in order to increase the count rates by a factor of {approx}100, which may have given us a chance to see LIED. Research Associate Dr. Sankar De (his salary was funded by the grant), in collaboration with Matthias Kling's group (then at MPQ Garching), proceeded to design a special multi-electrode VMI spectrometer for capturing high-energy ATI electrons and to install it in place of COLTRIMS inside our experimental chamber. That apparatus was later used for the first demonstration of field-free orientation in CO using two-color laser pulses as well as for a series of other experiments, such as pump-probe studies of molecular dynamics with few-cycle laser pulses, control of electron localization in dissociating hydrogen molecules using two-color laser pulses, and ATI spectra of Xe ionized by two-color laser pulses. In parallel, Dipanwita Ray (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) worked on measuring angle-resolved ATI spectra of noble gases using a stereo-ATI phasemeter as a TOF electron spectrometer. She observed the angular diffraction structures in 3D ATI spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe, which were interpreted in terms of the Quantitative Rescattering theory newly developed by C.D. Lin. We also attempted to use a much more powerful OPA (five times more energy per pulse than the one we had at JRML) available at the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) in Montreal to observe LIED. Two visits to ALLS by the PI, Igor Litvinyuk, and one visit by the PI's Ph.D. student (Irina Bocharova) were funded by the grant. Though we failed to observe LIED (the repetition rate of the ALLS OPA was too low at only 100 Hz), this international collaboration resulted in several publications on other related subjects, such as the wavelength dependence of laser Coulomb explosion of hydrogen, the wavelength dependence of non-sequential double ionization of neon and argon, the demonstration of charge-resonance enhanced ionization in CO{sub 2}, and the study of non-elastic scattering processes in H{sub 2}. Theoretical efforts to account for the hydrogen Coulomb explosion experiment resulted in another paper by Maia Magrakvelidze as lead author. Although for various reasons we failed to achieve our main goal of observing LIED, we salute the recent success in this endeavor by Lou DiMauro's group (with theoretical support from our KSU colleague C.D. Lin) published in Nature, which validates our approach.

  18. Integration of photonic and passive microfluidic devices into lab-on-chip with femtosecond laser materials processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Yu, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond laser materials processing is a powerful method for the integration of high resolution, 3D structures into Lab-On-Chip (LOC) systems. One major application of femtosecond laser materials processing is waveguide ...

  19. Methods for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian (Pleasanton, CA); Vetter, Kai M. (Alameda, CA); Chivers, Daniel H. (Fremont, CA)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are presented that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors. These methods increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  20. Title: Worldview 2 Satellite Image of York University Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and surrounding areas. Consists of two images, a multispectral (colour) and a panchromatic (black and white Panchromatic (blank and white) Image Resolution: 11 metre Multispectral (colour) image resolution: 3 metres Image Date: July 25, 2012 Cloud Cover: 0% Data Type: Raster Digital Data Format: GeoTIFF Datum / Map

  1. Systems for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.; Chivers, Daniel H.

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors are provided. These systems increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  2. Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

  3. Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland Observed at High Resolution by the Seasat Scatterometer D.G. Long', P.J. Hardin2, and RA to SASS data for the study of Greenland's ice sheet. We present a time series of the radar backscatter images over Greenland covering the time period July-September 1978. The images provide an island

  4. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  5. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, J., E-mail: jlu@pppl.gov [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J. [Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 ?m validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten L?1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 ?m. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  6. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhant Suerfu; Christopher G. Tully

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials.

  7. Gated frequency-resolved optical imaging with an optical parametric amplifier for medical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, S.M.; Bliss, D.E.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of optical imagery in a diffuse inhomogeneous medium such as biological tissue requires an understanding of photon migration and multiple scattering processes which act to randomize pathlength and degrade image quality. The nature of transmitted light from soft tissue ranges from the quasi-coherent properties of the minimally scattered component to the random incoherent light of the diffuse component. Recent experimental approaches have emphasized dynamic path-sensitive imaging measurements with either ultrashort laser pulses (ballistic photons) or amplitude modulated laser light launched into tissue (photon density waves) to increase image resolution and transmissive penetration depth. Ballistic imaging seeks to compensate for these {open_quotes}fog-like{close_quotes} effects by temporally isolating the weak early-arriving image-bearing component from the diffusely scattered background using a subpicosecond optical gate superimposed on the transmitted photon time-of-flight distribution. The authors have developed a broadly wavelength tunable (470 nm -2.4 {mu}m), ultrashort amplifying optical gate for transillumination spectral imaging based on optical parametric amplification in a nonlinear crystal. The time-gated image amplification process exhibits low noise and high sensitivity, with gains greater than 104 achievable for low light levels. We report preliminary benchmark experiments in which this system was used to reconstruct, spectrally upcovert, and enhance near-infrared two-dimensional images with feature sizes of 65 {mu}m/mm{sup 2} in background optical attenuations exceeding 10{sup 12}. Phase images of test objects exhibiting both absorptive contrast and diffuse scatter were acquired using a self-referencing Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor in combination with short-pulse quasi-ballistic gating. The sensor employed a lenslet array based on binary optics technology and was sensitive to optical path distortions approaching {lambda}/100.

  8. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M. (Boulder, CO); Boernge, James M. (Lakewood, CO); Harris, David W. (Lakewood, CO); Campbell, DeWayne A. (Littleton, CO); Tuttle, Gene E. (Littleton, CO); McKeown, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Beason, Steven C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  9. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  10. Imaging bolometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  11. Laser Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weijian; Ng, Kar Wei; Rao, Yi; Chase, Christopher; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavity optomechanics explores the coupling between the optical field and the mechanical oscillation to induce cooling and regenerative oscillation in a mechanical oscillator. So far, optomechanics relies on the detuning between the cavity and an external pump laser, where the laser acts only as a power supply. Here, we report a new scheme with mutual coupling between a mechanical oscillator that supports a mirror of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and the optical field, greatly enhancing the light-matter energy transfer. In this work, we used an ultra-light-weight (130 pg) high-contrast-grating (HCG) mirror in a VCSEL, whose reflectivity spectrum is designed to facilitate strong optomechanical coupling, to demonstrate optomechanically-induced regenerative oscillation of the laser optomechanical cavity with > 550 nm self-oscillation amplitude of the micro-mechanical oscillator, two to three orders of magnitude larger than typical. This new scheme not only offers an efficient approach for high-...

  12. Laser barometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

  13. Fundamenta Informaticae 133 1 A resolution calculus for first-order schemata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .Echenim@imag.fr Nicolas Peltier LIG/CNRS Nicolas.Peltier@imag.fr Abstract. We devise a resolution calculus that tests-2013-855 #12;2 V. Aravantinos, M. Echenim, N. Peltier / A resolution calculus for first-order schemata

  14. Image Fusion: Principles, Methods, and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sroubek, Filip

    different sensors (visible and infrared, CT and NMR, or panchromatic and multispectral satellite images fusion is used to achieve high spatial and spectral resolutions by combining images from two sensors, one applications have appeared in medical imaging like simultaneous evaluation of CT, MRI, and/or PET images

  15. High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G.E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

  16. Two-dimensional imaging of laser-induced fluorescence: OH in a plasma-generated molecular beam scattering from a silicon surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-temperature plasmas are used for a wide variety of materials processing applications, especially in the fabrication of microelectronic devices. Thus plasma processes, such as etching, deposition, and cleaning, are the subject of much current research. However, achieving a detailed understanding of such systems, especially for computer simulations, requires a great deal of kinetic information about the physics and chemistry. One particular aspect, the reactions of radicals generated in the plasma at the surfaces of the substrates, is important in determining the performance of a plasma process. However, such reactions are not well studied because there are few experimental techniques available that can directly probe them. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) imaging is a significant improvement to the IRIS (imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces) technique for measuring the reactivity of plasma-generated radicals at surfaces. Several interesting phenomena resulting from the effects of saturation of the optical transition and of molecular translation during the radiative lifetime of OH have now been observed directly.

  17. Biomedical Instrumentation and Imaging at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    cancer, including breast (scintimammography, positron emission mammography), brain and heart imaging and 2) high resolution, high sensitivity gamma imaging of small animals. The...

  18. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  19. Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

  20. An instrument for 3D x-ray nano-imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holler, M.; Raabe, J.; Diaz, A.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Quitmann, C.; Menzel, A.; Bunk, O. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an instrument dedicated to 3D scanning x-ray microscopy, allowing a sample to be precisely scanned through a beam while the angle of x-ray incidence can be changed. The position of the sample is controlled with respect to the beam-defining optics by laser interferometry. The instrument achieves a position stability better than 10 nm standard deviation. The instrument performance is assessed using scanning x-ray diffraction microscopy and we demonstrate a resolution of 18 nm in 2D imaging of a lithographic test pattern while the beam was defined by a pinhole of 3 {mu}m in diameter. In 3D on a test object of copper interconnects of a microprocessor, a resolution of 53 nm is achieved.

  1. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoeckl, C., E-mail: csto@lle.rochester.edu; Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub ?} line at ?1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ?7 cm in ?100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ?1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 ?m. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  2. High Resolution Timing with Low Resolution Clocks A Microsecond Resolution Timer for Sun Workstations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melvin, Stephen

    High Resolution Timing with Low Resolution Clocks and A Microsecond Resolution Timer for Sun for Sun 3 and Sun 4 workstations1. One can measure average service times without a high resolution clock?" 1. Introduction - Who Needs a Microsecond Clock Beginning with its Sun 3 workstations, Sun

  3. Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S. [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Shizuoka (Japan) and Institute de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) and Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Gunnma (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of {approx} 1.0 {mu}m at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5{mu}m FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

  4. Femtosecond time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy for spatiotemporal imaging of photogenerated carrier dynamics in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukumoto, Keiki, E-mail: fukumoto.k.ab@m.titech.ac.jp; Yamada, Yuki; Matsuki, Takashi; Koshihara, Shin-ya [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-CREST, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Onda, Ken [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency JST-PRESTO, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Mukuta, Tatsuhiko; Tanaka, Sei-ichi [Department of Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Oookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed an instrument for time-resolved photoemission electron microscopy (TR-PEEM) utilizing femtosecond (fs) laser pulses to visualize the dynamics of photogenerated electrons in semiconductors on ultrasmall and ultrafast scales. The spatial distribution of the excited electrons and their relaxation and/or recombination processes were imaged by the proposed TR-PEEM method with a spatial resolution about 100 nm and an ultrafast temporal resolution defined by the cross-correlation of the fs laser pulses (240 fs). A direct observation of the dynamical behavior of electrons on higher resistivity samples, such as semiconductors, by TR-PEEM has still been facing difficulties because of space and/or sample charging effects originating from the high photon flux of the ultrashort pulsed laser utilized for the photoemission process. Here, a regenerative amplified fs laser with a widely tunable repetition rate has been utilized, and with careful optimization of laser parameters, such as fluence and repetition rate, and consideration for carrier lifetimes, the electron dynamics in semiconductors were visualized. For demonstrating our newly developed TR-PEEM method, the photogenerated carrier lifetimes around a nanoscale defect on a GaAs surface were observed. The obtained lifetimes were on a sub-picosecond time scale, which is much shorter than the lifetimes of carriers observed in the non-defective surrounding regions. Our findings are consistent with the fact that structural defects induce mid-gap states in the forbidden band, and that the electrons captured in these states promptly relax into the ground state.

  5. Laser barometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Kevin R. (Westminster, CO); Shiels, David (Thornton, CO); Rash, Tim (Aurora, CO)

    2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

  6. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plateau, Guillaume

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After imaging the plasma to a primary focus shortly afterfocus was 1 mm above the nozzle. The laser pulse excited a plasma

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence of fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Haibo [Shanghai Key Laboratory of All Solid-state Laser and Applied Techniques, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan Zhijun; Zhou Jun; Dong Jingxing; Wei Yunrong; Lou Qihong [Shanghai Key Laboratory of All Solid-state Laser and Applied Techniques, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of high-purity fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser is studied experimentally. LIF bands of the fused silica centered at 281 nm, 478 nm, and 650 nm are observed simultaneously. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the three fluorescence peaks is examined. Microscopic image of the laser modified fused silica indicates that scattering of the generated fluorescence by laser-induced damage sites is the main reason for the angular distribution of LIF signals. Finally, the dependence of LIF signals intensities of the fused silica on laser power densities is presented. LIF signals show a squared power density dependence, which indicates that laser-induced defects are formed mainly via two-photon absorption processes.

  8. Method for controlling energy density for reliable pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowden, P. C., E-mail: dowden@lanl.gov, E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov; Bi, Z.; Jia, Q. X., E-mail: dowden@lanl.gov, E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Division of Materials Physics and Applications, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have established a methodology to stabilize the laser energy density on a target surface in pulsed laser deposition of thin films. To control the focused laser spot on a target, we have imaged a defined aperture in the beamline (so called image-focus) instead of focusing the beam on a target based on a simple “lens-focus.” To control the laser energy density on a target, we have introduced a continuously variable attenuator between the output of the laser and the imaged aperture to manipulate the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a “constant voltage” mode to eliminate changes in the lasers’ beam dimensions. This methodology leads to much better controllability/reproducibility for reliable pulsed laser deposition of high performance electronic thin films.

  9. High-resolution 18F-FDG PET with MRI for monitoring response to treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a dedicated breast PET/CT scanner during human imaging. J2]. A high-resolution PET/CT scanner for imaging extremitiesOA). An extremity 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan immediately following

  10. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

  11. Particle detector spatial resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

  12. Image texture analysis of elastograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Fasahat

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, co-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, fractal analysis and granulomeay are used to extract a number of features from each image. The inclusions...-RESOLUTION FRACTAL ANALYSIS . . . . . . E. GRANULOMETRIC FEATURES . . F. DATA NORMALIZATION . G. SEPARABILITY MEASURE 13 13 . . . . . 14 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 29 33 36 36 IV TEXTURE ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED ELASTOGRAMS. . . . . . . . . . . 38 A. SIMULATION...

  13. Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -

  14. Crystalline SiGe films grown on Si substrates using laser-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.-T.; Cheng, J.-H.; Lee, H.-Y. [Institute of Microelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China) and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared with conventional plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, laser-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (LAPECVD) can be used to deposit crystalline SiGe films on Si substrates at low temperature. In the LAPECVD system, a CO{sub 2} laser with a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m was utilized to assist the pyrolytical decomposition of SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} reactant gases. The resultant Si{sub 0.78}Ge{sub 0.22} films were obtained and verified through the use of the Auger electron spectroscopy measurement. As the diffraction pattern of a glancing incident angle X-ray diffraction measurement had indicated, several significant diffraction peaks corresponding to a diamond-cubic structure at (111) (220), and (311) were clearly observed. Crystalline SiGe films were also identified by the electron diffraction pattern of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

  15. High resolution time interval meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

  16. Subwavenumber charge-coupled device spectrometer calibration using molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Joseph G. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hernandez-Diaz, Carlos; Williamson, J. Charles [Department of Chemistry, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon 97301 (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometers configured with charge-coupled devices (CCD) or other array-based detectors require calibration to convert from the pixel coordinate to a spectral coordinate. A CCD calibration method well suited for Raman spectroscopy has been developed based on the 514.5 nm Ar{sup +} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of room-temperature molecular iodine vapor. Over 360 primary and secondary I{sub 2} LIF calibration lines spanning 510-645 nm were identified as calibrant peaks using an instrumental resolution of 1 cm{sup -1}. Two instrument calibration functions were evaluated with these peaks: a second-order polynomial and a function derived from simple optomechanical considerations. The latter function provided better fitting characteristics. Calibration using I{sub 2} LIF was tested with measurements of both laser light scattering and Raman spectra. The I{sub 2} LIF reference spectra and the signal spectra were recorded simultaneously, with no cross talk, by separating the two signals spatially along the vertical axis of the CCD imager. In this way, every CCD image could be independently calibrated. An accuracy and a precision of {+-}0.05 cm{sup -1} were achieved with this calibration technique.

  17. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  18. Signal and imaging sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers are presented in the areas of: Medical Technologies; Non-Destructive Evaluation; Applications of Signal/Image Processing; Laser Guide Star and Adaptive Optics; Computational Electromagnetic, Acoustics and Optics; Micro-Impulse Radar Processing; Optical Applications; TANGO Space Shuttle.

  19. High precision analysis of all four stable isotopes of sulfur S) at nanomole levels using a laser fluorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    compositions. This methodology increases the spatial resolution of the laser ablation in situ analysis) at nanomole levels using a laser fluorination isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography­mass spectrometry.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: S-33; S-36; Sulfur isotope; Laser; Isotope analysis; Continuous flow

  20. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  1. He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    3 He Lung Imaging in an Open Access, Very-Low-Field Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging System R. W. Butler,6 F. W. Hersman,4 and R. L. Walsworth1 The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive lung restrict sub- jects to lying horizontally. Imaging of human lungs using inhaled laser-polarized 3

  2. High-throughput snapshot spectral imaging in two dimensions Andrew R Harvey and David W Fletcher-Holmes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andy

    to be the first technique able to spectrally image in snapshot mode with modest resolution and without the need spectral imaging with modest spectral resolution and modest field of view. The second, biologically

  3. Optic for an endoscope/borescope having high resolution and narrow field of view

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, Gary F.; Trebes, James E.

    2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An optic having optimized high spatial resolution, minimal nonlinear magnification distortion while at the same time having a limited chromatic focal shift or chromatic aberrations. The optic located at the distal end of an endoscopic inspection tool permits a high resolution, narrow field of view image for medical diagnostic applications, compared to conventional optics for endoscopic instruments which provide a wide field of view, low resolution image. The image coverage is over a narrow (<20 degrees) field of view with very low optical distortion (<5% pin cushion or barrel distortion. The optic is also optimized for best color correction as well as to aid medical diagnostics.

  4. Algorithms for enhanced spatiotemporal imaging of human brain function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnaswamy, Pavitra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of human brain function require technologies to non-invasively image neuronal dynamics with high spatiotemporal resolution. The electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram (MEG) measure neuronal activity ...

  5. Laser/matter interactions by laser-launched plates and direct laser shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C. (Damian C.); Kopp, R. A. (Roger A.); Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Johnson, R. P. (Randall P.); Munson, C. P. (Carter P.); Letzring, S. A. (Samuel A.); Niemczura, J. G. (Johnathan G.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosives, gas guns, laser-launched flyer plates, and direct laser-irradiation can be used to generate shocks and high-stress in materials. Each method has a unique diameter and thickness of shock that can be generated. In past years, small laboratory lasers have been used to launch flyer plates 2 - 200-pm thick to terminal velocities 0.1 to 5 k d s . Over the past few years we have been using our TRIDENT laser facility (1kJ in 0.2 to 2ps) to accelerate larger diameter (8 mm) and thicker (0.1 - 1.5 mm) flyer plates. These larger diameters and thicker one-dimensional plates more closely compliment traditional experimental methods such as gas guns. The 8-mm diameter and 1-mm thick flyer plates can impart shocks in metals for constitutive dynamic property measurements. The versatility of laser-driven plates permits spatial and temporal profiles of the flyer plate impact on sample targets. LASNEX models and parameters of the laser drive can be used to optimize optical coupling efficiency. The flyer plate launch, acceleration, terminal velocity, and, depending on the experiment, flyer plate impact on to target materials are recorded using point-interferometry (VISAR), and line-imaging interferometry. These high speed optical and laser experimental methods will be described along with ancillary methods, and material data. Constitutive properties of bulk materials, rate effects, and grain size and/or orientation have been studied for several metals including copper, beryllium, gold, and some alloys.

  6. c 2013 by Jacob Thomas Stewart. All rights reserved. HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LARGE MOLECULES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    OF LARGE MOLECULES AND WATER CLUSTERS USING QUANTUM CASCADE LASERS BY JACOB THOMAS STEWART DISSERTATION-resolution spectroscopic studies of large molecules and water clusters which have been obtained using a quantum cascade cooling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including high-resolution spectroscopy of pyrene (C16H

  7. High Resolution Microprobe XPS | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raman and XPS characterization of fuel-cladding interactions using miniature specimens. Laser Raman spectroscopy was evaluated as a tool for studying fuel-cladding chemical...

  8. Broadband laser cooling of trapped atoms with ultrafast pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. B. Blinov; R. N. Kohn Jr.; M. J. Madsen; P. Maunz; D. L. Moehring; C. Monroe

    2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate broadband laser cooling of atomic ions in an rf trap using ultrafast pulses from a modelocked laser. The temperature of a single ion is measured by observing the size of a time-averaged image of the ion in the known harmonic trap potential. While the lowest observed temperature was only about 1 K, this method efficiently cools very hot atoms and can sufficiently localize trapped atoms to produce near diffraction-limited atomic images.

  9. BNL | CO2 Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on...

  10. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  11. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  12. Environmental Conflict Resolution | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Conflict Resolution Environmental Conflict Resolution ENVIRONMENTAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION In September 2012, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Office...

  13. Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantum number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 57239 Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantumhep-th/0310223 UCB-PTH-03/26 Harmonic resolution as aquantum number, the harmonic resolution K. The Bekenstein

  14. Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zhang, Song

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

  15. High resolution non-contact thermal characterization of semiconductor devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    imaging can have spatial resolution better than the diffraction limit of an infrared camera and can work infrared microscopes. Also, since the thermoreflectance technique does not rely upon the emitted black body measured the heating on a 35x35 micron MOS transistor, and Mansanares5 who measured temperature

  16. Optical nanolithography with k/15 resolution using bowtie aperture array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Optical nanolithography with k/15 resolution using bowtie aperture array Xiaolei Wen · Luis M nanolithography using bowtie apertures with the help of the interferometric- spatial-phase-imaging (ISPI) technique. The ISPI system can detect and control the distance between the bowtie aperture, and photoresist

  17. Ballistic Imaging of High-Pressure Fuel Sprays using Incoherent, Ultra- short Pulsed Illumination with an Ultrafast OKE-based Time Gating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an optical Kerr effect based time-gate with the collinear incidence of the pump and probe beams at the Kerr medium, liquid carbon disulfide, for ballistic imaging of the high-pressure fuel sprays. The probe pulse used to illuminate the object under study is extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses inside water, thereby destroying their coherence. The optical imaging spatial resolution and gate timings are investigated and compared with a similar setup without supercontinuum generation, where the probe is still coherent. And finally, a few ballistic images of the fuel sprays using coherent and incoherent illumination with the proposed time-gate are presented and compared qualitatively.

  18. Direct imaging of crystal structure and defects in metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} by quantitative aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Ulrich; Lotnyk, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.lotnyk@iom-leipzig.de; Thelander, Erik; Rauschenbach, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge about the atomic structure and vacancy distribution in phase change materials is of foremost importance in order to understand the underlying mechanism of fast reversible phase transformation. In this Letter, by combining state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy with image simulations, we are able to map the local atomic structure and composition of a textured metastable Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin film deposited by pulsed laser deposition with excellent spatial resolution. The atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations display the heterogeneous defect structure of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase. The obtained results are discussed. Highly oriented Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films appear to be a promising approach for further atomic-resolution investigations of the phase change behavior of this material class.

  19. Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Fordyce A.

    Laser Safety Management Policy Statement...........................................................2 Laser Users.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO

  20. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Hermann, Mark R. (San Ramon, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Tiszauer, Detlev H. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  1. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  2. Laser programs highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides highlights of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories` laser programs. Laser uses and technology assessment and utilization are provided.

  3. BNL | ATF Laser Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained...

  4. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  5. The Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS) : investigating galaxy cores and black holes with gravitational lens central images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Edward R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the Extragalactic Lens VLBI Imaging Survey (ELVIS), a search for central images in gravitational lenses. We present the first four ELVIS targets, for which we have radio VLBI observations with resolutions ...

  6. Fiber Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours, Programs and EventsFiber Lasers NIF

  7. Laser Faraday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,sandLaser Decontamination ofFaraday

  8. Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Euiheon

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

  9. Turbo ASL: Arterial Spin Labeling With Higher SNR and Temporal Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    Turbo ASL: Arterial Spin Labeling With Higher SNR and Temporal Resolution Eric C. Wong,* Wen the ASL SNR per image. We refer to this modified technique as turbo ASL. THEORY In pulsed ASL techniques

  10. Remote imaging of concealed objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lev, Aner, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il; Sfez, Bruno, E-mail: lev@soreq.gov.il [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical detection of objects hidden behind opaque screening layers is a challenging problem. We demonstrate an optically detected echographic-like method that combines collimated acoustic and laser beams. The acoustic waves cross the screening layers and their back-reflection from the hidden objects is detected through the analysis of a dynamic laser speckle pattern created at the outer surface of the screening layer. Real-time remote detection of moving targets 15 meters away, with a few mm resolutions is demonstrated using a very sensitive camera detection scheme.

  11. Apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, Philip L. (Bernalillo County, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Crump, Jr., O. B. (Albuquerque, NM); Bonzon, Lloyd L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for laser velocity interferometry employing a fixed interferometer cavity and delay element. The invention permits rapid construction of interferometers that may be operated by those non-skilled in the art, that have high image quality with no drift or loss of contrast, and that have long-term stability even without shock isolation of the cavity.

  12. Stress Evaluation and Model Validation Using Laser Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dike, Jay J.; Lu, Wei-yang; Peng, Lawrence W.; Wang, James C. F.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh surface waves can be used to evaluate surface stresses and through-thickness stress gradients based on acoustoelasticity. Laser based ultrasonic techniques, which generate and detect surface waves, have the advantages of good spatial resolution and remote operation. The techniques have many potential applications. This is the final report of a LDRD project that is the first to exploit the benefits of laser ultrasonics for stress and stress gradient evaluation.

  13. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  14. Identification marking by means of laser peening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

  15. Calculation of the spatial resolution in two-photon absorption spectroscopy applied to plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain); Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica “Daza de Valdés,” CSIC, 28006-Madrid (Spain); Fuentes, L. M. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain); Grützmacher, K.; Pérez, C., E-mail: concha@opt.uva.es; Rosa, M. I. de la [Departamento de Física Teórica, Atómica y Óptica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011-Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detailed characterization of the spatial resolution provided by two-photon absorption spectroscopy suited for plasma diagnosis via the 1S-2S transition of atomic hydrogen for optogalvanic detection and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A precise knowledge of the spatial resolution is crucial for a correct interpretation of measurements, if the plasma parameters to be analysed undergo strong spatial variations. The present study is based on a novel approach which provides a reliable and realistic determination of the spatial resolution. Measured irradiance distribution of laser beam waists in the overlap volume, provided by a high resolution UV camera, are employed to resolve coupled rate equations accounting for two-photon excitation, fluorescence decay and ionization. The resulting three-dimensional yield distributions reveal in detail the spatial resolution for optogalvanic and LIF detection and related saturation due to depletion. Two-photon absorption profiles broader than the Fourier transform-limited laser bandwidth are also incorporated in the calculations. The approach allows an accurate analysis of the spatial resolution present in recent and future measurements.

  16. 1 Resolution 1.1 Resolution in propositional logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charatonik, Witold

    is satisfiable if there exists a valuation such that ^() = T for all F; otherwise we say that F consequence of F if all valuations satisfying F also satisfy . Observation 3. A formula is a logical the soundness theorem for resolution method (If there exists a resolution proof of inconsistency of a set

  17. Cryogenic scanning Hall-probe microscope with centimeter scan range and submicron resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moler, Kathryn A.

    with 200 nm positioning resolution by coupling stepper motors to high-resolution drivers and reducing gears in coated conductors--high-Tc superconducting tapes--is demonstrated via model systems. We image an entire also use motor-driven microme- ters but couple them to improved electronics and reducing gears

  18. Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    Experimental measurement of human head motion for high-resolution computed tomography system design experimentally measured for high-resolution computed tomography CT design using a Canon digital camera. Our goal-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. DOI: 10.1117/1.3454379 Subject terms: head motion; computed tomography CT ; image

  19. Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senthilraja Singaravelu

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

  20. Longitudinal discharge laser baffles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

  1. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  2. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  3. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  4. Multimodality Imaging Atlas of Coronary Atherosclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Patrick

    NEW HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGING TECHNOLOGIES HAVE ENHANCED OUR UNDERSTANDING OF THE CORONARY atherosclerotic disease process, and this atlas provides a multimodality pictorial review of the development of histologically verified ...

  5. Seismic imaging using higher order statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Karthik

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in seismic resolution beyond typical seismic wavelength will have significant implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Conventional imaging algorithms can be derived as a least squared optimization problem in which...

  6. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadwick, B.A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

  7. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  8. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Reichert, P.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid. 3 figs.

  9. Faraday imaging at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Reichert, Patrick (Hayward, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Faraday filter rejects background light from self-luminous thermal objects, but transmits laser light at the passband wavelength, thus providing an ultra-narrow optical bandpass filter. The filter preserves images so a camera looking through a Faraday filter at a hot target illuminated by a laser will not see the thermal radiation but will see the laser radiation. Faraday filters are useful for monitoring or inspecting the uranium separator chamber in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. Other uses include viewing welds, furnaces, plasma jets, combustion chambers, and other high temperature objects. These filters are can be produced at many discrete wavelengths. A Faraday filter consists of a pair of crossed polarizers on either side of a heated vapor cell mounted inside a solenoid.

  10. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

  11. Laser ablated hard coating for microtools

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

  12. Towards the clinical application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for rapid pathogen diagnosis Qassem Mohaidat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rehse, Steven J.

    and Microbiology) Asst. Prof. Choong-Min Kang (WSU Dept. of Biological Sciences) Asst. Prof. Hossein Salimnia (WSU of Pathogenic Bacteria: A Spectroscopy Experiment at the Crossroads of Atomic Physics and Microbiology," S- resolution spectrometer, laser power supply, computer, and battery Hand-held probe contains laser, joystick

  13. Enhanced High Resolution RBS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M. [National Electrostatics Corp., Middleton, Wisconsin, U. S. A. 53562-0310 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

  14. Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okamato, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Laser Cooling H. Okamoto, A.M. Sessler,effective transverse laser cooling simultaneously withlongitudinal laser cooling, two possibilities are

  15. PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection This Laser Capture Microdissection system is equipped with 100 x objective lens for enriching distinct...

  16. Photomechanical, Photothermal and Photothermomechanical Mechanisms of Interaction of Nanosecond Laser Pulses With Artificial Tissue Models and Pigmented Melanoma Cells in Medical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Gutierrez, Francisco Gerardo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    up for laser irradiation of melanoma cells with nanosecondresolved imaging (TRI) of melanoma cells. Lasers Nd:YAG 1 asIntegrity and Survival of Melanoma Cells after Nanosecond

  17. A ber-optic based calibration system for the High Resolution Fly's Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A ber-optic based calibration system for the High Resolution Fly's Eye cosmic ray observatory J, 800 Yale Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1156 Abstract This article describes the ber-optic based: Highest energy cosmic rays Fly's Eye Experiment HiRes YAG Laser Fiber-optics PMT PACS: 95.45.+i 95.85.Ls

  18. Energy Resolved High Resolution Dynamic E-Cell Materials Research. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Ray; Sharma, Renu; Mayer, James

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop in situ materials reaction observation capability in an intermediate voltage high resolution transmission electron microscope. To accomplish this we purchased a GATAN imaging energy filter system, a hot stage, and designed and constructed an environmental cell and real time television image recording system, and installed this equipment on our EM 430 intermediate voltage electron microscope.

  19. Scene Reconstruction from High Spatio-Angular Resolution Light Fields Changil Kim1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Henning

    Scene Reconstruction from High Spatio-Angular Resolution Light Fields Changil Kim1,2 Henning Zimmer Figure 1: Our method reconstructs accurate depth from light fields of complex scenes. The images on the left show a 2D slice of a 3D input light field, a so called epipolar-plane image (EPI), and two out

  20. Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

  1. High Resolution Nanoimprint for Nanophotonics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Youwei

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    of SERS-active device depends on two main factors: good reproducibility and high enhancement factor. Ordered metallic nanostructures with high resolution are usually preferred for SERS application. Nanoimprint lithography can provide a low-cost and high...

  2. Differential high-resolution stimulated CW Raman spectroscopy of hydrogen in a hollow-core fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westergaard, Philip G; Petersen, Jan C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate sensitive high-resolution stimulated Raman measurements of hydrogen using a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). The Raman transition is pumped by a narrow linewidth (<50 kHz) 1064 nm continuous-wave (CW) fiber laser. The probe light is produced by a homebuilt CW optical parametric oscillator (OPO), tunable from around 800 nm to 1300 nm (linewidth ~ 5 MHz). These narrow linewidth lasers allow for an excellent spectral resolution of approximately 10^-4 cm^(-1). The setup employs a differential measurement technique for noise rejection in the probe beam, which also eliminates background signals from the fiber. With the high sensitivity obtained, Raman signals were observed with only a few mW of optical power in both the pump and probe beams. This demonstration allows for high resolution Raman identification of molecules and quantification of Raman signal strengths.

  3. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialographic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone. 1 fig.

  4. Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Dragon, Ernest P. (Danville, CA); Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialogroaphic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone.

  5. Higher signal harmonics, LISA's angular resolution, and dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. G. Arun; Bala R. Iyer; B. S. Sathyaprakash; Siddhartha Sinha; Chris Van Den Broeck

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is generally believed that the angular resolution of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) will not be good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster. This conclusion, based on using only the dominant harmonic of the binary SMBH signal, changes substantially when higher signal harmonics are included in assessing the parameter estimation problem. We show that in a subset of the source parameter space the angular resolution increases by more than a factor of 10, thereby making it possible for LISA to identify the host galaxy/galaxy cluster. Thus, LISA's observation of certain binary SMBH coalescence events could constrain the dark energy equation of state to within a few percent, comparable to the level expected from other dark energy missions.

  6. Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

  7. VISION & IMAGING The VV5301 and VV6301 sensors are highly integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltes, Jacky

    · Automotive systems · Personal video communications · Biometric readers Maximum pixel resolution 164 x 124 as critical components in life support devices or systems without express written approval.imaging@st.com centraleurope.imaging@st.com france.imaging@st.com japan.imaging@st.com nordic.imaging@st.com southerneurope

  8. Four dimensional hybrid ultrasound and optoacoustic imaging via passive element optical excitation in a hand-held probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehm, Thomas Felix; Razansky, Daniel, E-mail: dr@tum.de [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís [Institute for Biological and Medical Imaging (IBMI), Helmholtz Zentrum München, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasonography and optoacoustic imaging share powerful advantages related to the natural aptitude for real-time image rendering with high resolution, the hand-held operation, and lack of ionizing radiation. The two methods also possess very different yet highly complementary advantages of the mechanical and optical contrast in living tissues. Nonetheless, efficient integration of these modalities remains challenging owing to the fundamental differences in the underlying physical contrast, optimal signal acquisition, and image reconstruction approaches. We report on a method for hybrid acquisition and reconstruction of three-dimensional pulse-echo ultrasound and optoacoustic images in real time based on passive ultrasound generation with an optical absorber, thus avoiding the hardware complexity of active ultrasound generation. In this way, complete hybrid datasets are generated with a single laser interrogation pulse, resulting in simultaneous rendering of ultrasound and optoacoustic images at an unprecedented rate of 10 volumetric frames per second. Performance is subsequently showcased in phantom experiments and in-vivo measurements from a healthy human volunteer, confirming general clinical applicability of the method.

  9. Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Functional Nanomaterials Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss...

  10. High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural Materials. Abstract: Corrosion and cracking represent critical failure mechanisms for structural materials in many...

  11. Image Super-Resolution for Improved Automatic Target Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waagenb and Mary Cassabaumb aRice University, Houston, TX bRaytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, AZ ABSTRACT@rice.edu, DW: donald e waagen@raytheon.com, MC: mlcassabaum@raytheon.com #12;Figure 1. Example sub

  12. Imaging molecular adsorbates: Resolution effects and determination of adsorption parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Shirley

    azulene. and various methylazulenes, the details of the observed shapes permitted the identification- pared either by sequential dosing or by dosing from a mix- ture of bulk materials. Further details performed with positive sample bias. ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 Y, with tunneling currents of 0.5-4 n

  13. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California: Energy Resources Jump

  14. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  15. Laser preheat enhanced ignition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

  16. Laser-assisted electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, D.F.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of laser irradiation on electrodeposition processes has been investigated. These studies demonstrated that the addition of laser irradiation to an electroplating process can dramatically enhance plating rates and current efficiencies, as well as improve the morphology of the resultant electrodeposit. During the course of these investigations, the mechanism for the laser enhancement of electrodeposition processes was determined. Experimental evidence was obtained to show that laser irradiation of the substrate results in increased metal ion concentrations at the surface of the electrode due to a laser-induced Soret effect. The laser-induced Soret effect has important implications for laser-assisted electrochemical processing. The increase in the surface concentration of ions allows efficient electrodeposition from dilute solutions. As such, laser- assisted electrodeposition may develop into an environmentally conscious manufacturing process by reducing waste and limiting worker exposure to toxic chemicals.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING Berthold K.P. Horn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    Squares Match in FT #12;Polystyrene Micro Beads (1µm) #12;#12;(2) CODED APERTURE IMAGING · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays · Pinhole -- tradeoff resolution and SNR with: Richard Lanza, Roberto Accorsi, Klaus Ziock, and Lorenzo Fabris. #12;Coded Aperture Imaging · Can't refract or reflect gamma rays · Pinhole

  18. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  19. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, Peter L. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  20. Image Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

  1. Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers Michael Hutchins #12;The PROBLEM opia - near sightedness. ically corrected with concave #12;THE PROBLEM eropia - far sightedness sed by a flat cornea or ort eye from different focal points in different nes of the eye. used by non-uniform curvature of the cornea

  2. Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

    Transmyocardial Laser Revascularization Max Wiedmann #12;What is TMR? · TMR is used to improve blood flow to heart muscle tissue (myocardial tissue). · This is done using a laser to create small with bypass surgery so no additional opening is required. · The surgeon uses the laser to create 20 to 40 1mm

  3. Laser bottom hole assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

  4. LaserFest Celebration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

  5. Laser micro-processing of silicon using nanosecond pulse shaped fibre laser at 1 ?m wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Kun

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ). ............................................................................... 11 Figure 2.2(a): Schematic and (b) SEM image of 19.8% efficient multicrystalline silicon solar cell with “honeycomb” surface texturing (Zhao, Wang et al. 1998). (c) The “inverted pyramid” texture on the top surface (Zhao, Wang et al. 1995). (d) A... is 40 µm (Tan 2006). (c): SEM image of silicon machined by frequency tripled Nd: YAG laser (355 nm) followed by cleaning in the KOH solution (Chen and Darling 2005). (d) Profiles and SEM images (×1.5 k) of ablated a-Si under different irradiation...

  6. Quantitative strain mapping of InAs/InP quantum dots with 1 nm spatial resolution using dark field electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    by geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images resolution images have been used to obtain the strain in nano-structured materials.3 Although this approach in many different types of sam- ples, at this time the spatial resolution of between 3 and 6 nm

  7. Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

  8. Laser ignition of aluminum nanoparticles in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, M. M. (Mary M.); Oschwald, D. M. (David M); Son, S. F. (Steven F.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on recent experiments of the ignition of nanoaluminum in air by CO{sub 2} laser heating. Ignition time and temperature were measured as a function of Al particle size and laser power. The ignition time was determined by high-speed digital images and frrst light as determined by a photodiode. The ignition delay increases with increasing particle size, and the decreasing laser power. Two stage burning is observed. The first reaction takes place on the surface of the powder sample and moves from the center to the edges followed by the second reaction, which takes place within the bulk of the sample. As the particles size increases the material is less likely to burn through out, leaving behind unreacted Al powder.

  9. Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

  10. Remote sensing, imaging, and signal engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brase, J.M.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the Remote Sensing, Imaging, and Signal Engineering (RISE) trust area which has been very active in working to define new directions. Signal and image processing have always been important support for existing programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but now these technologies are becoming central to the formation of new programs. Exciting new applications such as high-resolution telescopes, radar remote sensing, and advanced medical imaging are allowing us to participate in the development of new programs.

  11. Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Quanxi, E-mail: quanxixue@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Wang, Feng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

  12. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  13. STORM/PALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope EMSL has developed and offers Fluorescence, Super Resolution STORM...

  14. Few-cycle optical probe-pulse for investigation of relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, M. B.; Sävert, A.; Polz, J.; Schnell, M.; Rinck, T.; Möller, M.; Hansinger, P. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Jäckel, O.; Paulus, G. G.; Kaluza, M. C. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Veisz, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a few-cycle optical probe-pulse for the investigation of laser-plasma interactions driven by a Ti:sapphire, 30 Terawatt (TW) laser system is described. The probe is seeded by a fraction of the driving laser's energy and is spectrally broadened via self-phase modulation in a hollow core fiber filled with a rare gas, then temporally compressed to a few optical cycles via chirped mirrors. Shadowgrams of the laser-driven plasma wave created in relativistic electron acceleration experiments are presented with few-fs temporal resolution, which is shown to be independent of post-interaction spectral filtering of the probe-beam.

  15. active fast-neutron imaging: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two generations of a novel detector for high-resolution transmission imaging and spectrometry of fast-neutrons are presented. These devices are based on a hydrogenous fiber...

  16. In Vivo Imaging with a Cell-Permeable Porphyrin-Based MRI Contrast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  17. In vivo imaging with a cell-permeable porphyrin-based MRI contrast agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekwan

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

  18. An investigation into the design of an image reconstruction algorithm for continuous wave tomosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douyon, Pierre-Guy Felix

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous wave (CW) tomosynthesis provides many theoretical advantages over traditional breast imaging techniques, like mammography. These theoretical advantages include improved spatial resolution, better information ...

  19. Relay telescope for high power laser alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system includes an optical path having an intracavity relay telescope with a telescope focal point for imaging an output of the gain medium between an image location at or near the gain medium and an image location at or near an output coupler for the laser system. A kinematic mount is provided within a vacuum chamber, and adapted to secure beam baffles near the telescope focal point. An access port on the vacuum chamber is adapted for allowing insertion and removal of the beam baffles. A first baffle formed using an alignment pinhole aperture is used during alignment of the laser system. A second tapered baffle replaces the alignment aperture during operation and acts as a far-field baffle in which off angle beams strike the baffle a grazing angle of incidence, reducing fluence levels at the impact areas.

  20. Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milewski, John O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernal, John E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.