Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

2

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization More Documents & Publications Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning

3

Single shot extreme ultraviolet laser imaging of nanostructures with wavelength resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated near-wavelength resolution microscopy in the extreme ultraviolet. Images of 50 nm diameter nanotubes were obtained with a single {approx}1 ns duration pulse from a desk-top size 46.9 nm laser. We measured the modulation transfer function of the microscope for three different numerical aperture zone plate objectives, demonstrating that 54 nm half-period structures can be resolved. The combination of near-wavelength spatial resolution and high temporal resolution opens myriad opportunities in imaging, such as the ability to directly investigate dynamics of nanoscale structures.

Jones, Juanita; Brewer, Courtney A.; Brizuela, Fernando; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Martz, Dale H.; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Attwood, David T.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Artyukov, Igor A.; Ponomareko, Alexander G.; Kondratenko, Valeriy V.; Marconi, Mario C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tech Stage: Demonstration D&D Toolbox: Project OR-071203, OR-071303; Deployed at SRS P Reactor Area Closure Project PBS SR-0040 The robotically deployed laser surveying system was demonstrated in the Purification room of SRS P-Reactor on September 24, 2008. Page 1 of 2 Savannah River Site South Carolina Michigan D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization Challenge The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. Planners must know the condition of facilities which may have been abandoned in years past with little or no

6

High Spatial Resolution Thermal Imaging of Multiple Section Semiconductor Lasers Ali Shakouri*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and peak wavelength characteristics of active optoelectronic devices. In this paper we describe how for optoelectronic devices such as laser sources, switching/routing elements, and detectors. This is especially true (TE) coolers. However since their integration with optoelectronic devices is difficult [1

7

EMSL - atomic-resolution imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

atomic-resolution-imaging en Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110). http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmolecular-hydrogen-formation-proxima...

8

Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. |...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching. Abstract: The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can...

9

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described. U.S. Patent No.: 7,675,045 (DOE S-112,966) Patent Application Filing Date: October 9, 2008

10

Atomic resolution images of graphite in air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Nanometer Resolution Imaging by SIngle Molecule Switching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fluorescence intensity of single molecules can change dramatically even under constant laser excitation. The phenomenon is frequently called "blinking" and involves molecules switching between high and low intensity states.[1-3] In additional to spontaneous blinking, the fluorescence of some special fluorophores, such as cyanine dyes and photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, can be switched on and off by choice using a second laser. Recent single-molecule spectroscopy investigations have shed light on mechanisms of single molecule blinking and photoswitching. This ability to controllably switch single molecules led to the invention of a novel fluorescence microscopy with nanometer spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit.

Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya

2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

Interpreting atomic resolution spectroscopic images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool providing information about electronic structure essential for understanding the properties of new and emerging materials. Here we show that the shape and width of spectroscopic images do not show a simple variation with binding energy, as commonly assumed. Rather they exhibit a complex dependence on the effective nonlocal scattering potential, and also on the dynamical channeling and absorption of the incident probe through the specimen. Consequently, in LaMnO$_3$, the low lying La N$_{4,5}$ edge at 99 eV can produce images of similar width to higher lying edges such as the O $K$ edge at 532 eV.

Oxley, Mark P [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Timothy J [ORNL; van Benthem, Klaus [ORNL; Findlay, Scott D. [University of Melbourne, Australia; Allen, L. J. [University of Melbourne, Australia; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions March 2, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? The electron beam that powers Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser pumped out a record power input of 500 kilvolts using an innovative energy-recovery system that amplifies energy with far less power. A sufficiently powerful laser could make an effective defensive weapon, as well as accurate detection and tracking. The few folks still keeping their New Year's resolutions to work out might be the first to appreciate the recent record-breaking lift by the Energy Department's Jefferson Lab. Take a steel dumbbell. Hoist it up - lift with your legs! - onto a stand. Then add another ...and another

14

Range imaging laser radar  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Imaging of Fluorine and Boron from Fluorinated Boronophenylalanine in the Same Cell at Organelle Resolution by Correlative Ion Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...J. A. Quantitative imaging and microlocalization of boron-10 in brain tumors and infiltrating tumor cells by SIMS ion...R. Quantitative subcellular dynamic SIMS imaging of boron-10 and boron-11 isotopes in the same cell delivered by...

Subhash Chandra; George W. Kabalka; Daniel R. Lorey II; Duane R. Smith; Jeffrey A. Coderre

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural Materials. High-Resolution Crack Imaging Reveals Degradation Processes in Nuclear Reactor Structural...

17

Light energy matching method in high-resolution image reconstruction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many approaches for high-resolution image reconstruction have been proposed in some literatures. One of the most commonly ways is to reconstruct a high-resolution image from a...

Wang, Ling; Xu, Zhihai; Feng, Huajun; Zhang, Ping

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

Vann, C.S.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Improved Performance of Laser-Ultrasonic F-SAFT Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spatial resolution of laser-ultrasonics depends upon the spot sizes of the generation and detection lasers and may be inadequate for detecting small and buried flaws. The use of a broad laser spot at the surf...

D. Lévesque; A. Blouin; C. Néron; M. Choquet…

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Geothermal Area Regions (0) Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHigh-ResolutionAeromagneticSurveytoImageShallowFaults,DixieValleyGeothermalField...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Laser LocatIRTM Pointer -- Pinpoints the hot spot on the IR image with the real physical target (FLIR i case FLIR i40 Additional Features · 0.6MP Visible Light Camera resolution · Picture in Picture (PIP) fixed · 14,400 pixels (120 x 120) FLIR i50 Additional Features · 2.3MP Visible Light Camera resolution

Short, Daniel

22

High vertical resolution crosswell seismic imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing high vertical resolution seismic images from crosswell data is disclosed. In accordance with one aspect of the disclosure, a set of vertically spaced, generally horizontally extending continuous layers and associated nodes are defined within a region between two boreholes. The specific number of nodes is selected such that the value of a particular characteristic of the subterranean region at each of the nodes is one which can be determined from the seismic data. Once values are established at the nodes, values of the particular characteristic are assigned to positions between the node points of each layer based on the values at node within that layer and without regard to the values at node points within any other layer. A seismic map is produced using the node values and the assigned values therebetween. In accordance with another aspect of the disclosure, an approximate model of the region is established using direct arrival traveltime data. Thereafter, the approximate model is adjusted using reflected arrival data. In accordance with still another aspect of the disclosure, correction is provided for well deviation. An associated technique which provides improvements in ray tracing is also disclosed.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

24

Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either...

Gross, Michel; Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal

25

High-resolution mapping of quantum efficiency of silicon photodiode via optical-feedback laser microthermography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We map the external quantum efficiency (QE) distribution of a silicon photodiode (PD) sample via a thermographic imaging technique based on optical-feedback laser confocal microscopy. An image pair consisting of the confocal reflectance image and the 2D photocurrent map is simultaneously acquired to delineate the following regions of interest on the sample: the substrate, the n-type region, the pn overlay, and the bonding pad. The 2D QE distribution is derived from the photocurrent map to quantify the optical performance of these sites. The thermal integrity of the sample is then evaluated by deriving the rate of change of QE with temperature T at each point on the silicon PD. These gradient maps function not only as stringent measures of local thermal QE activity but they also expose probable defect locations on the sample at high spatial resolution - a capability that is not feasible with existing bulk measurement techniques.

Cemine, Vernon Julius; Blanca, Carlo Mar; Saloma, Caesar

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Author University of Arizona Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Citation University of Arizona. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment [Internet]. 2007. [cited 2013/09/27]. Available from: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/HiBlog/tag/wavelength/ Retrieved from

27

Thin, Free-Standing Films For High Resolution Neutron Imaging.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thin, free-standing boro-phosphosilicate glass (BPSG) films were fabricated at PSU Nanofab to serve as prototype neutron converters for a proposed high resolution neutron imaging system… (more)

Trivelpiece, Cory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

Winefordner, James D. (Gainesville, FL); Matveev, Oleg I. (Gainesville, FL); Smith, Benjamin W. (Gainesville, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described. U.S. Patent No.: 7,675,045...

30

Fast Hyperspectral Imaging Using a Mid-Infrared Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active hyperspectral imaging system using an external cavity quantum cascade laser and a focal plane array acquiring images at 25 Hz from 985 cm-1 to 1075 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.3 cm 1 is demonstrated. The chemical imaging of gases is demonstrated in both static and dynamic cases. The system was also used to analyze liquid and solid samples.

Phillips, Mark C.; Ho, Nicolas

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Image Super-Resolution for Improved Automatic Target Recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the literature suited to real-time application on forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images. Keywords: Super-Resolution, Automatic Target Recognition, FLIR 1. INTRODUCTION The fidelity of data gathered by forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imagers is limited by the quality of the optical and electronic

32

Simulation on Improving Imaging Resolution of SAFT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concrete is one of the main construction materials in civil engineering. Among the existing Nondestructive Testing (NDT) methods, the imaging techniques that can give a graphic display of the inner structure of the concrete elements have received great ... Keywords: ultrasonic test, concrete, SAFT, WDT

Qiufeng Li; Xinhong Jin; Min Zhao; Lihua Shi; Zhixue Shao

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Image synthesis from nonimaged laser-speckle patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that unspeckled images of coherently illuminated, diffuse objects can be formed from measurements of backscattered laser-speckle intensity. The theoretical basis for...

Idell, Paul S; Fienup, J R; Goodman, Ron S

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fish embryo multimodal imaging by laser Doppler digital holography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A laser Doppler imaging scheme combined to an upright microscope is proposed. Quantitative Doppler imaging in both velocity norm and direction, as well as amplitude contrast of either zebrafish flesh or vasculature is demonstrated.

Verrier, Nicolas; Picart, Pascal; Gross, Michel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nonlinear formation of holographic images of obscurations in laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear formation of holographic images of obscurations in laser beams C. Clay Widmayer, David of obscurations in laser beams. The predictions of the model are found to be in good agreement with measurements the intensity and fluence of the beam at each component in the laser chain. Dam- age threats to the system can

36

Unsupervised Feature Learning for High-Resolution Satellite Image Classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rich data provided by high-resolution satellite imagery allow us to directly model geospatial neighborhoods by understanding their spatial and structural patterns. In this paper we explore an unsupervised feature learning approach to model geospatial neighborhoods for classification purposes. While pixel and object based classification approaches are widely used for satellite image analysis, often these approaches exploit the high-fidelity image data in a limited way. In this paper we extract low-level features to characterize the local neighborhood patterns. We exploit the unlabeled feature measurements in a novel way to learn a set of basis functions to derive new features. The derived sparse feature representation obtained by encoding the measured features in terms of the learned basis function set yields superior classification performance. We applied our technique on two challenging image datasets: ORNL dataset representing one-meter spatial resolution satellite imagery representing five land-use categories and, UCMERCED dataset consisting of 21 different categories representing sub-meter resolution overhead imagery. Our results are highly promising and, in the case of UCMERCED dataset we outperform the best results obtained for this dataset. We show that our feature extraction and learning methods are highly effective in developing a detection system that can be used to automatically scan large-scale high-resolution satellite imagery for detecting large-facility.

Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

3D Laser Imaging at Highway Speed Kelvin CP Wang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Laser Imaging at Highway Speed Kelvin CP Wang And the Team Formerly at the University Concrete Consortium Meeting Oklahoma City Sheraton Hotel #12;3D Laser Imaging for Pavements Mature Potential to Cover Most if Not All Data Collection on Pavement Surface How to Obtain True 1mm 3D Visual

38

Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submillimeter-resolution radiography of shielded structures with laser-accelerated electron beams (Received 24 March 2010; published 14 October 2010) We investigate the use of energetic electron beams beam (with energy >100 MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through

Umstadter, Donald

39

Infrared hyperspectral imaging using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser and microbolometer focal plane array  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A versatile mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging system is demonstrated by combining a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser and a microbolometer focal plane array. The tunable mid-infrared laser provided high brightness illumination over a tuning range from 985 cm-1 to 1075 cm-1 (9.30-10.15 ?m). Hypercubes containing images at 300 wavelengths separated by 0.3 cm 1 were obtained in 12 s. High spectral resolution chemical imaging of methanol vapor was demonstrated for both static and dynamic systems. The system was also used to image and characterize multiple component liquid and solid samples.

Phillips, Mark C.; Ho, Nicolas

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Deep-towed High Resolution multichannel seismic imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High Resolution (220–1050 Hz) seismic acquisition performed in deep water using deep-towed systems provides unrivalled lateral resolution when compared to conventional surface seismic. The lateral resolution of these acquisitions is controlled by the width of the first Fresnel zone, taking advantage of their positions close to the sea bottom. No current existing deep towed equipment can benefit from seismic imaging processing techniques to improve this resolution as a consequence of positioning inaccuracies. The technological developments of a digital deep-towed multichannel streamer are presented with a particular attention to positioning: each hydrophone incorporates a pitch, roll and heading sensor in order to monitor the constant deformation of the streamer in operation. The sea trials took place in July 2013 in the Mediterranean Sea. Pre-stack depth migration applied to the deep-towed multichannel data illustrates the potential of this emerging methodology in terms of penetration (12 dB improvement in Signal/Noise) and lateral resolution (mean signal wavelength: 3 m) when compared with deep-towed single-channel acquisition.

B. Marsset; E. Menut; S. Ker; Y. Thomas; J.-P. Regnault; P. Leon; H. Martinossi; L. Artzner; D. Chenot; S. Dentrecolas; B. Spychalski; G. Mellier; N. Sultan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

Jacobsen, Chris

2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Timson, D. J. [School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK, BT9 7BL (United Kingdom); Catney, M. [Andor Technology plc., 7 Millennium Way, Springvale Business Park, Belfast, UK, BT12 7AL (United Kingdom)

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Simultaneous High-Resolution 2-Dimensional Spatial and 1-Dimensional Picosecond Streaked X-ray Pinhole Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broad-band filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 {micro}m diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of <13 {micro}m.

Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

Imaging System With Confocally Self-Detecting Laser.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a confocal laser imaging system and method. The system includes a laser source, a beam splitter, focusing elements, and a photosensitive detector. The laser source projects a laser beam along a first optical path at an object to be imaged, and modulates the intensity of the projected laser beam in response to light reflected from the object. A beam splitter directs a portion of the projected laser beam onto a photodetector. The photodetector monitors the intensity of laser output. The laser source can be an electrically scannable array, with a lens or objective assembly for focusing light generated by the array onto the object of interest. As the array is energized, its laser beams scan over the object, and light reflected at each point is returned by the lens to the element of the array from which it originated. A single photosensitive detector element can generate an intensity-representative signal for all lasers of the array. The intensity-representative signal from the photosensitive detector can be processed to provide an image of the object of interest.

Webb, Robert H. (Lincoln, MA); Rogomentich, Fran J. (Concord, MA)

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution. 2 figs.

Thomas, S.W.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Greenhouse Gas Laser Imaging Tomography Experiment (GreenLITE): Evaluation of a new method to look at high resolution spatial/temporal distributions of carbon over key sub km sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently a new laser based approach for measuring area with potential for producing 2D estimates of the concentration spatial distribution has been developed through a cooperative agreement with the National Energy and Technology Laboratory of the Department of Energy, Exelis Inc. and AER Inc. The new approach is based on a pair of continuous wave intensity modulated laser absorption spectrometer transceivers, combined with a series of retro reflectors located around the perimeter of the area being monitored. The main goal of this cooperative agreement is monitoring, reporting and verification for ground carbon capture and storage projects. The system was recently tested at the Zero Emission Research and Technology site in Bozeman, MT, with underground leak rates ranging from 0.1 – 0.3 metric ton per day (T/d), as well as a 0.8 T/d surface release. Over 200 hours of data were collected over a rectangular grid 180m x 200m between August 18th and September 9th. In addition, multiple days of in situ data were acquired for the same site, using a Licor gas analyzer systems. Initial comparisons between the laser-based system and the in situ agree very well. The system is designed to operate remotely and transmit the data via a 3G/4G connection along with weather data for the site. An all web-based system ingests the data, populates a database, performs the inversion to ppm CO2 using the Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM), and displays plots and statistics for the retrieved data. We will present an overview of the GreenLITE measurement system, outline the retrieval and reconstruction approach, and discuss results from extensive field testing.

Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Perninit, Timothy; McGregor, Doug; Botos, Chris; Dobeck, Laura

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Laser hazard analysis for LASIRIS Model MAG-501L-670M-1000-45[degree]-K diode laser associated with high resolution pulsed scanner.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser hazard analysis and safety assessment was performed for the LASIRISTM Model MAG-501L-670M-1000-45o-K diode laser associated with the High Resolution Pulse Scanner based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The laser was evaluated for both indoor and outdoor use.

Augustoni, Arnold L.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

High-resolution emission spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spectra of pulsed terahertz quantum-cascade lasers were measured with high spectral resolution. The characteristic line width at half maximum was 0.01 cm{sup -1}; it is controlled by laser temperature variations during the supply voltage pulse. It was shown that an increase in the laser temperature leads to a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by an increase in the effective refractive index of the active region. It was also found that a decrease in the supply voltage results in a decrease in the emission frequency, which is caused by a change in the energy of diagonal transitions between lasing levels.

Ikonnikov, A. V., E-mail: antikon@ipm.sci-nnov.ru; Antonov, A. V.; Lastovkin, A. A.; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Sadof'ev, Yu. G.; Samal, N. [Trion Technology (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma dynamics Title Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma dynamics Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Li, Junjie, Xuan Wang, Zhaoyang Chen, Richard Clinite, Samuel S. Mao, Pengfei Zhu, Zhengming Sheng, Jie Zhang, and Jianming Cao Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 107 Issue 8 Date Published 03/2010 Keywords copper, electron beam applications, high-speed optical techniques, laser ablation, plasma diagnostics, plasma production by laser Abstract Plasma dynamics in the early stage of laser ablation of a copper target are investigated in real time by making ultrafast electron shadow images and electron deflectometry measurements. These complementary techniques provide both a global view and a local perspective of the associated transient electric field and charge expansion dynamics. The results reveal that the charge cloud above the target surface is composed predominantly of thermally ejected electrons and that it is self-expanding, with a fast front-layer speed exceeding 107 m/s. The average electric field strength of the charge cloud induced by a pump fluence of 2.2 J/cm2 is estimated to be ∼ 2.4×105 V/m.

50

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Abstract N/A Author V. J. S. Grauch Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2002 Report Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Citation V. J. S. Grauch. 2002. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada. (!) : U.S. Geological Survey. Report No.: 02-384. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=High-Resolution_Aeromagnetic_Survey_to_Image_Shallow_Faults,_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field,_Nevada&oldid=682601"

51

Progress on cellular resolution retinal imaging: setting the stage for translation between clinical and basic science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I will review our progress on developing clinical and animal (mice) cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging modalities. Example applications of these technologies to in vivo...

Zawadzki, Robert J

52

Progress on Cellular Resolution Retinal Imaging: Setting the Stage for Translation between Clinical and Basic Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

I will review our progress on developing clinical and animal (mice) cellular resolution in vivo retinal imaging modalities. Example applications of these technologies to in vivo...

Zawadzki, Robert J

53

Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO{sub 2} molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

Peters, M. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (CNRS), F-91405 Orsay (France); Departement de Chimie, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Nguyen-Dang, T. T. [Departement de Chimie, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Cornaggia, C. [CEA IRAMIS, SPAM, Saclay, Batiment 522, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (CNRS), F-91405 Orsay (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

High-resolution three-dimensional optical coherence tomography imaging of kidney microanatomy ex vivo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology that enables high-resolution, noninvasive, cross-sectional imaging of microstructure in biological tissues in situ and in real time. When combined ...

Chen, Yu

55

Brain MR image super-resolution reconstruction via sparse representation and non-local similarity regularisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In magnetic resonance imaging, image resolution is limited by several factors such as hardware constraints or physical considerations. In many cases, the acquired images have to be magnified to match a specific resolution. This paper presents a new super-resolution reconstruction algorithm to generate a high-resolution version of a low-resolution brain MR image. The proposed approach uses a multi-scale first- and second-order derivative analysis to estimate the missing high-frequency information and integrates sparse representation and non-local similarity regularisation into a unified L1-norm minimisation framework. Extensive experiments on brain MR image super-resolution validate that the proposed method achieves much better results than many state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of both quantitative measures and visual perception.

Di Zhang; Jiazhong He; Yun Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Improving resolution and depth of astronomical observations via modern mathematical methods for image analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past years modern mathematical methods for image analysis have led to a revolution in many fields, from computer vision to scientific imaging. However, some recently developed image processing techniques successfully exploited by other sectors have been rarely, if ever, experimented on astronomical observations. We present here tests of two classes of variational image enhancement techniques: "structure-texture decomposition" and "super-resolution" showing that they are effective in improving the quality of observations. Structure-texture decomposition allows to recover faint sources previously hidden by the background noise, effectively increasing the depth of available observations. Super-resolution yields an higher-resolution and a better sampled image out of a set of low resolution frames, thus mitigating problematics in data analysis arising from the difference in resolution/sampling between different instruments, as in the case of EUCLID VIS and NIR imagers.

Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Pilo, Stefano; Falcone, Maurizio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

OBJECTIVE QUALITY ASSESSMENT FOR IMAGE SUPER-RESOLUTION: A NATURAL SCENE STATISTICS APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECTIVE QUALITY ASSESSMENT FOR IMAGE SUPER-RESOLUTION: A NATURAL SCENE STATISTICS APPROACH assessment methods are useful and reliable, but are expensive, time-consuming, and difficult to be embedded attempts to de- velop an objective quality assessment method of a given resolution- enhanced image using

Wang, Zhou

58

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER ULTRASONIC IMAGING FOR IMPACT DAMAGE VISUALIZATION IN COMPOSITE STRUCTURE Chao Zhang1 , Jinhao Qiu1* , Hongli Ji1 1 State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures ultrasonic scanning technique has great potential for damage evaluation in various applications. In order

Boyer, Edmond

59

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design, assembly, and testing of a high-resolution relay lens used for holography with operation at both doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser wavelengths  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 1p/mm resolution at a 355-nm wavelength (ultraviolet) has been completed. By adding a doublet to this lens system, operation at a 532-nm wavelength (green) with > 1100 1p/mm resolution is achieved. This lens is used with high-power laser light to record holograms of fast-moving ejecta particles from a shocked metal surface located inside a test package. Part of the lens and the entire test package are under vacuum with a 1-cm air gap separation. Holograms have been recorded with both doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser light. The UV operation is very sensitive to the package window's tilt. If this window is tilted by more than 0.1 degrees, the green operation performs with better resolution than that of the UV operation. The setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording can be done with either UV light or green light. A resolution plate can be temporarily placed inside the test package so that a television microscope located beyond the hologram position can archive images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires., interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens are presented. Resolution variation across the 12-mm field of view and throughout the 5-mm depth of field is discussed for both wavelengths.

Sorenson, Danny S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pazuchanics, Peter D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Malone, Robert M [NSTEC; Cox, Brian C [NSTEC; Frogget, Brent C [NSTEC; Kaufman, Morris I [NSTEC; Capelle, Gene A [NSTEC/SB; Grover, M [NSTEC/SB; Stevens, Gerald D [NSTEC/SB; Turley, William D [NSTEC/SB

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

High resolution image reconstruction with constrained, total-variation minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in computed tomography (CT), see for example [1], because it is possible to account for noise in the data the resolution is arbitrarily high, because the system resolution is still limited by the discrete data sampling of the volume and ideal conditions of perfect data consistency: g = Xf, (1) where g represents the projection

Kurien, Susan

62

Accurate model-based high resolution cardiac image reconstruction in dual source CT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cardiac imaging represents one of the most challenging imaging problems, requiring high spatial and temporal resolutions along with good tissue contrast. One of the newest clinical cardiac CT scanners incorporates two source-detector pairs in order to ... Keywords: cardiac, dual source CT, iterative method, model-based imaging

Synho Do; Sanghee Cho; W. Clem Karl; Mannudeep K. Kalra; Thomas J. Brady; Homer Pien

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Cellular delivery and site-specific targeting of organic fluorophores for super-resolution imaging in living cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have pushed the spatial resolution of biological imaging down to a few nanometers. The key element to the development of such imaging modality is synthetic organic ...

Uttamapinant, Chayasith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Soft x-ray images of the laser entrance hole of ignition hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hohlraums are employed at the national ignition facility to convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes a fusion capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low spectral resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, which views the region around the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the size of the hohlraum's opening ('clear aperture') and fraction of the measured x-radiation, which comes from this opening, must be known. The size of the clear aperture is measured with the time integrated static x-ray imager (SXI). A soft x-ray imaging channel has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation emitted from inside the clear aperture. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the peak of the x-ray spectrum of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed.

Schneider, M. B.; Meezan, N. B.; Alvarez, S. S.; Alameda, J.; Baker, S.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Celeste, J. R.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Holographic laser Doppler imaging of pulsatile blood flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on wide-field imaging of pulsatile motion induced by blood flow using heterodyne holographic interferometry on the thumb of a healthy volunteer, in real-time. Optical Doppler images were measured with green laser light by a frequency-shifted Mach-Zehnder interferometer in off-axis configuration. The recorded optical signal was linked to local instantaneous out-of-plane motion of the skin at velocities of a few hundreds of microns per second, and compared to blood pulse monitored by plethysmoraphy during an occlusion-reperfusion experiment.

Bencteux, Jeffrey; Kostas, Thomas; Bayat, Sam; Atlan, Michael

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser HENRY N. CHAPMAN1 of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 Ã? 1013 W cm-2 pulse by one10 . X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expected to permit diffractive imaging at high

Loss, Daniel

68

High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this Letter, we present a method of performing broadband mid-infrared spectroscopy with conventional, free-running, continuous wave Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers (FP-QCLs). The measurement method is based on multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the radio-frequency domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution (?15?MHz) spectroscopy of molecular absorption are demonstrated and show great potential for development of high performance FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing.

Wang, Yin; Wang, Wen; Wysocki, Gerard, E-mail: gwysocki@princeton.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Soskind, Michael G. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersy 08901 (United States)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

High resolution laser induced fluorescence Doppler velocimetry utilizing saturated absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed to measure the flow velocity field of neutral particles in an electron-cyclotron-resonance argon plasma. The flow velocity has been determined by the Doppler shift of the LIF spectrum, which is proportional to the velocity distribution function. Very high accuracy in velocity determination has been achieved by installing a saturated absorption spectroscopy unit into the LIF system, where the absolute value and scale of laser wavelength are determined by using the Lamb dip and the fringes of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The minimum detectable flow velocity of a newly developed LIF system is {+-}2 m/s, and this performance remains unchanged in a long-time experiment. From the radial measurements of LIF spectra of argon metastable atoms, it is found that there exists an inward flow of neutral particles associated with neutral depletion.

Aramaki, Mitsutoshi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Ogiwara, Kohei; Etoh, Shuzo [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Yoshimura, Shinji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tanaka, Masayoshi Y. [Department of Advanced Energy Engineering Science, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design of thick aperture for fine-resolution neutron penumbral imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compact sources of 14-MeV neutrons have been imaged with a penumbral-coded aperture at a two-point resolution of 80{mu}m. We desire to improve the penumbral-aperture microscope to obtain resolutions as fine as 10{mu}m. In penumbral-coded-aperture imaging, the resolution is ultimately limited by the sharpness of the aperture point-spread function. I present a design for a thick penumbral aperture that provides the desired sharpness over a field of view of 150{mu}m. The point-spread function of these apertures is sufficiently isoplanatic and distortion-free to allow linear reconstruction of complex source distributions. The designs is generally appropriate for similar imaging techniques, such as fine-resolution neutron or gamma-ray pinhole imaging. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Ress, D.

1989-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

71

Improved resolution three-dimensional integral imaging using optimized irregular lens-array structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A rigorous approach is proposed to improve the resolution of integral imaging (InI) by finding the appropriate form of irregularity in the arrangement of the InI lenslets. The...

Kavehvash, Zahra; Mehrany, Khashayar; Bagheri, Saeed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Image resolution analysis: a new, robust approach to seismic survey design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-noise ratio in image resolution . . 64 3.5 Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 IV EFFICACY ASSESSMENT OF COMPETING 3-D ACQUI- SITION DESIGNS OVER A SALT DOME MODEL : : : : : : : 69 4.1 Introduction... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 4.2 Resolution and acquisition geometry in homogeneous media: Multi-o set versus single-o set surveys. . . . . . 70 4.3 Survey design for a salt dome model . . . . . . . . . . . 74 4.3.1 Subsalt imaging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 4...

Tzimeas, Constantinos

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

HIGH-RESOLUTION LAND/ICE IMAGING USING SEASAT SCATTEROMETER MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scatterometers which would permit the method to produce 1-2 km resolution over land and ice. The highHIGH-RESOLUTION LAND/ICE IMAGING USING SEASAT SCATTEROMETER MEASUREMENTS D. G. Long*, P. T. Whiting by the scatterometer,is expected to significantly enhance the utility of sca.tteroineter data in various land, ice

Long, David G.

74

Range imaging: a new method for high-resolution topographic measurements in small-and medium-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range imaging: a new method for high-resolution topographic measurements in small- and medium is a useful complement or alternative to existing methods for high-resolution measurements in small- to medium has led to a dramatic increase in terrain information and opened up new opportunities for hydro- logic

Kirchner, James W.

75

Selecting Representative High Resolution Sample Images for Land Cover Studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explore the com- tained using the TM map. The performance of samples selected by a combination of cover composition and con-bined use of coarse and fine resolution data in land cover studies. It describes composition at the regional scale. The Purposive Selection Algorithm (PSA) cover studies in which both large

Li, Zhanqing

76

DISLOCATION IMAGES IN HIGH RESOLUTION SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. There are several dislocation images in the back scattered mode which are distinctly of excess/defect contrast observed in the dark field : two seperate conditions cars. be found. There is a set of dislocations having

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

Rectangular discrete radon transform for buildings extraction from high resolution satellite images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach titled Rectangular Discrete Radon Transform (RDRT) which is based on the generalization of the classical Radon transform to project the images with rectangular objects instead of straight lines. The RDRT was conceived ... Keywords: high resolution satellite image, rectangular buildings, rectangular discrete radon transform

Elouedi Ines; Hamouda Atef; Rojbani Hmida

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

High-resolution imaging of velocity-controlled molecular collisions using counterpropagating beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ultrahigh-resolution measurements of state-to-state inelastic differential cross sections for NO-Ne and NO-Ar collisions, obtained by combining the Stark deceleration and velocity map imaging techniques. We show that for counterpropagating crossed beam geometries, the effect of the velocity spreads of the reagent beams on the angular resolution of the images is minimized. Futhermore, the counterpropagating geometry results in images that are symmetric with respect to the relative velocity vector. This allows for the use of inverse Abel transformation methods that enhance the resolution further. State-resolved diffraction oscillations in the differential cross sections are measured with an angular resolution approaching 0.3$^\\circ$. Distinct structures observed in the cross sections gauge the quality of recent \\emph{ab initio} potential energy surfaces for NO-rare gas atom collisions with unprecedented precision.

Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; van der Avoird, Ad; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effect of speckles on the depth sensitivity of laser Doppler perfusion imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model is presented and experimentally validated that allows the prediction of the effect of speckles on the depth sensitivity of laser Doppler perfusion imaging. It is...

Rajan, V; Varghese, B; van Leeuwen, T G; Steenbergen, W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA); Hartemann, Frederic V. (San Ramon, CA); McNabb, Dennis P. (Alameda, CA); Pruet, Jason A. (Brentwood, CA)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nanometric depth resolution from multi-focal images in microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...that have been stored in a computer, but it is noted that using...interdisciplinary Bridging the Gaps grant from the UK Engineering and...Physics, SUPA/IIS, School of Engineering and Physical...instrumentation Image Processing, Computer-Assisted methods Microscopy...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Local Optical Spectroscopies for Subnanometer Spatial Resolution Chemical Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evanescently coupled photon scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) have special requirements in terms of stability and optical access. We have made substantial improvements to the stability, resolution, and noise floor of our custom-built visible-photon STM, and will translate these advances to our infrared instrument. Double vibration isolation of the STM base with a damping system achieved increased rigidity, giving high tunneling junction stability for long-duration and high-power illumination. Light frequency modulation with an optical chopper and phase-sensitive detection now enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the tunneling junction during irradiation.

Weiss, Paul

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atoms created in plasma heated by subpicosecond laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigations of ultrashort (0.4-0.6 ps) laser pulse radiation interaction with solid targets have been carried out. The Trident subpicosecond laser system was used for plasma creation. The X-ray plasma emission was investigated with the help of high-resolution spectrographs with spherically bent mica crystals. It is shown that when high contrast ultrashort laser pulses were used for plasma heating its emission spectra could not be explained in terms of commonly used theoretical models, and transitions in so called {open_quotes}hollow atoms{close_quotes} must be taken into account for adequate description of plasma radiation.

Faenov, A.Ya.; Magunov, A.I.; Pikuz, T.A. [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Center of VNIIFTRI, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Third harmonic order imaging as a focal spot diagnostic for high intensity laser-solid interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensity inter- actions, i.e., fast ignition fusion, laser based ion acceleration etc., where fluctuationsThird harmonic order imaging as a focal spot diagnostic for high intensity laser-solid interactions, Glasgow, UK 4 Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Chilton, Didcot, Didcot, UK 5

Strathclyde, University of

85

Laser Coulomb-explosion imaging of small molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use intense few-cycle laser pulses to ionize molecules to the point of Coulomb explosion. We use Coulomb's law or ab initio potentials to reconstruct the molecular structure of D{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} from the correlated momenta of exploded fragments. For D{sub 2}O, a light and fast system, we observed about 0.3 A and 15 deg. deviation from the known bond length and bond angle. By simulating the Coulomb explosion for equilibrium geometry, we showed that this deviation is mainly caused by ion motion during ionization. Measuring three-dimensional structure with half bond length resolution is sufficient to observe large-scale rearrangements of small molecules such as isomerization processes.

Legare, F. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada); Lee, Kevin F.; Dooley, P.W. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Litvinyuk, I.V. [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States); Wesolowski, S.S.; Bunker, P.R.; Villeneuve, D.M.; Corkum, P.B. [National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0R6 (Canada); Dombi, P.; Krausz, F. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Austria); Bandrauk, A.D. [Departement de Chimie, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

90

Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts by Fast Electrons Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 3:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Huolin Xin Center for Functional Nanomaterials Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study structural, compositional, and electronic information of materials at the atomic scale. With the recent addition of 3rd-order and now 5th-order aberration correction, the numerical aperture can be opened up by a factor of 2-3, allowing sub-Angstrom resolution to be achieved in a STEM. Additionally, the enlarged numerical aperture couple with the use of

92

Sub-nanometer resolution in three-dimensional magnetic-resonance imaging of individual dark spins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized biomedical science by providing non-invasive, three-dimensional biological imaging. However, spatial resolution in conventional MRI systems is limited to tens of microns, which is insufficient for imaging on molecular and atomic scales. Here we demonstrate an MRI technique that provides sub-nanometer spatial resolution in three dimensions, with single electron-spin sensitivity. Our imaging method works under ambient conditions and can measure ubiquitous 'dark' spins, which constitute nearly all spin targets of interest and cannot otherwise be individually detected. In this technique, the magnetic quantum-projection noise of dark spins is measured using a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) magnetometer located near the surface of a diamond chip. The spatial distribution of spins surrounding the NV magnetometer is imaged with a scanning magnetic-field gradient. To evaluate the performance of the NV-MRI technique, we image the three-dimensional landscape of dark electronic spins at and just below the diamond surface and achieve an unprecedented combination of resolution (0.8 nm laterally and 1.5 nm vertically) and single-spin sensitivity. Our measurements uncover previously unidentified electronic spins on the diamond surface, which can potentially be used as resources for improved magnetic imaging of samples proximal to the NV-diamond sensor. This three-dimensional NV-MRI technique is immediately applicable to diverse systems including imaging spin chains, readout of individual spin-based quantum bits, and determining the precise location of spin labels in biological systems.

M. S. Grinolds; M. Warner; K. De Greve; Y. Dovzhenko; L. Thiel; R. L. Walsworth; S. Hong; P. Maletinsky; A. Yacoby

2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

93

Retrieval of Cloud Phase and Crystal Habit from Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of retrieving cloud phase and the dominant ice crystal habit from radiances measured by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has been developed. The retrieval method takes advantage of the differences in the phase function of various particle shapes as a function of scattering angle. Three case studies are presented which illustrate the retrieval method. A comparison with semi-coincident in situ observations for one case study indicates that the retrieved crystal habits are consistent with the observations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L{sub 3} absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C. G. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, J. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany) [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Germany; Hofmann, G.; Grunwaldt, J.-D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Damsgaard, C. D. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

Hantke, Max, F.

96

An attempt to study LiH and Li{sub 2} molecules by high resolution pulsed laser spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As we start a program to study alkali hydrides and dimers, we have developed a two-step photoionisation experiment on Li{sub 2} molecules based on the use of an atomic beam and two pulsed dye lasers. The first resonant step which excites the A {sup 1}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}Li{sub 2} dimer systems is a home-made cw-seeded DCM dye laser with a laser linewidth of 55 MHz (FWHM) and near the Fourier transform limit. The second step is a larger width fixed frequency UV laser which allows the photoionisation of the selectively excited molecules. The three {sup 6}Li{sub 2}, {sup 6}Li {sup 7}Li and {sup 7}Li{sub 2} spectra are recorded simultaneously by the use of a doubly-accelerating time-of-flight ion analyser. Comparison between recorded and calculated absorption spectra using Dunham parameters found in the literature is satisfactory. To develop similar pulsed high-resolution investigations in LiH, we have characterized our molecular beam by using the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique with a cw blue dye laser. Two Franck-Condon LiH Doppler-free resonances have been observed.

Bouloufa, Nadia; Cabaret, Louis; Cacciani, Patrice; Camus, Pierre; Pitcheev, Boris; Vetter, Raymond [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS II, Bat 505, Campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Label Free Mid-IR Photothermal Imaging of Bird Brain With Quantum Cascade Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Label free mid-infrared photothermal imaging on bird brain slices is presented. The Amide-I vibrational band is excited by a quantum cascade laser and an Er:doped fiber measures the...

Mertiri, Alket; Totachawattana, Atcha; Liu, Hui; Hong, Mi K; Gardner, Tim; Sander, Michelle Y; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

98

Street-Parking Vehicle Detection from Panoramic Laser Range-Image  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to develop a detection system of those vehicles. We propose a detection method using a laser-range finder detection is out of his league. Zhao et al. [7], [8] proposed a vehicle-borne system of measuring 3-D urbanStreet-Parking Vehicle Detection from Panoramic Laser Range-Image Kiyotaka Hirahara and Katsushi

Ikeuchi, Katsushi

99

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Imaging latch-up sites in CMOS integrated circuits using laser scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMAGING LATCH-UP SITES IN CMOS INTEGRATED CIRCUITS USING LASER SCANNING A Thesis JEAN-FRANSOIS FENECH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AEM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1985 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering IMAGING LATCH-Up SITES IN CMDS INTEGRATED CIRCUITS USING LASER SCANNING A Thesis by JEAN-FRAN(OIS FENECH Approved as to style and content by: D. L. Parker (Chairman of Committee) N. R. Strader II...

Fenech, Jean-Francois

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Time-resolved imaging of material response during laser-induced bulk damage in SiO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on time resolved imaging of the dynamic events taking place during laser-induced damage in the bulk of fused silica samples with nanosecond temporal resolution and one micron spatial resolution. These events include: shock/pressure wave formation and propagation, transient absorption, crack propagation and formation of residual stress fields. The work has been performed using a time-resolved microscope system that utilizes a probe pulse to acquire images at delay times covering the entire timeline of a damage event. Image information is enhanced using polarized illumination and simultaneously recording the two orthogonal polarization image components. For the case of fused silica, an electronic excitation is first observed accompanied by the onset of a pressure wave generation and propagation. Cracks are seen to form early in the process and reach their final size at about 25 ns into the damage event. In addition, changes that in part are attributed to transient absorption in the modified material are observed for delays up to about 200 microseconds.

Demos, S G; Negres, R A

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

102

3D Imaging of Porous Media Using Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy with Application to Microscale Transport Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present advances in the application of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to image, reconstruct, and characterize statistically the microgeometry of porous geologic and engineering materials. We discuss technical and practical aspects of this imaging technique, including both its advantages and limitations. Confocal imaging can be used to optically section a material, with sub-micron resolution possible in the lateral and axial planes. The resultant volumetric image data, consisting of fluorescence intensities for typically {approximately}50 million voxels in XYZ space, can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the two-phase medium. We present several examples of this application, including studying pore geometry in sandstone, characterizing brittle failure processes in low-porosity rock deformed under triaxial loading conditions in the laboratory, and analyzing the microstructure of porous ceramic insulations. We then describe approaches to extract statistical microgeometric descriptions from volumetric image data, and present results derived from confocal volumetric data sets. Finally, we develop the use of confocal image data to automatically generate a three-dimensional mesh for numerical pore-scale flow simulations.

Fredrich, J.T.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

A convenient alignment approach for x-ray imaging experiments based on laser positioning devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a two-laser alignment approach for facilitating the precise alignment of various imaging and measuring components with respect to the x-ray beam. The first laser constantly pointed to the output window of the source, in a direction parallel to the path along which the components are placed. The second laser beam, originating from the opposite direction, was calibrated to coincide with the first laser beam. Thus, a visible indicator of the direction of the incident x-ray beam was established, and the various components could then be aligned conveniently and accurately with its help.

Zhang Da; Donovan, Molly; Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

105

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

106

Design of a scanning Josephson junction microscope for submicron-resolution magnetic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a magnetic field scanning instrument designed to extend the spatial resolution of scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy into the submicron regime. This instrument, the scanning Josephson junction microscope, scans a single Josephson junction across the surface of a sample, detecting the local magnetic field by the modulation of the junction critical current. By using a submicron junction and a scanning tunneling microscope feedback system to maintain close proximity to the surface, magnetic field sensitivity of 10 {mu}G with a spatial resolution of 0.3 {mu}m should be attainable, opening up new opportunities for imaging vortex configurations and core structure in superconductors and magnetic domains in magnetic materials. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Plourde, B.L.; Van Harlingen, D.J. [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Impulse Response Estimation for Spatial Resolution Enhancement in Ultrasonic NDE Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a signal processing algorithm and MATLAB software for improving spatial resolution in ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging of materials. Given a measured reflection signal and an associated reference signal, the algorithm produces an optimal least-squares estimate of the impulse response of the material under test. This estimated impulse response, when used in place of the raw reflection signal, enhances the spatial resolution of the ultrasonic measurements by removing distortion caused by the limited-bandwidth transducers and the materials under test. The theory behind the processing algorithms is briefly presented, while the reader is referred to the bibliography for details. The main focus of the report is to describe how to use the MATLAB software. Two processing examples using actual ultrasonic measurements are provided for tutorial purposes.

Clark, G A

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Single-cell resolution in high-resolution synchrotron X-ray CT imaging with gold nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that single-cell resolution can be obtained ex vivo in the brain of small animals using gold nanoparticles with the synchrotron-based computed tomography technique.

Sch?ltke, E.

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate, regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.

Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W; Knapp, M; Berghaeuser, A; Zschack, P; Karapetrova, E; Yang, N; Kriven, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L?{sub 1}- and L?{sub 2}-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

Bitter, M., E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, Jian [Department of Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fully-automatic laser welding and micro-sculpting with universal in situ inline coherent imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Though new affordable high power laser technologies make possible many processing applications in science and industry, depth control remains a serious technical challenge. Here we show that inline coherent imaging, with line rates up to 312 kHz and microsecond-duration capture times, is capable of directly measuring laser penetration depth in a process as violent as kW-class keyhole welding. We exploit ICI's high speed, high dynamic range and robustness to interference from other optical sources to achieve fully automatic, adaptive control of laser welding as well as ablation, achieving micron-scale sculpting in vastly different heterogeneous biological materials.

Webster, Paul J L; Ji, Yang; Galbraith, Christopher M; Kinross, Alison W; Van Vlack, Cole; Fraser, James M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

2D and 3D imaging resolution trade-offs in quantifying pore throats for prediction of permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the impact of subsurface geochemical reactions on porosity is relatively well understood, changes in permeability remain difficult to estimate. In this work, pore-network modeling was used to predict permeability based on pore- and pore-throat size distributions determined from analysis of 2D scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of thin sections and 3D X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) data. The analyzed specimens were a Viking sandstone sample from the Alberta sedimentary basin and an experimental column of reacted Hanford sediments. For the column, a decrease in permeability due to mineral precipitation was estimated, but the permeability estimates were dependent on imaging technique and resolution. X-ray CT imaging has the advantage of reconstructing a 3D pore network while 2D SEM imaging can easily analyze sub-grain and intragranular variations in mineralogy. Pore network models informed by analyses of 2D and 3D images at comparable resolutions produced permeability esti- mates with relatively good agreement. Large discrepancies in predicted permeabilities resulted from small variations in image resolution. Images with resolutions 0.4 to 4 lm predicted permeabilities differ- ing by orders of magnitude. While lower-resolution scans can analyze larger specimens, small pore throats may be missed due to resolution limitations, which in turn overestimates permeability in a pore-network model in which pore-to-pore conductances are statistically assigned. Conversely, high-res- olution scans are capable of capturing small pore throats, but if they are not actually flow-conducting predicted permeabilities will be below expected values. In addition, permeability is underestimated due to misinterpreting surface-roughness features as small pore throats. Comparison of permeability pre- dictions with expected and measured permeability values showed that the largest discrepancies resulted from the highest resolution images and the best predictions of permeability will result from images between 2 and 4 lm resolution. To reduce permeability underestimation from analyses of high-resolu- tion images, a resolution threshold between 3 and 15 lm was found to be effective, but it is not known whether this range is applicable beyond the samples studied here.

Beckingham, Lauren E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

114

Phys. Med. Biol. 43 (1998) 10011013. Printed in the UK PII: S0031-9155(98)90627-3 High-resolution 3D Bayesian image reconstruction using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resolution 3D Bayesian image reconstruction using the microPET small-animal scanner Jinyi Qi, Richard M Leahy of high-resolution 3D images from the microPET small-animal scanner. Resolution recovery is achieved 2 mm when using an analytic 3D reprojection (3DRP) method with a ramp filter. These results also

Leahy, Richard M.

115

Laser Doppler holographic microscopy in transmission: application to fish embryo imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have extended Laser Doppler holographic microscopy to transmission geometry. The technique is validated with living fish embryos imaged by a modified upright bio-microcope. By varying the frequency of the holographic reference beam, and the combination of frames used to calculate the hologram, multimodal imaging has been performed. Doppler images of the blood vessels for different Doppler shifts, images where the flow direction is coded in RGB colors or movies showing blood cells individual motion have been obtained as well. The ability to select the Fourier space zone that is used to calculate the signal, makes the method quantitative.

Verrier, Nicolas; Gross, Michel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

High-speed one-dimensional spatial light modulator for Laser Direct Imaging and other patterning applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-speed one-dimensional spatial light modulator for Laser Direct Imaging and other patterning developed a one-dimensional high-speed spatial light modulator in cooperation with Micronic Mydata AB of ultraviolet light needs to be combined with high throughput and high precision. Keywords: Laser Direct Imaging

Jonsson, Fredrik

117

Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast “white light” supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of the instrument.

Henn, T.; Kiessling, T., E-mail: tobias.kiessling@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Ossau, W.; Molenkamp, L. W. [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universität Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut (EP3), Universität Würzburg, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Biermann, K.; Santos, P. V. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, 10117 Berlin (Germany)] [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind momentum ratio of this system. However, as the WR wind dominates the colliding wind X-ray emission it appears unlikely that the mass-loss rate and the terminal velocity of the companion wind can be separately determined from X-ray observations. We also note an inconsistency between numerical and analytical estimates of the X-ray luminosity ratio of the stronger and weaker wind components, and conclude that the analytical results are in error.

J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens; P. M. Williams; A. M. T. Pollock; S. L. Skinner; M. F. Corcoran; A. F. J. Moffat

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

119

Whole-brain calcium imaging with cellular resolution in freely behaving C. elegans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to acquire large-scale recordings of neuronal activity in awake and unrestrained animals poses a major challenge for studying neural coding of animal behavior. We present a new instrument capable of recording intracellular calcium transients from every neuron in the head of a freely behaving C. elegans with cellular resolution while simultaneously recording the animal's position, posture and locomotion. We employ spinning-disk confocal microscopy to capture 3D volumetric fluorescent images of neurons expressing the calcium indicator GCaMP6s at 5 head-volumes per second. Two cameras simultaneously monitor the animal's position and orientation. Custom software tracks the 3D position of the animal's head in real-time and adjusts a motorized stage to keep it within the field of view as the animal roams freely. We observe calcium transients from 78 neurons and correlate this activity with the animal's behavior. Across worms, multiple neurons show significant correlations with modes of behavior correspo...

Nguyen, Jeffrey P; Linder, Ashley N; Plummer, George S; Shaevitz, Joshua W; Leifer, Andrew M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Imaging Density Disturbances in Water with a 41.3-Attosecond Time Resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the momentum flexibility of inelastic x-ray scattering may be exploited to invert its loss function, allowing real time imaging of density disturbances in a medium. We show the disturbance arising from a point source in liquid water, with a resolution of 41.3 attoseconds (4.13×10-17???s) and 1.27???Å (1.27×10-8???cm). This result is used to determine the structure of the electron cloud around a photoexcited chromophore in solution, as well as the wake generated in water by a 9 MeV gold ion. We draw an analogy with pump-probe techniques and suggest that energy-loss scattering may be applied more generally to the study of attosecond phenomena.

P. Abbamonte; K. D. Finkelstein; M. D. Collins; S. M. Gruner

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cross strip microchannel plate imaging photon counters with high time resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have implemented cross strip readout microchannel plate detectors in 18 mm active area format including open face (UV/particle) and sealed tube (optical) configurations. These have been tested with a field programmable gate array based parallel channel electronics for event encoding which can process high input event rates (> 5 MHz) with high spatial resolution. Using small pore MCPs (6 {micro}m) operated in a pair, we achieve gains of >5 x 10{sup 5} which is sufficient to provide spatial resolution of <35 {micro}m FHWM, with self triggered event timing accuracy of {approx}2 ns for sealed tube optical sensors. A peak quantum efficiency of {approx}19% at 500 nm has been achieved with SuperGenII photocathodes that have response over the 400 nm to 900 nm range. Local area counting rates of up to >200 events/mcp pore sec{sup -1} have been attained, along with image linearity and stability to better than 50 {micro}m.

Stonehill, Laura C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabin, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Siegmund, Oswald H W [U.C. BERKELEY; Vallerga, John V [U.C. BERKELEY; Tremsin, Anton S [U.C. BERKELEY

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Enhancement of the resolution of full-field optical coherence tomography by using a colour image sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of white balance in a colour image detector on the resolution of a full-field optical coherence tomograph (FFOCT) is studied. The change in the interference pulse width depending on the white balance tuning is estimated in the cases of a thermal radiation source (incandescent lamp) and a white light emitting diode. It is shown that by tuning white balance of the detector in a certain range, the FFOCT resolution can be increased by 20 % as compared to the resolution, attained with the use of a monochrome detector. (optical coherence tomography)

Kalyanov, A L; Lychagov, V V; Smirnov, I V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G. Chernyshevsky Saratov State University, Saratov (Russian Federation)

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Extensive simulation studies on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive detector based on pixelated CdTe crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive radiation instrument (COCAE) based on extensive simulation studies. The reconstructed image resolution has been investigated in a wide range of incident photon energies emitted by point-like sources located at different source-to-detector distances on and off the detector's symmetry axis. The ability of the detector to distinguish multiple radioactive sources observed simultaneously is investigating by simulating point-like sources of different energies located on and off the detector's symmetry axis and at different positions

Zachariadou, K; Kaissas, I; Seferlis, S; Lambropoulos, C; Loukas, D; Potiriadis, C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Extensive simulation studies on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive detector based on pixelated CdTe crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive radiation instrument (COCAE) based on extensive simulation studies. The reconstructed image resolution has been investigated in a wide range of incident photon energies emitted by point-like sources located at different source-to-detector distances on and off the detector's symmetry axis. The ability of the detector to distinguish multiple radioactive sources observed simultaneously is investigating by simulating point-like sources of different energies located on and off the detector's symmetry axis and at different positions

K. Zachariadou; K. Karafasoulis; I. Kaissas; S. Seferlis; C. Lambropoulos; D. Loukas; C. Potiriadis

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

Terahertz imaging and quantum cascade laser based devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terahertz (THz) frequency range (f=0.3-10 THz, [lambda]=30-1000 lam) is much less technologically developed that the adjacent microwave and infrared frequency ranges, but offers several advantages for imaging applications: ...

Lee, Alan Wei Min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Toward the development of a soft x-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration using a soft x-ray laser at 18. 2 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the recent results obtained from a soft X-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration. The microscope demonstrated a spatial resolution of 0.7 {mu}m with a magnification of 16 at 18.2 nm. The soft X-ray laser at 18.2 nm was used as an X-ray source. Mo/Si multilayers were coated on the Schwarzschild optics and the normal incidence reflectivity at 18.2 nm per surface was measured to be {approximately} 20 %. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Dicicco, D.; Rosser, R. (Princeton X-Ray Laser, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)); Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI): Wind and Temperature Observations from the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the Michelson Interferometer for Global High-resolution Thermospheric Imaging (MIGHTI), an instrument designed to measure thermospheric wind and temperature as part of the...

Englert, Christoph R; Harlander, John Mark; Brown, Charles M; Stephan, Andrew W; Makela, Jonathan J; Marr, Kenneth D; Immel, Thomas J

128

High-resolution multi-MeV x-ray radiography using relativistic laser-solid interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When high intensity ({>=}10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}) laser light interacts with matter, multi-MeV electrons are produced. These electrons can be utilized to generate a MeV bremsstrahlung x-ray emission spectrum as they propagate into a high-Z solid target positioned behind the interaction area. The short duration (<10 ps) and the small diameter (<500 {mu}m) of the x-ray pulse combined with the MeV x-ray spectrum offers an interesting alternative to conventional bremsstrahlung x-ray sources based on an electron accelerator used to radiograph dense, rapidly moving objects. In experiments at the Omega EP laser, a multi-MeV x-ray source is characterized consistently with number of independent diagnostics. An unfiltered x-ray dose of approximately 2 rad in air at 1 m and a source diameter of less than 350 {mu}m are inferred. Radiography of a complex and high area density (up to 61 g/cm{sup 2}) object is then performed with few hundred microns spatial resolution.

Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Barbotin, M.; Bazzoli, S.; Brebion, D.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Le Dain, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C.; Biddle, L.; Drew, D.; Gardner, M.; Ramsay, M.; Simons, A.; Sircombe, N. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an information bridge between super-resolution microscopy and structural biology by using generative models

Matsuda, Noboru

130

Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS37-B332, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-Resolution Radio Imaging of Gravitational Lensing Candidates in the 1 Jansky BL Lac Sample  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.

T. A. Rector; J. T. Stocke

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

Direct analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analysis analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry Seokwon Jung 1,3 , Yanfeng Chen 3 , M. Cameron Sullards 1,3 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 * 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Received 10 July 2010; Revised 9 August 2010; Accepted 23 August 2010 Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) was applied to the analysis of the spatial distribution of cellulose on a cross-section of juvenile poplar (Populus deltoids) stems. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was used to optimize matrix (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic

133

Laser Ablation Sampling of Materials Directly into the Formed Liquid Microjunction of a Continuous Flow Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Ionization Emitter for Mass Spectral Analysis and Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transmission geometry laser ablation directly into a formed liquid microjunction of a continuous flow liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization emitter was utilized for molecular and elemental detection and mass spectrometry imaging. The ability to efficiently capture and ionize ablated material was demonstrated by the detection of various small soluble n-mers of polyaniline and silver ion solvent clusters formed from laser ablation of electropolymerized polyaniline and silver thin films, respectively. In addition, analysis of surfaces that contain soluble components was accomplished by coating or laminating the sample with an insoluble film to enable liquid junction formation without directly extracting material from the surface. The ability to perform mass spectrometry imaging at a spatial resolution of about 50 m was illustrated by using laminated inked patterns on a microscope slide. In general, these data demonstrate at least an order of magnitude signal enhancement compared to the non-contact, laser ablation droplet capture-based surface sampling/ionization approaches that have been previously presented.

Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL] [ORNL; Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL] [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Spatial resolution and noise in organic light-emitting diode displays for medical imaging applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the resolution and noise characteristics of handheld and workstation organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays in comparison with liquid crystal displays (LCDs). The...

Yamazaki, Asumi; Wu, Chih-Lei; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

IMPLICATIONS OF A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION IMAGE OF THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN RXJ1347-1145  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most X-ray luminous cluster known, RXJ1347-1145 (z = 0.45), has been the object of extensive study across the electromagnetic spectrum. We have imaged the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) at 90 GHz ({lambda} = 3.3 mm) in RXJ1347-1145 at 10'' resolution with the 64 pixel MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope, confirming a previously reported strong, localized enhancement of the SZE 20'' to the southeast of the center of X-ray emission. This enhancement of the SZE has been interpreted as shock-heated (>20 keV) gas caused by an ongoing major (low mass ratio) merger event. Our data support this interpretation. We also detect a pronounced asymmetry in the projected cluster pressure profile, with the pressure just east of the cluster core {approx}1.6x higher than just to the west. This is the highest resolution image of the SZE made to date.

Mason, B. S.; Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Dicker, S. R.; Korngut, P. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Aguirre, J. E. [University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Koch, P. M.; Molnar, S. M. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Sievers, J. [The Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Benford, D.; Staguhn, J. G.; Moseley, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Irwin, K. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Ade, P., E-mail: bmason@nrao.ed [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low-spatial coherence electrically-pumped semiconductor laser for speckle-free full-field imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spatial coherence of laser sources has limited their application to parallel imaging and projection due to coherent artifacts, such as speckle. In contrast, traditional incoherent light sources, such as thermal sources or light emitting diodes (LEDs), provide relatively low power per independent spatial mode. Here, we present a chip-scale, electrically-pumped semiconductor laser based on a novel design, demonstrating high power per mode with much lower spatial coherence than conventional laser sources. The laser resonator was fabricated with a chaotic, D-shaped cavity optimized to achieve highly multimode lasing. Lasing occurs simultaneously and independently in ~1000 modes, and hence the total emission exhibits very low spatial coherence. Speckle-free full-field imaging is demonstrated using the chaotic cavity laser as the illumination source. The power per mode of the sample illumination is several orders of magnitude higher than that of a LED or thermal light source. Such a compact, low-cost source, wh...

Redding, B; Huang, X; Lee, M L; Stone, A D; Choma, M A; Cao, H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments By Copyright 2014 Bevin L. Bailey Submitted to the Department of Geology and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments ________________________________ Chairperson Richard D. Miller Date approved: April 4th, 2014 iii Abstract S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical...

Bailey, Bevin

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was ob...

Watanabe, Shin; Aono, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution conductivity imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution potentials and the magnetic fields produced by the probing current are measured. Surface potentials are measured by using conventional electrical impedance tomography techniques and high resolution magnetic

Eyüboðlu, Murat

140

High-resolution 3-D refractive index imaging and Its biological applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a theory of 3-D imaging in partially coherent light under a non-paraxial condition. The transmission cross-coefficient (TCC) has been used to characterize partially coherent imaging in a 2- D and 3-D ...

Sung, Yongjin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Attainable Resolution of Energy-Selecting Image Using High-Voltage Electron Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......mapping using an imaging energy filter: Image formation...elemental mapping In an energy filtering transmission...Egerton RF: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy In the electron microscope. New York and London: Plenum Press......

Hiroki Kurata; Sakumi Moriguchi; Seiji Isoda; Takashi Kobayashi

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cellular resolution ex vivo imaging of gastrointestinal tissues with coherence microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) combines confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to improve imaging depth and contrast, enabling cellular imaging in human tissues. We aim to investigate OCM for ex ...

Fujimoto, James G.

143

High-resolution measurements of the spatial and temporal evolution of megagauss magnetic fields created in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pump-probe polarimetric technique is demonstrated, which provides a complete, temporally and spatially resolved mapping of the megagauss magnetic fields generated in intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions. A normally incident time-delayed probe pulse reflected from its critical surface undergoes a change in its ellipticity according to the magneto-optic Cotton-Mouton effect due to the azimuthal nature of the ambient self-generated megagauss magnetic fields. The temporal resolution of the magnetic field mapping is typically of the order of the pulsewidth, limited by the laser intensity contrast, whereas a spatial resolution of a few ?m is achieved by this optical technique. High-harmonics of the probe can be employed to penetrate deeper into the plasma to even near-solid densities. The spatial and temporal evolution of the megagauss magnetic fields at the target front as well as at the target rear are presented. The ?m-scale resolution of the magnetic field mapping provides valuable information on the filamentary instabilities at the target front, whereas probing the target rear mirrors the highly complex fast electron transport in intense laser-plasma interactions.

Chatterjee, Gourab, E-mail: gourab@tifr.res.in; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Kumar, G. Ravindra, E-mail: grk@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Rapid high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with pulsed laser source and time-of-flight spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-efficiency spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) spectrometer is coupled with a laboratory-based laser for rapid high-resolution measurements. The spectrometer combines time-of-flight (TOF) energy measurements with low-energy exchange scattering spin polarimetry for high detection efficiencies. Samples are irradiated with fourth harmonic photons generated from a cavity-dumped Ti:sapphire laser that provides high photon flux in a narrow bandwidth, with a pulse timing structure ideally matched to the needs of the TOF spectrometer. The overall efficiency of the combined system results in near-E{sub F} spin-resolved ARPES measurements with an unprecedented combination of energy resolution and acquisition speed. This allows high-resolution spin measurements with a large number of data points spanning multiple dimensions of interest (energy, momentum, photon polarization, etc.) and thus enables experiments not otherwise possible. The system is demonstrated with spin-resolved energy and momentum mapping of the L-gap Au(111) surface states, a prototypical Rashba system. The successful integration of the spectrometer with the pulsed laser system demonstrates its potential for simultaneous spin- and time-resolved ARPES with pump-probe based measurements.

Gotlieb, K. [Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hussain, Z.; Bostwick, A.; Jozwiak, C. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lanzara, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Developments in limited data image reconstruction techniques for ultrahigh-resolution x-ray tomographic imaging of microchips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of soft x-ray (about 1.8 KeV) nanotomography techniques for the evaluation and failure mode analysis of microchips was investigated. Realistic numerical simulations of the imaging process were performed and a specialized approach to image reconstruction from limited projection data was devised. Prior knowledge of the structure and its component materials was used to eliminate artifacts in the reconstructed images so that defects and deviations from the original design could be visualized. Simulated data sets were generated with a total of 21 projections over three different angular ranges: -50 to +50, - 80 to +80 and -90 to +90 degrees. In addition, a low level of illumination was assumed. It was shown that sub-micron defects within one cell of a microchip (< 10 pm3) could be imaged in 3-D using such an approach.

Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Reflection mode imaging with nanoscale resolution using a compact extreme ultraviolet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schwarzschild condenser and a freestanding zone plate objective. The reported results advance the development-produced plasma source and normal-incidence multilayer mirrors," Opt. Lett. 14, 539-541 (1989). 6. I. A. Artioukov in the Schwarzschild configuration using a soft-x-ray laser at 18.2 nm," Opt. Lett. 17, 157-159 (1992). 9. T. Haga, H

Rocca, Jorge J.

147

Bridge recognition of median-resolution SAR images using pun histogram entropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel algorithm for bridge recognition of median synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images using histogram entropy presented by Pun is proposed. Firstly, Lee filter and histogram...

Wu, Wenyu; Yin, Dong; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Yan; Pan, Jia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Two-beam ultrabroadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for high resolution gas-phase multiplex imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose and develop a method for wideband coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) in the gas phase and demonstrate the single-shot measurement of N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4}. Pure-rotational and vibrational O-, Q-, and S- branch spectra are collected simultaneously, with high spectral and spatial resolution, and within a single-laser-shot. The relative intensity of the rotational and vibrational signals can be tuned arbitrarily using polarization techniques. The ultrashort 7 fs pump and Stokes pulses are automatically overlapped temporally and spatially using a two-beam CARS technique, and the crossed probe beam allows for excellent spatial sectioning of the probed location.

Bohlin, Alexis; Kliewer, Christopher J., E-mail: cjkliew@sandia.gov [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

Audio signal reconstruction based on adaptively selected seed points from laser speckle images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Speckle patterns, present in the laser reflection from an object, reflect the micro-structure of the object where the laser is illuminated on. When the object surface vibrates, the speckle patterns move accordingly, and this movement can be recovered with a high-speed camera system. Due to the low signal to noise ratio (SNR), it is a challenging task to recover the micro-vibration information and reconstruct the audio signal from the captured speckle image sequences fast and effectively. In this paper, we propose a novel method based on pixels? gray value variations in laser speckle patterns to work out with the challenging task. The major contribution of the proposed method relies on using the intensity variations of the adaptively selected seed points to recover the vibration information and the audio signal with a novel model that effectively fuses the multiple seed points? information together. Experiments show that our method not only recovers the vibration information with high quality but is also robust and runs fast. The SNR of the experimental results reach about 20 dB and 10 dB at the detection distances of 10 m and 50 m, respectively.

Ziyi Chen; Cheng Wang; Chaohong Huang; Hongyan Fu; Huan Luo; Hanyun Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was obtained at 59.54 keV. Moreover, the possibility of improved spectral performance by utilizing the energy information of both side strips was demonstrated. We designed and fabricated a new analog ASIC, VA32TA6, for the readout of semiconductor detectors, which is also suitable for DSDs. A new feature of the ASIC is its internal ADC function. We confirmed this function and good noise performance that reaches an equivalent noise charge of 110 e- under the condition of 3-4 pF input capacitance.

Shin Watanabe; Shin-nosuke Ishikawa; Hiroyuki Aono; Shin'ichiro Takeda; Hirokazu Odaka; Motohide Kokubun; Tadayuki Takahashi; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Hiroyasu Tajima; Mitsunobu Onishi; Yoshikatsu Kuroda

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a high-resolution gamma-ray imaging system with synthetic collimation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work outlines the development of a multi-pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system designed to produce a synthetic-collimator image of a small field of… (more)

Havelin, Ronan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

High-resolution crosswell imaging of a west Texas carbonate reservoir. Part 1: Project summary and interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide flood pilot is being conducted in a section of Chevron`s McElroy field in Crane County, west Texas. Prior to CO{sub 2} injection, two high-frequency crosswell seismic profiles were recorded to investigate the use of seismic profiling for high-resolution reservoir delineation and CO{sub 2} monitoring. These preinjection profiles provide the baseline for time-lapse monitoring. Profile {number_sign}1 was recorded between an injector well and an offset observation well at a nominal well-to-well distance of 184 ft (56 m). Profile {number_sign}2 was recorded between a producing well and the observation well at a nominal distance of 600 ft (183 m). The combination of traveltime tomography and stacked CDP reflection amplitudes demonstrates how high-frequency crosswell seismic data can be used to image both large and small scale heterogeneity between wells: transmission traveltime tomography is used to image the large scale velocity variations; CDP reflection imaging is then used to image smaller scale impedance heterogeneities. The results of this integrated study demonstrate (1) the use of crosswell seismic profiling to produce a high-resolution reservoir delineation and (2) the possibility for successful monitoring of CO{sub 2} in carbonate reservoirs. The crosswell data were acquired with a piezoelectric source and a multilevel hydrophone array. Both profiles, nearly 80,000 seismic traces, were recorded in approximately 80 hours using a new acquisition technique of shooting on-the-fly. This paper presents the overall project summary and interpretation of the results from the near-offset profile.

Harris, J.M.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R.C.; Van Schaack, M.; Lazaratos, S.K.; Rector, J.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Langan, R.T. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

Schot, Gijs, vander

154

The high resolution X-ray imaging detector planes for the MIRAX mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5–200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-masks telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm2, a large field of view (60° ? 60° FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution ( ~ 2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~ 2.1 keV @ 60 keV and 2.3 @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

B H G Rodrigues; J E Grindlay; B Allen; J Hong; S Barthelmy; J Braga; F D'Amico; R E Rothschild

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~2.1 keV @ 60 keV and ~2.3 keV @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

Barbara H. G. Rodrigues; Jonathan E. Grindlay; Branden Allen; Jaesub Hong; Scott Barthelmy; Joao Braga; Flavio D'Amico; Richard E. Rothschild

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment ...

Rodrigues, Barbara H G; Allen, Branden; Hong, Jaesub; Barthelmy, Scott; Braga, Joao; D'Amico, Flavio; Rothschild, Richard E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

High Resolution/High Fidelity Seismic Imaging and Parameter Estimation for Geological Structure and Material Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we develop new theories and methods for multi-domain one-way wave-equation based propagators, and apply these techniques to seismic modeling, seismic imaging, seismic illumination and model parameter estimation in 3D complex environments. The major progress of this project includes: (1) The development of the dual-domain wave propagators. We continue to improve the one-way wave-equation based propagators. Our target is making propagators capable of handling more realistic velocity models. A wide-angle propagator for transversely isotropic media with vertically symmetric axis (VTI) has been developed for P-wave modeling and imaging. The resulting propagator is accurate for large velocity perturbations and wide propagation angles. The thin-slab propagator for one-way elastic-wave propagation is further improved. With the introduction of complex velocities, the quality factors Qp and Qs have been incorporated into the thin-slab propagator. The resulting viscoelastic thin-slab propagator can handle elastic-wave propagation in models with intrinsic attenuations. We apply this method to complex models for AVO modeling, random media characterization and frequency-dependent reflectivity simulation. (2) Exploring the Information in the Local Angle Domain. Traditionally, the local angle information can only be extracted using the ray-based method. We develop a wave-equation based technique to process the local angle domain information. The approach can avoid the singularity problem usually linked to the high-frequency asymptotic method. We successfully apply this technique to seismic illumination and the resulting method provides a practical tool for three-dimensional full-volume illumination analysis in complex structures. The directional illumination also provides information for angle-domain imaging corrections. (3) Elastic-Wave Imaging. We develop a multicomponent elastic migration method. The application of the multicomponent one-way elastic propagator and the wide-angle correction preserve more dynamic information carried by the elastic waves. The vector imaging condition solves the polarization problem of converted wave imaging. Both P-P and P-S images can be calculated. We also use converted waves to improve the image of steep sub-salt structures. The synthetic data for the SEG/EAGE salt model are migrated with a generalized screen algorithm and for the converted PSS-wave path. All the sub-salt faults are properly imaged.

Ru-Shan Wu, Xiao-Bi Xie, Thorne Lay

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 ?m, respectively.

Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

High-resolution X-ray characterization of mid-IR Al0.45Ga0.55As/GaAs Quantum Cascade Laser structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the X-ray diffraction profiles of Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) structures have been investigated. The examined structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The crystallographic characterization was carried out using high resolution X-ray diffractometer. The information about thickness of individual layers and periodicity of the structures was derived from simulation of diffraction profiles calculated using dynamical diffraction theory. The influence of interface roughness on the shape of satellite peaks was studied. The particular attention has been paid to the analysis of the broadening of satellite peaks. The presented results show that broadening is due to the variation of thickness of individual layers.

J. Kubacka-Traczyk; I. Sankowska; O.H. Seeck; K. Kosiel; M. Bugajski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Spatially Resolved ? Emission from Laser Fusion Targets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ?-particle emission from laser-compressed, D-T-filled microshells has been imaged using a zone-plate-coded imaging technique. Nominal image resolution was 10 ?m. Approximately 97% of the recorded ? emission was found to originate within a thermonuclear burn region of diameter roughly 13 that of the original target. The full width at half-maximum of the burn region had a diameter roughly 16 that of the target.

N. M. Ceglio and L. W. Coleman

1977-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

Soft x-ray laser holography with wavelength P. W. Wachulak, M. C. Marconi,* R. A. Bartels, C. S. Menoni, and J. J. Rocca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft x-ray laser holography with wavelength resolution P. W. Wachulak, M. C. Marconi,* R. A the tabletop acquisition of soft x-ray holographic images of nanostructures with a spatial resolution of 46 using a compact, tabletop capillary-discharge soft x-ray laser emitting at 46.9 nm in a high

Rocca, Jorge J.

163

A Multi-resolution Stochastic Level Set Method for Mumford-Shah Image Segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the computational cost and enhance the search for the global minimum. Furthermore, we derived a simple but useful image shown in Fig. 9, the proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clusters (black dots around segmentation: clustering, histogram-based, region-growing, graph partitioning and optimization model

Soatto, Stefano

164

Supporting Online Material High resolution electroluminescent imaging of pressure distribution using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modeling of basic mechanics and physics C: Devices fabrication process and hydrothermal growth of nanowires emitting intensity change with image acquisition and processing technologies. Figure S1 | Schematic diagram by hydrothermal methods. (Fig. S4) (3) Spacing is very important for the device, and there is an optimum spacing

Wang, Zhong L.

165

Lawrence Livermore to build advanced laser system in Czech Republic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9-06 9-06 For immediate release: 09/17/2013 | NR-13-09-06 High Resolution Image The High Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System, or HAPLS, will be designed, developed, assembled and tested at Lawrence Livermore. It will be transferred to the ELI Beamlines facility in 2016, where it will be commissioned for use by the international scientific community. Lawrence Livermore to build advanced laser system in Czech Republic Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov High Resolution Image Artist renderings of the ELI Beamlines facility, currently under construction in the Czech Republic. High Resolution Image A CAD image of the ELI-HAPLS laser. LIVERMORE, Calif. - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), through Lawrence Livermore National Security LLC (LLNS), has been awarded more than

166

Separating strain from composition in unit cell parameter maps obtained from aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the evaluation of lattice parameter maps in aberration corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy images, we propose a simple method that allows quantifying the composition and disorder of a semiconductor alloy at the unit cell scale with high accuracy. This is realized by considering, next to the out-of-plane, also the in-plane lattice parameter component allowing to separate the chemical composition from the strain field. Considering only the out-of-plane lattice parameter component not only yields large deviations from the true local alloy content but also carries the risk of identifying false ordering phenomena like formations of chains or platelets. Our method is demonstrated on image simulations of relaxed supercells, as well as on experimental images of an In{sub 0.20}Ga{sub 0.80}N quantum well. Principally, our approach is applicable to all epitaxially strained compounds in the form of quantum wells, free standing islands, quantum dots, or wires.

Schulz, T.; Remmele, T.; Korytov, M.; Markurt, T.; Albrecht, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung, Max-Born-Straße 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Duff, A.; Lymperakis, L.; Neugebauer, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Chèze, C. [TopGaN Sp. z o.o., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Skierbiszewski, C. [TopGaN Sp. z o.o., Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of High Pressure Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sokolowska 29/37, 01-142 Warsaw (Poland)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

167

HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGING OF THE 2004 TRANSIT OF VENUS AND ASYMMETRIES IN THE CYTHEREAN ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the only space-borne optical-imaging observations of the 2004 June 8 transit of Venus, the first such transit visible from Earth since AD 1882. The high-resolution, high-cadence satellite images we arranged from NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) reveal the onset of visibility of Venus's atmosphere and give further information about the black-drop effect, whose causes we previously demonstrated from TRACE observations of a transit of Mercury. The atmosphere is gradually revealed before second contact and after third contact, resulting from the changing depth of atmospheric layers refracting the photospheric surface into the observer's direction. We use Venus Express observations to relate the atmospheric arcs seen during the transit to the atmospheric structure of Venus. Finally, we relate the transit images to current and future exoplanet observations, providing a sort of ground truth showing an analog in our solar system to effects observable only with light curves in other solar systems with the Kepler and CoRoT missions and ground-based exoplanet-transit observations.

Pasachoff, Jay M. [Williams College-Hopkins Observatory, 33 Lab Campus Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Widemann, Thomas [Observatoire de Paris-LESIA, 92190 Meudon (France)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

Fratalocchi, A. [PRIMALIGHT, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Physics, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Ruocco, G. [Department of Physics, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)] [IPCF-CNR, c/o Department of Physics, Sapienza University, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

A black phosphorus photo-detector for multispectral, high-resolution imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the different 2-dimensional inorganic materials with their unique electronic and optical properties, the layered semiconductor black phosphorus is currently intensely researched for its potential applications in electronics and optoelectronics. The band gap energy of the bulk is 0.3eV, however, it increases with decreasing layer number; to 1.5eV for a single layer. Therefore, a multi-layer black phosphorus device should, in principle, allow photo-detection over a broad spectral range with sufficient sensitivity for practical imaging applications. Here, we map the active area of a multi-layer black phosphorus photo-detector and we characterize responsivity and gain of the device in the visible ({\\lambda}_{VIS}=532nm) as well as the near-infrared ({\\lambda}_{IR}=1550nm) spectral domain. By using the same device as a point-like detector at the two test wavelengths, we acquire diffraction-limited images of structures that exhibit sub-micron feature sizes. The results demonstrate the usefulness of two-dimens...

Engel, Michael; Avouris, Phaedon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fluorescence, Super Resolution STORM Microscope | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fluorescence imaging of the intact cell with nanometer resolution. It incorporates single-molecule fluorescence techniques to reconstruct super-resolution images using...

171

Infrared Scattering Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscopy Using An External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser For Nanoscale Chemical Imaging And Spectroscopy of Explosive Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) is an apertureless superfocusing technique that uses the antenna properties of a conducting atomic force microscope (AFM) tip to achieve infrared spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. The instrument can be used either in imaging mode, where a fixed wavelength light source is tuned to a molecular resonance and the AFM raster scans an image, or in spectroscopy mode where the AFM is held stationary over a feature of interest and the light frequency is varied to obtain a spectrum. In either case, a strong, stable, coherent infrared source is required. Here we demonstrate the integration of a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) into an s-SNOM and use it to obtain infrared spectra of microcrystals of chemicals adsorbed onto gold substrates. Residues of the explosive compound tetryl was deposited onto gold substrates. s-SNOM experiments were performed in the 1260-1400 cm?1 tuning range of the ECQCL, corresponding to the NO2 symmetric stretch vibrational fingerprint region. Vibrational infrared spectra were collected on individual chemical domains with a collection area of *500nm2 and compared to ensemble averaged far-field reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) results.

Craig, Ian M.; Phillips, Mark C.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Josberger, Erik E.; Raschke, Markus Bernd

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

172

Atomic-Resolution Image of GaAs(110) Surface with an Ultrahigh-Vacuum Atomic Force Microscope (UHV-AFM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first demonstration of atomic-resolution imaging of a GaAs(HO) surface with an ultrahigh vacuum atomic force microscope (UHV-AFM) was performed. We also observed ... GaAs(llO). This result suggests that the UHV

Y. Sugawara; M. Ohta; K. Hontani; S. Morita; F. Osaka…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Development of a high-frame-rate high-resolution particle image velocimetry system and applications to the characterization of synthetic jet actuators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 3,000 frames per second and a maximum image resolution of 512 by 512 pixels. The performance of these systems was demonstrated by utilizing them to experimentally characterize the flowfield generated by a synthetic jet actuator, operating at a...

Gilarranz, Jose Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters studied by time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser initiated reactions in N{sub 2}O clusters were studied by a time-sliced velocity imaging technique. The N{sub 2}O clusters, (N{sub 2}O){sub n}, generated by supersonic expansion were irradiated by an ultraviolet laser around 204 nm to convert reactant pairs, O({sup 1}D{sub 2})-(N{sub 2}O){sub n?1}. The NO molecules formed from these reactant pairs were ionized by the same laser pulse and their velocity distribution was determined by the time-sliced velocity imaging technique. At low nozzle pressure, lower than 1.5 atm, the speed distribution in the frame moving with the clusters consists of two components. These components were ascribed to the products appeared in the backward and forward directions in the center-of-mass frame, respectively. The former consists of the vibrational ground state and the latter consists of highly vibrational excited states. At higher nozzle pressure, a single broad speed distribution became dominant for the product NO. The pressure and laser power dependences suggested that this component is attributed to the product formed in the clusters larger than dimer, (N{sub 2}O){sub n} (n ? 3)

Honma, Kenji [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kohto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kohto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operation. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and neutron radiography were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells under various operating conditions. Variables examined include: sub-freezing conditions, inlet relative humidities, cell temperature, current density and response transients, different flow field orientations and different component materials (membranes, GDLs and MEAs). Quantification of the water within the membrane was made by neutron radiography after equilibration to different humidified gases, during fuel cell operation and in hydrogen pump mode. The water content was evaluated in bare Nafion{reg_sign} membranes as well as in MEAs operated in both fuel cell and H{sub 2} pump mode. These in situ imaging results allow measurement of the water content and gradients in the PEFC membrane and relate the membrane water transport characteristics to the fuel cell operation and performance under disparate materials and operational combinations. Flow geometry makes a large impact on MEA water content. Higher membrane water with counter flow was measured compared with co-flow for sub-saturated inlet RH's. This correlates to lower HFR and higher performance compared with co-flow. Higher anode stoichiometry helps remove water which accumulates in the anode channels and GDL material. Cell orientation was measured to affect both the water content and cell performance. While membrane water content was measured to be similar regardless of orientation, cells with the cathode on top show flooding and loss of performance compared with similarly operated cells with the anode on top. Transient fuel cell current measurements show a large degree of hysteresis in terms of membrane hydration as measured by HFR. Current step transients from 0.01 A cm{sup -2} to 0.68 A cm{sup -2} consistently show PEM wetting occurring within 5 to 20 sec. Whereas the PEM drying response to the reverse step transient of 0.68 A cm{sup -2} to 0.01 A cm{sup -2}, takes several minutes. The observed faster wetting response is due to reaction water being produced in the cathode and back diffusing into the membrane. The slower PEM drying is due to the water slowly being removed out of the wetted GDLs. This rate of removal of water and hence the PEM hydration level was found to be influenced strongly by the PTFE loadings in the GDL substrate and Microporous layer (MPL). The drying of the membrane is influenced by both the anode and cathode GDL PTFE loadings. Lower PTFE loading in the anode GDL leads to better membrane hydration probably due to the easier incorporation of water from the anode GDL into the membrane. Similarly a lower PTFE loading in the cathode GDL also results in better membrane hydration probably due to the better water retention properties (less hydrophobic) of this GDL. Fuel cells operated isothermal at sub-freezing temperatures show gradual cell performance decay over time and eventually drops to zero. AC impedance analysis indicates that losses are initially due to increasing charge transfer resistance. After time, the rate of decay accelerates rapidly due to mass transport limitations. High frequency resistance also increases over time and is a function of the initial membrane water content. These results indicate that catalyst layer ice formation is influenced strongly by the MEA and is responsible for the long-term degradation of fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures. Water distribution measurements indicate that ice may be fonning mainly in the GDLs at -10 C but are concentrated in the catalyst layer at -20 C.

Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairweather, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Robotic Laser-Adaptive-Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates using Robo-AO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is designed to observe every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 representative Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 44 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from 0.15" to 2.5" separation, with contrast ratios up to delta-m~6. We measure an overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% +/- 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured plan...

Law, Nicholas M; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Ziegler, Carl; Johnson, John Asher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Das, H K; Dekany, Richard G; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Image-Based Feature Tracking Algorithms for Real-Time Clad Height Detection in Laser Cladding.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In laser cladding, a material, usually in the form of powder, is deposited on a substrate. Powder particles are intermingled with inert gas and fed… (more)

Iravani-Tabrizipour, Mehrdad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense femtosecond laser fields studied by coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in an intense laser field has been experimentally studied using femtosecond laser pulses at 790 nm in the intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Kinematically complete measurements of both the ionic H{sup +} and neutral H fragments dissociated from a vibrationally excited H{sub 2}{sup +} beam have been achieved by a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging system. Angular-resolved kinetic energy release spectra for a series of different intensity ranges have been obtained using the intensity-difference spectrum method, thus disentangling the problem caused by the intensity volume effect. Our results indicate that the dissociation dynamics are drastically different for 'long' (135 fs) and 'short' (45 fs) laser pulses at similar high laser intensities. Specifically, bond softening is found to be the main feature in long pulses, while above threshold dissociation is dominant in short pulses whose durations are comparable with the vibrational period of the molecule. Bond softening in short pulses appears at low kinetic energy release with a narrow angular distribution. The experimental results are well interpreted by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer representation without nuclear rotation.

Wang, P. Q.; Sayler, A. M.; Carnes, K. D.; Xia, J. F.; Smith, M. A.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I. [J. R. Macdonald Laboratory, Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through thick tissue with a thin capillary as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the ability to guide high-frequency photoacoustic waves through thick tissue with a water-filled silica-capillary (150 \\mu m inner diameter and 30 mm long). An optical-resolution photoacoustic image of a 30 \\mu m diameter absorbing nylon thread was obtained by guiding the acoustic waves in the capillary through a 3 cm thick fat layer. The transmission loss through the capillary was about -20 dB, much lower than the -120 dB acoustic attenuation through the fat layer. The overwhelming acoustic attenuation of high-frequency acoustic waves by biological tissue can therefore be avoided by the use of a small footprint capillary acoustic waveguide for remote detection. We finally demonstrate that the capillary can be used as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide, paving the way for the development of minimally invasive optical-resolution photoacoustic endoscopes free of any acoustic or optical elements at their imaging tip.

Simandoux, Olivier; Gateau, Jerome; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri; Bossy, Emmanuel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Active hyperspectral imaging using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) array and digital-pixel focal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, "Quantum cascade lasers," Phys. Today 55(5), 34 (2002). 13. Daylight Solutions, Inc., www.daylightsolutions.com; Block Engineering LLC, www.blockeng.com. 14. B. G. Lee, M. A

Capasso, Federico

189

Design of a near-field coded aperture cameras for high-resolution medical and industrial gamma-ray imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coded Aperture Imaging is a technique originally developed for X-ray astronomy, where typical imaging problems are characterized by far-field geometry and an object made of point sources distributed over a mainly dark ...

Accorsi, Roberto, 1971-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

191

Real-time atomic-resolution imaging of crystal growth process in water by phase modulation atomic force microscopy at one frame per second  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advancement in dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) has enabled its operation in liquid with atomic-scale resolution. However, its imaging speed has often been too slow to visualize atomic-scale dynamic processes. Here, we propose a method for making a significant improvement in the operation speed of dynamic-mode AFM. In this method, we use a wideband and low-latency phase detector with an improved algorithm for the signal complexification. We demonstrate atomic-scale imaging of a calcite crystal growth process in water at one frame per second. The significant improvement in the imaging speed should enable various studies on unexplored atomic-scale interfacial processes.

Miyata, Kazuki [Division of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Division of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Asakawa, Hitoshi [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Fukuma, Takeshi, E-mail: fukuma@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan) [Division of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); ACT-C, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Honcho 4-1-9, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

BazookaSPECT: A Low-Cost Approach to High-Resolution, Single-Photon Imaging Using Columnar Scintillators and Image Intensifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-photon counting gamma-ray detector based on an image intensifier optically coupled to a low-cost CCD. Typically and allowing for a customizable imaging system. Operating in photon-counting mode, individual gamma-ray functioning as a gamma-ray microscope, (b) white-light microscope image of four 111 In oxine source beads, (c

Arizona, University of

193

Astron. Nachr./AN 32X (2002) X, XXXXXX Imaging Magnetographs for High-Resolution Solar Observations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetograph (VIM) is basically a twin of IRIM for observations in the wavelength range from 550 nm to 700 nm goals of VIM and IRIM are high temporal and spatial resolution observations while maintaining moderate

194

High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical advantages, when compared to P-wave profiling, such as high-resolution potential, greater sensitivities to lithologic changes and insensitivity to the… (more)

Bailey, Bevin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of a two-color laser-induced fluorescence based temperature imaging device with micro-scale resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's constant, c is the speed of light, and R is the wavelength of the incident light (Guilbault 1973). Since the energy diflerence between electronic states is fixed by the structure of the molecule, the wavelength of light that can be absorbed by a.... The molar concentration can also be fixed by using a known or calibrated solution. The quantum yield or efficiency of a molecule is the ratio of the number of photons emitted to the number absorbed. This is expressed by the equation r (3) I +k where I...

Gallina, Mark J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Image enhancement using a range gated MCPII video system with a 180-ps FWHM shutter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The video image of a target submerged in a scattering medium was improved through the use of range gating techniques. The target, an Air Force resolution chart, was submerged in 18 in. of a colloidal suspension of tincture green soap in water. The target was illuminated with pulsed light from a Raman shifted, frequency-doubled, ND:YAG laser having a wavelength of 559 mm and a width of 20 ps FWHM. The laser light reflected by the target along with the light scattered by the soap, was imaged onto a microchannel-plate image intensifier (MCPII). The output from the MCPII was then recorded with a RS-170 video camera and a video digitizer. The MCPII was gated on with a pulse synchronously timed to the laser pulse. The relative timing between the reflected laser pulse and the shuttering of the MCPII determined the distance to the imaged region. The resolution of the image was influenced by the MCPII`s shutter time. A comparison was made between the resolution of images obtained with 6 ns, 500 ps and 180 ps FWHM (8 ns, 750 ps and 250 ps off-to-off) shutter times. it was found that the image resolution was enhanced by using the faster shutter since the longer exposures allowed light scattered by the water to be recorded too. The presence of scattered light in the image increased the noise, thereby reducing the contrast and the resolution.

Thomas, M.C. [Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Yates, G.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Zadgarino, P. [Sharpenit, Ellwood, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

TESTING THE HYPOTHESIS THAT METHANOL MASER RINGS TRACE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: HIGH-RESOLUTION NEAR-INFRARED AND MID-INFRARED IMAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Milliarcsecond very long baseline interferometry maps of regions containing 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission have lead to the recent discovery of ring-like distributions of maser spots and the plausible hypothesis that they may be tracing circumstellar disks around forming high-mass stars. We aimed to test this hypothesis by imaging these regions in the near- and mid-infrared at high spatial resolution and compare the observed emission to the expected infrared morphologies as inferred from the geometries of the maser rings. In the near-infrared we used the Gemini North adaptive optics system of ALTAIR/NIRI, while in the mid-infrared we used the combination of the Gemini South instrument T-ReCS and super-resolution techniques. Resultant images had a resolution of {approx}150 mas in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared. We discuss the expected distribution of circumstellar material around young and massive accreting (proto)stars and what infrared emission geometries would be expected for the different maser ring orientations under the assumption that the masers are coming from within circumstellar disks. Based upon the observed infrared emission geometries for the four targets in our sample and the results of spectral energy distribution modeling of the massive young stellar objects associated with the maser rings, we do not find compelling evidence in support of the hypothesis that methanol masers rings reside in circumstellar disks.

De Buizer, James M. [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS N232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Bartkiewicz, Anna; Szymczak, Marian, E-mail: jdebuizer@sofia.usra.edu [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Gagarina 11, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Gated x-ray framing camera image of a direct-drive cylindrical implosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gated X-ray images of laser-driven implosions can provide movies of typically 16 frames with {approximately} 80 ps time resolution and 10 {micro}m spatial resolution. Cylindrical implosions allow study of convergent hydrodynamics but with excellent diagnostic access down the axis of the cylinder. This example from a recent cylindrical implosion campaign on the OMEGA laser provides quantitative data on the growth of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in convergent geometry.

Voss, S.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Oertel, J.A.; Watt, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Knauer, J.P.; Pien, G. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics] [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Applicability of 2-D Time-Lapse High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Approach to Image Natural Salt-Dissolution and Subsidence in Central Kansas and Improved Post-Processed Vibroseis Data Characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effectiveness of 2-D time-lapse imaging for monitoring natural dissolution of the Hutchinson Salt in eastern Reno County, Kansas was shown to be restricted when comparing high-resolution seismic reflection data acquired ...

Rice, Daniel

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

Schot, Gijs, vander

202

Label-Free Bacterial Imaging with Deep-UV-Laser-Induced Native Fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significant disadvantages. First, the mineral surfaces...and demonstrate the first noninvasive detection...samples from the deep ocean (Loihi Seamount...epi-illumination. The DUV laser power at the sample, after...also demonstrate the first noninvasive detection...samples from the deep ocean (Lo'ihi Seamount...

Rohit Bhartia; Everett C. Salas; William F. Hug; Ray D. Reid; Arthur L. Lane; Katrina J. Edwards; Kenneth H. Nealson

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Seeing inside chips and cells: High-resolution subsurface imaging of integrated circuits, quantum dots and subcellular structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Department of Physics, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, MA 02215, goldberg@bu.edu and Y. Leblebici, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, Switzerland 35-word abstract: In this work we. Standard non-contact optical resolution is limited by diffraction to about half the wavelength of light

204

HIGH-RESOLUTION INFRARED IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE Z CANIS MAJORIS SYSTEM DURING QUIESCENCE AND OUTBURST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present adaptive optics photometry and spectra in the JHKL bands along with high spectral resolution K-band spectroscopy for each component of the Z Canis Majoris system. Our high angular resolution photometry of this very young ({approx}<1 Myr) binary, comprised of an FU Ori object and a Herbig Ae/Be star, was gathered shortly after the 2008 outburst while our high-resolution spectroscopy was gathered during a quiescent phase. Our photometry conclusively determines that the outburst was due solely to the embedded Herbig Ae/Be member, supporting results from earlier works, and that the optically visible FU Ori component decreased slightly ({approx}30%) in luminosity during the same period, consistent with previous works on the variability of FU Ori type systems. Further, our high-resolution K-band spectra definitively demonstrate that the 2.294 {mu}m CO absorption feature seen in composite spectra of the system is due solely to the FU Ori component, while a prominent CO emission feature at the same wavelength, long suspected to be associated with the innermost regions of a circumstellar accretion disk, can be assigned to the Herbig Ae/Be member. These findings clarify previous analyses of the origin of the CO emission in this complex system.

Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil; Brenner, Douglas [Astrophysics Department, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Rice, Emily L. [Department of Engineering Science and Physics, College of Staten Island, City University of New York, 2800 Victory Bvld, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Jennifer E.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Burruss, Rick; Wallace, J. Kent; Cady, Eric; Zhai, Chengxing [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kraus, Adam L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Ireland, Michael J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, New South Wales, NSW 2109 (Australia); Beichman, Charles [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dekany, Richard [Caltech Optical Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Parry, Ian R. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Atomic Resolution Imaging of Grain Boundary Defects in Monolayer Chemical Vapor Deposition-Grown Hexagonal Boron Nitride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-high-resolution transmission electron microscopy at elevated temperature. Five- and seven-fold defects are readily observed to their potential scalability. However, low and ambient pressure CVD synthesis routes on polycrystalline substrates determined the structure of vacancies, holes, line defects, and grain boundaries8-10 in CVD graphene, as well

Zettl, Alex

206

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Nondestructive 3D confocal laser imaging with deconvolution of seven whole stardust tracks with complementary XRF and quantitative analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a nondestructive 3D system for analysis of whole Stardust tracks, using a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy and synchrotron XRF. 3D deconvolution is used for optical corrections, and results of quantitative analyses of several tracks are presented. The Stardust mission to comet Wild 2 trapped many cometary and ISM particles in aerogel, leaving behind 'tracks' of melted silica aerogel on both sides of the collector. Collected particles and their tracks range in size from submicron to millimeter scale. Interstellar dust collected on the obverse of the aerogel collector is thought to have an average track length of {approx}15 {micro}m. It has been our goal to perform a total non-destructive 3D textural and XRF chemical analysis on both types of tracks. To that end, we use a combination of Laser Confocal Scanning Microscopy (LCSM) and X Ray Florescence (XRF) spectrometry. Utilized properly, the combination of 3D optical data and chemical data provides total nondestructive characterization of full tracks, prior to flattening or other destructive analysis methods. Our LCSM techniques allow imaging at 0.075 {micro}m/pixel, without the use of oil-based lenses. A full textural analysis on track No.82 is presented here as well as analysis of 6 additional tracks contained within 3 keystones (No.128, No.129 and No.140). We present a method of removing the axial distortion inherent in LCSM images, by means of a computational 3D Deconvolution algorithm, and present some preliminary experiments with computed point spread functions. The combination of 3D LCSM data and XRF data provides invaluable information, while preserving the integrity of the samples for further analysis. It is imperative that these samples, the first extraterrestrial solids returned since the Apollo era, be fully mapped nondestructively in 3D, to preserve the maximum amount of information prior to other, destructive analysis.

Greenberg, M.; Ebel, D.S. (AMNH)

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

209

Laser Computed Tomographic Bioimaging by Means of Coherent Detection Imaging — GDI Scheme I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This series of papers report for the first known time on the operation principle and the experimental demonstration of optical computed tomography providing two-dimensional imaging of various in vitro and in v...

H. Inaba; M. Toida; M. Kondo; T. Ichimura

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Automated detection and time lapse analysis of dendritic spines in laser scanning microscopy images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is roughly divided into three related components. First, we focus on an image processing pipeline we have and Repair (now Harvard Neurodiscovery Center). I also would like to thank our collaborators: Bernardo

Miller, Eric

211

Tiny images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The human visual system is remarkably tolerant to degradations in image resolution: in a scene recognition task, human performance is similar whether $32 \\times 32$ color images or multi-mega pixel images are used. With ...

Torralba, Antonio

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

EUREM 12, Brno, Czech Republic, July 9-14, 2000 I 159 Super Resolution Imaging of Complex Metal Oxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rather than the image intensity that is recorded by conventional HREM. In this paper, restorations that have been investigated are Nb16W18O94, which consists of pentagonal columns of metal cations projected, samples were prepared by crushing and dispersion of the raw material onto a holey carbon support film

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

213

Imaging and 3D Elemental Characterization of Intact Bacterial Spores by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a quantitative, imaging technique based on nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry for mapping the 3D elemental distribution present in an individual micrometer-sized Bacillus spore. We use depth profile analysis to access the 3D ...

Sutapa Ghosal; Stewart J. Fallon; Terrance J. Leighton; Katherine E. Wheeler; Michael J. Kristo; Ian D. Hutcheon; Peter K. Weber

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Convective flow measurements in a heated cavity using pulsed laser velocimetry with digital image processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This is essentially the trapezoidal sheet shown in figure 4. The thickness of the beam remains on the order of 1-1. 5 13 x-v plane z-y plane First Lens Focal Point Second Lens Third Lens Fig. 4. Laser light passing through a trio of piano-convex cylindrical...2 U3 v1 v2 3 u4 u5 u7 u8 u6 u9 v4 v 5 v7 v8 Figure 24. Pixel positions in relation to vector components. Expressing equation (15) spatially, where uij and vij are gray level values ranging from 0 to 255 at position i and j of each region...

Chavez, Hector Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Application of PILATUS II Detector Modules for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for Doppler measurements of the radial profiles of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity in tokamak plasmas is presently being developed in a collaboration between various laboratories. The spectrometer will consist of a spherically bent crystal and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector; and it will record temporally and spatially resolved X-ray line spectra from highly-charged ions. The detector must satisfy challenging requirements with respect to count rate and spatial resolution. The paper presents the results from a recent test of a PILATUS II detector module on Alcator C-Mod, which demonstrate that the PILATUS II detector modules will satisfy these requirements.

M.L. Bitter, Ch. Borennimann, E.F. Eikenberry, K.W. Hill, A. Ince-Chushman, S.G. Lee, J.E. Rice, and S. Scott.

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

216

High-Resolution UV Relay Lens for Particle Size Distribution Measurements Using Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock waves passing through a metal sample can produce ejecta particulates at a metal-vacuum interface. Holography records particle size distributions by using a high-power, short-pulse laser to freeze particle motion. The sizes of the ejecta particles are recorded using an in-line Fraunhofer holography technique. Because the holographic plate would be destroyed in an energetic environment, a high-resolution lens has been designed to relay the interference fringes to a safe environment. Particle sizes within a 12-mm-diameter, 5-mm-thick volume are recorded onto holographic film. To achieve resolution down to 0.5 ?m, ultraviolet laser (UV) light is needed. The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution and operates at f/0.89 will be described. To set up this lens system, a doublet lens is temporarily attached that enables operation with 532-nm laser light and 1100 lp/mm resolution. Thus, the setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording is done with UV light. During setup, the 532-nm beam provides enough focus shift to accommodate the placement of a resolution target outside the ejecta volume; this resolution target does not interfere with the calibrated wires and pegs surrounding the ejecta volume. A television microscope archives images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens will be presented, and resolution variation through the 5-mm depth of field will be discussed.

Malone, Robert M.; Capelle, Gene A.; Frogget, Brent C.; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S.; Stevens, Gerald D.; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

On-Chip Rayleigh Imaging and Spectroscopy of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a novel on-chip Rayleigh imaging technique using wide-field laser illumination to measure optical scattering from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a solid substrate with high spatial and spectral resolution. This method in ...

Daniel Y. Joh; Lihong H. Herman; Sang-Yong Ju; Jesse Kinder; Michael A. Segal; Jeffreys N. Johnson; Garnet K. L. Chan; Jiwoong Park

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Design and optimization of a flexible high-peak-power laser-to-fiber coupled illumination system used in digital particle image velocimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a study on the design and parameter optimization of a flexible high-peak-power fiber-optic laser delivery system using commercially available solid-core silica fibers and an experimental glass hollow waveguide (HW). The fiber-optic delivery system provides a flexible, safe, and easily and precisely positioned laser irradiation for many applications including uniform illumination for digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The delivery fibers, when coupled through a line-generating lens, produce a uniform thin laser sheet illumination for accurate and repeatable DPIV two-dimensional velocity measurements. We report experimental results on homogenizing the laser beam profile using various mode-mixing techniques. Furthermore, because a fundamental problem for fiber-optic-based high-peak-power laser delivery systems is the possible damage effects of the fiber material, we determine experimentally the peak power density damage threshold of various delivery fibers designed for the visible spectral range at a typical DPIV laser wavelength of 532 nm. In the case of solid-core silica delivery fibers using conventional lens-based laser-to-fiber coupling, the damage threshold varies from 3.7 GW/cm{sup 2} for a 100-{mu}m-core-diameter high-temperature fiber to 3.9 GW/cm{sup 2} for a 200-{mu}m-core-diameter high-power delivery fiber, with a total output laser energy delivered of at least 3-10 mJ for those respective fibers. Therefore, these fibers are marginally suitable for most macro-DPIV applications. However, to improve the high-power delivery capability for close-up micro-DPIV applications, we propose and validate an experimental fiber link with much higher laser power delivery capability than the solid-core fiber links. We use an uncoated grazing-incidence-based tapered glass funnel coupled to a glass HW with hollow air-core diameter of 700 {mu}m, a low numerical aperture of 0.05, and a thin inside cladding of cyclic olefin polymer coating for optimum transmission at 532 nm. Because of the mode homogenizing effect and lower power density, the taper-waveguide laser delivery technique ensured high damage threshold for the delivery HW, and as a result, no damage occurred at the maximum measured input laser energy of 33 mJ used in this study.

Robinson, Ronald A.; Ilev, Ilko K. [FDA/CDRH, 9200 Corporate Blvd., HFZ-170, Rockville, Maryland 20850 (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our interactive modeling for Gaussian beam modeling in two-dimensional, triangulated complex geologic structure, has been generalized to include transmission losses at interfaces, and density and Q-characterization of attenuation in layers. Also, multiple reflections and the option to model data from VSP acquisition geometry have been included. Shortcomings when the structure contains first-order discontinuities, however, limit the full geologic complexity that presently can be modeled by the Gaussian beam method. Other studies of wave filtering that arises for waves propagating nearly parallel to bedding reveal the importance of tunneling evanescent filtering on the propagating wavelet. Likewise, for reflections from steep interfaces, we have developed a dip-divergence correction to compensate for shortcomings in the conventional divergence correction for energy spreading. A new direction this past year, which we will be pursuing in the year ahead is analysis of errors in migration and dip-moveout (DMO) that arise when conventional imaging processing, which ignores anisotropy, is applied to data acquired where the subsurface is transversely isotropic. We are also developing approaches for taking anisotropy into account in these important imaging processes. Similarly, we have developed an efficient approach to performing DMO on P-SV-mode-converted data. Our interests in taking anisotropy into account have led us to study the importance of anisotropy in the overburden on reflection amplitude variations with offset (AVO).

Larner, K.; Hale, D.; Bleistein, N.; Cohen, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Tracking of the advance of the coagulation front in a laser irradiated tissue using ultrasound imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perpendicular to the axis of rotation. T;"re signal bounced off jrcficcted from) the object, a piece of beef. This rcfiection ivas received by the transducer. The trarrsducer rvas operated on a B-Scan mode. Using this scanner the images v crc. obtained...?b('ca(is&. of he in!i&i'i'eiii, iioisc that ii as f)resent, iii th('. u!1 rasoiuid 'iiiage du(' to sl)(ck!e. Various cuive fitting pr&)(cdures like iaol&nomial curve. Gaiissian ciirve, e!liptical curve fitting etc. were examined. The data ivas analyzed hy thi...

Jagathesan, Shoban Srikrishna

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1,5-Diaminonaphthalene Hydrochloride Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Small Molecules in Tissues Following Focal Cerebral Ischemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, 1,5-naphthalenediamine (1,5-DAN) hydrochloride was prepared for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of small molecules in liver, brain, and kidneys from mice. ... Rat brains were removed and immediately frozen under ?80 °C. ... In this study, we conducted IMS on rat brains damaged by ischemic injury and detected various phospholipids that showed unique distributions between normal and damaged areas of the brain. ...

Huihui Liu; Rui Chen; Jiyun Wang; Suming Chen; Caiqiao Xiong; Jianing Wang; Jian Hou; Qing He; Ning Zhang; Zongxiu Nie; Lanqun Mao

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

New Insights to the Sawtooth Oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Hot Plasmas based on High Resolution 2-D Images of Te Fluctuations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dimensional (2-D) images of electron temperature fluctuations with high temporal and spatial resolution have been employed to study the sawtooth oscillation (m/n=1/1 mode) in Toroidal EXperiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) tokamak plasmas. 2-D imaging data revealed new physics which were not available in previous studies based on the 1-D electron temperature measurement and X-ray tomography. Review of the physics of the sawtooth oscillation is given by comparative studies with prominent theoretical models suggest that a new physics paradigm is needed to describe the reconnection physics of the sawtooth oscillation. The new insights are: A pressure driven instability (not a ballooning mode) leads to the X-point reconnection process. The reconnection process is identified as a random 3-D local reconnection process with a helical structure. The reconnection time scale is similar for different types of sawtooth oscillation ("kink" and tearing type) and is significantly faster than the resistive time scale. Heat flow from the core to the outside of the inversion radius during the reconnection process is highly collective rather than stochastic.

H.K. Park, N.C. Luhmann, Jr, A.J.H. Donné, C.W. Domier, T. Munsat, M.J. Van de Pol, and the TEXTOR Team

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

223

Laser Roadshow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

outreach Laser Roadshow The NIF Laser Roadshow includes a number of interactive laser demonstrations (Laser Light Fountain, Laser DJ, and NIF "3D ride") that have traveled across...

224

High resolution vital fluorescence imaging of tumor microanatomy for surgical margin assessment Jenna Mueller1, Nimmi Ramanujam1, Jeff Mito3, Zachary Harmany2, Stephanie Kennedy1, Joseph Geradts4, David Kirsch3, Rebecca Willett2, J. Quincy Brown1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a haystack 10 20 30 40 0 0.05 0.1 0.15 0.2 RelativeFrequency Area (cm2 ) Touch- Frozen section Optical 5% Entire margin Depth Surface > 2 mm 1­ care) Yes Method Touch prep Frozen Section Area Examined 5% EntireHigh resolution vital fluorescence imaging of tumor microanatomy for surgical margin assessment

Ramanujam, Nimmi

225

On the possibility of designing a high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer for near-IR range on the basis of a tunable diode laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of heterodyning of broadband radiation in the near-IR range are presented. A stabilised DFB laser was used as a local oscillator, while the role of a broadband radiation source was played by another DFB laser, excited by the pump current below its threshold value. A fibre-optical Y-coupler based on the single-mode silica fibre served as a diplexer. The radiation mixed in the singlemode fibre was incident on the photodetector, the role of which was played by a p - i - n photodiode. The signal from the photodiode was amplified by the preamplifier with the feedback resistance 240 k{Omega} and the bandwidth {approx}1 MHz and then digitised using a 16-digit ADC. The frequency scanning was implemented via the variation of the local oscillator frequency. The developed registration system provides the sensitivity {approx}1.4 % of the shot noise value at the acquisition time {approx}40 min.

Klimchuk, A Yu; Nadezhdinskii, Aleksandr I; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Shapovalov, Yu P; Rodin, A V

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 08/26/2013 | NR-13-08-04 High Resolution Image All NIF experiments are controlled and orchestrated by the integrated computer control system in the facility's control room. It consists of 950 front-end processors attached to about 60,000 control points, including mirrors, lenses, motors, sensors, cameras, amplifiers, capacitors and diagnostic instruments. Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov High Resolution Image The preamplifiers of the National Ignition Facility are the first step in increasing the energy of laser beams as they make their way toward the target chamber. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In the early morning hours of Aug.13, Lawrence

227

Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

atomic-resolution imaging | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at this time. Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110). Abstract: Understanding hydrogen formation on TiO2 surfaces is of great importance as it...

229

Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Injection-controlled laser resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new injection-controlled laser resonator incorporates self-filtering and self-imaging characteristics with an efficient injection scheme. A low-divergence laser signal is injected into the resonator, which enables the injection signal to be converted to the desired resonator modes before the main laser pulse starts. This injection technique and resonator design enable the laser cavity to improve the quality of the injection signal through self-filtering before the main laser pulse starts. The self-imaging property of the present resonator reduces the cavity induced diffraction effects and, in turn, improves the laser beam quality. 5 figs.

Chang, J.J.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

231

Laser Ignition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable...

232

High resolution data acquisition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

Thornton, Glenn W. (Los Alamos, NM); Fuller, Kenneth R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

High resolution data acquisition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame VayBoost.gif An image showing the "boosted frame,"...

235

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

236

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

237

Non-invasive real-time imaging through scattering layers and around corners via speckle correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging with optical resolution through and inside complex samples is a difficult challenge with important applications in many fields. The fundamental problem is that inhomogeneous samples, such as biological tissues, randomly scatter and diffuse light, impeding conventional image formation. Despite many advancements, no current method enables to noninvasively image in real-time using diffused light. Here, we show that owing to the memory-effect for speckle correlations, a single image of the scattered light, captured with a standard high-resolution camera, encodes all the information that is required to image through the medium or around a corner. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot imaging through scattering media and around corners using incoherent light and various samples, from white paint to dynamic biological samples. Our lensless technique is simple, does not require laser sources, wavefront-shaping, nor time-gated detection, and is realized here using a camera-phone. It has the potential to en...

Katz, Ori; Fink, Mathias; Gigan, Sylvain

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

240

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

242

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

243

Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Low-Altitude Laser Altimeter to Assist UAV Autolanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project presents a low-altitude laser altimeter system to assist UAV autolanding. This system generates aircraft altitude and attitude estimates; it consists of laser illuminators, a digital imaging unit (image sensor, lens, and optical filter...

Bergmann, Nicholas M

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Laser Cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser cladding is a surface modification process in which a laser beam is used to melt an addition ... process must be clearly differentiated from that of laser surface alloying ( Laser Surface Al...

Prof. Dr. José L. Ocaña; Prof. Janez Grum

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A laser speckle based position sensing technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Monte Carlo study for optimal conditions in single-shot imaging with femtosecond x-ray laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense x-ray pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable the unveiling of atomic structure in material and biological specimens via ultrafast single-shot exposures. As the radiation is intense enough to destroy the sample, a new sample must be provided for each x-ray pulse. These single-particle delivery schemes require careful optimization, though systematic study to find such optimal conditions is still lacking. We have investigated two major single-particle delivery methods: particle injection as flying objects and membrane-mount as fixed targets. The optimal experimental parameters were searched for via Monte Carlo simulations to discover that the maximum single-particle hit rate achievable is close to 40%.

Park, Jaehyun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Large Area and High Efficiency Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with High Time and Spatial Resolution for Night Time Sensing and Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and background rates of ~50 kHz at 8° C. The sensor system including our processing electronics achieves spatial National Laboratory, Chicago Il Gary Varner University of Hawaii ABSTRACT Imaging sensors using Ga, low background rates (0.1 events cm-2 sec-1 ), and very good lifetime stability to 7 C cm-2 of charge

Michalet, Xavier

249

Pixel super-resolution in serial time-encoded amplified microscopy (STEAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose pixel super-resolution serial time-encoded amplified microscopy (STEAM) for achieves high speed and high-resolution imaging - relaxing the stringent requirement on the...

Wong, Terence T W; Chan, Antony; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

250

Device for translating negative film image to a line scan  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A negative film reader records high-resolution optical density changes across negative film radiographic images to allow precise image dimensions to be determined. A laser light source capable of high-resolution focusing is passed through an intensity control filter, focused by a lens, and reflected off a mirror to focus in the plane of the negative film. The light transmitted through the film is collected by a second lens and directed to a photo diode detector which senses the transmitted intensity. The output of the photo diode signal amplifier is sent to the Y-axis input of an X-Y recorder. The film sample is transported in a plane perpendicular to the beam axis by means of a slide. The film position is monitored, with the signal amplified and recorded as the X-axis on the X-Y recorder. The linear dimensions and positions of image components can be determined by direct measurement of the amplified recording.

Dutton, G.W.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Incoherent x-ray scattering in single molecule imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging of the structure of single proteins or other biomolecules with atomic resolution would be enormously beneficial to structural biology. X-ray free-electron lasers generate highly intense and ultrashort x-ray pulses, providing a route towards imaging of single molecules with atomic resolution. The information on molecular structure is encoded in the coherent x-ray scattering signal. In contrast to crystallography there are no Bragg reflections in single molecule imaging, which means the coherent scattering is not enhanced. Consequently, a background signal from incoherent scattering deteriorates the quality of the coherent scattering signal. This background signal cannot be easily eliminated because the spectrum of incoherently scattered photons cannot be resolved by usual scattering detectors. We present an ab initio study of incoherent x-ray scattering from individual carbon atoms, including the electronic radiation damage caused by a highly intense x-ray pulse. We find that the coherent scattering pa...

Slowik, Jan Malte; Dixit, Gopal; Jurek, Zoltan; Santra, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High-Speed Coherent Raman Fingerprint Imaging of Biological Tissues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a coherent Raman imaging platform using broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (BCARS) that provides an unprecedented combination of speed, sensitivity, and spectral breadth. The system utilizes a unique configuration of laser sources that probes the Raman spectrum over 3,000 cm$^{-1}$ and generates an especially strong response in the typically weak Raman "fingerprint" region through heterodyne amplification of the anti-Stokes photons with a large nonresonant background (NRB) while maintaining high spectral resolution of $chemical imaging in two- and three-dimensional views of healthy murine liver and pancreas tissues and interfaces between xenograft brain tumors and the surrounding healthy brain matter.

Camp, Charles H; Heddleston, John M; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Walker, Angela R Hight; Rich, Jeremy N; Lathia, Justin D; Cicerone, Marcus T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

PRECISE THROUGHPUT DETERMINATION OF THE PanSTARRS TELESCOPE AND THE GIGAPIXEL IMAGER USING A CALIBRATED SILICON PHOTODIODE AND A TUNABLE LASER: INITIAL RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used a precision-calibrated photodiode as the fundamental metrology reference in order to determine the relative throughput of the PanSTARRS telescope and the Gigapixel imager, from 400 nm to 1050 nm. Our technique uses a tunable laser as a source of illumination on a transmissive flat-field screen. We determine the full-aperture system throughput as a function of wavelength, including (in a single integral measurement) the mirror reflectivity, the transmission functions of the filters and the corrector optics, and the detector quantum efficiency, by comparing the light seen by each pixel in the CCD array to that measured by a precision-calibrated silicon photodiode. This method allows us to determine the relative throughput of the entire system as a function of wavelength, for each pixel in the instrument, without observations of celestial standards. We present promising initial results from this characterization of the PanSTARRS system, and we use synthetic photometry to assess the photometric perturbations due to throughput variation across the field of view.

Stubbs, Christopher W.; Doherty, Peter; Cramer, Claire; Narayan, Gautham; Brown, Yorke J. [Department of Physics, 17 Oxford Street Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Lykke, Keith R.; Woodward, John T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg MD 20899 (United States); Tonry, John L., E-mail: stubbs@physics.harvard.ed [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu HI 96822 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Design of new seismometer based on laser Doppler effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to improve the resolution of seismic acquisition, a new seismic acquisition system based on tangential laser Doppler effect with an optimized differential optical...

Du, Zhenhui; Huang, Fuxiang; Jiang, Chengzhi; Tao, Zhifei; Gao, Hua; Lv, Lina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

External Cavity Quantum Cascade Lasers: Recent Advances, Applications, and Comparisons with Alternative Sources in the MIR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of external cavity quantum/interband cascade lasers (ECqcL/ECicL) in molecular detection and imaging applications will be discussed. Alternative MIR laser technologies...

Day, Timothy

256

High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Laser Atmospheric Studies with VERITAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a calibrated laser pulse propagates through the atmosphere, the amount of Rayleigh-scattered light arriving at the VERITAS telescopes can be calculated precisely. This technique was originally developed for the absolute calibration of ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray fluorescence telescopes but is also applicable to imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). In this paper, we present two nights of laser data taken with the laser at various distances away from the VERITAS telescopes and compare it to Rayleigh scattering simulations.

C. M. Hui; for the VERITAS collaboration

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Laser Ignition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

259

Widely tuneable scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy using pulsed quantum cascade lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the use of a pulsed quantum cascade laser, wavelength tuneable between 6 and 10??m, with a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscope (s-SNOM). A simple method for calculating the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the s-SNOM measurement is presented. For pulsed lasers, the SNR is shown to be highly dependent on the degree of synchronization between the laser pulse and the sampling circuitry; in measurements on a gold sample, the SNR is 26 with good synchronization and less than 1 without. Simulations and experimental s-SNOM images, with a resolution of 100?nm, corresponding to ?/80, and an acquisition time of less than 90 s, are presented as proof of concept. They show the change in the field profile of plasmon-resonant broadband antennas when they are excited with wavelengths of 7.9 and 9.5??m.

Yoxall, Edward, E-mail: edward.yoxall@imperial.ac.uk; Rahmani, Mohsen; Maier, Stefan A.; Phillips, Chris C. [The Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [The Blackett Laboratory, Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Navarro-Cía, Miguel [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom)] [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BT (United Kingdom)

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

260

Optimizing Laser-accelerated Ion Beams for a Collimated Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-flux neutrons for imaging and materials analysis applications have typically been provided by accelerator- and reactor-based neutron sources. A novel approach is to use ultraintense (>1018W/cm2) lasers to generate picosecond, collimated neutrons from a dual target configuration. In this article, the production capabilities of present and upcoming laser facilities are estimated while independently maximizing neutron yields and minimizing beam divergence. A Monte-Carlo code calculates angular and energy distributions of neutrons generated by D-D fusion events occurring within a deuterated target for a given incident beam of D+ ions. Tailoring of the incident distribution via laser parameters and microlens focusing modifies the emerging neutrons. Projected neutron yields and distributions are compared to conventional sources, yielding comparable on-target fluxes per discharge, shorter time resolution, larger neutron energies and greater collimation.

C.L. Ellison and J. Fuchs

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera's two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera's integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting.

Hutchinson, Donald P. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

Hutchinson, D.P.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Concentration and temperature measurements in a laser-induced high explosive ignition zone. Part I: LIF spectroscopy measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a method that combines a laser ignition technique with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy for studying the gas-phase products in a laser-induced subignition zone and the reactions that lead to a self-sustained ignition. The experiment comprises a tunable 180 W CO2-laser as ignition source, an excimer pumped dye-laser for inducing the fluorescence, and a spectrometer equipped with an optical multichannel analyzer. This technique was used for measurements of relative NO and CN concentrations in the subignition zone of RDX (1,3,5-Trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine) in pseudo-real time (time resolution better than 1 ?s). By using LIF technique for measuring the relative population of different vibrational levels, we were able to calculate the vibrational temperature in the gas phase reaction zone in front of the sample at subignition to approximately 3100 K. The measurements show clearly that the chemical reactions and the diffusion in the subignition zone play an important part long before a self-sustained reaction occurs, and thus influence the sensitivity of an explosive. By using LIF imaging technique, two-dimensional images of the NO concentration were registered at different times in the ignition pulse, and the wavelength dependence of the ignition source was also studied. The results correspond to a model for fast radiative ignition where Lambert-Beer absorption is the main energy interaction mechanism between the energetic material and the laser beam.

H. Östmark; M. Carlson; K. Ekvall

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A new compact, high sensitivity neutron imaging system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a new small neutron imaging system (SNIS) diagnostic for the OMEGA laser facility. The SNIS uses a penumbral coded aperture and has been designed to record images from low yield (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} neutrons) implosions such as those using deuterium as the fuel. This camera was tested at OMEGA in 2009 on a rugby hohlraum energetics experiment where it recorded an image at a yield of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}. The resolution of this image was 54 {mu}m and the camera was located only 4 meters from target chamber centre. We recently improved the instrument by adding a cooled CCD camera. The sensitivity of the new camera has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. The calibration showed that the signal-to-noise ratio could be improved by using raw binning detection.

Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF,F-91297 Arpajon (France); Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Park, H. S.; Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Attenuation of laser power of a focused Gaussian beam during interaction between a laser and powder in coaxial laser cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power of a focused laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile attenuated by powder in coaxial laser cladding is investigated experimentally and theoretically, and its resolution model is developed. With some assumptions, it is concluded that the attenuation of laser power is an exponential function and is determined by the powder feed rate, particle moving speed, spraying angles and waist positions and diameters of the laser beam and powder flow, grain diameter and run of the laser beam through the powder flow. The attenuation of laser power increases with powder feed rate or run of laser beam through the powder flow. In the experiment presented, 300?W laser power from a focused Gaussian beam is attenuated by a coaxial powder flow. The experimental results agree well with the values calculated with the developed model.

Jichang Liu; Lijun Li; Yuanzhong Zhang; Xiaozhu Xie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ti K{alpha} radiography of Cu-doped plastic microshell implosions via spherically bent crystal imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that short pulse laser generated Ti K{alpha} radiation can be used effectively as a backlighter for radiographic imaging. This method of x-ray radiography features high temporal and spatial resolution, high signal to noise ratio, and monochromatic imaging. We present here the Ti K{alpha} backlit images of six-beam driven spherical implosions of thin-walled 500-{mu}m Cu-doped deuterated plastic (CD) shells and of similar implosions with an included hollow gold cone. These radiographic results were used to define conditions for the diagnosis of fast ignition relevant electron transport within imploded Cu-doped coned CD shells.

King, J.A.; Akli, K.; Zhang, B.; Freeman, R.R.; Key, M.H.; Chen, C.D.; Hatchett, S.P.; Koch, J. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Snavely, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Borghesi, M.; Romagnani, L.; Zepf, M.; Cowan, T.; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Toyama, Y.; Karsch, S. [Department of Applied Sciences, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); The Queens University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565 (Japan); Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon, OX11 OQX (United Kingdom); General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [and others

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

268

CONSTRUCTING A WISE HIGH RESOLUTION GALAXY ATLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {mu}m, 4.6 {mu}m, 12 {mu}m, and 22 {mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Fowler, J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, S.; Lake, S.; Wright, E. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cluver, M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benford, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Bridge, C.; Neill, James D. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Donoso, E. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koribalski, B. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Insititution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sheth, K. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow. (United States); Stanford, S., E-mail: jarrett@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fusion of urban remote image based on multi-characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fusion approach is proposed to refine the resolution of urban multi-spectral images using the corresponding high-resolution panchromatic (PAN) images. Firstly, the two images are...

Yang, Xuhong; Jing, Zhongliang; Liu, Gang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Compact imaging Bragg spectrometer for fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact imaging x-ray spectrometer has been designed for tokamaks and stellarators to measure the plasma parameters at different spatial chords. It has been optimized for high spectral resolution and high sensitivity. High spectral resolution is obtained by using solid state detectors and minimizing the imaging errors of the spherical crystals. It is shown, that using spherical crystals the solid angle and hence the throughput can be increased significantly, without compromising the spectral resolution. The design is useful for the measurement of the spectra of He- and H-like ions from Si to Kr. The spectral resolution is sufficient for the measurement of plasma parameters. The temporal resolution is high enough for transport studies by gas puff and laser ablation experiments. The design is based on a modified Johann spectrometer mount, utilizing a spherically bent crystal instead of the cylindrically bent crystal in the traditional Johann mount. The astigmatism of the wavelength selective reflection on the spherical crystal is applied to obtain imaging of an extended plasma source on a two-dimensional detector. For each element, a separate crystal is required, only in few cases, a crystal can be used for the spectra of two elements. For the spectra of most of the He-like ions from Si up to Kr, suitable crystal cuts have been found on quartz, silicon and germanium crystals with Bragg angles in a small interval around the design value of 53.5 deg. All of the crystals have the same radius. They are fixed on a rotational table. The distance to the detector is adjusted by an x-y table to fit to the Rowland circle.

Bertschinger, G.; Biel, W.; Jaegers, H.; Marchuk, O. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Observation and Measurement of Temperature Rise and Distribution on GaAs Photo-cathode Wafer with a 532nm Drive Laser and a Thermal Imaging Camera  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant temperature rise and gradient are observed from a GaAs photo-cathode wafer irradiated at various power levels with over 20W laser power at 532nm wavelength. The laser power absorption and dissipated thermal distribution are measured. The result shows a clear indication that proper removal of laser induced heat from the cathode needs to be considered seriously when designing a high average current or low quantum efficiency photo-cathode electron gun. The measurement method presented here provides a useful way to obtain information about both temperature and thermal profiles, it also applies to cathode heating study with other heating devices such as electrical heaters.

Shukui Zhang, Stephen Benson, Carlos Hernandez-Garcia

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of the technique of laser resonance ionization to the production of singly charged ions at radioactive ion beam facilities is discussed. The ability to combine high efficiency and element selectivity makes a resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) an important component of many radioactive ion beam facilities. At CERN, for example, the RILIS is the most commonly used ion source of the ISOLDE facility, with a yearly operating time of up to 3000 hours. For some isotopes the RILIS can also be used as a fast and sensitive laser spectroscopy tool, provided that the spectral resolution is sufficiently high to reveal the influence of nuclear structure on the atomic spectra. This enables the study of nuclear properties of isotopes with production rates even lower than one ion per second and, in some cases, enables isomer selective ionization. The solutions available for the implementation of resonance laser ionization at radioactive ion beam facilities are summarized. Aspects such as the laser r...

Marsh, B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. The beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being recombined with the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Page 1Laser Safety Training Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Laser Institute of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1Laser Safety Training © Laser Institute of America 1 Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety: Hazards, Bioeffects, and Control Measures Laser Institute of America Gus Anibarro Education Manager 2Laser Safety © Laser Institute of America Laser Safety Overview Laser Safety Accidents

Farritor, Shane

275

Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

La Rosa, Andres H.

276

Backscatter absorption gas imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

McRae, Jr., Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Laser microphone  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microphone for detecting sound pressure waves includes a laser resonator having a laser gain material aligned coaxially between a pair of first and second mirrors for producing a laser beam. A reference cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors for transmitting a reference portion of the laser beam between the mirrors. A sensing cell is disposed between the laser material and one of the mirrors, and is laterally displaced from the reference cell for transmitting a signal portion of the laser beam, with the sensing cell being open for receiving the sound waves. A photodetector is disposed in optical communication with the first mirror for receiving the laser beam, and produces an acoustic signal therefrom for the sound waves.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Nobel Prizes for Super-Resolution Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publication Date (Web): October 28, 2014 ... For more detailed descriptions of their work and some of the extraordinary subsequent developments that it inspired and motivated, please see a terrific review at the Nobel Prize Web site. ...

Paul S. Weiss

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Pointer System Intuitive Interaction for Large High-Res Displays LEDs Accelerometer Vibration Buttons Laser & LEDs Unlike conventional input devices like mouse and keyboard, laser pointers do that are displayed on large high-resolution screens. The laser pointer technology was developed in cooperation

Reiterer, Harald

280

Near-electrode imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In a third embodiment, alternating short and long pulses of light from the excitation light source are directed into the ignitor laser. Each of the embodiments of the invention can be multiplexed so as to provide laser light energy sequentially to more than one ignitor laser.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Coherence versus interferometric resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

Alfredo Luis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

Coherence versus interferometric resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the relation between second-order coherence and resolution in the interferometric detection of phase shifts. While for classical thermal light resolution and second-order coherence are synonymous, we show that for quantum light beams reaching optimum precision second-order coherence and resolution become antithetical.

Luis, Alfredo [Departamento de Optica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be an important focus of laser-plasma acceleration researchfocus. In both cases, light regions of the image ionized and heated the plasma,

Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

Heimann, P.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US). Advanced Light Source; Larsson, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Physics Dept.; Chang, Z. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

‘Taking X-ray phase contrast imaging into mainstream applications’ and its satellite workshop ‘Real and reciprocal space X-ray imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...presented Femtosecond X-ray lasers for imaging atomic structure...which he described X-ray laser-induced electronic ordering...characterization of targets for laser fusion experiments. Krist. Tech...1205396109 ) 20 Talbot, HF . 1836 Facts relating to...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Protective laser beam viewing device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Instrument Series: Spectroscopy and Diffraction High Spatial Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High Spatial Resolution High Spatial Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) EMSL's novel, new-generation ion microprobe extends high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis to extremely small areas (down to 50 nm) and volumes while maintaining high sensitivity (e.g., ppm in element imaging) at high mass resolution. NanoSIMS can measure up to seven ions in parallel, offering perfect isotopic ratio results from the same small volume for perfect image superimposition. NanoSIMS can be used for enhanced imaging of cellular structures; simultaneous imaging of elements/isotopes on minerals and soft surfaces at the nanoscale; and imaging elements and isotopes of aerosols, nanoparticles, and organic and inorganic surfaces. Research Applications

291

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In the embodiment of the invention claimed herein, the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion of it being combined with either the first portion after a delay before injection into the ignitor laser.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Laser ignition studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to study the details of laser induced ignition and combustion of high-temperature condensed-phase exothermic reactions. In this work high-speed photography (HSP) and real-time optical pyrometry have been combined to provide a diagnostic tool with a 1 ms temporal resolution for studying laser ignition and combustion wave propagation. Previous experiments have involved the use of HSP for studying combustion wave propagation (1) Real-time pyrometry studies of the ignition process have also been performed previously. The present paper describes how HSP has been expanded to include three-view split-frame photography to allow the ignition and combustion processes to be recorded and studied simultaneously. 2 refs., 3 figs.

Fredin, L.; Hansen, G.P.; Margrave, J.L.; Behrens, R.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Laser ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In the apparatus of the invention, a first excitation laser or other excitation light source capable of producing alternating beams of light having different wavelengths is used in tandem with one or more ignitor lasers to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using the single remote excitation light source for pumping one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones with alternating wavelengths of light.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Lester, Charles S. (San Juan Pueblo, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Applications of soft x-ray lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

Skinner, C.H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, Wynn (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Forrest L. (Bernalillo, NM); Kortegaard, Birchard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Lasers as a tool for plasma diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers can be used as non-perturbative probes to measure many plasma parameters. Plasma refractivity is primarily a function of electron density, and interferometric measurements of phase changes with either pulsed or CW lasers can determine this parameter with spatial or temporal resolution over several orders of magnitude sensitivity by using laser wavelengths from the near uv to the far infrared. Laser scattering from free electrons yields the most fundamental electron temperature measurements in the plasma parameter range where individual scattering events are uncorrelated in phase and ion temperature or plasma wave and turbulence structure in the opposite limit. Laser scattering from bound electrons can be many orders of magnitude larger if the laser is matched to appropriate resonance frequencies and can be used in specialized circumstances for measuring low-ionized impurity or dominant species neutral concentrations and velocities.

Jahoda, F.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

300

Dispute Resolution Information  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is any technique for resolving disputes without resorting to litigation in either an administrative or judicial forum.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PMCO: Issue Resolution  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The expertise available within the Project Management Coordination Office (PMCO) team is regularly called upon to resolve issues that cut across technology offices and require prompt resolution....

302

Laser postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry in tissue: a powerful tool for elemental and molecular imaging in the development of targeted drugs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...32 Chandra S, Lorey DRI, Smith DR. Quantitative subcellular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of boron-10 and boron-11 isotopes in the same cell delivered by two combined BNCT drugs: in vitro studies on human glioblastoma...

Andrea Wittig; Heinrich F. Arlinghaus; Christian Kriegeskotte; Raymond L. Moss; Klaas Appelman; Kurt W. Schmid; Wolfgang A.G. Sauerwein

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High-resolution laser spectroscopy between 0.9 and 14.3 THz in a supersonic beam: Rydberg-Rydberg transitions of atomic Xe at intermediate n values  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laser-based, pulsed, narrow-band source of submillimeter-wave radiation has been developed that is continuously tunable from 0.1 THz to 14.3 THz. The source is based on difference-frequency mixing in the nonlinear crystal trans-4{sup Prime }-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium tosylate. By varying the pulse length, the bandwidth of the submillimeter-wave radiation can be adjusted between 85 MHz and 2.8 MHz. This new radiation source has been integrated in a vacuum-ultraviolet-submillimeter-ware double-resonance spectrometer, with which low-frequency transitions of atoms and molecules in supersonic beams can be detected mass-selectively by photoionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The properties of the radiation source and spectrometer are demonstrated in a study of 33f Leftwards-Arrow nd Rydberg-Rydberg transitions in Xe with n in the range 16-31. The frequency calibration of the submillimeter-wave radiation was performed with an accuracy of 2.8 MHz. The narrowest lines observed experimentally have a full-width at half-maximum of {approx}3 MHz, which is sufficient to fully resolve the hyperfine structure of the Rydberg-Rydberg transitions of {sup 129}Xe and {sup 131}Xe. A total of 72 transitions were measured in the range between 0.937 THz and 14.245 THz and their frequencies are compared with frequencies calculated by multichannel quantum defect theory.

Haase, Christa; Agner, Josef A.; Merkt, Frederic [Laboratorium fuer Physikalische Chemie, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Using X-ray free-electron lasers for probing of complex interaction dynamics of ultra-intense lasers with solid matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advance the understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. In this paper, we focus on XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions based on quantitative calculations using synthesized data and evaluate the feasibility of various imaging and scattering techniques with special focus on the small angle X-ray scattering technique.

Kluge, T., E-mail: t.kluge@hzdr.de; Huang, L. G.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Gutt, C. [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

306

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has...

307

Laser device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Single molecule laser spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article, we discussed some single molecule spectroscopy techniques and methods. We have chosen the simplicity in this survey based on our laboratory experience in this field. We concentrated on the imaging by both techniques the wide field and the scanning microscopes. Other imaging enhancements on the technique like extended resolution wide field, the total internal reflection imaging, and its derivatives are also reviewed. In addition to the imaging techniques, some diffusion techniques also are discussed like fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The related methods like Forester resonance transfer, photo-induced electron transfer and anisotropy (steady state and time decay) are also discussed. In addition, we elucidated some simple details about the theory behind the FCS and its resulting curve fitting. This review is preceded by general introduction and ended with the conclusion.

Diaa Atta; Ali Okasha

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment imaging issues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the super-resolution (SR) of images and video... . The term SR is used to describe the process of obtaining a high-resolution (HR) image, or a sequence of HR... images, from a set...

310

XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

Newnam, B.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli, determined by a Berkeley-Berlin collaboration to a resolution of 3.5 Ã…, the highest yet achieved, provide many new insights into how the ribosome factory works. Ribosomes Ready for Extreme Close-Up In 1999, the first structure of the intact ribosome-a very large, asymmetric protein that is difficult to crystallize-was solved by x-ray crystallography at the ALS (see "Solving the Ribosome Puzzle"). Since then, scientists have developed quite an extensive photo gallery of ribosomes from various organisms and in various configurations. More importantly, they have sharpened the focus significantly, going from a resolution of 7.8 Ã… in 1999, to 5.5 Ã… in 2001 (see "Zooming in on Ribosomes"), to an amazing 3.5 Ã… in this latest work. What was initially seen as fuzzy "fingers" of electron density can now be resolved into individual nucleotides in the RNA strands. Serendipitously, the crystals used in this particular study contained two versions of the ribosome, each one in a different "pose," allowing the researchers to compare the positions of the various parts and deduce how they work. With these sharper images, scientists are now better able to interpret previous data, test models, and develop new theories, both practical (how do antibiotics that target the ribosome work?) and theoretical (how much has the ribosome evolved from bacteria to human?). Stay tuned.

312

7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

Hui Su

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

10{times} reduction imaging at 13.4nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Schwarzschild imaging system has been designed to achieve 0.1 {mu}m resolution in a 0.4 mm diameter field of view when operated at a center wavelength of 13.4 nm. A decentered aperture is located on the convex primary resulting in an unobstructed numerical aperture of 0.08 and a corresponding depth of field of {plus_minus} 1 {mu}m. The Schwarzschild imaging objective is part of a five-reflection system containing the laser plasma source (LPS), condensing optics, turning mirror and reflection mask as shown in Figure 1. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is generated by impinging a laser beam onto a copper target. The plasma source is driven by a Lambda Physik PLX 250 KrF excimer laser emitting 0.6 Joule, 20 ns pulses at a 200 Hz maximum repetition rate. Measurements of the source indicate that the full-width-half-maximum diameter is less than 100 {mu}m.

Tichenor, D.A.; Kubiak, G.D.; Malinowski, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

317

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

318

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

319

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

320

Laser goniometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

Fairer, George M. (Boulder, CO); Boernge, James M. (Lakewood, CO); Harris, David W. (Lakewood, CO); Campbell, DeWayne A. (Littleton, CO); Tuttle, Gene E. (Littleton, CO); McKeown, Mark H. (Golden, CO); Beason, Steven C. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - art noninvasive imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging methods are unable to characterize... and Otological Society, Inc. Imaging of the Pediatric Airway Using ... Source: Chen, Zhongping - Beckman Laser Institute and Medical...

322

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

non-premixed methane/air flame John B. Bell, Marcus S. Day, Joseph F. Grcar Computing Sciences-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH3-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame Abstract In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded

Bell, John B.

323

Pulsed Laser Deposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulsed Laser Deposition Pulsed Laser Deposition EMSL's pulsed laser deposition (PLD) system is designed for epitaxial growth of oxide, ceramic, or synthetic mineral thin films and...

324

Laser barometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

LASER ACCELERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Accelerator & Fusion Researchat the 1983 Particle Accelerator Conference, Santa Fe, NM,March 21-23, 1983 LASER ACCELERATORS A.M. Sessler TWO-WEEK

Sessler, A.M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Laser ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to their thermodynamic benefits, second-generation spark-ignition engines with gasoline direct injection systems have ... combination of a spray-guided combustion process with laser-induced ignition allows th...

Bernhard Geringer; Dominikus Klawatsch; Josef Graf; Hans Peter Lenz…

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fiber Laser Based Nonlinear Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illumination into the smallest focal volume possible in order to achieve the best resolution and to maximize nonlinear response. The size of the focal volume depends on the numerical aperture (NA) of the lens and the quality of the lens backfill... to refer to any cone-shaped propagating light field, in which case the medium will be assumed to be air. The backfill characteristic of a laser and lens combination must be considered because the beam generally has a Gaussian mode profile...

Adany, Peter

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

329

Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser EYE SURGERY LASIK and Excimer Lasers Michael Hutchins #12;The PROBLEM opia - near sightedness - Laser Assisted in SItu Keratomileusis atomileusis is the procedure of opening the eye and ring the cornea. SIK uses an excimer laser to perform the alterations an er a knife or a femtosecond laser

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

330

Photoinduced Formation of Zinc Nanoparticles by UV Laser Irradiation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials & Processes Instruments: Microbeam Diffractometer Tags: ultra-high vacuum UHV VT SPM atomic-resolution imaging Volume: 25 Issue: 4 Pages: 1930-1933 Publication year:...

331

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, the author introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, they demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sup 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection. In the second part of this dissertation, the author used laser-induced native fluorescence coupled with capillary electrophoresis (LINF-CE) and microscope imaging to study the single cell degranulation. On the basis of good temporal correlation with events observed through an optical microscope, they have identified individual peaks in the fluorescence electropherograms as serotonin released from the granular core on contact with the surrounding fluid.

Hui Su

2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic resolution z-contrast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cambridge Collection: Materials Science 11 Spectroscopic Imaging of Single AtomsWithin a Bulk Solid S. D. Findlay,2 Summary: a high resolution Z-contrast image of a...

334

Using high-resolution displays for high-resolution cardiac data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...builds on the appreciation that medical interventions need to be tailored...disease. Increasingly detailed medical imaging data require new tools...These tools need to support medical decision-making in real time...operation under normal room lighting. A broad overview of high-resolution...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps ChemCam zaps rocks with a high-powered laser to determine their composition and carries a camera that can survey the Martian landscape. December 5, 2013 This figure is a ChemCam Remote Micro Imager (RMI) image of the target "Ithaca". The image is a mosaic of three separate images taken on Sol 439, with the scale as shown. The image shows the scars from the ten LIBS points labeled from point 1 to point 10. One of the 30 shots at point no. 1 was the 100,000th firing of the ChemCam laser! The distance to the target from the ChemCam telescope at the top of the mast was 4.04 m. The vertical line of ten points taken by ChemCam on Ithaca, starts in a pitted lower coarser grained unit and crosses into a finer grained, smoother, upper unit. The chemical composition appears to be very similar between units. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP)

336

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

POLAR SEA-ICE CLASSIFICATION USING ENHANCED RESOLUTION NSCAT DATA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLAR SEA-ICE CLASSIFICATION USING ENHANCED RESOLUTION NSCAT DATA Q. P. Remund and D. G. Long of the scatterometer image reconstruction with filter (SIRF) algorithm. SIRF produces images of A and B where A is U is shown to have high correlation with the NSIDC SSM/I derived multiyear ice maps. INTRODUCTION Polar sea

Long, David G.

338

Laser Safety Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Safety #12;Introduction · A Laser is a device that controls the way energized atoms release photons. · LASER is an acronym for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation" · The light emitted by a laser is non

McQuade, D. Tyler

339

Along the Laser Beampath  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 20 | Next | Last Back to Index NIF Laser Bay Each NIF laser bay is 122 meters (400 feet) long and contains 96 beamlines. This side view of Laser Bay 2 shows the four-high laser...

340

OMEGA Laser System completes 20,000th target shot | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2008. The two lasers can be used independently or together to provide a more detailed x-ray image of a particular experiment. The Omega Laser Facility is used to generate extreme...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

during a series of partial regenerations (9302012). - Achieved * Determine temporal and spatial resolution of neutron imaging with respect to fluid density and flow in fuel...

342

Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

diesel injector: Filled reservoir Void in reservoir 6 Milestones * Determine temporal and spatial resolution of neutron imaging with respect to fluid density and flow in fuel...

343

The planar imaging of laser induced fluorescence of fuel and hydroxyl for a wall-interacting jet in a single-cylinder, automotive-size, optically accessible diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fuel penetration and reacting diesel jet development have been studied in a small-bore optical engine to better understand a swirl-influenced, wall-interacting diesel flame. The fuel injection was executed for long duration, creating negative ignition dwell conditions in which the start of combustion occurs before the end of injection. Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of hydroxyl (OH-PLIF), fuel-PLIF, and line-of-sight integrated chemiluminescence imaging were performed for various combustion stages identified by the in-cylinder pressure traces and apparent heat release rates. These include stages of vaporising fuel penetration, low-temperature reaction, and high-temperature reaction. The fuel-PLIF images show that the fuel penetration is strongly influenced by a swirl flow with the wall–jet penetration on the up-swirl side being shorter than that on the down-swirl jet. During the low-temperature reaction, cool flame chemiluminescence appears near the wall–jet head region. Interestingly, this region is where the initial turbulent ring-vortex is formed due to jet–wall interactions, suggesting that locally enhanced mixing induced the first-stage ignition. The OH-PLIF images show that the second-stage, high-temperature reaction starts to occur in the same initial head vortex region, which is largely different to the flame base found in the free jet region in heavy-duty, large-bore engines. Since the reaction occurs in the wall–jet region, the swirl flow impacts the high-temperature reaction significantly, as evidenced by more intense OH signals in the down-swirl jet. This is due to the influence of the swirl flow on the mixing process and the strain rate of the mixture, leading to earlier, faster and stronger high-temperature reaction on the down-swirl side. Upon the end of high temperature reaction, the heat release rate declines and the OH-PLIF signals slowly diminish.

Minh K. Le; Sanghoon Kook; Evatt R. Hawkes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Laser Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the cosmos, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. Concurrently the laser technology has undergone dramatic revolutions, providing exciting opportunity for science applications. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. We believe that this remains true in cosmology. Current frontier phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events; (2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers can calibrate astrophysical observations, investigate underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe fundamental physics in extreme limits. In this article we give an overview of the exciting prospect of laser cosmology. In particular, we showcase its unique capability of investigating frontier cosmology issues such as cosmic accelerator and quantum gravity.

Pisin Chen

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Quantitative x-ray imager (abstract)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on development of a quantitative x-ray imager (QXI) for the national Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Included in this development is a study of photocathode response as a function of photon energy, 2--17.5 keV, which is related to diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The QXI is defined as being a quantative imager due to the repeated characterization. This instrument is systematically checked out, electronically as well as its photocathode x-ray response, both on a direct current and pulsed x-ray sources, before and after its use on a shot campaign. The QXI is a gated x-ray imager1 used for a variety of experiments conducted in the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Radiation Physics Program. The camera was assembled in Los Alamos and has been under development since 1997 and has now become the workhorse framing camera by the program. The electronics were built by Grant Applied Physics of San Fransisco, CA.2 The QXI has been used at the LANL Trident, LLNL Nova, and University of Rochester Laboratory OMEGA laser facilities. The camera consists of a grated microchannel plate (MCP), a phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate coupled to film for data readout, along with high speed electronic pulsers to drive the x-ray detector. The QXI has both a two-strip and a four-strip detection head and has the ability to individually bias the gain of each of the strips. The timing of the QXI was done at the Trident short pulse laboratory, using 211 nm light. Single strip jitter was looked at as well and determined to be <25 ps. Flatfielding of the photocathode across the MCP was done with the Trident main laser with 150 J on a gold disk with a 1 ns. Spatial resolution was determined to be <5 {mu}m by using the same laser conditions as before and a backlit 1000 lp/in. grid. The QXI has been used on cylindrical implosion work at the Nova Laser Facility, and on direct-drive cylinder mix and indirect-drive high convergence implosion experiments at OMEGA. Its two-strip module has provided the capability to look at point backlighters, as part of technique development for experiments on the NIF. Its next use will be in March 2000 with its off axis viewer nose at Omega, providing a perpendicular view of Rayleigh--Taylor spike dissipation.

Evans, Scott C.; Archuleta, Tom N.; Oertel, John A.; Walsh, Peter J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-resolution spectroscopic probes of collisions and half-collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in this program explores the dynamics of gas phase collisions and photodissociation by high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Simultaneous state and velocity detection frequently permits a determination of scalar or vector correlations among products. The correlated product distributions are always more informative, and often easier to interpret than the uncorrelated product state distributions. The authors have recently built an apparatus to record transient absorption spectra with 50 nS time resolution and 20 MHz frequency resolution using a single frequency Ti:sapphire laser. The photodissociation of NCCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SCN at 193 nm is discussed.

Hall, G.E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Spectroscopic investigations of hard x-ray emission from 120 ps laser-produced plasmas at intensities near 10{sup 17} W cm{sup {minus}2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectroscopic investigations of the x-ray emission of plasmas heated by 120 ps, frequency doubled pulses from the JANUS Nd: glass laser are presented. High Z K-shell spectra emitted from slab targets heated to near 10{sup 17} W cm{sup {minus}2} intensity are investigated. High resolution ({gamma}/{Delta}{gamma}>5000) x-ray spectra of multicharged ions of H-like Ti, Co, Ni, Cu, and also H-like Sc in the spectral range 1.5--3.0 {angstrom} are obtained in single laser shots using a spherically bent Mica crystal spectrograph with a 186 mm radius of curvature. The spectra- have one dimensional spatial resolution of about 25{mu}m and indicate that the size of the emission zone of the resonance, transitions is <25{mu}m. Simultaneous x-ray images of the plasma from a charge-coupled device pinhole camera confirmed that the plasma x-ray emission is from a similar sized source. Survey spectra {gamma}/{Delta}{gamma}=500--1000) taken with a flat LiF (200) crystal spectrometer with a charge-coupled device detector complement the high resolution data. Two dimensional LASNEX modeling of the laser target conditions indicate that the high K-shell charge states are produced in the hot dense region of the plasma with electron temperature >2 keV and density{approximately}10{sup 22} cm{sup {minus}3}. These experiments demonstrate that with modest laser energy, plasmas heated by high-intensity 120 ps lasers provide a very bright source of hard {approximately}8 keV x-ray emission.

Dunn, J.; Young, B.K.F.; Osterheld, A.L.; Foord, M.E.; Walling, R.S.; Stewart, R.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Faenov, A.Y. [VINIFTRI, Mendeleevo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Laser spectroscopy and dynamics of transient species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to study the vibrational and electronic spectra and excited state dynamics of a number of transient sulfur and oxygen species. A variety of supersonic jet techniques, as well as high resolution FT-IR and intracavity dye laser spectroscopy, have been applied to these studies.

Clouthier, D.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Multigigahertz beam diagnostics for laser fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system to make ultra wideband measurements of fast laser pulses and their induced target interactions at a distance of approximately 38 m from the target location is discussed. The system has demonstrated an overall bandwidth of 3 GHz with projected unfolding to 4 GHz. This system allows high resolution temporal history diagnostics in a remote location providing high EMI and radiation immunity.

Smith, R.C.; Hodson, E.K.; Carlson, R.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Applications of infrared laser spectroscopy to laser chemistry and laser development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact on infrared molecular spectroscopy of high-resolution tunable laser sources and laser-controlled Fourier-transform spectrometers is discussed, with special reference to rovibrational spectra of spherical-top molecules such as CH/sub 4/, OsO/sub 4/, SiF/sub 4/, SF/sub 6/, and UF/sub 6/. The role of tunable laser spectroscopy in analyzing the CF/sub 4/ laser, resulting in the precise prediction of lasing frequencies between 605 and 655 cm/sup /minus/1/, is described. Studies of overtone and combination bands of SF/sub 6/ enable the vibrational anharmonicity to be determined, resulting in a more detailed description of the pump transitions involved in laser photochemistry, and of higher vibrational levels and pathways to excitation and dissociation. This permits more accurate calculations of vibrational state densities for spherical-top molecules. Implications for the photochemistry of species, such as SiF/sub 4/, SF/sub 6/, UF/sub 6/, and Ni(Co)/sub 4/, are discussed. 48 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

McDowell, R.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

355

Possibilities for Nuclear Photo-Science with Intense Lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of intense laser light with relativistic electrons can produce unique sources of high-energy x rays and gamma rays via Thomson scattering. ''Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray'' (T-REX) sources with peak photon brightness (photons per unit time per unit bandwidth per unit solid angle per unit area) that exceed that available from world's largest synchrotrons by more than 15 orders of magnitude are possible from optimally designed systems. Such sources offer the potential for development of ''nuclear photo-science'' applications in which the primary photon-atom interaction is with the nucleons and not the valence electrons. Applications include isotope-specific detection and imaging of materials, inverse density radiography, transmutation of nuclear waste and fundamental studies of nuclear structure. Because Thomson scattering cross sections are small, < 1 barn, the output from a T-REX source is optimized when the laser spot size and the electron spot size are minimized and when the electron and laser pulse durations are similar and short compared to the transit time through the focal region. The principle limitation to increased x-ray or gamma-ray brightness is ability to focus the electron beam. The effects of space charge on electron beam focus decrease approximately linearly with electron beam energy. For this reason, T-REX brightness increases rapidly as a function of the electron beam energy. As illustrated in Figure 1, above 100 keV these sources are unique in their ability to produce bright, narrow-beam, tunable, narrow-band gamma rays. New, intense, short-pulse, laser technologies for advanced T-REX sources are currently being developed at LLNL. The construction of a {approx}1 MeV-class machine with this technology is underway and will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in variety of materials. Nuclear resonance fluorescent spectra are unique signatures of each isotope and provide an ideal mechanism for identification of nuclear materials. With TREX it is possible to use NRF to provide high spatial resolution (micron scale) images of the isotopic distribution of all materials in a given object. Because of the high energy of the photons, imaging through dense and/or thick objects is possible. This technology will have applicability in many arenas including the survey of cargo for the presence of clandestine nuclear materials. It is also possible to address the more general radiographic challenge of imaging low-density objects that are shielded or placed behind high density objects. In this case, it is the NRF cross section and not the electron density of the material that provides contrast. Extensions of T-REX technology will be dependent upon the evolution of short pulse laser technology to high average powers. Concepts for sources that would produce 10's of kWs of gamma-rays by utilizing MW-class average-power, diode-pumped, short pulse lasers and energy recovery LINAC technology have been developed.

Barty, C J; Hartemann, F V; McNabb, D P; Messerly, M; Siders, C; Anderson, S; Barnes, P; Betts, S; Gibson, D; Hagmann, C; Hernandez, J; Johnson, M; Jovanovic, I; Norman, R; Pruet, J; Rosenswieg, J; Shverdin, M; Tremaine, A

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.

Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Izumi, N; King, J A; Kuba, J; Norreys, P; Mackinnon, A J; Murphy, C D; Snavely, R; Stepehens, R; Stoeckel, C; Theobald, W; Zhang, B

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

High-Throughput in vivo Genetic and Drug Screening Using Femtosecond Laser Microsurgery and Microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed microfluidic devices, imaging algorithms and femtosecond laser microsurgery technologies to manipulate large numbers of small-animals on a single chip for sub-cellular...

Rohde, Christopher B; Zeng, Fei; Gilleland, Coddy; Gonzalez-Rubio, Ricardo; Angel, Matthew; Yanik, Mehmet F

358

Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After imaging the plasma to a primary focus shortly afterfocus was 1 mm above the nozzle. The laser pulse excited a plasma

Plateau, Guillaume

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

High Resolution Timing with Low Resolution Clocks A Microsecond Resolution Timer for Sun Workstations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Resolution Timing with Low Resolution Clocks and A Microsecond Resolution Timer for Sun for Sun 3 and Sun 4 workstations1. One can measure average service times without a high resolution clock?" 1. Introduction - Who Needs a Microsecond Clock Beginning with its Sun 3 workstations, Sun

Melvin, Stephen

360

DSM Generation and Interior Orientation Determination of IKONOS Images Using a Testfield in Switzerland*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DSM Generation and Interior Orientation Determination of IKONOS Images Using a Testfield-resolution satellite images, IKONOS, image matching, DSM generation, in-flight calibration, interior orientation- timal imaging conditions (snow, long shadows). A sophisticated matching algorithm for DSM generation

Giger, Christine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High speed imaging television system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

Wilkinson, William O. (Silver Spring, MD); Rabenhorst, David W. (Silver Spring, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Particle detector spatial resolution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Free resolutions of algebras.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given an algebra A, presented by generators and relations, i.e. as a quotient of a tensor algebra by an ideal, we construct a free algebra resolution of A, i.e. a differential graded algebra which is quasi-isomorphic to A and which is itself a tensor algebra. The construction rests combinatorially on the set of bracketings that arise naturally in the description of a free contractible differential graded algebra with given generators.

Joe Chuang; Alastair King

364

Biomedical Instrumentation and Imaging at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

for cancer, including breast (scintimammography, positron emission mammography), brain and heart imaging and 2) high resolution, high sensitivity gamma imaging of small...

365

High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

366

Nonlinear optical protection against frequency agile lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An eye-protection or equipment-filter device for protection from laser energy is disclosed. The device may be in the form of a telescope, binoculars, goggles, constructed as part of equipment such as image intensifiers or range designators. Optical elements focus the waist of the beam within a nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal or nonlinear optical element or fiber. The nonlinear elements produce a harmonic outside the visible spectrum in the case of crystals, or absorb the laser energy in the case of nonlinear fibers. Embodiments include protectors for the human eye as well as filters for sensitive machinery such as TV cameras, FLIR systems or other imaging equipment.

McDowell, V.P.

1988-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

Laser illuminated flat panel display  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

Veligdan, J.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

External cavity quantum cascade laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we review the progress of the development of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) operated in an external cavity configuration. We concentrate on QCLs based on the bound-to-continuum design, since this design is especially suitable for broadband applications. Since they were first demonstrated, these laser-based tunable sources have improved in performance in terms of output power, duty cycle, operation temperature and tuneability. Nowadays they are an interesting alternative to FTIRs for some applications. They operate at room temperature, feature a high spectral resolution while being small in size. They were successfully used in different absorption spectroscopy techniques. Due to their vast potential for applications in industry, medicine, security and research, these sources enjoy increasing interest within the research community as well as in industry.

Andreas Hugi; Richard Maulini; Jérôme Faist

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Jupiter Laser Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jupiter Laser Facility The commissioning of the Titan Petawatt-Class laser to LLNL's Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) has provided a unique platform for the use of petawatt (PW)-class...

371

Hypersonic gasdynamic laser system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a visible, or near to mid infra-red, hypersonic gas dynamic laser system. It comprises: a hypersonic vehicle for carrying the hypersonic gas dynamic laser system, and also providing high energy ram air for thermodynamic excitation and supply of the laser gas; a laser cavity defined within the hypersonic vehicle and having a laser cavity inlet for the laser cavity formed by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle, such that ram air directed through the laser cavity opening supports gas dynamic lasing operations at wavelengths less than 10.6{mu} meters in the laser cavity; and an optical train for collecting the laser radiation from the laser cavity and directing it as a substantially collimated laser beam to an output aperture defined by an opening in the hypersonic vehicle to allow the laser beam to be directed against a target.

Foreman, K.M.; Maciulaitis, A.

1990-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

372

Terahertz quantum cascade lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Michael Pepper Terahertz quantum cascade lasers Jerome Faist 1 Lassaad Ajili...developments in terahertz quantum cascade lasers are reviewed. Structures...magnetic confinement| Terahertz quantum cascade lasers. | Recent developments in...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

Time-Resolved Interferometry of Ruby Laser Emission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 1. The front surface of the laser crystal was 44 cm from the fore slit Slf In the absence of the etalon E the rotating mirror camera swept an enlarged image ...

T. P. HUGHES

1962-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

375

Laser Desorption Analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Desorption Analysis Laser Desorption Analysis EMSL offers a suite of instrumentation dedicated to understanding photoreactivity in the condensed phase, on surfaces, and at...

376

Laser Desorption Analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutral particle detection using a second multiphoton ionization or REMPI laser system; and UHV surface diagnostic equipment (AES, LEED, XPS). User Portal Name: Laser...

377

Laser Safety Management Policy Statement ............................................................................................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Safety Management Policy Statement...........................................................2 Laser Users.............................................................................................................2 Unit Laser Safety Officer (ULSO

Davidson, Fordyce A.

378

Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Imaging the evolution of an ultracold strontium Rydberg gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clouds of ultracold strontium 5s48s 1S0 or 5s47d 1D2 Rydberg atoms are created by two photon excitation of laser cooled 5s2 1S0 atoms. The spontaneous evolution of the cloud of low orbital angular momentum (low-l) Rydberg states towards an ultracold neutral plasma is observed by imaging resonant light scattered from core ions, a technique that provides both spatial and temporal resolution. Evolution is observed to be faster for the S-states, which display isotropic attractive interactions, than for the D-states, which exhibit anisotropic, principally repulsive interactions. Immersion of the atoms in a dilute ultracold neutral plasma speeds up the evolution and allows the number of Rydberg atoms initially created to be determined.

McQuillen, P; Strickler, T; Dunning, F B; Killian, T C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Laser Stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book chapter covers the basics of the field of stabilizing lasers to optical frequency references such as optical cavities and molecular transitions via the application of servo control systems. These discussions are given with reference to the real-life frequency metrology experienced in Hall-Labs (now Ye-Labs), JILA, University of Colorado. The subjects covered include: the basics of control system stability, a discussion of both the theoretical and experimental limitations, an outline of optical cavity susceptibility to environmental noise, and a brief introduction to the use and limitations of molecular transitions as frequency references.

Hall, John L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Ye, Jun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Omega Laser Facility - Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE...

382

OMEGA Laser - Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE Tours LLE...

383

OMEGA Laser Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drivers - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the Director Map to LLE LLE...

384

DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

Jacques, S.L. (Oregon Medical Laser Center, Portland, OR (United States))

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Phase Retrieval Using Estimation Methods For Intensity Correlation Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The angular resolution of an imaging system is sharply bounded by the diffraction limit, a fundamental property of electromagnetic radiation propagation. In order to increase resolution and see finer details of remote objects, the sizes...

Young, Brian T.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

386

High resolution, high speed ultrahigh vacuum microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The history and future of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is discussed as it refers to the eventual development of instruments and techniques applicable to the real time in situ investigation of surface processes with high resolution. To reach this objective, it was necessary to transform conventional high resolution instruments so that an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment at the sample site was created, that access to the sample by various in situ sample modification procedures was provided, and that in situ sample exchanges with other integrated surface analytical systems became possible. Furthermore, high resolution image acquisition systems had to be developed to take advantage of the high speed imaging capabilities of projection imaging microscopes. These changes to conventional electron microscopy and its uses were slowly realized in a few international laboratories over a period of almost 40 years by a relatively small number of researchers crucially interested in advancing the state of the art of electron microscopy and its applications to diverse areas of interest; often concentrating on the nucleation, growth, and properties of thin films on well defined material surfaces. A part of this review is dedicated to the recognition of the major contributions to surface and thin film science by these pioneers. Finally, some of the important current developments in aberration corrected electron optics and eventual adaptations to in situ UHV microscopy are discussed. As a result of all the path breaking developments that have led to today's highly sophisticated UHV-TEM systems, integrated fundamental studies are now possible that combine many traditional surface science approaches. Combined investigations to date have involved in situ and ex situ surface microscopies such as scanning tunneling microscopy/atomic force microscopy, scanning Auger microscopy, and photoemission electron microscopy, and area-integrating techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, high-resolution electron energy-loss and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, and others. Material systems ranging from atomic layers of metals and semiconductors to biology related depositions are being investigated. In the case of biological materials, however, strict limitations to high-resolution applications are imposed by electron radiation damage considerations.

Poppa, Helmut [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities...

388

Signal and imaging sciences workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented in the areas of: Medical Technologies; Non-Destructive Evaluation; Applications of Signal/Image Processing; Laser Guide Star and Adaptive Optics; Computational Electromagnetic, Acoustics and Optics; Micro-Impulse Radar Processing; Optical Applications; TANGO Space Shuttle.

Candy, J.V.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The laser satellites communications and laser noises  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gain of advanced optical communication systems is reduced by the noise of optical source. Coherent optical communication systems are in particular very sensitive to the noise transmitter and local laser. Optical space communications is on the verge ... Keywords: laser, laser communication, noise limits, optical communication, range loss, satellite communications, satellite systems, signal transfer loss, space channel

Marketa Mazalkova

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Neutrino Telescope Array Letter of Intent: A Large Array of High Resolution Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov and Fluorescence Detectors for Survey of Air Showers from Cosmic Tau Neutrinos in the PeV-EeV Energy Range  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter of Intent (LoI) describes the outline and plan for the Neutrino Telescope Array (NTA) project. High-energy neutrinos provide unique and indisputable evidence for hadronic acceleration, as well as a most accurate probe into the hidden sector of traditional astronomy or physics, such as dark matter. However, their extremely low flux and interaction cross section make their detection extraordinarily difficult. Recently, IceCube has reported astronomical neutrino candidates in excess of expectation from atmospheric secondaries, but is limited by the water Cherenkov detection method. A next generation high-energy neutrino telescope should be capable of establishing indisputable evidence for cosmic high-energy neutrinos. It should not only have orders-of-magnitude larger sensitivity, but also enough pointing accuracy to probe known or unknown astronomical objects, without suffering from atmospheric secondaries. The proposed installation is a large array of compound eye stations of imaging atmospheric Ch...

Sasaki, Makoto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Image texture analysis of elastograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated elastograms to obtain effective texture features. Four image analysis techniques, co-occurrence statistics, wavelet decomposition, fractal analysis and granulomeay are used to extract a number of features from each image. The inclusions...-RESOLUTION FRACTAL ANALYSIS . . . . . . E. GRANULOMETRIC FEATURES . . F. DATA NORMALIZATION . G. SEPARABILITY MEASURE 13 13 . . . . . 14 . . . . . 20 . . . . . 29 33 36 36 IV TEXTURE ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED ELASTOGRAMS. . . . . . . . . . . 38 A. SIMULATION...

Hussain, Fasahat

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Y High-Resolution  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Y Y High-Resolution . __ DO NOT M I C PET COVER for medical science studies Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California September 1989 DlSTRlBUTlGN OF THIS DOCUMENT IS U#LIIY/ITEE Acknowledgments This booklet was prepared under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health Effects Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division. We thank Sarah Cahn and Douglas Vaughan for coordination of this booklet. esolution PET for Medical Science Studies Thomas F. Budinger Stephen E. Derenzo Ronald H. Huesman William J. Jagust Peter E. Valk CONTENTS A PET Primer Positron Emission Tomography: Evolution of a Technology 7 PET Theory: Emission, Detection, and Reconstruction

393

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight-path laser absorption measurements [14]­[16], in-situ visible and near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectral

Lawrence, Rick L.

394

Fluorescent microthermographic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

Barton, D.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ablation laser spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ablation laser mass spectrometer molecular beam REMPI laser NREL has designed and developed a combined laser ablation/ pulsed sample introduction/mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis and/or laser ablation with resonance- enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) time-of-flight mass

396

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Short wavelength laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

Hagelstein, P.L.

1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Identification marking by means of laser peening  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Contour forming of metals by laser peening  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Glazing of Railroad Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails Project description: Laser glazing of rails. Category: Project with industrial partner (American Association of Railroads) Bookmark and Share

402

Laser Welding of Metals [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding of Metals Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Project description: High-speed laser welding of metals. Category: Project with industrial partner (Delphi Energy and Engine Management Systems) Bookmark and Share

403

Isotropic 3D fast spin-echo imaging versus standard 2D imaging at 3.0 T of the knee—image quality and diagnostic performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SB (2007) High-resolution 3D cartilage imaging with IDEALMa Thomas M. Link Isotropic 3D fast spin-echo imaging versusintermediate-weighted (IM-w) 3D fast spin-echo (FSE) se-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Imaging the Coso geothermal area crustal structure with an array...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

resolution images of the crust and mantle than have been previously obtainable. The Earth is appearing to be more heterogeneous than was thought when only rougher scale...

405

PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection PALM - Laser Capture Microdissection This Laser Capture Microdissection system is equipped with 100 x objective lens for enriching distinct...

406

Learn More about Fusion & Lasers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Lasers How Lasers Work Learn how lasers were developed and how they work. Outreach NIF & Photon Science researchers take learning opportunities on the road. Glossary Don't...

407

Definition: Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Hyperspectral Imaging Hyperspectral sensors collect data across a wide range of the spectrum (VNIR-LWIR, plus TIR) at small spectral resolution (5-15 nm) and high spatial resolution (1-5 m). This allows detailed spectral signatures to be identified for different imaged materials - for example hyperspectral imaging can be used to identify specific clay minerals; multispectral imaging can identify only the presence of clay minerals in general. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Hyperspectral imaging, like other spectral imaging, collects and processes information from across the electromagnetic spectrum. Much as the human eye sees visible light in three bands (red, green, and blue), spectral imaging divides the spectrum into many more bands. This technique

408

Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10--20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode. 12 figs.

McLean, W. II; Balooch, M.; Siekhaus, W.J.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transportation Issues and Resolutions Compilation of Laboratory...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Issues and Resolutions Compilation of Laboratory Transportation Work Package Reports Transportation Issues and Resolutions Compilation of Laboratory Transportation...

411

BNL | CO2 Laser  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Laser CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on fast optical switching from the output of a conventional CO2 laser oscillator, and a chain of high-pressure laser amplifiers. It starts with a wavelength converter wherein a near-IR picosecond solid-state laser with l»1 μm produces a mid-IR 10-μm pulse. This process employs two methods; semiconductor optical switching, and the Kerr effect. First, we combine the outputs from a multi-nanosecond CO2 laser oscillator with a picosecond Nd:YAG laser on a germanium Brewster-plate to produce an ~200 ps, 10μm pulse by semiconductor optical switching. Co-propagating this pulse with a Nd:YAG's 2nd harmonic in a

412

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, Prof. Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moore, Tom [OmniProbe, Inc.; Magel, Greg [OmniProbe, Inc.; Hartfield, Cheryl [OmniProbe, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Strain compensation in boron-indium coimplanted laser thermal processed silicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strain compensation in boron-indium coimplanted laser thermal processed silicon Mark H. Clarka Strain in B-implanted laser thermal processed LTP silicon is reduced by coimplantation of In. Strain in the codoped layer is calculated using lattice constants measured by high-resolution x-ray diffraction

Florida, University of

415

Ames Lab 101: Real-Time 3D Imaging  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory scientist Song Zhang explains his real-time 3-D imaging technology. The technique can be used to create high-resolution, real-time, precise, 3-D images for use in healthcare, security, and entertainment applications.

Zhang, Song

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

416

Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high- ... resolution imaging techni...

André Gahleitner; G. Watzek; H. Imhof

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Improve image resolution for microseismicimaging and time-lapse active seismic imaging; Enhance the prediction of fluid flow and temperature distributions and stress changes by coupling fracture flow simulations with reservoir flow simulations; and integrating imaging into modeling.

418

BNL | CFN Laser System Qualifications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser System Qualification There are multiple laser systems at the CFN. Users who will be working with the following class 3B or 4 laser systems are required to complete the Laser...

419

Enhanced High Resolution RBS System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in full spectrum resolution with the second NEC high resolution RBS system are summarized. Results for 50 A ring TiN/HfO films on Si yielding energy resolution on the order of 1 keV are also presented. Detector enhancements include improved pulse processing electronics, upgraded shielding for the MCP/RAE detector, and reduced noise generated from pumping. Energy resolution measurements on spectra front edge coupled with calculations using 0.4mStr solid angle show that beam energy spread at 400 KeV from the Pelletron registered accelerator is less than 100 eV. To improve user throughput, magnet control has been added to the automatic data collection. Depth profiles derived from experimental data are discussed. For the thin films profiled, depth resolutions were on the Angstrom level with the non-linear energy/channel conversions ranging from 100 to 200 eV.

Pollock, Thomas J.; Hass, James A.; Klody, George M. [National Electrostatics Corp., Middleton, Wisconsin, U. S. A. 53562-0310 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method is disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam.

Salmon, Jr., Joseph T. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam. 11 figures.

Salmon, J.T. Jr.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

422

Multi-resolution surfel maps for efficient dense 3D modeling and tracking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building consistent models of objects and scenes from moving sensors is an important prerequisite for many recognition, manipulation, and navigation tasks. Our approach integrates color and depth measurements seamlessly in a multi-resolution map representation. ... Keywords: 3D multi-resolution RGB-D image representation, Dense indoor scene mapping, Dense object modeling, On-line loop-closure detection, Real-time RGB-D image registration, Real-time pose tracking, Real-time simultaneous localization and mapping, Visual odometry

Jörg Stückler; Sven Behnke

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

BUILDING A CHEMICAL LASER WEAPON ... Under fire, Airborne Laser program director confronts challenges of revolutionary weapons system ...

WILLIAM G. SCHULZ

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cell Division Stage in C. elegans Imaged Using Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

C. elegans embryogenesis, at the cell division stage, was imaged using third harmonic generation microscopy employing ultrashort pulsed lasers at 1028nm and 1550nm. This technique...

Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Tserevelakis, G J; Santos, Susana I c o; Filippidis, G; Krmpot, A J; Vlachos, M; Tavernarakis, N; Brodschelm, A; Kaenders, W; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

425

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

A ber-optic based calibration system for the High Resolution Fly's Eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A ber-optic based calibration system for the High Resolution Fly's Eye cosmic ray observatory J, 800 Yale Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1156 Abstract This article describes the ber-optic based: Highest energy cosmic rays Fly's Eye Experiment HiRes YAG Laser Fiber-optics PMT PACS: 95.45.+i 95.85.Ls

428

Along the Laser Beampath  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has been installed in the preamplifier modules (PAMs) at the front end of the NIF laser system. The spatial shapers can obscure the laser light at programmed locations within...

429

Laser particle sorter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided. 11 figs.

Early, J.W.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Laser-assisted electrochemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of laser irradiation on electrodeposition processes has been investigated. These studies demonstrated that the addition of laser irradiation to an electroplating process can dramatically enhance plating rates and current efficiencies, as well as improve the morphology of the resultant electrodeposit. During the course of these investigations, the mechanism for the laser enhancement of electrodeposition processes was determined. Experimental evidence was obtained to show that laser irradiation of the substrate results in increased metal ion concentrations at the surface of the electrode due to a laser-induced Soret effect. The laser-induced Soret effect has important implications for laser-assisted electrochemical processing. The increase in the surface concentration of ions allows efficient electrodeposition from dilute solutions. As such, laser- assisted electrodeposition may develop into an environmentally conscious manufacturing process by reducing waste and limiting worker exposure to toxic chemicals.

Glenn, D.F.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Short wavelength laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

Hagelstein, Peter L. (Livermore, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Laser Heat Treatment [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear Engineering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Heat Treatment Project description: Optimization of laser beam heat treatment. Category: Project with industrial partner (Caterpillar and USCAR) Bookmark and Share Heat treatment optics

435

Laser-driven fusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of intense laser light to bring about thermonuclear reactions in a plasma is of considerable current interest. We present detailed analytical and computational studies which show the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. The required laser technology and the presently anticipated practical difficulties are discussed in outline.

Keith A. Brueckner and Siebe Jorna

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Laser bottom hole assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

437

High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

Eberhard, Jeffrey W. (Schenectady, NY); Cain, Dallas E. (Scotia, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Usage of turbulence for superresolved imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used the turbulent flow of hot air to improve the diffraction limits of resolution in an imaging system. A time-multiplexing approach was applied and used the turbulent flow...

Zalevsky, Zeev; Rozental, Shay; Meller, Moshe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Seismic imaging using higher order statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improvements in seismic resolution beyond typical seismic wavelength will have significant implications for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Conventional imaging algorithms can be derived as a least squared optimization problem in which...

Srinivasan, Karthik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resolution can be obtained with this higher gradient field. By making the gradient wire structures out of coplanar stripline design a high microwave gradient field can be easily obtained. 5 Microdevice for Imaging: Magnetometer One of the key... by using a rotating sample. However this is very inconvenient for micro-imaging applications because of 6 the difficulty of maintaining high spatial resolution while rotating at high speeds. An alternative is to rotate the magnetic field using micro-stripline...

Kim, Changdong

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

442

X-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Optoacoustic laser monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of tissues, cells, and other biological objects with a high spatial and time resolution, which is necessary for selective destruction of cancer and benign tumours during cryotherapy, as well as for preventing any damage to the structure and functioning of biological objects in cryobiology, is considered. The optoacoustic method, based on the measurement and analysis of acoustic waves induced by short laser pulses, is proposed for monitoring the cooling and freezing of the tissue. The effect of cooling and freezing on the amplitude and time profile of acoustic signals generated in real tissues and in a model object is studied. The experimental results indicate that the optoacoustic laser technique can be used for real-time monitoring of cooling and freezing of biological objects with a submillimeter spatial resolution and a high contrast. (laser biology and medicine)

Larin, Kirill V; Larina, I V; Motamedi, M; Esenaliev, R O [University of Texas, Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Laser sources and techniques for spectroscopy and dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program focuses on the development of novel laser and spectroscopic techniques in the IR, UV, and VUV regions for studying combustion related molecular dynamics at the microscopic level. Laser spectroscopic techniques have proven to be extremely powerful in the investigation of molecular processes which require very high sensitivity and selectivity. The authors approach is to use quantum electronic and non-linear optical techniques to extend the spectral coverage and to enhance the optical power of ultrahigh resolution laser sources so as to obtain and analyze photoionization, fluorescence, and photoelectron spectra of jet-cooled free radicals and of reaction products resulting from unimolecular and bimolecular dissociations. New spectroscopic techniques are developed with these sources for the detection of optically thin and often short-lived species. Recent activities center on regenerative amplification of high resolution solid-state lasers, development of tunable high power mid-IR lasers and short-pulse UV/VUV tunable lasers, and development of a multipurpose high-order suppressor crossed molecular beam apparatus for use with synchrotron radiation sources. This program also provides scientific and technical support within the Chemical Sciences Division to the development of LBL`s Combustion Dynamics Initiative.

Kung, A.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ultrafast Laser Facility | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Laser Facility Ultrafast Laser Facility Click for an Overview of the Ultrafast Laser Facility The PARC Ultrafast Laser Facility, under the direction of Associate Director...

446

BNL | ATF Laser Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ATF Laser Safety ATF Laser Safety To be present in a secured laser area at ATF, a person must either have the required laser training, or be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained personnel should not be instructed to enter interlocked areas or be escorted into an area and left unattended. If someone without training must enter a secured area, they must be continuously escorted, and are considered spectators, which means they may not perform any work in the area. At ATF, there are 3 classes of personnel authorized to enter secured areas: Experimental operators may secure areas, perform approved experiments with beams from facility lasers (YAG + CO2) or FEL beams, and

447

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Drop shaping by laser-pulse impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the hydrodynamic response of a falling drop hit by a laser pulse. Combining high-speed with stroboscopic imaging we report that a millimeter-sized dyed water drop hit by a milli-Joule nanosecond laser-pulse deforms and propels forward at several meters per second, until it eventually fragments. We show that the drop motion results from the recoil momentum imparted at the drop surface by water vaporization. We measure the propulsion speed and the time-deformation law of the drop, complemented by boundary integral simulations. We explain the drop propulsion and shaping in terms of the laser pulse energy and drop surface tension. These findings are crucial for the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in lithography machines.

Klein, Alexander L; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Hyperspectral imaging of plasmonic nanostructures with nanoscale resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasmons; (250.5403) Plasmonics. References and Links 1. S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals Spectrometer (AVIRIS)," Remote Sens. Environ. 65, 227-248 (1998). 9. E. D. Palik, ed. Handbook of Optical

Jonsson, Fredrik

450

ICORE: Image Co-addition with Optional Resolution Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masci * Implemented QA plot files. * Included ­wf option to control inverse variance weighting. When on. There is no warranty that the software described herein is free of bugs. This includes proper graceful program WCS and distortion keys). * Implemented auto-tiling option to support memory management for outlier

Masci, Frank

451

HRTEM imaging of atoms at sub-Ångström resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......non-periodic objects. Ultramicroscopy 64 : 211-230. 30. Thust A, Overwijk M, Coene W, and Lentzen M (1996) Numerical correction of...phase-retrieval HRTEM. Ultramicroscopy 64 : 249-260. 31. Thust A, Overwijk M, Jia C L, and Urban K (2003) Direct determination of......

Michael A. O'Keefe; Lawrence F. Allard; Douglas A. Blom

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

HRTEM Imaging of Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

64 : 211-230. 30. Thust A, Overwijk M, Coene W and LentzenLBNL-57121 31. Thust A, Overwijk M, Jia C L and Urban K (

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the enlarged numerical aperture couple with the use of a cold-field-emission gun provides a factor of 100x increase in the usable current for probing inelastic...

454

Accepted Manuscript Title: Infrared chemical imaging: spatial resolution evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-La Roche A.G., Basel, Switzerland.6 (c) Multi-Dimensional Signal Processing Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, Baskin School7 of Engineering, University of California, 1156 High Street, Mailcode is more or less equal to22 the wavelength of the light (i.e. 2.5 to 25 m). Unfortunately, the spatial

Milanfar, Peyman

455

HRTEM imaging of atoms at sub-Ångström resolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Sciences Division, of the US Department of Energy, under contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and the Assistant Secretary for EERE, Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology, HTML User Program, ORNL, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for DOE (contract......

Michael A. O'Keefe; Lawrence F. Allard; Douglas A. Blom

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Synthetic aperture imaging for three dimensional resolution of fluid flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid mechanics and instrumentation have a long history together, as experimental fluids studies play an important role in describing a more complete physical picture in a variety of problems. Presently. state-of-the-art ...

Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Ion Beam Collimation For Improved Resolution In Associated Particle Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam spot size on target for a Penning ion source has been measured under different source operating pressures as a function of the extraction channel length and beam energy. A beam halo/core structure was observed for ion extraction at low extraction voltages, and was greatly reduced at higher beam energy. Collimation through use of longer extraction channels results in reduced ion current on target; the resultant reduction in neutron yield for an API system driven by such an ion source can be compensated for by use of even higher beam energies.

Sy, Amy [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ji Qing [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

High-resolution imaging with soft x-rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concave surface of the larger mirror, where a second reflection...the surface of the spherical mirrors is the main limitation, and...achievable and will permit a Schwarzschild x-ray microscope to have...be able to test spherical mirrors to within 6 angstroms by next...

AL Robinson

1982-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

459

Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the demagnified electron source, respectively. Previousfinite size of the electron source, thus implying infinitethe finite size of the electron source using the geometrical

Erni, Rolf P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

None

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the Nano-Platform Speaker(s): Andreas Ostendorf Date: January 27, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Multiphoton laser processing is one of the rapidly advancing laser technologies, providing unique possibilities for the fabrication of two- and three-dimensional microstructures. Multiphoton material processing has very important advantages over processes based on single photon absorption: an increased spatial resolution and the possibility of photofabrication inside transparent materials. Due to nonlinear nature of multiphoton processing, applications of ultrashort laser systems allow one to overcome the diffraction limit and to produce high quality 3D microstructures with a sub-wavelength resolution. This is very powerful

462

Defining Electron Backscatter Diffraction Resolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping systems have existed for more than 10 years [1,2], and due to their versatility in characterizing multiple aspects of microstructure, they have become an important tool in microscale crystallographic studies. Their increasingly widespread use however raises questions about their accuracy in both determining crystallographic orientations, as well as ensuring that the orientation information is spatially correct. The issue of orientation accuracy (as defined by angular resolution) has been addressed previously [3-5]. While the resolution of EBSD systems is typically quoted to be on the order of 1{sup o}, it has been shown that by increasing the pattern quality via acquisition parameter adjustment, the angular resolution can be improved to sub-degree levels. Ultimately, the resolution is dependent on how it is identified. In some cases it can be identified as the orientation relative to a known absolute, in others as the misorientation between nearest neighbor points in a scan. Naturally, the resulting values can be significantly different. Therefore, a consistent and universal definition of resolution that can be applied to characterize any EBSD system is necessary, and is the focus of the current study. In this work, a Phillips (FEI) XL-40 FEGSEM coupled to a TexSEM Laboratories OIM system was used. The pattern capturing hardware consisted of both a 512 by 512 pixel SIT CCD camera and a 1300 by 1030 pixel Peltier cooled CCD camera. Automated scans of various sizes, each consisting of 2500 points, were performed on a commercial-grade single crystal silicon wafer used for angular resolution measurements. To adequately quantify angular resolution for all possible EBSD applications we define two angular values. The first is {omega}{sub center}, the mean of the misorientation angle distribution between all scan points and the scan point coincident to the calibration source (typically the scan center). The {omega}{sub center} value is used to describe the overall system resolution, as it effectively quantifies the deviation of all orientations in the scan relative to the diffraction pattern least affected by distortions. The second is {omega}{sub max}, the largest misorientation angle possible between any pair of points in the dataset, and describes the worst possible case. Fig. 1 shows the effects of scan size and captured pattern resolution (bin size) on both angular values, illustrating that smaller scan and bin sizes have the effect of increasing angular resolution. However, it can be observed that the benefits of utilizing smaller bin sizes (and consequently slower data collection) diminish with scan size. Fig. 2 shows the effect of the number of pixels used in the Hough transform (defined as the ratio of pixels used to maximum possible pixels) on the angular values. It can be seen that the best angular resolutions are achieved at a pixel ratio of 0.80, again illustrating that the use of higher resolutions is not always beneficial. As evidenced by the results, the use of {omega}{sub center} and {omega}{sub max} not only permits the characterization of the angular resolution of an EBSD system, but they allow for a more efficient utilization of the system by identifying appropriate settings depending on the desired angular resolution [6].

El-Dasher, B S; Rollett, A D

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Laser-direct-driven quasi-isentropic experiments on aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-direct-driven ramp compression experiments were performed on long temporally shaped laser pulses based on an analytical isentropic compression model. Upper pressure limits, the ablation pressure scaling law, and stress-density curves were studied. The validity of the analytical model used, the ablation pressure scaling law, and the phenomena of missing line-imaging velocity interferometer (VISAR) fringes in the experimental results are discussed.

Xue, Quanxi, E-mail: quanxixue@163.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Wang, Feng [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ye, Xisheng; Liu, Jingru [State Key Laboratory of Laser Interaction with Matter, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

Milewski, John O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernal, John E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Few-cycle optical probe-pulse for investigation of relativistic laser-plasma interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a few-cycle optical probe-pulse for the investigation of laser-plasma interactions driven by a Ti:sapphire, 30 Terawatt (TW) laser system is described. The probe is seeded by a fraction of the driving laser's energy and is spectrally broadened via self-phase modulation in a hollow core fiber filled with a rare gas, then temporally compressed to a few optical cycles via chirped mirrors. Shadowgrams of the laser-driven plasma wave created in relativistic electron acceleration experiments are presented with few-fs temporal resolution, which is shown to be independent of post-interaction spectral filtering of the probe-beam.

Schwab, M. B.; Sävert, A.; Polz, J.; Schnell, M.; Rinck, T.; Möller, M.; Hansinger, P. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Jäckel, O.; Paulus, G. G.; Kaluza, M. C. [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Insitut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Veisz, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Straße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

467

Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling Laser Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame VayBoost.gif An image showing the "boosted frame," in which the observer moves at near light speed. The laser pulse is represented in blue and red; the wakefields are colored pale blue and yellow. In this frame, the plasma (yellow box) has contracted and the wavefronts are fewer and farther apart, resulting in far fewer calculations and faster results. Why it Matters: Laser driven plasma waves can produce accelerating gradients orders of magnitude greater than standard accelerating structures. High quality electron beams of energy up to 1 GeV have been produced in just a few centimeters and 10-GeV stages being planned as

468

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

469

Study of Fuzzy based Classifier Parameter across Spatial Resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification and interpretation of satellite images are complex processes and that may be affected by various factors. Most fuzzy based soft classification techniques have been used to provide a more appropriate and accurate area estimation when fine, medium and coarse spatial resolution data are being used. Spatial resolution determines the spatial details on the Earth surface and greatly reduces the problem of mixed pixel. This paper examines the effect of weighting exponent „m ? parameter of fuzzy c-means (FCM) and possibilistic c-mean (PCM) classifiers with respect to entropy, an uncertainty indicator for different extracted classes. This paper measures uncertainty variations across spatial resolution for different class extraction. Uncertainty can be defined as skepticism wherein entropy is an absolute indicator of an

Rakesh Dwivedi; S. K. Ghosh

470

High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Alternative Dispute Resolution | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution The Office of Conflict Prevention and Resolution (formerly the Office of Dispute Resolution) provides assistance throughout the Department and to its contractors on using various types of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to prevent and resolve disputes without litigation. The Director of the office offers training, provides system design support, and acts as a consultant for all types of dispute resolution, ranging from preventive techniques, such as partnering, differing professional opinion processes and ombuds, to mediation in many types of disputes, such as intellectual property, contracts, environmental, grants, equal employment opportunity (Title VII), and whistleblower complaints.

473

THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF NANOSCALE MATERIALS BY UISNG COHERENT X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirmed the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 Ã? resolution from a 2D spherical diffraction pattern alone. As X-ray free electron lasers are under rapid development worldwide, ankylography may open up a new horizon to obtain the 3D structure of a non-crystalline specimen from a single pulse and allow time-resolved 3D structure determination of disordered materials.

Jianwei Miao

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in laboratories or research is responsible for reporting laser acquisition to the Office of Laboratory Safety, selecting a departmental deputy laser safety officer, mandating training for its laser operators

Vertes, Akos

475

OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at UR-LLE is close to that required for ignition to occur. #12;The OMEGA Extended Performance (EP) laserOMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R. L. McCrory University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser­18 February 2008 #12;OMEGA Extended Performance Laser System R.L. McCrory Laboratory for Laser Energetics

476

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Laser diagnostics on a hypersonic combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NASA-Langley has implemented a laser-based multipoint/multiparameter diagnostics system at its hypersonic direct-connect combustor, in order to measure both temperature and majority species densities in two dimensions, using spatially-scanned CARS; in addition, line-imaged measurements of radical densities are simultaneously generated by LIF at any of several planes downstream of the fuel injector. Initial experimental trials have demonstrated successful detection of one-dimensional images of OH density, as well as CARS N2-temperature measurements, in the turbulent reaction zone of the hypersonic combustor.

Taylor, D.J.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Tiee, J.J.; Northam, G.B.; Antcliff, R.R.; Cutler, A.D.; Jarrett, O.; Smith, M.W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (USA) NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Laser Safety Inspection Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A responsibility of the Laser Safety Officer (LSO) is to perform laser safety audits. The American National Standard Z136.1 Safe use of Lasers references this requirement in several sections: (1) Section 1.3.2 LSO Specific Responsibilities states under Hazard Evaluation, ''The LSO shall be responsible for hazards evaluation of laser work areas''; (2) Section 1.3.2.8, Safety Features Audits, ''The LSO shall ensure that the safety features of the laser installation facilities and laser equipment are audited periodically to assure proper operation''; and (3) Appendix D, under Survey and Inspections, it states, ''the LSO will survey by inspection, as considered necessary, all areas where laser equipment is used''. Therefore, for facilities using Class 3B and or Class 4 lasers, audits for laser safety compliance are expected to be conducted. The composition, frequency and rigueur of that inspection/audit rests in the hands of the LSO. A common practice for institutions is to develop laser audit checklists or survey forms. In many institutions, a sole Laser Safety Officer (LSO) or a number of Deputy LSO's perform these audits. For that matter, there are institutions that request users to perform a self-assessment audit. Many items on the common audit list and the associated findings are subjective because they are based on the experience and interest of the LSO or auditor in particular items on the checklist. Beam block usage is an example; to one set of eyes a particular arrangement might be completely adequate, while to another the installation may be inadequate. In order to provide more consistency, the National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (NIF-LLNL) has established criteria for a number of items found on the typical laser safety audit form. These criteria are distributed to laser users, and they serve two broad purposes: first, it gives the user an expectation of what will be reviewed by an auditor, and second, it is an opportunity to explain audit items to the laser user and thus the reasons for some of these items. Some examples are given from