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1

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization More Documents & Publications D&D Toolbox Project - Technology Demonstration of Fixatives Applied to Hot Cell Facilities via Remote Sprayer Platforms Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition.

2

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization More Documents & Publications Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition. In addition, on the right: K Cooling Tower at Savannah River Site demolition. Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Program Map DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning

3

D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tech Stage: Demonstration D&D Toolbox: Project OR-071203, OR-071303; Deployed at SRS P Reactor Area Closure Project PBS SR-0040 The robotically deployed laser surveying system was demonstrated in the Purification room of SRS P-Reactor on September 24, 2008. Page 1 of 2 Savannah River Site South Carolina Michigan D&D Toolbox Robotic Deployment of High Resolution Laser Imaging for Characterization Challenge The characterization of complex and/or hazardous facilities for the purposes of planning D&D projects can be excessively time consuming and present unacceptable hazards for personnel who enter or access the facility. Planners must know the condition of facilities which may have been abandoned in years past with little or no

4

Speckle-free laser imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many imaging applications require increasingly bright illumination sources, motivating the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with light emitting diodes (LEDs), superluminescent diodes (SLDs) and lasers. Despite their brightness, lasers and SLDs are poorly suited for full-field imaging applications because their high spatial coherence leads to coherent artifacts known as speckle that corrupt image formation. We recently demonstrated that random lasers can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence. Here, we exploit the low spatial coherence of specifically-designed random lasers to perform speckle-free full-field imaging in the setting of significant optical scattering. We quantitatively demonstrate that images generated with random laser illumination exhibit higher resolution than images generated with spatially coherent illumination. By providing intense laser illumination without the drawback of coherent artifacts, random lasers are well suited for a host of full-field imaging applicatio...

Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Coregistration of Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) topography with high-resolution Mars images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spacecraft continue to send back extraordinary amounts of data from Mars leaving scientists with the considerable task of analyzing an ever-increasing wealth of information. There are abundant uses for coregistered topography and images, but coregistering ... Keywords: CTX, HiRISE, MOC, MOLA, Mars, Topography

Kelly J. Kolb; Chris H. Okubo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Technology & Communications 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling...

7

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM). Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email 3-Dimensional Imaging At Nanometer Resolutions An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described. U.S. Patent No.: 7,675,045 (DOE S-112,966) Patent Application Filing Date: October 9, 2008

8

Apparent display resolution enhancement for moving images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited spatial resolution of current displays makes the depiction of very fine spatial details difficult. This work proposes a novel method applied to moving images that takes into account the human visual system and leads to an improved perception ... Keywords: eye tracking, image reconstruction, perception

Piotr Didyk; Elmar Eisemann; Tobias Ritschel; Karol Myszkowski; Hans-Peter Seidel

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Submillimeter-Resolution Radiography of Shielded Structures with Laser-Accelerated Electron Beams  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the use of energetic electron beams for high-resolution radiography of flaws embedded in thick solid objects. A bright, monoenergetic electron beam (with energy >100 MeV) was generated by the process of laser-wakefield acceleration through the interaction of 50-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a supersonic helium jet. The high energy, low divergence, and small source size of these beams make them ideal for high-resolution radiographic studies of cracks or voids embedded in dense materials that are placed at a large distance from the source. We report radiographic imaging of steel with submillimeter resolution.

Ramanathan, Vidya [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Banerjee, Sudeep [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Powell, Nathan [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cummingham, N. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Chandler-Smith, Nate [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Zhao, Kun [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Brown, Kevin [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Umstadter, Donald [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Clarke, Shaun [University of Michigan; Pozzi, Sara [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions Lasers, Electron Beams and New Years Resolutions March 2, 2011 - 3:43pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? The electron beam that powers Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser pumped out a record power input of 500 kilvolts using an innovative energy-recovery system that amplifies energy with far less power. A sufficiently powerful laser could make an effective defensive weapon, as well as accurate detection and tracking. The few folks still keeping their New Year's resolutions to work out might be the first to appreciate the recent record-breaking lift by the Energy Department's Jefferson Lab. Take a steel dumbbell. Hoist it up - lift with your legs! - onto a stand. Then add another ...and another

11

Range imaging laser radar  

SciTech Connect

A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

Scott, Marion W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Heuristic optimization in penumbral image for high resolution reconstructed image  

SciTech Connect

Penumbral imaging is a technique which uses the fact that spatial information can be recovered from the shadow or penumbra that an unknown source casts through a simple large circular aperture. The size of the penumbral image on the detector can be mathematically determined as its aperture size, object size, and magnification. Conventional reconstruction methods are very sensitive to noise. On the other hand, the heuristic reconstruction method is very tolerant of noise. However, the aperture size influences the accuracy and resolution of the reconstructed image. In this article, we propose the optimization of the aperture size for the neutron penumbral imaging.

Azuma, R.; Nozaki, S. [Transdisciplinary Research Organization for Subtropics and Island Studies, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Chen, Y. W. [College of Information Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Namihira, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Minimally invasive diagnostic imaging using high resolution Optical Coherence Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in medical imaging have given researchers unprecedented capabilities to visualize, characterize and understand biological systems. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a high speed, high resolution imaging technique ...

Herz, Paul Richard, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Direct super-resolution and registration using raw CFA images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-resolution has been applied mainly to grayscale images, but producing a high-resolution color image using a single CCD sensor has not been investigated in detail until recently. This work aims at producing a high-resolution color image directly ...

Tomomasa Gotoh; Masatoshi Okutomi

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for ultra-high resolution computed tomography imaging, comprising the steps of: focusing a high energy particle beam, for example x-rays or gamma-rays, onto a target object; acquiring a 2-dimensional projection data set representative of the target object; generating a corrected projection data set by applying a deconvolution algorithm, having an experimentally determined a transfer function, to the 2-dimensional data set; storing the corrected projection data set; incrementally rotating the target object through an angle of approximately 180.degree., and after each the incremental rotation, repeating the radiating, acquiring, generating and storing steps; and, after the rotating step, applying a cone-beam algorithm, for example a modified tomographic reconstruction algorithm, to the corrected projection data sets to generate a 3-dimensional image. The size of the spot focus of the beam is reduced to not greater than approximately 1 micron, and even to not greater than approximately 0.5 microns.

Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Sari-Sarraf, Hamed (Knoxville, TN); Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William (Harriman, TN); Gleason, Shaun S. (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, Jr., Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Molecular image resolution in electron microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to determine the ultimate molecular resolution attainable with a conventional electron microscope

Natsu Uyeda; Takashi Kobayashi; Eiji Suito; Yoshiyasu Harada

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

18

Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beams originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD`s are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens in positioned coaxial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shuttles and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

Vann, C.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Author University of Arizona Published Publisher Not Provided, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Citation University of Arizona. High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment [Internet]. 2007. [cited 2013/09/27]. Available from: http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/HiBlog/tag/wavelength/ Retrieved from

20

Imaging Lithium Atoms at Sub-Angstrom Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

110] orientation for LiCoO 2 without lithium atoms ( upper)and with lithium atoms (lower). Images are simulated at 0.9ÅHorn LBNL-56646 resolution of lithium ions in LiCoO 2 . Fall

O'Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley...

22

3-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for enabling precise, 3-dimensional, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) using selective, two-photon activation of fluorophores in a single z-slice of a sample in cooperation with time-gated imaging for reducing the background radiation from other image planes to levels suitable for single-molecule detection and spatial location, are described.

Werner, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Goodwin, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM); Shreve, Andrew P. (Santa Fe, NM)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Imaging a laser pulse propagation trough an image acquisition system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to generate a laser pulse and to capture it by an image acquisition system. We use a confocal resonator to generate a laser pulse; then the generate light is focused in to an optical fiber using an achromatic doublet; the light ... Keywords: Hermite Gaussian polynomial, Laplacian filter, MTF, PSF, achromatic doublet, amplitude filter, bilateral filter, fixed pattern noise, photon shot noise

Toadere Florin; Nikos E. Mastorakis

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High-resolution Urban Image Classification Using Extended Features  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution image classification poses several challenges because the typical object size is much larger than the pixel resolution. Any given pixel (spectral features at that location) by itself is not a good indicator of the object it belongs to without looking at the broader spatial footprint. Therefore most modern machine learning approaches that are based on per-pixel spectral features are not very effective in high- resolution urban image classification. One way to overcome this problem is to extract features that exploit spatial contextual information. In this study, we evaluated several features in- cluding edge density, texture, and morphology. Several machine learning schemes were tested on the features extracted from a very high-resolution remote sensing image and results were presented.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Car Detection in Low Resolution Aerial Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a system to detect passenger cars in aerial images wherecars appear as small objects. We pose this as a 3D object recognition problem to account for the variation in viewpoint and the shadow. We startedfrom psychological tests to find important features for human detection of cars. Based on these observations, we selected the boundary of the car body, the boundary of the front windshield, and the shadow as the features. Some of these features are affected by the intensity of the car and whether or not there is a shadow along it. This information is represented in the structure of the Bayesian network that we use to integrate all features. Experiments show very promising results even on some very challenging images. 1

Tao Zhao; Ram Nevatia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wolter-like high resolution x-ray imaging microscope for Rayleigh Taylor instabilities studies  

SciTech Connect

In the context of the inertial confinement fusion, experiments have been carried out on the Phebus laser facility to study the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTIs) at the ablation front. Premodulated brominated plastic targets (25 {mu}m thick) with a modulation wavelength between 12 and 50 {mu}m were accelerated with a temporally shaped soft x-ray pulse emitted from a hohlraum with a maximum radiation temperature of about 115 eV. The RTI growth was measured by face-on radiography using a microscope coupled with an x-ray streak camera, which has spatial and temporal resolutions of about 5 {mu}m and 50 ps, respectively. The acceleration was derived from side-on velocity measurements. The microscope we have developed is a Wolter-like microscope which consists of two toroiedal mirrors. We will present the experimental and theoretical potentialities of this microscope: characterization with an x-ray generator and plasma laser x-ray source (Phebus facility) for two-dimensional (2D) and 1D time-resolved imaging studies. Spatial resolution of about 4 {mu}m was achieved in the 1-5 keV range. The Wolter-like constitutes an interesting device for laser plasma diagnostics and will be very useful in the Laser Megajoules experiments conducted with more powerful lasers.

Troussel, Ph.; Meyer, B.; Reverdin, R.; Angelier, B.; Lidove, G.; Salvatore, P.; Richard, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DAM-Ile de France, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-les-Chatel (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay 91191 (France); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CESTA, BP2, 33114 Le Barp (France)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

An interactive super resolution coding approach of images and videos for enhanced user visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose an interactive super resolution coding technique to enhance user's visualization of received low resolution (LR) images. The proposed technique hides/embeds high frequencies and edges in the LR image, and constructs a high resolution ...

Gamal Fahmy

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Spatial resolution of a ?PIC-based neutron imaging detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber ({\\mu}PIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100{\\mu}m-level spatial and sub-{\\mu}s time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48 +/- 0.77 {\\mu}m (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334 +/- 13 {\\mu}m), and compares well with conventional neutron imaging detectors and with other high-rate detectors currently under development. Further, a detector simulation indicates that a spatial resolution of less than 60 {\\mu}m may be possible with optimization of the gas characteristics and {\\mu}PIC structure. We also present an example of imaging combined with neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy.

Joseph D. Parker; Masahide Harada; Kaori Hattori; Satoru Iwaki; Shigeto Kabuki; Yuji Kishimoto; Hidetoshi Kubo; Shunsuke Kurosawa; Yoshihiro Matsuoka; Kentaro Miuchi; Tetsuya Mizumoto; Hironobu Nishimura; Takayuki Oku; Tatsuya Sawano; Takenao Shinohara; Jun-ichi Suzuki; Atsushi Takada; Toru Tanimori; Kazuki Ueno

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Supernormal vision, high-resolution retinal imaging, multiphoton imaging and nanosurgery of the cornea: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wavelength-corrected, adaptive optics and their relevance for diagnostic procedures of the human retina are considered. First, it is shown that the compensation of errors of the dioptric apparatus of the eye allows sharp and high-contrast images of retinal ... Keywords: aberrometry, adaptive optics, femtosecond laser, nanoresolution, picosecond laser, superresolution, supervision, wave-front correction

Franz Fankhauser; Peter F. Niederer; Sylwia Kwasniewska; Eugen van der Zypen

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A high-resolution two-dimensional imaging velocimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity interferometers are typically used to measure velocities of surfaces at a single point or along an imaged line as a function of time. We describe an optical arrangement that enables high-resolution measurements of the two-dimensional velocity field across a shock front or shocked interface. The technique is employed to measure microscopic fluctuations in shock fronts that have passed through materials being considered as ablators for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion. With picosecond time resolution the instrument captures velocity modes with wavelengths as short as 2.5 {mu}m at a resolution of {approx}10 m/s rms on velocity fields averaging many km/s over an 800 {mu}m field of view.

Celliers, P. M.; Erskine, D. J.; Sorce, C. M.; Braun, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe  

SciTech Connect

Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.

Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

34

Implementation and optimization of a new super-resolution technique in PET imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Super-Resolution (SR) techniques are used in PET imaging to generate a high-resolution image by combining multiple low-resolution images that have been acquired from different points of view (POV). In this paper, we propose a new implementation of the ...

Guoping Chang; Tinsu Pan; John W. Clark; Osama R. Mawlawi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Subcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single-mode telecommunications fiber to the rest of the optical ranging system. This type of detector of of the reflected laser sig- nal, which is focused into a multimode optical fiber. An in-line bandpass interferenceSubcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging system

Buller, Gerald S.

36

Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

Zuo, Jian-min [University of Illinois

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution.

Thomas, Stanley W. (Livermore, CA)

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution. 2 figs.

Thomas, S.W.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

Self-imaging-based laser collimation testing technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser collimation is required in many experiments based on lasers. Some laser experiments demand a high quality of collimation, e.g., the optical coherent processor, image transformer, and Fourier transform generator. A device is required to test the collimation of lasers in such experiments. We have suggested a modification in existing collimation testing techniques by which sensitivity can be improved. Theoretical analysis and experimental results demonstrate twice the improvement in sensitivity when used with previous techniques.

Mudassar, Asloob A.; Butt, Saira

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laser Microdissection and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Coupled for Multimodal Imaging  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the coupling of ambient laser ablation surface sampling, accomplished using a laser capture microdissection system, with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry for high spatial resolution multimodal imaging. A commercial laser capture microdissection system was placed in close proximity to a modified ion source of a mass spectrometer designed to allow for sampling of laser ablated material via a transfer tube directly into the ionization region. Rhodamine 6G dye of red sharpie ink in a laser etched pattern as well as cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section were identified and imaged from full scan mass spectra. A minimal spot diameter of 8 m was achieved using the 10X microscope cutting objective with a lateral oversampling pixel resolution of about 3.7 m. Distinguishing between features approximately 13 m apart in a cerebellum mouse brain thin tissue section was demonstrated in a multimodal fashion including co-registered optical and mass spectral chemical images.

Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Super-resolution in medical imaging: an illustrative approach through ultrasound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirements for better resolution in all medical imaging modalities currently represent a very important and open challenge. Accurate measurement and visualization of structure in living tissues is intrinsically limited by the imaging system features. ... Keywords: AR model, medical imaging, multidimensional, super-resolution, ultrasound

D. Kouamé; M. Ploquin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Pulse-dilation enhanced gated optical imager with 5 ps resolution (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5 ps gated framing camera was demonstrated using the pulse-dilation of a drifting electron signal. The pulse-dilation is achieved by accelerating a photoelectron derived information pulse with a time varying potential [R. D. Prosser, J. Phys. E 9, 57 (1976)]. The temporal dependence of the accelerating potential causes a birth time dependent axial velocity dispersion that spreads the pulse as it transits a drift region. The expanded pulse is then imaged with a conventional gated microchannel plate based framing camera and the effective gating time of the combined instrument is reduced over that of the framing camera alone. In the drift region, electron image defocusing in the transverse or image plane is prevented with a large axial magnetic field. Details of the unique issues associated with rf excited photocathodes were investigated numerically and a prototype instrument based on this principle was recently constructed. Temporal resolution of the instrument was measured with a frequency tripled femtosecond laser operating at 266 nm. The system demonstrated 20x temporal magnification and the results are presented here. X-ray image formation strategies and photometric calculations for inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments are also examined.

Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom); Bell, P. M.; Koch, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; McCarville, T.; Pivovaroff, M.; Soufli, R.; Bionta, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Optimization in multi-scale segmentation of high-resolution satellite images for artificial feature recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-resolution segmentation, as one of the most popular approaches in object-oriented image segmentation, has been greatly enabled by the advent of the commercial software, eCognition. However, the application of multi-resolution segmentation still ...

J. Tian; D. -M. Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Abstract N/A Author V. J. S. Grauch Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2002 Report Number 02-384 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada Citation V. J. S. Grauch. 2002. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey to Image Shallow Faults, Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada. (!) : U.S. Geological Survey. Report No.: 02-384. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=High-Resolution_Aeromagnetic_Survey_to_Image_Shallow_Faults,_Dixie_Valley_Geothermal_Field,_Nevada&oldid=682601"

46

Multi-resolution system for artifact removal and edge enhancement in computerized tomography images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of image enhancement means adopting some technical method, which includes algorithm, to stand out the interested characteristics of the image and to restrain some useless characteristics of the image. The image, which has been improved, can satisfy ... Keywords: Edge enhancement, Industrial CT images, Multi-resolution techniques

S. Arivazhagan; S. Deivalakshmi; K. Kannan; B. N. Gajbhiye; C. Muralidhar; Sijo N. Lukose; M. P. Subramanian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies  

SciTech Connect

Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Dynamic Experimentation Div.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE HUMAN CONNECTOME: 4-TESLA HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION DIFFUSION IMAGING (HARDI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE HUMAN CONNECTOME: 4-TESLA HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION DIFFUSION IMAGING (HARDI diffusion imaging at 4 Tesla, we scanned 234 young adult twins and siblings (mean age: 23.4 ± 2.0 SD years

Thompson, Paul

50

An Improved High-Resolution Processing Method for a Frequency Domain Interferometric Imaging (FII) Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frequency hopping [also recently called range imaging (RIM) or frequency domain interferometric imaging (FII)] is a pulse compression technique used to improve the range resolution ?r of Doppler radars limited by their minimum transmitted pulse ...

Lydi Sma; Hubert Luce; Michel Crochet; Shoichiro Fukao

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Dedicated mobile high resolution prostate PET imager with an insertable transrectal probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dedicated mobile PET imaging system to image the prostate and surrounding organs. The imaging system includes an outside high resolution PET imager placed close to the patient's torso and an insertable and compact transrectal probe that is placed in close proximity to the prostate and operates in conjunction with the outside imager. The two detector systems are spatially co-registered to each other. The outside imager is mounted on an open rotating gantry to provide torso-wide 3D images of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs. The insertable probe provides closer imaging, high sensitivity, and very high resolution predominately 2D view of the prostate and immediate surroundings. The probe is operated in conjunction with the outside imager and a fast data acquisition system to provide very high resolution reconstruction of the prostate and surrounding tissue and organs.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma dynamics Title Ultrafast electron beam imaging of femtosecond laser-induced plasma dynamics Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Li, Junjie, Xuan Wang, Zhaoyang Chen, Richard Clinite, Samuel S. Mao, Pengfei Zhu, Zhengming Sheng, Jie Zhang, and Jianming Cao Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 107 Issue 8 Date Published 03/2010 Keywords copper, electron beam applications, high-speed optical techniques, laser ablation, plasma diagnostics, plasma production by laser Abstract Plasma dynamics in the early stage of laser ablation of a copper target are investigated in real time by making ultrafast electron shadow images and electron deflectometry measurements. These complementary techniques provide both a global view and a local perspective of the associated transient electric field and charge expansion dynamics. The results reveal that the charge cloud above the target surface is composed predominantly of thermally ejected electrons and that it is self-expanding, with a fast front-layer speed exceeding 107 m/s. The average electric field strength of the charge cloud induced by a pump fluence of 2.2 J/cm2 is estimated to be ∼ 2.4×105 V/m.

54

Potential for ultrafast dynamic chemical imaging with few-cycle infrared lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We studied the photoelectron spectra generated by an intense few-cycle infrared laser pulse. By focusing on the angular distributions of the back rescattered high energy photoelectrons, we show that accurate differential elastic scattering cross sections of the target ion by free electrons can be extracted. Since the incident direction and the energy of the free electrons can be easily changed by manipulating the laser's polarization, intensity, and wavelength, these extracted elastic scattering cross sections, in combination with more advanced inversion algorithms, may be used to reconstruct the effective single-scattering potential of the molecule, thus opening up the possibility of using few-cycle infrared lasers as powerful table-top tools for imaging chemical and biological transformations, with the desired unprecedented temporal and spatial resolutions.

Morishita, T; Chen, Z; Lin, C D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Slit-scanning confocal microendoscope for high-resolution in vivo imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and construction of a novel imaging system in which a fiber-optic imaging bundle and miniature optical face of the fiber-optic imaging bundle. In this system an argon- ion laser operating at 488 nm is used bundle is the object for this optical system. The light coming from the bun- dle is collimated

Gmitro, Arthur F.

56

Line-imaging velocimeter for shock diagnostics at the OMEGA laser facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A line-imaging velocity interferometer has been implemented at the OMEGA laser facility of the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. This instrument is the primary diagnostic for a variety of experiments involving laser-driven shock-wave propagation, including high-pressure equation of state experiments, materials characterization experiments, shock characterization for Rayleigh-Taylor experiments, and shock timing experiments for inertial confinement fusion research. Using a laser probe beam to illuminate a target, the instrument measures shock breakout times at temporal resolutions as low as 20 ps, and spatial resolution {approx}4 {mu}m. For velocity measurements the detection limit is <0.1 km/s, and velocities of interfaces, free surfaces, and shock fronts traveling through transparent media can be measured with accuracies {approx}1% over the range from 4 km/s to greater than 50 km/s. Quantitative measurements of the optical reflectance of ionizing shock fronts can also be obtained simultaneously with the velocity measurements.

Celliers, P.M.; Bradley, D.K.; Collins, G.W.; Hicks, D.G.; Boehly, T.R.; Armstrong, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cellular delivery and site-specific targeting of organic fluorophores for super-resolution imaging in living cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent advances in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy have pushed the spatial resolution of biological imaging down to a few nanometers. The key element to the development of such imaging modality is synthetic organic ...

Uttamapinant, Chayasith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mapping Burned Areas in a Mediterranean Environment Using Soft Integration of Spectral Indices from High-Resolution Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a new method for burned area mapping using high-resolution satellite images in the Mediterranean ecosystem. In such a complex environment, high-resolution satellite images represent an appropriate data source for identifying ...

Mirco Boschetti; Daniela Stroppiana; Pietro Alessandro Brivio

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A bayesian approach for building detection in densely build-up high resolution satellite image  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a novel automatic approach for building detection from high resolution satellite image with densely build-up buildings. Unlike the previous approaches which normally start with lines and junctions, our approach is based on regions. ...

Zongying Song; Chunhong Pan; Q. Yang

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Perfusion-Based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion-Based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla Josef Pfeuffer smaller voxel size than previously reported in humans. High-resolution CBF maps were obtained with voxel sizes as small as 0.9 0.9 1.5 mm3 in the human brain. High sensitivity was made possible by signal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A DUAL MODALITY SYSTEM FOR HIGH RESOLUTION -TRUE CONDUCTIVITY IMAGING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the difference between the current densities calculated based on the potential and the magnetic field Resonance Current Density Imaging (MRCDI) has been proposed to image current density and magnetic flux the current density at dc and RF frequency (Scoot et al 1995). Using MRCDI, the magnetic flux density

Eyüboðlu, Murat

62

Note: Spatial resolution of Fuji BAS-TR and BAS-SR imaging plates  

SciTech Connect

The spatial resolution of two types of imaging plates, Fuji BAS-TR and Fuji BAS-SR, has been measured using a knife-edge x-ray source of 8-keV Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation. The values for the spatial resolution, defined as the distance between 10% and 90% levels of the edge spread function, are 94 {mu}m and 109 {mu}m, respectively. The resolution values are important for quantitative analysis of x-ray and particle imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics.

Fiksel, G.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Rd., Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

High-resolution retinal imaging using adaptive optics and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention permits retinal images to be acquired at high speed and with unprecedented resolution in three dimensions (4.times.4.times.6 .mu.m). The instrument achieves high lateral resolution by using adaptive optics to correct optical aberrations of the human eye in real time. High axial resolution and high speed are made possible by the use of Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Using this system, we have demonstrated the ability to image microscopic blood vessels and the cone photoreceptor mosaic.

Olivier, Scot S. (Livermore, CA); Werner, John S. (Davis, CA); Zawadzki, Robert J. (Sacramento, CA); Laut, Sophie P. (Pasedena, CA); Jones, Steven M. (Livermore, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Generative Models for Super-Resolution Single Molecule Microscopy Images of Biological Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 3.2 Conventional fluorescence image (A) and STORM reconstruction (B,C) of annular clathrin introduced by Ernst Abbe in 1873. Super-resolution (SR) imaging has led to various important studies the fluorescence of the molecules so that a subset of molecules are emitting at any given time and thus

65

High resolution laser spectroscopy of cesium and rubidium molecules with optically induced coherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the study of the quantum coherent effects in diatomic molecular systems by using high resolution laser spectroscopy. In particular, we have studied the rubidium diatomic molecular gaseous medium's absorption spectrum with high resolution single mode laser spectroscopy. The derived electronic and rotational vibrational constants were used in the backward Raman amplification experiment of Rb diatomic molecule. Both experimental results and theoretical calculation confirms that there is strong backward directionally dependent radiation. This effect can further be utilized in remote detection of chemical material. In the saturated spectroscopy experiment of the cesium diatomic molecule, long-lived ground state coherence was observed. The coherence would decay at a rate less than the natural life time of the excited states, which indicates great possibility for performing the quantum optics experiments previously performed in atomic systems only. Electromagnetically induced transparency has been observed in many atomic systems for many years, while it has been seldom realized in molecular systems. In our experiment of electromagnetically induced transparency in cesium diatomic molecules, we utilized Ã?Â? energy levels, and observed subnatural linewidth. This is the first time to realize a Ã?Â? type EIT in a molecular ensemble. This experiment will lead to many other experiments of quantum effects in a molecular system, such like magnetic optical rotation, light storage in ensemble of molecules. Magnetically induced chirality in an atomic ensemble is also investigated in my research.

Chen, Hui

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Applications of Fourier Domain Mode Locked lasers for optical coherence tomography imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a micrometer-resolution imaging technique that produces cross-sectional images of sample microstructure by measuring the amplitude and echo time delay of backscattered light. OCT imaging ...

Adler, Desmond Christopher, 1978-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

An Automated Platform for High-Resolution Tissue Imaging Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An automated platform has been developed for acquisition and visualization of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI). The new system enables robust operation of the nano-DESI imaging source over many hours. This is achieved by controlling the distance between the sample and the probe by mounting the sample holder onto an automated XYZ stage and defining the tilt of the sample plane. This approach is useful for imaging of relatively flat samples such as thin tissue sections. Custom software called MSI QuickView was developed for visualization of large data sets generated in imaging experiments. MSI QuickView enables fast visualization of the imaging data during data acquisition and detailed processing after the entire image is acquired. The performance of the system is demonstrated by imaging rat brain tissue sections. High resolution mass analysis combined with MS/MS experiments enabled identification of lipids and metabolites in the tissue section. In addition, high dynamic range and sensitivity of the technique allowed us to generate ion images of low-abundance isobaric lipids. High-spatial resolution image acquired over a small region of the tissue section revealed the spatial distribution of an abundant brain metabolite, creatine, in the white and gray matter that is consistent with the literature data obtained using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Heath, Brandi S.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Laskin, Julia

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA); Hartemann, Frederic V. (San Ramon, CA); McNabb, Dennis P. (Alameda, CA); Pruet, Jason A. (Brentwood, CA)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

71

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Atomic-Resolution Spectroscopic Imaging and In Situ Environmental Study of Bimetallic Nanocatalysts by Fast Electrons Thursday, October 24, 2013 - 3:30pm SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Huolin Xin Center for Functional Nanomaterials Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) has proven to be a powerful technique to study structural, compositional, and electronic information of materials at the atomic scale. With the recent addition of 3rd-order and now 5th-order aberration correction, the numerical aperture can be opened up by a factor of 2-3, allowing sub-Angstrom resolution to be achieved in a STEM. Additionally, the enlarged numerical aperture couple with the use of

72

Novel ultrahigh resolution data acquisition and image reconstruction for multi-detector row CT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a special ultrahigh resolution mode providing considerably enhanced spatial resolution both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction for a routine medical multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) system. Data acquisition is performed by using a flying focal spot both in the scan plane and in the z-axis direction in combination with tantalum grids that are inserted in front of the multi-row detector to reduce the aperture of the detector elements both in-plane and in the z-axis direction. The dose utilization of the system for standard applications is not affected, since the grids are moved into place only when needed and are removed for standard scanning. By means of this technique, image slices with a nominal section width of 0.4 mm (measured full width at half maximum=0.45 mm) can be reconstructed in spiral mode on a CT system with a detector configuration of 32x0.6 mm. The measured 2% value of the in-plane modulation transfer function (MTF) is 20.4 lp/cm, the measured 2% value of the longitudinal (z axis) MTF is 21.5 lp/cm. In a resolution phantom with metal line pair test patterns, spatial resolution of 20 lp/cm can be demonstrated both in the scan plane and along the z axis. This corresponds to an object size of 0.25 mm that can be resolved. The new mode is intended for ultrahigh resolution bone imaging, in particular for wrists, joints, and inner ear studies, where a higher level of image noise due to the reduced aperture is an acceptable trade-off for the clinical benefit brought about by the improved spatial resolution.

Flohr, T. G.; Stierstorfer, K.; Suess, C.; Schmidt, B.; Primak, A. N.; McCollough, C. H. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany) and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Computed Tomography CTE PA Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ultra-fast image converter streak cameras for laser fusion diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The design and operation of a 10-ps resolution optical streak camera used to characterize laser pulses and other transient optical signals in fusion research is discussed. Performance characteristics are presented. The design, operation, and application of an x-ray streak camera used to study laser-produced plasmas in the x-ray spectral region of 1 to 10 keV with temporal and spatial resolutions of approximately 20 ps and approximately 10 $mu$m is also discussed. (auth)

Houghton, J.W.; Thomas, S.W.; Attwood, D.T.; Coleman, L.W.

1975-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Active laser frequency stabilization and resolution enhancement of interferometers for the measurement of gravitational waves in space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser frequency stabilization is notably one of the major challenges on the way to a space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is presently under development in an ESA, NASA collaboration. We present a novel method for active laser stabilization and phase noise suppression in such a gravitational wave detector. The proposed approach is a further evolution of the "arm locking" method, which in essence consists of using an interferometer arm as an optical cavity, exploiting the extreme long-run stability of the cavity size in the frequency band of interest. We extend this method by using the natural interferometer arm length differences and existing interferometer signals as additional information sources for the reconstruction and active suppression of the quasi-periodic laser frequency noise, enhancing the resolution power of space-borne gravitational wave detectors.

Markus Herz

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

The SeaBED AUV – a platform for high resolution imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SeaBED autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is a new imaging platform designed for high resolution optical and acoustic sensing. This low cost vehicle has been specifically designed for use in waters upto 2000 meters to carry out video transects, bathymetric and side-scan sonar surveys. In this paper we detail the systems issues associated with navigation, control, and imaging that led us to our particular hardware and software design choices so as to allow us to operate in shallow, shelf and ocean basin environments. I.

Hanumant Singh; Ryan Eustice; Chris Roman; Oscar Pizarro; Woods Hole; Woods Hole Ma

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A high spatial resolution Stokes polarimeter for motional Stark effect imaging  

SciTech Connect

We describe an enhanced temporally switched interfero-polarimeter that has been successfully deployed for high spatial resolution motional Stark effect imaging on the KSTAR superconducting tokamak. The system utilizes dual switching ferroelectric liquid crystal waveplates to image the full Stokes vector of elliptically polarized and Doppler-shifted Stark-Zeeman Balmer-alpha emission from high energy neutral beams injected into the magnetized plasma. We describe the optical system and compare its performance against a Mueller matrix model that takes account of non-ideal performance of the switching ferro-electric liquid crystal waveplates and other polarizing components.

Thorman, Alex; Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water transport in the ionomeric membrane, typically Nafion{reg_sign}, has profound influence on the performance of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell, in terms of internal resistance and overall water balance. In this work, high resolution neutron imaging of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane is presented in order to measure water content and through-plane gradients in situ under disparate temperature and humidification conditions.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Makundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hussey, D S [NIST; Jacobson, D L [NIST; Arif, M [NIST

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1991-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Virtually distortion-free imaging system for large field, high resolution lithography using electrons, ions or other particle beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Virtually distortion free large field high resolution imaging is performed using an imaging system which contains large field distortion or field curvature. A reticle is imaged in one direction through the optical system to form an encoded mask. The encoded mask is then imaged back through the imaging system onto a wafer positioned at the reticle position. Particle beams, including electrons, ions and neutral particles, may be used as well as electromagnetic radiation.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

Cha, Sangwon

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original goal is to devise computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Initially the research emphasis was primarily on developing methods for efficient ray- theoretic modeling of acoustic waves in triangulated representations of media and on efficient means of modeling waves that travel sub- horizontally in horizontally layered media. Subsequent directions included new efficient methods for imaging the Earth`s subsurface (specifically, 3-D migration via the McClellan transformation, and squeezing dip movement (DMO) for depth-variable velocity), demonstrations of the importance of taking P-wave anisotrophy into account in migration and DMO, the development of algorithms for doing migration and DMO in heterogeneous, anisotropic media, and the development of a methodology for the all-important step of deriving the anisotrophy parameters necessary for imaging of P-wave data.

Larner, K.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Time Resolved Shadowgraph Images of Silicon during Laser Ablation:Shockwaves and Particle Generation  

SciTech Connect

Time resolved shadowgraph images were recorded of shockwaves and particle ejection from silicon during laser ablation. Particle ejection and expansion were correlated to an internal shockwave resonating between the shockwave front and the target surface. The number of particles ablated increased with laser energy and was related to the crater volume.

Liu, C.Y.; Mao, X.L.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

High-resolution single photon planar and spect imaging of brain and neck employing a system of two co-registered opposed gamma imaging heads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact, mobile, dedicated SPECT brain imager that can be easily moved to the patient to provide in-situ imaging, especially when the patient cannot be moved to the Nuclear Medicine imaging center. As a result of the widespread availability of single photon labeled biomarkers, the SPECT brain imager can be used in many locations, including remote locations away from medical centers. The SPECT imager improves the detection of gamma emission from the patient's head and neck area with a large field of view. Two identical lightweight gamma imaging detector heads are mounted to a rotating gantry and precisely mechanically co-registered to each other at 180 degrees. A unique imaging algorithm combines the co-registered images from the detector heads and provides several SPECT tomographic reconstructions of the imaged object thereby improving the diagnostic quality especially in the case of imaging requiring higher spatial resolution and sensitivity at the same time.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

87

Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Frequency Comb, Ultrafast Laser. ...

90

Development of a New Underwater Bathymetric Laser Imaging System: L-Bath  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction, and performance of a new high-resolution underwater bathymetric prototype system (L-Bath) with extended imaging capability is presented. The design offers simultaneous reflectance and depth information on a pixel-by-...

Karl D. Moore; Jules S. Jaffe; Benjamin L. Ochoa

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

92

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

93

Resolution and Accuracy of an Airborne Scanning Laser System for Beach Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne scanning laser technology provides an effective method to systematically survey surface topography and changes in that topography with time. In this paper the authors describe the capability of a rapid-response lidar system in which ...

J. H. Middleton; C. G. Cooke; E. T. Kearney; P. J. Mumford; M. A. Mole; G. J. Nippard; C. Rizos; K. D. Splinter; I. L. Turner

94

Resolution and Accuracy of an Airborne Scanning Laser System for Beach Surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne scanning laser technology provides an effective method to systematically survey surface topography and changes in that topography with time. In this paper, the authors describe the capability of a rapid-response lidar system in which ...

J. H. Middleton; C. G. Cooke; E. T. Kearney; P. J. Mumford; M. A. Mole; G. J. Nippard; C. Rizos; K. D. Splinter; I. L. Turner

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A PERCEPTION-INSPIRED BUILDING INDEX FOR AUTOMATIC BUILT-UP AREA DETECTION IN HIGH-RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of automatic extraction of built-up areas from high-resolution remote sensing images. We propose a new building presence index from the point view of perception. We argue that built-up areas usually result in significant corners and junctions in high-resolution satellite images, due to the man-made structures and occlusion, and thus can be measured by the geometrical structures they contained. More precisely, we first detect corners and junctions by relying on a perception-inspired corner detector, called an a-contrario junction detector. Each detected corner is associated with a perceptual significance, which measures the structural saliency of the corner in the image and is independent of the contrast and scale. All these detected corners together with their significance are then used to compute the building index. The proposed approach is evaluated on a high-resolution satellite image set, including 15 big images from GeoEye-1, QuickBird and IKONOS. The results demonstrated that our method achieves the state-of-the-art results and can be used in practical applications. Index Terms — High-resolution satellite images, junction detection, built-up area detection, contrast independent, urban area detection. 1.

Gang Liu; Gui-song Xia; Xin Huang; Wen Yang; Liangpei Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind momentum ratio of this system. However, as the WR wind dominates the colliding wind X-ray emission it appears unlikely that the mass-loss rate and the terminal velocity of the companion wind can be separately determined from X-ray observations. We also note an inconsistency between numerical and analytical estimates of the X-ray luminosity ratio of the stronger and weaker wind components, and conclude that the analytical results are in error.

J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens; P. M. Williams; A. M. T. Pollock; S. L. Skinner; M. F. Corcoran; A. F. J. Moffat

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Compact, high-resolution, gamma ray imaging for scintimammography and other medical diagostic applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution gamma ray imaging device includes an aluminum housing, a lead screen collimator at an opened end of the housing, a crystal scintillator array mounted behind the lead screen collimator, a foam layer between the lead screen collimator and the crystal scintillator array, a photomultiplier window coupled to the crystal with optical coupling grease, a photomultiplier having a dynode chain body and a base voltage divider with anodes, anode wire amplifiers each connected to four anodes and a multi pin connector having pin connections to each anode wire amplifier. In one embodiment the crystal scintillator array includes a yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) crystal array. In an alternate embodiment, the crystal scintillator array includes a gadolinium oxyorthosilicate (GSO) crystal array.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA); Wojcik, Randolph F. (Yorktown, VA); Steinbach, Daniela (Williamsburg, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

High resolution seismic imaging of Rainier Mesa using surface reflection and surface to tunnel tomography  

SciTech Connect

In the interpretation of seismic data to infer properties of an explosion source, it is necessary to account for wave propagation effects. In order to understand and remove these propagation effects, it is necessary to have a model. An open question concerning this matter is the detail and accuracy which must be present in the velocity model in order to produce reliable estimates in the estimated source properties. While it would appear that the reliability of the results would be directly related to the accuracy of the velocity and density models used in the interpretation, it may be that certain deficiencies in these models can be compensated by the and amount of seismic data which is used in the inversion. The NPE provided an opportunity to test questions of this sort. In August 1993, two high resolution seismic experiments were performed in N-Tunnel and on the surface of Rainier Mesa above it. The first involved a surface-to-tunnel imaging experiment with sources on the surface and receivers in tunnel U12n.23 about 88 meters west of the NPE. It was possible to estimate the apparent average velocity between the tunnel and the surface. In a separate experiment, a high resolution reflection experiment was performed in order to image the lithology in Rainier Mesa. Good quality, broad band, reflections were obtained from depths extending into the Paleozoic basement. A high velocity layer near the surface is underlain by a thick section of low velocity material, providing a nonuniform but low average velocity between the depth of the NPE and the surface.

Majer, E.L.; Johnson, L.R.; Karageorgi, E.K.; Peterson, J.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cross strip microchannel plate imaging photon counters with high time resolution  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented cross strip readout microchannel plate detectors in 18 mm active area format including open face (UV/particle) and sealed tube (optical) configurations. These have been tested with a field programmable gate array based parallel channel electronics for event encoding which can process high input event rates (> 5 MHz) with high spatial resolution. Using small pore MCPs (6 {micro}m) operated in a pair, we achieve gains of >5 x 10{sup 5} which is sufficient to provide spatial resolution of <35 {micro}m FHWM, with self triggered event timing accuracy of {approx}2 ns for sealed tube optical sensors. A peak quantum efficiency of {approx}19% at 500 nm has been achieved with SuperGenII photocathodes that have response over the 400 nm to 900 nm range. Local area counting rates of up to >200 events/mcp pore sec{sup -1} have been attained, along with image linearity and stability to better than 50 {micro}m.

Stonehill, Laura C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shirey, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rabin, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, David C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Siegmund, Oswald H W [U.C. BERKELEY; Vallerga, John V [U.C. BERKELEY; Tremsin, Anton S [U.C. BERKELEY

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Terahertz quantum cascade lasers and video-rate THz imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transitions between subbands in semiconductor quantum wells were suggested as a method to generate long wavelength radiation at customizable frequencies. The recently developed THz quantum-cascade lasers (QCL) hold great ...

Hu, Qing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electron heated target temperature measurements in petawatt laser experiments based on extreme ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent methods (extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, imaging at 68 and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultraintense laser-plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 and 256 eV photon energies give a planar deuterated carbon target rear surface pre-expansion temperature in the 125-150 eV range, with the rear plasma plume averaging a temperature approximately 74 eV.

Ma, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Beg, F. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Chung, H.-K.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Hatchett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Offermann, D. T.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ultrafast supercontinuum fiber-laser based pump-probe scanning MOKE microscope for the investigation of electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a two-color pump-probe scanning magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscope which we have developed to investigate electron spin phenomena in semiconductors at cryogenic temperatures with picosecond time and micrometer spatial resolution. The key innovation of our microscope is the usage of an ultrafast `white light' supercontinuum fiber-laser source which provides access to the whole visible and near-infrared spectral range. Our Kerr microscope allows for the independent selection of the excitation and detection energy while avoiding the necessity to synchronize the pulse trains of two separate picosecond laser systems. The ability to independently tune the pump and probe wavelength enables the investigation of the influence of excitation energy on the optically induced electron spin dynamics in semiconductors. We demonstrate picosecond real-space imaging of the diffusive expansion of optically excited electron spin packets in a (110) GaAs quantum well sample to illustrate the capabilities of t...

Henn, T; Ossau, W; Molenkamp, L W; Biermann, K; Santos, P V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging of Electron Heated Targets in Petawatt Laser Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the transport of electrons, and the flow of energy into a solid target or dense plasma, is instrumental in the development of fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. An extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging diagnostic at 256 eV and 68 eV provides information about heating and energy deposition within petawatt laser-irradiated targets. XUV images of several irradiated solid targets are presented.

Ma, T; MacPhee, A; Key, M; Akli, K; Mackinnon, A; Chen, C; Barbee, T; Freeman, R; King, J; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B; Beg, F

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-Resolution Imaging and Optical Control of Bose-Einstein Condensates in an Atom Chip Magnetic Trap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-resolution projection and imaging system for ultracold atoms is implemented using a compound silicon and glass atom chip. The atom chip is metalized to enable magnetic trapping while glass regions enable high numerical aperture optical access to atoms residing in the magnetic trap about 100 microns below the chip surface. The atom chip serves as a wall of the vacuum system, which enables the use of commercial microscope components for projection and imaging. Holographically generated light patterns are used to optically slice a cigar-shaped magnetic trap into separate regions; this has been used to simultaneously generate up to four Bose-condensates. Using fluorescence techniques we have demonstrated in-trap imaging resolution down to 2.5 microns

Evan A. Salim; Seth C. Caliga; Jonathan B. Pfeiffer; Dana Z. Anderson

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

106

First field test of NAPL detection with high resolution borehole seismic imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this field test is to evaluate the detectability of NAPLs by high resolution tomographic borehole seismic imaging. The site is a former Department of Energy (DOE) manufacturing facility in Pinellas County, Florida. Cross-hole seismic and radar measurements were made in a shallow aquifer contaminated with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Cone penetration test (CPT) and induction logging were performed for lithology and conductivity, respectively. The main challenge is to distinguish fluid phase heterogeneities from anomalies arising from geologic structure. Our approach is to compare measurements between locations of known contamination with a nearby uncontaminated location of similar lithology where differences in signal transmission may be attributed to fluid phase changes. The CPT data show similar lithologic structure at the locations both within and outside the NAPL-contaminated area. Zones of low seismic amplitude at about 7 m depth appear more extensive in the NAPL-contaminated area. These zones may be the result of fluid phase heterogeneities (NAPL or gas), or they may be due to the lithology, i.e. attenuating nature of the layer itself, or the transition between two distinct layers. The presence of lithologic contrasts, specifically from higher permeability sands to lower permeability silts and clays, also indicate potential locations of NAPL, as they could be flow barriers to downward NAPL migration.

Geller, Jil T.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Majer, Ernest L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

Stafford, D

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Pansharpening of high and medium resolution satellite images using bilateral filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide and evaluate a fusion algorithm of remotely sensed images, i.e. the fusion of a panchromatic (PAN) image with a multi-spectral (MS) image using bilateral filtering, applied to images of three different sensors: SPOT 5, Landsat ETM+ and Quickbird. ... Keywords: bilateral filter, image fusion, pansharpening

Diego Renza; Estibaliz Martinez; Agueda Arquero; Javier Sanchez

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Terahertz imaging and quantum cascade laser based devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The terahertz (THz) frequency range (f=0.3-10 THz, [lambda]=30-1000 lam) is much less technologically developed that the adjacent microwave and infrared frequency ranges, but offers several advantages for imaging applications: ...

Lee, Alan Wei Min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Digital Image Processing "Cookbook": A method to derive bathymetric data from high spatial resolution multi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imagery. It records image processing steps of the second run through an image specific methodology Processing: Geometric correction (only) File Type: ERDAS Imagine (.img) Complete sets of metadata

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

111

Systems and methods for imaging using radiation from laser produced plasmas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In particular embodiments, the present disclosure provides systems and methods for imaging a subject using radiation emitted from a laser produced plasma generating by irradiating a target with a laser. In particular examples, the target includes at least one radiation enhancing component, such as a fluor, cap, or wire. In further examples, the target has a metal layer and an internal surface defining an internal apex, the internal apex of less than about 15 .mu.m, such as less than about 1 .mu.m. The targets may take a variety of shapes, including cones, pyramids, and hemispheres. Certain aspects of the present disclosure provide improved imaging of a subject, such as improved medical images of a radiation dose than typical conventional methods and systems.

Renard-Le Galloudec, Nathalie (Reno, NV); Cowan, Thomas E. (Reno, NV); Sentoku, Yasuhiko (Reno, NV); Rassuchine, Jennifer (Reno, NV)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to the control of video and optical information and, more specifically, to control systems utilizing video images to provide control. Accurate control of video images and laser beams is becoming increasingly important as the use of lasers for machine, medical and experimental processes escalates. In, AURORA, an installation at Los Alamos National Laboratory dedicated to laser fusion research, it is necessary to precisely control the path and angle of up to 96 lasers beams. This invention is comprised of an optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, W.; Anderson, F.L.; Kortegaard, B.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to the control of video and optical information and, more specifically, to control systems utilizing video images to provide control. Accurate control of video images and laser beams is becoming increasingly important as the use of lasers for machine, medical and experimental processes escalates. In, AURORA, an installation at Los Alamos National Laboratory dedicated to laser fusion research, it is necessary to precisely control the path and angle of up to 96 lasers beams. This invention is comprised of an optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, W.; Anderson, F.L.; Kortegaard, B.L.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

An Approach for Improving Cirrus Cloud-Top Pressure/Height Estimation by Merging High-Spatial-Resolution Infrared-Window Imager Data with High-Spectral-Resolution Sounder Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next-generation Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) offers infrared (IR)-window measurements with a horizontal spatial resolution of at least 1 km, but it lacks IR spectral bands that are sensitive to absorption by carbon ...

Elisabeth Weisz; W. Paul Menzel; Nadia Smith; Richard Frey; Eva E. Borbas; Bryan A. Baum

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of microphysical and optical properties, as well as determining the radiative impact. Perhaps one of the most recognized instruments used for such research is the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), carried aboard the NASA EOS satellites Terra and Aqua. The present research aims to support ongoing efforts in the field of ice cloud research by use of observations obtained from Terra and Aqua MODIS. First, a technique is developed to infer ice cloud optical depth from the MODIS cirrus reflectance parameter. This technique is based on a previous method developed by Meyer et al. (2004). The applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with retrievals from level-2 and -3 MODIS data. The technique is also evaluated with the operational MODIS cloud retrieval product and a method based on airborne ice cloud observations. From this technique, an archive of daily optical depth retrievals is constructed. Using simple statistics, the global spatial and temporal distributions of ice clouds are determined. Research has found that Aqua MODIS observes more frequent ice clouds and larger optical depths and ice water paths than does Terra MODIS. Finally, an analysis of the time series of daily optical depth values revealed that ice clouds at high latitudes, which are most likely associated with synoptic scale weather sytems, persist long enough to move with the upper level winds. Tropical ice clouds, however, dissipate more rapidly, and are in all likelihood associated with deep convective cells.

Meyer, Kerry Glynne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT): High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy in the far-infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a recently-completed pre-Formulation Phase study of SPIRIT, a candidate NASA Origins Probe mission. SPIRIT is a spatial and spectral interferometer with an operating wavelength range 25 - 400 microns. SPIRIT will provide sub-arcsecond resolution images and spectra with resolution R = 3000 in a 1 arcmin field of view to accomplish three primary scientific objectives: (1) Learn how planetary systems form from protostellar disks, and how they acquire their inhomogeneous composition; (2) characterize the family of extrasolar planetary systems by imaging the structure in debris disks to understand how and where planets of different types form; and (3) learn how high-redshift galaxies formed and merged to form the present-day population of galaxies. Observations with SPIRIT will be complementary to those of the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground-based Atacama Large Millimeter Array. All three observatories could be operational contemporaneously.

David Leisawitz; Charles Baker; Amy Barger; Dominic Benford; Andrew Blain; Rob Boyle; Richard Broderick; Jason Budinoff; John Carpenter; Richard Caverly; Phil Chen; Steve Cooley; Christine Cottingham; Julie Crooke; Dave DiPietro; Mike DiPirro; Michael Femiano; Art Ferrer; Jacqueline Fischer; Jonathan P. Gardner; Lou Hallock; Kenny Harris; Kate Hartman; Martin Harwit; Lynne Hillenbrand; Tupper Hyde; Drew Jones; Jim Kellogg; Alan Kogut; Marc Kuchner; Bill Lawson; Javier Lecha; Maria Lecha; Amy Mainzer; Jim Mannion; Anthony Martino; Paul Mason; John Mather; Gibran McDonald; Rick Mills; Lee Mundy; Stan Ollendorf; Joe Pellicciotti; Dave Quinn; Kirk Rhee; Stephen Rinehart; Tim Sauerwine; Robert Silverberg; Terry Smith; Gordon Stacey; H. Philip Stahl; Johannes Staguhn; Steve Tompkins; June Tveekrem; Sheila Wall; Mark Wilson

2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Applications of High Resolution Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Environmental and Biological Samples  

SciTech Connect

This chapter details the application of LIBS in a number of environmental areas of research such as carbon sequestration and climate change. LIBS has also been shown to be useful in other high resolution environmental applications for example, elemental mapping and detection of metals in plant materials. LIBS has also been used in phytoremediation applications. Other biological research involves a detailed understanding of wood chemistry response to precipitation variations and also to forest fires. A cross-section of Mountain pine (pinceae Pinus pungen Lamb.) was scanned using a translational stage to determine the differences in the chemical features both before and after a fire event. Consequently, by monitoring the elemental composition pattern of a tree and by looking for abrupt changes, one can reconstruct the disturbance history of a tree and a forest. Lastly we have shown that multivariate analysis of the LIBS data is necessary to standardize the analysis and correlate to other standard laboratory techniques. LIBS along with multivariate statistical analysis makes it a very powerful technology that can be transferred from laboratory to field applications with ease.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Labbe, Nicole [ORNL; Wagner, Rebekah J. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Real-Time High Resolution Quantitative Imaging by Three Wavelength Digital Holography  

An optical system capable of reproducing three-dimensional images was invented atORNL. This system can detect height changes of a few nanometers or less and renderclear, single shot images. These types of precise, high speed measurements are ...

119

Direct analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrixassisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

analysis analysis of cellulose in poplar stem by matrix- assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry Seokwon Jung 1,3 , Yanfeng Chen 3 , M. Cameron Sullards 1,3 and Arthur J. Ragauskas 1,2,3 * 1 BioEnergy Science Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 2 Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, 500 10 th St., Atlanta, GA 30332, USA 3 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA Received 10 July 2010; Revised 9 August 2010; Accepted 23 August 2010 Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) was applied to the analysis of the spatial distribution of cellulose on a cross-section of juvenile poplar (Populus deltoids) stems. Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was used to optimize matrix (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic

120

Radiation-Induced Damage to Microstructure of Parotid Gland: Evaluation Using High-Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate the radiation-induced damage to the microstructure of the parotid gland using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods and Materials: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the parotid gland was performed before radiotherapy (RT) and during the RT period or {<=}3 weeks after RT completion for 12 head-and-neck cancer patients using a 1.5-T scanner with a microscopy coil. The maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was evaluated, and changes in the internal architecture of the gland were assessed both visually and quantitatively. Results: Magnetic resonance images were obtained at a median parotid gland dose of 36 Gy (range, 11-64). According to the quantitative analysis, the maximal cross-sectional area of the gland was reduced, the width of the main duct was narrowed, and the intensity ratio of the main duct lumen to background was significantly decreased after RT (p <.0001). According to the visual assessment, the width of the main duct tended to narrow and the contrast of the duct lumen tended to be decreased, but no significant differences were noted. The visibility of the duct branches was unclear in 10 patients (p = .039), and the septum became dense in 11 patients (p = .006) after RT. Conclusion: High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive method of evaluating radiation-induced changes to the internal architecture of the parotid gland. Morphologic changes in the irradiated parotid gland were demonstrated during the RT course even when a relatively small dose was delivered to the gland.

Kan, Tomoko, E-mail: tkan@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan); Kodani, Kazuhiko; Michimoto, Koichi; Fujii, Shinya; Ogawa, Toshihide [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago, Tottori (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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121

High Spatial Resolution Thermal Imaging of Multiple Section Semiconductor Lasers Ali Shakouri*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermal design of the device, we have achieved record level of damage free power dissipation in electro-absorption that could be used to control temperature of individual devices on a chip. They have achieved cooling power structures and integrated electro- absorption modulators. Integrated electroabsorption modulator is very

122

High resolution telescope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

High resolution telescope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activites. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

Massie, Norbert A. (San Ramon, CA); Oster, Yale (Danville, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

High resolution telescope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employs speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by an electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Massie, N.A.; Oster, Y.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Laser fusion diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The current status of the capability of laser fusion diagnostics is reviewed. Optical and infrared streak cameras provide one time resolution measurement capability of less than 10 ps, while x-ray streak cameras provide 15 ps time resolution in the range of about 1--30 keV presently. Time integrated spatial resolutions of 1 ..mu..m are provided with a variety of optical techniques. Ultraviolet holographic interferometry has measured electron densities above 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/ with 1 ..mu..m spatial resolution and 15 ps temporal resolution. X-ray microscopes provide 3 ..mu..m time integrated resolution and the x-ray streak pinhole camera has 6 ..mu..m spatial resolution. Development of the framing camera has thus far provided 50 ..mu..m spatial resolution with 125 ps frame duration and the third order reconstruction of zone plate images has provided 3 ..mu..m resolutions for alpha particles. Time integrated measurements of x-rays span the range shown. Finally, the new Shiva neutron spectrometer increases the energy resolution capability of that technique to 25 keV for 14-MeV neutrons. These combined capabilities provide a unique set of diagnostics for the detailed measurement of the interaction of laser light with targets and a subsequent performance of those targets.

Coleman, L.W.

1978-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

Findlay, S. D. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramic Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

127

High-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, 6.151 keV x-ray imaging of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics experiments on Sandia's Z accelerator (invited)  

SciTech Connect

When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' 20 MA, 100 ns rise-time Z accelerator [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)], the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV, Mn-He{sub {alpha}} curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for various high-energy-density physics experiments. Enhancements to this imaging system during 2005 have led to the capture of inertial confinement fusion capsule implosion and complex hydrodynamics images of significantly higher quality. The three main improvements, all leading effectively to enhanced image plane brightness, were bringing the source inside the Rowland circle to approximately double the collection solid angle, replacing direct exposure film with Fuji BAS-TR2025 image plate (read with a Fuji BAS-5000 scanner), and generating a 0.3-0.6 ns, {approx}200 J prepulse 2 ns before the 1.0 ns, {approx}1 kJ main pulse to more than double the 6.151 keV flux produced compared with a single 1 kJ pulse. It appears that the 20{+-}5 {mu}m imaging resolution is limited by the 25 {mu}m scanning resolution of the BAS-5000 unit, and to this end, a higher resolution scanner will replace it. ZBL is presently undergoing modifications to provide two temporally separated images ('two-frame') per Z shot for this system before the accelerator closes down in summer 2006 for the Z-refurbished (ZR) upgrade. In 2008, after ZR, it is anticipated that the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) addition to ZBL will be completed, possibly allowing high-energy 11.2224 and 15.7751 keV K{alpha}{sub 1} curved-crystal imaging to be performed. With an ongoing several-year project to develop a highly sensitive multiframe ultrafast digital x-ray camera (MUDXC), it is expected that two-frame HEPW 11 and 16 keV imaging and four-frame ZBL 6.151 keV curved-crystal imaging will be possible. MUDXC will be based on the technology of highly cooled silicon and germanium photodiode arrays and ultrafast, radiation-hardened integrated circuitry.

Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Wenger, D. F.; Cuneo, M. E.; Adams, R. G.; Barnard, W. J.; Beutler, D. E.; Burr, R. A.; Campbell, D. V.; Claus, L. D.; Foresi, J. S.; Johnson, D. W.; Keller, K. L.; Lackey, C.; Leifeste, G. T.; McPherson, L. A.; Mulville, T. D.; Neely, K. A.; Rambo, P. K.; Rovang, D. C. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1106 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image No 150 DPI Version 300 DPI Image. Title: Ultrafast Laser Speeds Up Quest for Atomic Control. ...

129

Unsupervised Semantic Labeling Framework for Identification of Complex Facilities in High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear proliferation is a major national security concern for many countries. Existing feature extraction and classification approaches are not suitable for monitoring proliferation activity using high-resolution multi-temporal remote sensing imagery. ... Keywords: GMM, LDA, Remote Sensing, Nuclear Nonproliferation

Ranga Raju Vatsavai; Anil Cheriyadat; Shaun Gleason

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High-Resolution Imaging of Rain Systems with the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) has been developed and flown in the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft for imaging various atmospheric and surface processes, primarily the internal structure of rain clouds. The AMPR is a ...

Roy W. Spencer; Robbie E. Hood; Frank J. Lafontaine; Eric A. Smith; Robert Platt; Joe Galliano; Vanessa L. Griffin; Elena Lobl

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-resolution subsurface imaging and neural network recognition: Non-intrusive buried substance location. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A high-frequency, high-resolution electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) elimination of electric-field interference at high frequencies, (5) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (6) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (7) visualization of complex structures during the survey. Four major experiments were conducted with the system: (1) Data were collected for several targets in our physical modeling facility. (2) The authors tested the system over targets buried in soil. (3) The authors conducted an extensive survey at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The location of the buried waste, category of waste, and thickness of the clay cap were successfully mapped. (4) The authors ran surveys over the acid pit at INEL. This was an operational survey over a hot site. The interpreted low-resistivity region correlated closely with the known extent of the acid pit.

Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

1997-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Background and Scattered Light Subtraction in the High-Resolution Echelle Modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple, effective approach for estimating the on-order backgrounds of spectra taken with the highest-resolution modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scheme for determining the on-order background spectrum uses polynomial fits to the inter-order scattered light visible in the two-dimensional STIS MAMA images. We present a suite of high-resolution STIS spectra to demonstrate that our background subtraction routine produces the correct overall zero point, as judged by the small residual flux levels in the centers of strongly-saturated interstellar absorption lines. Although there are multiple sources of background light in STIS echelle mode data, this simple approach works very well for wavelengths longward of Lyman-alpha. At shorter wavelengths, the smaller order separation and generally lower signal-to-noise ratios of the data can reduce the effectiveness of our background estimation procedure. Slight artifacts in the background-subtracted spectrum can be seen in some cases, particularly at wavelengths light. We discuss the limitations of high-resolution STIS data in light of the uncertainties associated with our background subtraction procedure. We compare our background-subtracted STIS spectra with GHRS Ech-A observations of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B and GHRS first-order G160M observations of the early-type star HD 218915. We find no significant differences between the GHRS data and the STIS data reduced with our method in either case.

J. Christopher Howk; Kenneth R. Sembach

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Novel x-ray imaging methods at the Nova Laser Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are pursuing several novel x-ray imaging schemes to measure plasma parameters in inertial-confinement fusion experiments. This paper will review two quite successful approaches, the soft x-ray moire deflectometer, and the annular (ring) coded-aperture microscope. The deflectometer is the newer diagnostic, and this paper will concentrate on this topic. We will describe the operating principles of moire deflectometry, give the motivations for soft x-ray probing, describe the physical apparatus in detail, and present some sample images and results. The ring coded-aperture microscope has been described previously, so here we will only briefly review the principle of the instrument. We will concentrate on the signal-to-noise ratio calculations that motivate the use of annular coded apertures, and describe recent work to predict and measure the resolution of the instrument.

Ress, D.; DaSilva, L.B.; London, R.A.; Trebes, J.E.; Lerche, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bradley, D.K. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

The 2D-S (Stereo) Probe: Design and Preliminary Tests of a New Airborne, High-Speed, High-Resolution Particle Imaging Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, laboratory calibrations, and flight tests of a new optical imaging instrument, the two-dimensional stereo (2D-S) probe, are presented. Two orthogonal laser beams cross in the middle of the sample volume. Custom, high-speed, 128-...

R. Paul Lawson; Darren O’Connor; Patrick Zmarzly; Kim Weaver; Brad Baker; Qixu Mo; Haflidi Jonsson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lawrence Livermore to build advanced laser system in Czech Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9-06 9-06 For immediate release: 09/17/2013 | NR-13-09-06 High Resolution Image The High Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System, or HAPLS, will be designed, developed, assembled and tested at Lawrence Livermore. It will be transferred to the ELI Beamlines facility in 2016, where it will be commissioned for use by the international scientific community. Lawrence Livermore to build advanced laser system in Czech Republic Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov High Resolution Image Artist renderings of the ELI Beamlines facility, currently under construction in the Czech Republic. High Resolution Image A CAD image of the ELI-HAPLS laser. LIVERMORE, Calif. - Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), through Lawrence Livermore National Security LLC (LLNS), has been awarded more than

136

Geometric and radiometric improvement of an ikonos panchromatic image using a digital surface model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High resolution satellite images are now important data sources for map update in urban areas. Digital surface models (DSM) acquired by laser scanning are also becoming popular for urban planning and other applications. This paper deals with the integration ...

José Gonçalves

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Scanning tunneling microscope; Semiconductor; Spintronics. Description: [Left] A high resolution STM image of a manganese ...

138

High resolution neutron imaging of water in the polymer electrolyte membrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve a deeper understanding of water transport and performance issues associated with water management, we have conducted in situ water examinations to help understand the effects of components and operation. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and neutron radiography were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells under various operating conditions. Variables examined include: sub-freezing conditions, inlet relative humidities, cell temperature, current density and response transients, different flow field orientations and different component materials (membranes, GDLs and MEAs). Quantification of the water within the membrane was made by neutron radiography after equilibration to different humidified gases, during fuel cell operation and in hydrogen pump mode. The water content was evaluated in bare Nafion{reg_sign} membranes as well as in MEAs operated in both fuel cell and H{sub 2} pump mode. These in situ imaging results allow measurement of the water content and gradients in the PEFC membrane and relate the membrane water transport characteristics to the fuel cell operation and performance under disparate materials and operational combinations. Flow geometry makes a large impact on MEA water content. Higher membrane water with counter flow was measured compared with co-flow for sub-saturated inlet RH's. This correlates to lower HFR and higher performance compared with co-flow. Higher anode stoichiometry helps remove water which accumulates in the anode channels and GDL material. Cell orientation was measured to affect both the water content and cell performance. While membrane water content was measured to be similar regardless of orientation, cells with the cathode on top show flooding and loss of performance compared with similarly operated cells with the anode on top. Transient fuel cell current measurements show a large degree of hysteresis in terms of membrane hydration as measured by HFR. Current step transients from 0.01 A cm{sup -2} to 0.68 A cm{sup -2} consistently show PEM wetting occurring within 5 to 20 sec. Whereas the PEM drying response to the reverse step transient of 0.68 A cm{sup -2} to 0.01 A cm{sup -2}, takes several minutes. The observed faster wetting response is due to reaction water being produced in the cathode and back diffusing into the membrane. The slower PEM drying is due to the water slowly being removed out of the wetted GDLs. This rate of removal of water and hence the PEM hydration level was found to be influenced strongly by the PTFE loadings in the GDL substrate and Microporous layer (MPL). The drying of the membrane is influenced by both the anode and cathode GDL PTFE loadings. Lower PTFE loading in the anode GDL leads to better membrane hydration probably due to the easier incorporation of water from the anode GDL into the membrane. Similarly a lower PTFE loading in the cathode GDL also results in better membrane hydration probably due to the better water retention properties (less hydrophobic) of this GDL. Fuel cells operated isothermal at sub-freezing temperatures show gradual cell performance decay over time and eventually drops to zero. AC impedance analysis indicates that losses are initially due to increasing charge transfer resistance. After time, the rate of decay accelerates rapidly due to mass transport limitations. High frequency resistance also increases over time and is a function of the initial membrane water content. These results indicate that catalyst layer ice formation is influenced strongly by the MEA and is responsible for the long-term degradation of fuel cells operated at sub-freezing temperatures. Water distribution measurements indicate that ice may be fonning mainly in the GDLs at -10 C but are concentrated in the catalyst layer at -20 C.

Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fairweather, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Physically-Intuitive Method for Calculation of the Local Lattice Constant from a High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Image by Fourier Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a physically-intuitive method to calculate the local lattice constant as a function of position in a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image by performing a two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. We apply a Gaussian filter with appropriate spatial full-width-half-max (FWHM) bandwidth to the image centered at the desired location to calculate the local lattice constant (as opposed to the average lattice constant). Fourier analysis of the filtered image yields the vertical and horizontal lattice constants at this location. The process is repeated by stepping the Gaussian filter across the image to produce a set of local lattice constants in the vertical and horizontal direction as a function of position in the image. The method has been implemented in a freely available tool on nanoHUB.

Teherani, James T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Electron-Heated Target Temperature Measurements in Petawatt Laser Experiments Based on Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging and Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent methods (XUV spectroscopy, imaging at 68 eV and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 eV and 256 eV photon energies were used to determine the rear surface temperature of planar CD targets. Temperatures were found to be in the 60-150 eV range, with good agreement between the three diagnostics.

Ma, T; Beg, F; Macphee, A; Chung, H; Key, M; Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Hatchett, S; Akli, K; Stephens, R; Chen, C; Freeman, R; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

BazookaSPECT: A Low-Cost Approach to High-Resolution, Single-Photon Imaging Using Columnar Scintillators and Image Intensifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the light power emerging from the ends of optical fibers used typically in laser- based fiberoptic has been spurred by the needs of light-wave communications systems, optoelectronic computing00-3 Planning Report Economic Impact Assessment: NIST-EEEL Laser and Fiberoptic Power

Arizona, University of

142

Measurements of electron and proton heating temperatures from extreme-ultraviolet light images at 68 eV in petawatt laser experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 68 eV extreme-ultraviolet light imaging diagnostic measures short pulse isochoric heating by electrons and protons in petawatt laser experiments. Temperatures are deduced from the absolute intensities and comparison with modeling using a radiation hydrodynamics code.

Gu Peimin; Zhang, B.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K.; Hey, D.; King, J. A.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Snavely, R. A.; Stephens, R. B. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States); Department of Applied Science, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a target position, an optical component separated a distance J from the target position, and a laser energy source separated a distance H from the optical component, distance H being greater than distance J. A laser source manipulation mechanism exhibits a mechanical resolution of positioning the laser source. The mechanical resolution is less than a spatial resolution of laser energy at the target position as directed through the optical component. A vertical and a lateral index that intersect at an origin can be defined for the optical component. The manipulation mechanism can auto align laser aim through the origin during laser source motion. The laser source manipulation mechanism can include a mechanical index. The mechanical index can include a pivot point for laser source lateral motion and a reference point for laser source vertical motion. The target position can be located within an adverse environment including at least one of a high magnetic field, a vacuum system, a high pressure system, and a hazardous zone. The laser source and an electro-mechanical part of the manipulation mechanism can be located outside the adverse environment. The manipulation mechanism can include a Peaucellier linkage.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

High-speed nanometer-resolved imaging vibrometer and velocimeter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional laser vibrometers are incapable of performing multidimensional vibrometry at high speeds because they build on single-point measurements and rely on beam scanning, significantly limiting their utility and precision. Here we introduce a laser vibrometer that performs high-speed multidimensional imaging-based vibration and velocity measurements with nanometer-scale axial resolution without the need for beam scanning. As a proof-of-concept, we demonstrate real-time microscopic imaging of acoustic vibrations with 1 nm axial resolution, 1200 image pixels, and 30 ps dwell time at 36.7 MHz scan rate.

Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Fard, Ali [Department of Electrical Engineering, Photonics Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ayazi, Ali; Kim, Sang Hyup [Department of Electrical Engineering, Photonics Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Jalali, Bahram [Department of Electrical Engineering, Photonics Laboratory, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

A new generic method for the semi-automatic extraction of river and road networks in low and mid-resolution satellite images  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the problem of semi-automatic extraction of road or hydrographic networks in satellite images. For that purpose, we propose an approach combining concepts arising from mathematical morphology and hydrology. The method exploits both geometrical and topological characteristics of rivers/roads and their tributaries in order to reconstruct the complete networks. It assumes that the images satisfy the following two general assumptions, which are the minimum conditions for a road/river network to be identifiable and are usually verified in low- to mid-resolution satellite images: (i) visual constraint: most pixels composing the network have similar spectral signature that is distinguishable from most of the surrounding areas; (ii) geometric constraint: a line is a region that is relatively long and narrow, compared with other objects in the image. While this approach fully exploits local (roads/rivers are modeled as elongated regions with a smooth spectral signature in the image and a maximum width) and global (they are structured like a tree) characteristics of the networks, further directional information about the image structures is incorporated. Namely, an appropriate anisotropic metric is designed by using both the characteristic features of the target network and the eigen-decomposition of the gradient structure tensor of the image. Following, the geodesic propagation from a given network seed with this metric is combined with hydrological operators for overland flow simulation to extract the paths which contain most line evidence and identify them with the target network.

Grazzini, Jacopo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dillard, Scott [PNNL; Soille, Pierre [EC JRC

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fourier Transform Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging, High-Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Detection of Single Cancer Cells and Single Viral Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single Cancer Cells from Human tumors are being detected and imaged by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR)Hyperspectral Imaging and Fluorescence Correlation Microspectroscopy. The first FT-NIR chemical, microscopic images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are here reported. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are also presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos as well as 99% accurate calibrations are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such high-resolution, 400 MHz H-1 NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. >~20%) compared to the average levels in non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monito...

Baianu,I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, in vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Three-dimensional molecular imaging by infrared laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos; Nemes, Peter

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Laser ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) for atmospheric pressure, In vivo, and imaging mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The field of the invention is atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry (MS), and more specifically a process and apparatus which combine infrared laser ablation (LA) with electrospray ionization (ESI).

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Nemes, Peter (Silver Spring, MD)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

152

A uniformly redundant imaging array of penumbral apertures coupled with a heuristic reconstruction for hard x-ray and neutron imaging  

SciTech Connect

A coded imaging and decoding (image reconstruction) scheme was developed for diagnosing a hot and dense region emitting hard x-rays and neutrons in laser-fusion plasmas. Because the imager was a uniformly redundant array of penumbral aperture (URPA) arranged in an M-matrix, URPA leads to N times (N: the total number of apertures) enhancement of signal intensity in comparison with a single penumbral aperture. A recorded penumbral image was reconstructed by a computer-based heuristic method to reduce artifacts caused by noises contained in a penumbral image. Applicability of this technique was investigated by imaging x-rays emitted from laser-produced plasmas, demonstrating a spatial resolution of 16 {mu}m. Under the present conditions, the spatial resolution was determined dominantly by a detector resolution (10.5 {mu}m) and a signal-to-noise ratio of the obtained penumbral image.

Ueda, Tatsuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6, Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Nozaki, Shinya; Azuma, Rumiko [Transdisplinary Research Organization for Subtropics Island Studies, University of the Ryukyus, 1 Senbaru Nishihara, Okinawa, 903-0213 (Japan); Chen, Yen-Wei [College of Information Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigasi Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of a high-resolution image intensified spectrograph. Final report 10 November 1975--30 April 1977  

SciTech Connect

This instrument was developed to provide high resolution spectral information of low light level optical radiation from atomic and molecular species related to the infrared chemistry of the upper atmosphere when excited by electron bombardment from a rocket-borne electron accelerator. (Author)

Tuttle, A.H.

1977-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

154

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High Temporal Resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High and is mainly limited by sensitivity. Here, signal-to-noise gains at high magnetic fields (7 Tesla

155

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Near Infrared Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence Microspectroscopy, Infrared Chemical Imaging and High Resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Soybean Seeds, Somatic Embryos and Single Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel methodologies are currently being developed and established for the chemical analysis of soybean seeds, embryos and single cells by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Near Infrared (FT-NIR) Microspectroscopy, Fluorescence and High-Resolution NMR (HR-NMR). The first FT-NIR chemical images of biological systems approaching one micron resolution are presented here. Chemical images obtained by FT-NIR and FT-IR Microspectroscopy are presented for oil in soybean seeds and somatic embryos under physiological conditions. FT-NIR spectra of oil and proteins were obtained for volumes as small as two cubic microns. Related, HR-NMR analyses of oil contents in somatic embryos are also presented here with nanoliter precision. Such 400 MHz 1H NMR analyses allowed the selection of mutagenized embryos with higher oil content (e.g. ~20%) compared to non-mutagenized control embryos. Moreover, developmental changes in single soybean seeds and/or somatic embryos may be monitored by FT-NIR with a precision ...

Baianu, I C; Hofmann, N E; Korban, S S; Lozano, P; You, T; AOCS 94th Meeting, Kansas

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Determination of electron-heated temperatures of petawatt laser-irradiated foil targets with 256 and 68 eV extreme ultraviolet imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of plasma temperature at the rear surface of foil targets due to heating by hot electrons, which were produced in short pulse high intensity laser matter interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser, are reported. Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) imaging at 256 and 68 eV energies is used to determine spatially resolved target rear surface temperature patterns by comparing absolute intensities to radiation hydrodynamic modeling. XUV mirrors at these two energies were absolutely calibrated at the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Temperatures deduced from both imagers are validated against each other within the range of 75-225 eV.

Ma, T. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Key, M. H.; Hatchett, S. P.; Barbee, T. W.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Offermann, D. T.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); King, J. A.; Beg, F. N. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Zhang, B. [University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Visible Light Digital Camera --Up to 2.3MP resolution with LED lamps provides sharp images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regardless of lighting conditions · Fusion Picture in Picture (PIP) -- Displays thermal image super Marker Function · Auto Hot/Cold spot marker function shows a spot within the area that automatically finds the hottest or coldest spot within the box i-Series Features FLIR i60 -- Scalable Fusion picture

Short, Daniel

159

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to explore how calibrated high dynamic range (HDR) images (luminance maps) acquired in real world daylit environments can be used to characterize, evaluate, and compare visual comfort conditions of innovative facade shading and light-redirecting systems. Detailed (1536 x 1536 pixel) luminance maps were time-lapse acquired from two view positions in an unoccupied full scale testbed facility. These maps were analyzed using existing visual comfort metrics to quantify how innovative interior and exterior shading systems compare to conventional systems under real sun and sky conditions over a solstice-to-solstice test interval. The results provide a case study in the challenges and potential of methods of visualizing, evaluating and summarizing daily and seasonal variation of visual comfort conditions computed from large sets of image data.

Konis, Kyle; Lee, Eleanor; Clear, Robert

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Application of PILATUS II Detector Modules for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for Doppler measurements of the radial profiles of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity in tokamak plasmas is presently being developed in a collaboration between various laboratories. The spectrometer will consist of a spherically bent crystal and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector; and it will record temporally and spatially resolved X-ray line spectra from highly-charged ions. The detector must satisfy challenging requirements with respect to count rate and spatial resolution. The paper presents the results from a recent test of a PILATUS II detector module on Alcator C-Mod, which demonstrate that the PILATUS II detector modules will satisfy these requirements.

M.L. Bitter, Ch. Borennimann, E.F. Eikenberry, K.W. Hill, A. Ince-Chushman, S.G. Lee, J.E. Rice, and S. Scott.

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Apparent resolution enhancement for animations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presenting the variety of high resolution images captured by high-quality devices, or generated on the computer, is challenging due to the limited resolution of current display devices. Our recent work addressed this problem by taking into account human ... Keywords: eye tracking, image reconstruction, perception

Krzysztof Templin; Piotr Didyk; Tobias Ritschel; Elmar Eisemann; Karol Myszkowski; Hans-Peter Seidel

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ultrafast x-ray diagnostics for laser fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

Temporally, spectrally, and spatially resolved x-ray emission diagnostics are important tools in the study of the heating and compression of laser fusion targets by sub-nanosecond laser pulses. The use of the Livermore 15 psec resolution x-ray streak camera to make such measurements is reviewed. Temporal histories of spectrally resolved x-ray emission in the 1 to 10 keV range have been obtained. These data have served to further define the x-ray streak camera as a quantative diagnostic tool and have also provided data relating to the absorption and compression phases of laser heating. The x-ray streak camera has been used in conjunction with a specially designed pinhole imaging system to temporally record images of laser compressed targets with a spatial resolution of approximately 6 ..mu..m. Implosion characteristics are presented for experiments with glass microshell targets. The concept, development, and testing of an ultrafast framing camera for full two-dimensional time resolved imaging is discussed. A prototype camera, based on the image dissection-restoration concept, has achieved an approximately 200 psec frame period with a resolution of 50 ..mu..m.

Coleman, L.W.

1976-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-or...

Duchêne, G; Bouvier, J; André, P; Djupvik, A A; Ghez, A M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multiple protostellar systems. II. A high resolution near-infrared imaging survey in nearby star-forming regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Our project endeavors to obtain a robust view of multiplicity among embedded Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars in a wide array of nearby molecular clouds to disentangle ``universal'' from cloud-dependent processes. We have used near-infrared adaptive optics observations at the VLT through the H, Ks and L' filters to search for tight companions to 45 Class I and Flat Spectrum protostars located in 4 different molecular clouds (Taurus-Auriga, Ophiuchus, Serpens and L1641 in Orion). We complemented these observations with published high-resolution surveys of 13 additional objects in Taurus and Ophiuchus. We found multiplicity rates of 32+/-6% and 47+/-8% over the 45-1400 AU and 14-1400 AU separation ranges, respectively. These rates are in excellent agreement with those previously found among T Tauri stars in Taurus and Ophiuchus, and represent an excess of a factor ~1.7 over the multiplicity rate of solar-type field stars. We found no non-hierarchical triple systems, nor any quadruple or higher-order systems. No significant cloud-to-cloud difference has been found, except for the fact that all companions to low-mass Orion protostars are found within 100 AU of their primaries whereas companions found in other clouds span the whole range probed here. Based on this survey, we conclude that core fragmentation always yields a high initial multiplicity rate, even in giant molecular clouds such as the Orion cloud or in clustered stellar populations as in Serpens, in contrast with predictions of numerical simulations. The lower multiplicity rate observed in clustered Class II and Class III populations can be accounted for by a universal set of properties for young systems and subsequent ejections through close encounters with unrelated cluster members.

G. Duchêne; S. Bontemps; J. Bouvier; P. André; A. A. Djupvik; A. M. Ghez

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

Simple microwave field imaging technique using hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple technique for microwave field imaging using alkali atoms in a vapor cell. The microwave field to be measured drives Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions, which are detected in a spatially resolved way using a laser beam and a CCD camera. Our vapor cell geometry enables single-shot recording of two-dimensional microwave field images with 350 {\\mu}m spatial resolution. Using microfabricated vapor cell arrays, a resolution of a few micrometers seems feasible. All vector components of the microwave magnetic field can be imaged. Our apparatus is simple and compact and does not require cryogenics or ultra-high vacuum.

Böhi, Pascal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simple microwave field imaging technique using hot atomic vapor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a simple technique for microwave field imaging using alkali atoms in a vapor cell. The microwave field to be measured drives Rabi oscillations on atomic hyperfine transitions, which are detected in a spatially resolved way using a laser beam and a camera. Our vapor cell geometry enables single-shot recording of two-dimensional microwave field images with 350 {\\mu}m spatial resolution. Using microfabricated vapor cell arrays, a resolution of a few micrometers seems feasible. All vector components of the microwave magnetic field can be imaged. Our apparatus is simple and compact and does not require cryogenics or ultra-high vacuum.

Pascal Böhi; Philipp Treutlein

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G. Adriany, A. Shmuel, E. Yacoub, P.-F. van de Moortele, X. Hu, K. Ugurbil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G was made possible by signal-to-noise gains at the high magnetic field of 7 Tesla and by using a novel RF

168

Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Imaging the geometrical structure of the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion by high-order above-threshold ionization in an intense laser field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a frequency-domain theory, we demonstrate that an angle-resolved high-order above-threshold ionization (HATI) spectrum carries three pieces of important information: the fingerprint of the molecular wave function in the direct above-threshold-ionization amplitude, the geometrical structure of the molecule in the potential scattering between two plane waves, and the interaction between the ionized electron and the laser field, manifested in a phase factor associated with laser-assisted collisions. As a result all main interference features in the HATI spectrum can be physically explained. As an application it is pointed out that the skeleton structure of a molecule can be better imaged using lasers of higher frequencies.

Guo Yingchun [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Fu Panming; Wang Bingbing [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yan Zongchao [Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, P.O. Box 4400, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada E3B 5A3 (Canada); Center for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Gong Jiangbin [Department of Physics and Center of Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Resolution-enhanced photometric stereo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional photometric stereo has a fundamental limitation that the scale of recovered geometry is limited to the resolution of the input images. However, surfaces that contain sub-pixel geometric structures are not well modelled by a single normal ...

Ping Tan; Stephen Lin; Long Quan

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 08/26/2013 | NR-13-08-04 High Resolution Image All NIF experiments are controlled and orchestrated by the integrated computer control system in the facility's control room. It consists of 950 front-end processors attached to about 60,000 control points, including mirrors, lenses, motors, sensors, cameras, amplifiers, capacitors and diagnostic instruments. Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov High Resolution Image The preamplifiers of the National Ignition Facility are the first step in increasing the energy of laser beams as they make their way toward the target chamber. LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In the early morning hours of Aug.13, Lawrence

172

In-line phase-contrast imaging of a biological specimen using a compact laser-Compton scattering-based x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

Laser-Compton scattering (LCS) x-ray sources have recently attracted much attention for their potential use at local medical facilities because they can produce ultrashort pulsed, high-brilliance, and quasimonochromatic hard x rays with a small source size. The feasibility of in-line phase-contrast imaging for a 'thick' biological specimens of rat lumbar vertebrae using the developed compact LCS-X in AIST was investigated for the promotion of clinical imaging. In the higher-quality images, anatomical details of the spinous processes of the vertebrae are more clearly observable than with conventional absorption radiography. The results demonstrate that phase-contrast radiography can be performed using LCS-X.

Ikeura-Sekiguchi, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yasumoto, M.; Toyokawa, H.; Koike, M.; Yamada, K. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 2-5, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Sakai, F. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI), 2-1-1, Yatocho, Nishitokyo, Tokyo 188-8585 (Japan); Mori, K.; Maruyama, K. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2, Ami, Inashiki, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Oka, H.; Kimata, T. [St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1, Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki City 216-8512 (Japan)

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Final Technical Report for DE-FG02-06ER15835: Chemical Imaging with 100nm Spatial Resolution: Combining High Resolution Flurosecence Microscopy and Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.

Buratto, Steven K. [UC Santa Barbara

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF  

SciTech Connect

As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

High resolution data acquisition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock pulse train and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train. The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging Print Imaging Print The wavelengths of soft x-ray photons (1-15 nm) are very well matched to the creation of "nanoscopes" capable of probing the interior structure of biological cells and inorganic mesoscopic systems.Topics addressed by soft x-ray imaging techniques include cell biology, nanomagnetism, environmental science, and polymers. The tunability of synchrotron radiation is absolutely essential for the creation of contrast mechanisms. Cell biology CAT scans are performed in the "water window" (300-500 eV). Nanomagnetism studies require the energy range characteristic of iron, cobalt, and nickel (600-900 eV). Mid- and far-infrared (energies below 1 eV) microprobes using synchrotron radiation are being used to address problems such as chemistry in biological tissues, chemical identification and molecular conformation, environmental biodegradation, mineral phases in geological and astronomical specimens, and electronic properties of novel materials. Infrared synchrotron radiation is focused through, or reflected from, a small spot on the specimen and then analyzed using a spectrometer. Tuning to characteristic vibrational frequencies serves as a sensitive fingerprint for molecular species. Images of the various species are built up by raster scanning the specimen through the small illuminated spot.

178

PYRAMIDAL MULTI-VIEW PBR A Point-Based Algorithm for Multi-view Multi-resolution Rendering of Large Data Sets from Range Images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Farooq,S. Siebert,J.P. GRAPP2009 - The International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and ComputerGraphics Theory and Applications

Farooq, S.; Siebert, J.P.

179

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

180

Laser programs highlights 1993  

SciTech Connect

Over the last two decades, the scope of our laser research has grown immensely. The small, low-power laser systems of our early days have given way to laser systems of record-breaking size and power. Now we are focusing our activities within the target physics and laser science programs to support the ignition and gain goals of the proposed glass-laser National Ignition Facility. In our laser isotope separation work, we completed the most important set of experiments in the history of the AVLIS Program in 1993, which culminated in a spectacularly successful run that met or exceeded all our objectives. We are also developing lasers and laser-related technologies for a variety of energy, commercial, and defense uses. On the horizon are transfers of important technologies for waste treatment, x-ray lithography, communications and security, optical imaging, and remote sensing, among others.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improved resolution and reduced clutter in ultra-wideband microwave imaging using cross-correlated back projection: experimental and numerical results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave breast cancer detection is based on the dielectric contrast between healthy and malignant tissue. This radar-based imaging method involves illumination of the breast with an ultra-wideband pulse. Detection of tumors within the breast is achieved ...

S. Jacobsen; Y. Birkelund

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

184

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

185

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

186

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

187

Advanced Measurement Laboratory Image Gallery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This NIST-developed instrument, a scanning electron microscope with spin polarization analysis, is the highest resolution magnetization imaging ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

188

ORION laser target diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K. [Plasma Physics Department, Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

High-energy x-ray backlighter spectrum measurements using calibrated image plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The x-ray spectrum between 18 and 88 keV generated by a petawatt laser driven x-ray backlighter target was measured using a 12-channel differential filter pair spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a series of filter pairs on a Ta mask coupled with an x-ray sensitive image plate. A calibration of Fuji{trademark} MS and SR image plates was conducted using a tungsten anode x-ray source and the resulting calibration applied to the design of the Ross pair spectrometer. Additionally, the fade rate and resolution of the image plate system were measured for quantitative radiographic applications. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into silver K{alpha} x rays from a petawatt laser target was measured using the differential filter pair spectrometer and compared to measurements using a single photon counting charge coupled device.

Maddox, B.R.; Park, H.S.; Remington, B.A.; Izumi, N.; Chen, S.; Chen, C.; Kimminau, G.; Ali, Z.; Haugh, M.J.; Ma, Q. (LLNL); (NWU); (Oxford); (NSTec)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

High-energy x-ray backlighter spectrum measurements using calibrated image plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The x-ray spectrum between 18 and 88 keV generated by a petawatt laser driven x-ray backlighter target was measured using a 12-channel differential filter pair spectrometer. The spectrometer consists of a series of filter pairs on a Ta mask coupled with an x-ray sensitive image plate. A calibration of Fuji MS and SR image plates was conducted using a tungsten anode x-ray source and the resulting calibration applied to the design of the Ross pair spectrometer. Additionally, the fade rate and resolution of the image plate system were measured for quantitative radiographic applications. The conversion efficiency of laser energy into silver K{alpha} x rays from a petawatt laser target was measured using the differential filter pair spectrometer and compared to measurements using a single photon counting charge coupled device.

Maddox, B. R.; Park, H. S.; Remington, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Chen, S.; Chen, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kimminau, G. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Ali, Z.; Haugh, M. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Ma, Q. [DND-CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4857 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Three dimensional optical manipulation and structural imaging of soft materials by use of laser tweezers and multimodal nonlinear microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an integrated system of holographic optical trapping and multimodal nonlinear microscopy and perform simultaneous three-dimensional optical manipulation and non-invasive structural imaging of composite soft-matter systems. We combine different nonlinear microscopy techniques such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, multi-photon excitation fluorescence and multi-harmonic generation, and use them for visualization of long-range molecular order in soft materials by means of their polarized excitation and detection. The combined system enables us to accomplish both, manipulation in composite soft materials such as colloidal inclusions in liquid crystals as well as imaging of each separate constituents of the composite material in different nonlinear optical modalities. We also demonstrate optical generation and control of topological defects and simultaneous reconstruction of their three-dimensional long-range molecular orientational patterns from the nonlinear optical images.

Rahul P. Trivedi; Taewoo Lee; Kris A. Bertness; Ivan I. Smalyukh

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments  

SciTech Connect

The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel...

196

High-Resolution Doppler Lidar for Boundary Layer and Cloud Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-resolution Doppler lidar (HRDL) was developed to provide higher spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution and more reliable performance than was previously obtainable with CO2-laser-based technology. The improved performance is needed ...

Christian J. Grund; Robert M. Banta; Joanne L. George; James N. Howell; Madison J. Post; Ronald A. Richter; Ann M. Weickmann

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

Levin, Craig S. (Santa Monica, CA); Hoffman, Edward J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ex-Situ High Resolution NMR and MRI - Lawrence Berkeley ...  

Alexander Pines and colleagues have opened the way to high resolution ex situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

199

Computer analysis of four channel x-ray microscopy images to obtain source and spectral emission data on laser fusion  

SciTech Connect

It is possible to analyze the images obtained from the four- channel x- ray microscope to obtain reasonable estimates of source spatial and energy emission. The technique shown here is particularly useful when relative comparisons are desired in which, from shot to shot, few parameters are changed. These data are of use in fuel pellet design and in checking design code predictions. The technique should also apply to pinhole camera data. Largest uncertainties appear to be due to film energy/handling calibration and mirror efficiency measurements. (auth)

Harper, T.L.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Acquisition Conflict Resolution  

Acquisition Conflict Resolution At the option of the Supplier, a concern may be brought to the Ombuds Office or may be taken to the Internal Conflict Resolution Process

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Space and Time Resolved Measurements of the Heating of Solids to Ten Million Kelvin by a Petawatt Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating of plane solid targets by the Vulcan petawatt laser at powers of 0.32-0.73 PW and intensities of up to 4 x 10^20 W cm^-2 has been diagnosed with a temporal resolution of 17 ps and a spatial resolution of 30 um, by measuring optical emission from the opposite side of the target to the laser with a streak camera. Second harmonic emission was filtered out and the target viewed at an angle to eliminate optical transition radiation. Spatial resolution was obtained by imaging the emission onto a bundle of fibre optics, arranged into a one-dimensional array at the camera entrance. The results show that a region 160 um in diameter can be heated to a temperature of ~10^7 K (kT/e ~ keV) in solid targets from 10 to 20 um thick and that this temperature is maintained for at least 20 ps, confirming the utility of PW lasers in the study of high energy density physics. Hybrid code modelling shows that magnetic field generation prevents increased target heating by electron refluxing above a certain target thickness and that the absorption of laser energy into electrons entering the solid target was between 15-30%, and tends to increase with laser energy.

Nakatsutsumi, M.; Davies, J.R.; Kodama, R.; Green, J.S.; Lancaster, K.L.; Akli, K.U.; Beg, F.N.; Chen, S.N.; Clark, D.; Freeman, R.R.; Gregory, C.D.; Habara, H.; Heathcote, R.; Hey, D.S.; Highbarger, K.; Jaanimagi, P.; Key, M.H.; Krushelnick, K.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; MacKinnon, A.J.; Nakamura, H.; Stephens, R.B.; Storm, M.; Tampo, M.; Theobald, W.; Van Woerkom, L.; Weber, R.L.; Wei, M.S.; Woolsey, N.C.; Norreys, P.A.

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

CONSTRUCTING A WISE HIGH RESOLUTION GALAXY ATLAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After eight months of continuous observations, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mapped the entire sky at 3.4 {mu}m, 4.6 {mu}m, 12 {mu}m, and 22 {mu}m. We have begun a dedicated WISE High Resolution Galaxy Atlas project to fully characterize large, nearby galaxies and produce a legacy image atlas and source catalog. Here we summarize the deconvolution techniques used to significantly improve the spatial resolution of WISE imaging, specifically designed to study the internal anatomy of nearby galaxies. As a case study, we present results for the galaxy NGC 1566, comparing the WISE enhanced-resolution image processing to that of Spitzer, Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and ground-based imaging. This is the first paper in a two-part series; results for a larger sample of nearby galaxies are presented in the second paper.

Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, F.; Tsai, C. W.; Fowler, J. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, S.; Lake, S.; Wright, E. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cluver, M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Benford, D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Blain, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, LE1 7RH Leicester (United Kingdom); Bridge, C.; Neill, James D. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Donoso, E. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koribalski, B. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Seibert, M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Insititution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sheth, K. [NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow. (United States); Stanford, S., E-mail: jarrett@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method and apparatus for coherent imaging of infrared energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coherent camera system performs ranging, spectroscopy, and thermal imaging. Local oscillator radiation is combined with target scene radiation to enable heterodyne detection by the coherent camera`s two-dimensional photodetector array. Versatility enables deployment of the system in either a passive mode (where no laser energy is actively transmitted toward the target scene) or an active mode (where a transmitting laser is used to actively illuminate the target scene). The two-dimensional photodetector array eliminates the need to mechanically scan the detector. Each element of the photodetector array produces an intermediate frequency signal that is amplified, filtered, and rectified by the coherent camera`s integrated circuitry. By spectroscopic examination of the frequency components of each pixel of the detector array, a high-resolution, three-dimensional or holographic image of the target scene is produced for applications such as air pollution studies, atmospheric disturbance monitoring, and military weapons targeting. 8 figs.

Hutchinson, D.P.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quantum Imaging: Enhanced Image Formation Using Quantum States of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Imaging: Enhanced Image Formation Using Quantum States of Light Robert W. Boyd, Kam Wai, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA ABSTRACT We review recent research in the field of quantum imaging. Quantum imaging deals with the formation of images that possess higher resolution or better

Boyd, Robert W.

205

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

206

Range-gated imaging for near-field target identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of two complementary technologies developed independently at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) has demonstrated feasibility of target detection and image capture in a highly light-scattering, medium. The technique uses a compact SNL developed Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch/Laser Diode Array (PCSS/LDA) for short-range (distances of 8 to 10 m) large Field-Of-View (FOV) target illumination. Generation of a time-correlated echo signal is accomplished using a photodiode. The return image signal is recorded with a high-speed shuttered Micro-Channel-Plate Image Intensifier (MCPII), declined by LANL and manufactured by Philips Photonics. The MCPII is rated using a high-frequency impedance-matching microstrip design to produce 150 to 200 ps duration optical exposures. The ultra first shuttering producer depth resolution of a few inches along the optic axis between the MCPII and the target, producing enhanced target images effectively deconvolved from noise components from the scattering medium in the FOV. The images from the MCPII are recorded with an RS-170 Charge-Coupled-Device camera and a Big Sky, Beam Code, PC-based digitizer frame grabber and analysis package. Laser pulse data were obtained by the but jitter problems and spectral mismatches between diode spectral emission wavelength and MCPII photocathode spectral sensitivity prevented the capture of fast gating imaging with this demonstration system. Continued development of the system is underway.

Yates, G.J.; Gallegos, R.A.; McDonald, T.E. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Laser Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... over a wide range of powers, energies, and wavelengths. ... the SI units for laser power and energy. ... Novel power meter for high-efficiency laser diode ...

2012-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

208

Acceleration methods for image super-resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Atlanta, GA, USA (2000) 43­49 18. Franchi, D., Belardinelli, A., Palagi, G., Ripoli, A., Bedini, R.: New

Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

209

Inverse Kriging to Enhance Spatial Resolution of Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a unique approach to image resolution enhancement, inverse kriging (IK), which takes advantage of the spatial relationship between high- and low-resolution images within an area of overlap. Once established, this mathematical relationship then can be applied across the entire low-resolution image to significantly sharpen the image. The mathematical relationship uses the spatial correlations within the low-resolution image and between the low and high spatial-resolution imagery. Two of the most important requirements of the technique are that the images be co-registered well within the resolution of the larger pixels and that the spatial structure of the training area (where the spatial correlation statistics are compared) is similar to the structure of the remaining image area where it will be applied. Testing was performed using same-sensor and multi-sensor imagery. We show results that indicate that the method does improve the low spatial-resolution imagery. The selection of a training area spatial structure similar to the area being processed is important, as areas with different spatial structure (e.g., vegetation versus buildings and roads) will produce poor results. Comparisons with bilinear interpolation demonstrate that IK could be used as an improved interpolation tool, for example, in the image-registration process.

Petrie, Gregg M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Heasler, Patrick G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Perry, Eileen M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thompson, Sandra E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Daly, Don S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Backscatter absorption gas imaging system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

McRae, Jr., Thomas G. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Near-Electrode Imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager use the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.; Woelk, Klaus; Gerald, Rex E.,II

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Diagnostics systems developments and applications for laser fusion experiments  

SciTech Connect

A variety of systems are required for adequate diagnostics of laser fusion experiments. Picosecond scale temporal measurements are typically made with ultrafast streak cameras. Visible and x-ray sensitive streak cameras with resolutions of 6 psec and 15 psec, respectively, and dynamic recording range in excess of 10/sup 3/ are in regular use on experiments at Livermore. The characteristics of these cameras and their applications to target experiment diagnostics are described. The development and testing of a prototype ultrafast framing system is discussed. Because of the need for ''real time'' data acquisition, analysis, and control systems, techniques for providing directly computer interfaced image data from streak and framing cameras and optical imaging systems are being developed. The status of these developments and the characteristics of the computer interfaced data and control systems on Argus and Shiva are summarized.

Coleman, L.W.

1977-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

High resolution x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I. [Adelphi Technology, Inc. 981-B Industrial Road, San Carlos, California 94070 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Kurchatova 7, Minsk 220064 (Belarus)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Instrument Series: Spectroscopy and Diffraction High Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Spatial Resolution High Spatial Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) EMSL's novel, new-generation ion microprobe extends high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analysis to extremely small areas (down to 50 nm) and volumes while maintaining high sensitivity (e.g., ppm in element imaging) at high mass resolution. NanoSIMS can measure up to seven ions in parallel, offering perfect isotopic ratio results from the same small volume for perfect image superimposition. NanoSIMS can be used for enhanced imaging of cellular structures; simultaneous imaging of elements/isotopes on minerals and soft surfaces at the nanoscale; and imaging elements and isotopes of aerosols, nanoparticles, and organic and inorganic surfaces. Research Applications

215

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

216

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame VayBoost.gif An image showing the "boosted frame," in which...

218

Acquisition Conflict Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a fair process that maximizes the opportunity for resolution. The Ombuds Office does not conduct official investigations. Note: Contacting the Ombuds Office does not automatically...

219

Video image position determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical beam position controller in which a video camera captures an image of the beam in its video frames, and conveys those images to a processing board which calculates the centroid coordinates for the image. The image coordinates are used by motor controllers and stepper motors to position the beam in a predetermined alignment. In one embodiment, system noise, used in conjunction with Bernoulli trials, yields higher resolution centroid coordinates.

Christensen, Wynn (Los Alamos, NM); Anderson, Forrest L. (Bernalillo, NM); Kortegaard, Birchard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Imaging with Scattered Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A multipurpose TIM-based optical telescope for Omega and the Trident laser facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have recently designed and are building a telescope which acts as an imaging light collector relaying the image to an optical table for experiment dependent analysis and recording. The expected primary use of this instrument is a streaked optical pyrometer for witness plate measurements of Hohlraum drive temperature. The telescope is based on University of Rochester`s Ten-Inch Manipulator (TIM) which allows compatibility between Omega, Trident, and the NIF lasers. The optics capture a f/7 cone of light, have a field of view of 6-mm, have a spatial resolution of 5 to 7-{micro}m per line pair at the object plane, and are optimized for operation at 280-nm. The image is at a magnification of 11.7x, which is convenient for many experiments, but can be changed using additional optics that reside outside the TIM.

Oertel, J.A.; Murphy, T.J.; Berggren, R.R. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Laser Spectro.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more information about my work on laser spectroscopy, consult the following papers: Sansonetti, CJ, Gillaspy, JD, and ...

223

Space bounds for resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a new way to measure the space needed in a resolution refutation of a CNF formula in propositional logic. With the former definition [6] the space required for the resolution of any unsatisfiable formula in CNF is linear in the number of ...

Juan Luis Esteban; Jacobo Torán

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli, determined by a Berkeley-Berlin collaboration to a resolution of 3.5 Ã…, the highest yet achieved, provide many new insights into how the ribosome factory works. Ribosomes Ready for Extreme Close-Up In 1999, the first structure of the intact ribosome-a very large, asymmetric protein that is difficult to crystallize-was solved by x-ray crystallography at the ALS (see "Solving the Ribosome Puzzle"). Since then, scientists have developed quite an extensive photo gallery of ribosomes from various organisms and in various configurations. More importantly, they have sharpened the focus significantly, going from a resolution of 7.8 Ã… in 1999, to 5.5 Ã… in 2001 (see "Zooming in on Ribosomes"), to an amazing 3.5 Ã… in this latest work. What was initially seen as fuzzy "fingers" of electron density can now be resolved into individual nucleotides in the RNA strands. Serendipitously, the crystals used in this particular study contained two versions of the ribosome, each one in a different "pose," allowing the researchers to compare the positions of the various parts and deduce how they work. With these sharper images, scientists are now better able to interpret previous data, test models, and develop new theories, both practical (how do antibiotics that target the ribosome work?) and theoretical (how much has the ribosome evolved from bacteria to human?). Stay tuned.

225

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Wednesday, 28 March 2012 00:00 Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

226

The athermal Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new laser concept is presented, called the athermal laser, unifying all the hitherto known implementations of radiative laser cooling.

Muys, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Other Principal Investigators Grant Bromhal, National Energy Technology Laboratory Targets Milestones - Improve image resolution for fracture...

228

XFEL Materials Imaging at the LCLS CXI Endstation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Characterization of Materials through High Resolution Coherent Imaging.

229

Protective laser beam viewing device  

SciTech Connect

A protective laser beam viewing system or device including a camera selectively sensitive to laser light wavelengths and a viewing screen receiving images from the laser sensitive camera. According to a preferred embodiment of the invention, the camera is worn on the head of the user or incorporated into a goggle-type viewing display so that it is always aimed at the area of viewing interest to the user and the viewing screen is incorporated into a video display worn as goggles over the eyes of the user.

Neil, George R.; Jordan, Kevin Carl

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

231

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

232

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

233

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures Print Magnetism is useful for many devices and techniques, from electric motors and computer hard drives to magnetic resonance imaging used in medicine. By studying the basics of magnetism, scientists aim to better understand the fundamental physical principles that govern magnetic systems, perhaps leading to important new technologies. The high brightness and coherence of the ALS's soft x-rays have enabled scientists to apply lensless x-ray imaging for the first time to nanometer-scale magnetic structures in an alloy. Many Ways To See You open your eyes and detect the light rays streaming through your bedroom window (transmission), illuminating your socks on the floor (scattering). You put on your glasses (refraction) to detect the state of your image in the mirror (reflection). If you are an ALS scientist, perhaps you go to work and shine some x-ray light on a crystal to detect the arrangement of the atoms in the crystal (diffraction). Now, thanks to Turner et al., you can also shine some x-ray light on a magnetic sample to detect the arrangement of its electron spins through a method known as lensless imaging. This last example is an equally valid way to "see," but instead of using windows, lenses, or mirrors to manipulate light and construct an image, mathematical formulas are used to describe the effects that particles and fields in the sample have on the light. These formulas have always contained terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but they were previously ignored. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only crystal structure, but magnetic spin distribution and orientation as well, with a spatial resolution limited only by the wavelength of x-rays used. This promising method can be used at any coherent light source, including modern x-ray free-electron lasers, where ultrashort pulses would freeze-frame magnetic changes, offering the potential for imaging in unprecedented detail the structure and motion of boundaries between regions with different magnetic orientation.

234

High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes.

Norbert, Massie A. (San Ramon, CA); Yale, Oster (Danville, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

High resolution telescope including an array of elemental telescopes aligned along a common axis and supported on a space frame with a pivot at its geometric center  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large effective-aperture, low-cost optical telescope with diffraction-limited resolution enables ground-based observation of near-earth space objects. The telescope has a non-redundant, thinned-aperture array in a center-mount, single-structure space frame. It employes speckle interferometric imaging to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio problem is mitigated by moving the wavelength of operation to the near-IR, and the image is sensed by a Silicon CCD. The steerable, single-structure array presents a constant pupil. The center-mount, radar-like mount enables low-earth orbit space objects to be tracked as well as increases stiffness of the space frame. In the preferred embodiment, the array has elemental telescopes with subaperture of 2.1 m in a circle-of-nine configuration. The telescope array has an effective aperture of 12 m which provides a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.02 arc seconds. Pathlength matching of the telescope array is maintained by a electro-optical system employing laser metrology. Speckle imaging relaxes pathlength matching tolerance by one order of magnitude as compared to phased arrays. Many features of the telescope contribute to substantial reduction in costs. These include eliminating the conventional protective dome and reducing on-site construction activities. The cost of the telescope scales with the first power of the aperture rather than its third power as in conventional telescopes. 15 figs.

Norbert, M.A.; Yale, O.

1992-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for the LIL program  

SciTech Connect

This article describes x-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes, developed for the experimental program carried out on the Ligne d'Integration Laser (LIL) facility [J. P. Le Breton et al., Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2001 (Elsevier, Paris, 2002), pp. 856-862] (24 kJ, UV--0.35 nm). The design includes a large target-to-microscope (400-700 mm) distance required by the x-ray ablation issues anticipated on the Laser MegaJoule facility [P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999)] (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes [P. Kirkpatrick and A. V. Baez J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 766 (1948)] with different spectral wavelength ranges and with a 400 mm source-to-mirror distance image the target on a custom-built framing camera (time resolution of {approx}80 ps). The soft x-ray version microscope is sensitive below 1 keV and its spatial resolution is better than 30 {mu}m over a 2-mm-diam region. The hard x-ray version microscope has a 10 {mu}m resolution over an 800-{mu}m-diam region and is sensitive in the 1-5 keV energy range. Two other x-ray microscopes based on an association of toroidal/spherical surfaces (T/S microscopes) produce an image on a streak camera with a spatial resolution better than 30 {mu}m over a 3 mm field of view in the direction of the camera slit. Both microscopes have been designed to have, respectively, a maximum sensitivity in the 0.1-1 and 1-5 keV energy range. We present the original design of these four microscopes and their test on a dc x-ray tube in the laboratory. The diagnostics were successfully used on LIL first experiments early in 2005. Results of soft x-ray imaging of a radiative jet during conical shaped laser interaction are shown.

Rosch, R.; Boutin, J. Y.; Le Breton, J. P.; Gontier, D.; Jadaud, J. P.; Reverdin, C.; Soullie, G.; Lidove, G.; Maroni, R. [CEA/DIF, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-Le-Chatel (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

The digital laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is well-known how to control the spatial output from a laser, with most solutions to date involving customised intra-cavity elements in the form of apertures, diffractive optics and free-form mirrors. These optical elements require considerable design and fabrication effort and suffer from the further disadvantage of being immutably connected to the selection of a particular spatial mode. Consequently, most laser systems are designed for the ubiquitous Gaussian mode, whereas it is clear that there are many instances when a customised mode would be preferable. We overcome these limitations with the first digital laser, comprising an electrically addressed reflective phase-only spatial light modulator as an intra-cavity holographic mirror. The phase and amplitude of the holographic mirror may be controlled as simply as writing a new gray-scale image (computer generated hologram) to the device: on-demand laser modes. We show that we can digitally control the laser modes with ease, albeit with higher round-tri...

Ngcobo, Sandile; Burger, Liesl; Forbes, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Automatic image segmentation optimized by bilateral filtering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object-based methodology is one of the most commonly used strategies for processing high spatial resolution images. A prerequisite to object-based image analysis is image segmentation, which is normally defined as the subdivision of an image into ... Keywords: bilateral filter, image segmentation, self-calibrating framework

Javier Sanchez; Estibaliz Martinez; Agueda Arquero; Diego Renza

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Information Systems Laboratories, Inc., Brownsboro, Alabama, 35741 (United States)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

243

DOE-Imaging grant FG02-06ER15829, entitled "Developing Laser-Induced Re-Collision Electron Self-Diffraction" Brief summary of accomplishments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our principal goal was the experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Key steps along the development of this experimental technique have been accomplished and reported in the publications listed in this brief report. We started with measuring 3D electron momenta spectra in aligned nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Chakra Maharjan (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) was a lead researcher on this project. Although Chakra succeeded in obtaining those spectra, we were scooped by the publication of identical results in Science by the NRC Ottawa group. Our results were never published as a refereed article, but became a part of Chakra's Ph.D. dissertation. That Science paper was the first experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Chakra also worked on wavelength dependence of 3D ATI spectra of atoms and molecules using tunable OPA pulses. Another Ph.D. student, Maia Magrakvelidze (her GRA was funded by the grant), started working on COLTRIMS experiments using OPA pulses (1800 nm wavelength). After some initial experiments it became apparent that COLTRIMS did not yield sufficient count rates of electrons in the high-energy part of the spectrum to see diffraction signatures with acceptable statistics (unfavorable scaling of the electron yield with laser wavelength was partly to blame). Nevertheless, Maia managed to use COLTRIMS and OPA to measure the angular dependence of the tunneling ionization rate in D{sub 2} molecules. Following the initial trial experiments, the decision was made to switch from COLTRIMS to VMI in order to increase the count rates by a factor of {approx}100, which may have given us a chance to see LIED. Research Associate Dr. Sankar De (his salary was funded by the grant), in collaboration with Matthias Kling's group (then at MPQ Garching), proceeded to design a special multi-electrode VMI spectrometer for capturing high-energy ATI electrons and to install it in place of COLTRIMS inside our experimental chamber. That apparatus was later used for the first demonstration of field-free orientation in CO using two-color laser pulses as well as for a series of other experiments, such as pump-probe studies of molecular dynamics with few-cycle laser pulses, control of electron localization in dissociating hydrogen molecules using two-color laser pulses, and ATI spectra of Xe ionized by two-color laser pulses. In parallel, Dipanwita Ray (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) worked on measuring angle-resolved ATI spectra of noble gases using a stereo-ATI phasemeter as a TOF electron spectrometer. She observed the angular diffraction structures in 3D ATI spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe, which were interpreted in terms of the Quantitative Rescattering theory newly developed by C.D. Lin. We also attempted to use a much more powerful OPA (five times more energy per pulse than the one we had at JRML) available at the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) in Montreal to observe LIED. Two visits to ALLS by the PI, Igor Litvinyuk, and one visit by the PI's Ph.D. student (Irina Bocharova) were funded by the grant. Though we failed to observe LIED (the repetition rate of the ALLS OPA was too low at only 100 Hz), this international collaboration resulted in several publications on other related subjects, such as the wavelength dependence of laser Coulomb explosion of hydrogen, the wavelength dependence of non-sequential double ionization of neon and argon, the demonstration of charge-resonance enhanced ionization in CO{sub 2}, and the study of non-elastic scattering processes in H{sub 2}. Theoretical efforts to account for the hydrogen Coulomb explosion experiment resulted in another paper by Maia Magrakvelidze as lead author. Although for various reasons we failed to achieve our main goal of observing LIED, we salute the recent success in this endeavor by Lou DiMauro's group (with theoretical support from our KSU colleague C.D. Lin) published in Nature, which validates our approach.

Igor V. Litvinyuk, and Itzik Ben-Itzhak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Laser Catalyst  

INL’s Laser Catalyst is a method for removing contaminant matter from a porous material. A polymer material is applied to a contaminated surface and ...

245

Beam transport and monitoring for laser plasma accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The controlled transport and imaging of relativistic electron beams from laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) are critical for their diagnostics and applications. Here we present the design and progress in the implementation of the transport and monitoring system for an undulator based electron beam diagnostic. Miniature permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQs) are employed to realize controlled transport of the LPA electron beams, and cavity based electron beam position monitors for non-invasive beam position detection. Also presented is PMQ calibration by using LPA electron beams with broadband energy spectrum. The results show promising performance for both transporting and monitoring. With the proper transport system, XUV-photon spectra from THUNDER will provide the momentum distribution of the electron beam with the resolution above what can be achieved by the magnetic spectrometer currently used in the LOASIS facility.

Nakamura, K.; Sokollik, T.; Tilborg, J. van; Gonsalves, A. J.; Shaw, B.; Shiraishi, S.; Mittal, R.; De Santis, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Leemans, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems  

SciTech Connect

Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

Newnam, B.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Recent Advances in Laser-based Diagnostics for Gaseous Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-based diagnostic techniques offer unique capabilities for experimentation on gaseous flows. In this paper, we overview recent progress of two concepts: spectrally resolved absorption and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. The absorption ... Keywords: PLIF, absorption spectroscopy, acetone, combustion control, diode laser, hypersonic, supersonic

R. Hanson; D. Baer; C. Morris; M. Thurber; E. Furlong; S. Wehe

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

High resolution electron crystallography of protein molecules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron diffraction data and high resolution images can now be used to obtain accurate, three-dimensional density maps of biological macromolecules. These density maps can be interpreted by building an atomic-resolution model of the structure into the experimental density. The Cowley-Moodie formalism of dynamical diffraction theory has been used to validate the use of kinematic diffraction theory, strictly the weak phase object approximation, in producing such 3-D density maps. Further improvements in the preparation of very flat specimens and in the retention of diffraction to a resolution of 0.2 nm or better could result in electron crystallography becoming as important a technique as x-ray crystallography currently is for the field of structural molecular biology.

Glaeser, R.M. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cell Biology]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Downing, K.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NIST Laser Applications Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Group. Welcome. The Laser Applications Group advances laser technology for applications in optical ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Diagnostics with an X-ray Laser? Lessons from the First Nanoscale Imaging of Airborne Particles Mike Bogan Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA What does airborne particulate matter look like? How do we develop quantitative descriptors for particles of complex morphology? These challenges were highlighted in the NIST workshop report "Aerosol Metrology Needs for Climate Science" (Dec, 2011). Sure, we can capture aerosol particles on surfaces - removing them from their airborne state - and probe them with high resolution optical and chemical imaging tools, but what information do we lose about the airborne particles? How can we follow dynamics? In this talk we will explore these very basic questions and their importance to combustion

251

Integration of photonic and passive microfluidic devices into lab-on-chip with femtosecond laser materials processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond laser materials processing is a powerful method for the integration of high resolution, 3D structures into Lab-On-Chip (LOC) systems. One major application of femtosecond laser materials processing is waveguide ...

Gu, Yu, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Metalworking Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Several models of metalworking lasers of both domestic and foreign manufacture are commercially available. The majority of these are of either the neodymium yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) solid-state type or the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas type. These lasers may have pulsed or...

254

Laser device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser device includes a virtual source configured to aim laser energy that originates from a true source. The virtual source has a vertical rotational axis during vertical motion of the virtual source and the vertical axis passes through an exit point from which the laser energy emanates independent of virtual source position. The emanating laser energy is collinear with an orientation line. The laser device includes a virtual source manipulation mechanism that positions the virtual source. The manipulation mechanism has a center of lateral pivot approximately coincident with a lateral index and a center of vertical pivot approximately coincident with a vertical index. The vertical index and lateral index intersect at an index origin. The virtual source and manipulation mechanism auto align the orientation line through the index origin during virtual source motion.

Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tremblay, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Measuring the coherence properties of light emission from laser-plasma interactions. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several detrimental instabilities can be excited when a high-intensity laser interacts with plasma. The temporal evolution and spectra of the scattered light emitted by many of these instabilities are used to characterize the instabilities and to benchmark theories. It has been difficult to image the emission region with sufficient resolution to make quantitative comparisons with theory. Direct measurement of the emission region would yield information on ponderomotive steepening phenomena, the true emission zone of convective instabilities, and on the saturation of absolute instabilities. The increase in laser intensity caused by the filamentation instability is conjectured to elevate the levels of parametric instabilities found in high-energy laser-plasma interactions. Because the diameter of the filaments is very small (on the order of 10 {micro}m), it is impossible to image the emission sites directly and either to prove or to disprove this conjecture. The research reported here examines an alternate method of measuring the emission region of scattered light from parametric instabilities. This report provides a brief background of coherence theory by defining the relevant parameters in Section 2. A concrete example of the effect that multiple scattering sites would have on the proposed measurement is provided in Section 3. The following section briefly describes experiments that might be able to demonstrate the proposed technique. The conclusion raises the issue of coherence and its effect on the expected angular distribution of scattering light from parametric instabilities.

Batha, S.H.

1998-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

259

Imaging Collagen Orientation Using Polarization-Modulated Second Harmonic Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use polarization-modulated second harmonic generation to image fiber orientation in collagen tissues, with an axial resolution of about 10 {micro}m and a transverse resolution of up to 1 {micro}m. A linearly polarized ultra-short pulse (200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser beam is modulated using an electro-optic modulator and quarter-wave plate combination and focused onto a translation stage mounted sample using a microscope objective. The generated second harmonic light is collected using a photomultiplier tube and demodulated using phase sensitive detection to obtain signal intensity and fiber orientation information. In order to obtain second harmonic generation images of different types of collagen organization, we analyze several different tissues, including rat-tail tendon, mouse aorta, mouse fibrotic liver, and porcine skin. We can use our technique to image fibrotic tissue in histological sections of damaged liver and to identify burned tissue in porcine skin to a depth of a few hundred microns. Polarization-modulated second harmonic generation potentially could be a useful clinical technique for diagnosing collagen related disease or damage, especially in the skin.

Stoller, P; Celliers, P M; Reiser, K M; Rubenchik, A M

2002-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Iron-Based Superconductors. Description ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Space Weather Forecasts. Description ...

262

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: Organic Solar Power. Description ...

263

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Nanotechnology; Biotechnology/Health; Nanocrystals; Hwang. ...

264

Laser Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

• Community needs to work together to provide the technical case for funding an IFE program. • IFE program should nurture competition, with judgments made on the basis of technical progress and the potential of the various approaches to IFE. • Direct-drive with lasers looks very attractive for IFE, the physics and needed technologies are mature and advancing. • KrF provides physics advantages for direct drive. • KrF’s demonstrated performance is competitive with solid state lasers as a high-rep-rate durable, efficient IFE driver. (on several important parameters KrF technology leads) Direct Laser Drive is a better choice for Energy

Steve Obenschain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Gas laser  

SciTech Connect

According to the invention, the gas laser comprises a housing which accommodates two electrodes. One of the electrodes is sectional and has a ballast resistor connected to each section. One of the electrodes is so secured in the housing that it is possible to vary the spacing between the electrodes in the direction of the flow of a gas mixture passed through an active zone between the electrodes where the laser effect is produced. The invention provides for a maximum efficiency of the laser under different operating conditions.

Kosyrev, F. K.; Leonov, A. P.; Pekh, A. K.; Timofeev, V. A.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF  

SciTech Connect

A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different fuel injection strategies. Finally, mixture distributions for late injection obtained using quantitative PLIF are compared to predictions of computational fluid dynamics calculations. (author)

Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard [Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger [Shell Global Solutions (UK), Shell Research Centre Thornton, P. O. Box 1, Chester, CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan [Jaguar Cars, Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry, CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Particle detector spatial resolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing separated columns of scintillation layer material, for use in detection of X-rays and high energy charged particles with improved spatial resolution is disclosed. A pattern of ridges or projections is formed on one surface of a substrate layer or in a thin polyimide layer, and the scintillation layer is grown at controlled temperature and growth rate on the ridge-containing material. The scintillation material preferentially forms cylinders or columns, separated by gaps conforming to the pattern of ridges, and these columns direct most of the light produced in the scintillation layer along individual columns for subsequent detection in a photodiode layer. The gaps may be filled with a light-absorbing material to further enhance the spatial resolution of the particle detector. 12 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Free resolutions of algebras.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given an algebra A, presented by generators and relations, i.e. as a quotient of a tensor algebra by an ideal, we construct a free algebra resolution of A, i.e. a differential graded algebra which is quasi-isomorphic to A and which is itself a tensor algebra. The construction rests combinatorially on the set of bracketings that arise naturally in the description of a free contractible differential graded algebra with given generators.

Joe Chuang; Alastair King

269

High speed imaging television system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

Wilkinson, William O. (Silver Spring, MD); Rabenhorst, David W. (Silver Spring, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Laser barometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention of a pressure measuring instrument which uses laser radiation to sense the pressure in an enclosed environment by means of measuring the change in refractive index of a gas - which is pressure dependent.

Abercrombie, K.R.; Shiels, D.; Rash, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps Martian laser surpasses 100,000 zaps ChemCam zaps rocks with a high-powered laser to determine their composition and carries a camera that can survey the Martian landscape. December 5, 2013 This figure is a ChemCam Remote Micro Imager (RMI) image of the target "Ithaca". The image is a mosaic of three separate images taken on Sol 439, with the scale as shown. The image shows the scars from the ten LIBS points labeled from point 1 to point 10. One of the 30 shots at point no. 1 was the 100,000th firing of the ChemCam laser! The distance to the target from the ChemCam telescope at the top of the mast was 4.04 m. The vertical line of ten points taken by ChemCam on Ithaca, starts in a pitted lower coarser grained unit and crosses into a finer grained, smoother, upper unit. The chemical composition appears to be very similar between units. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP)

272

High speed optical coherence microscopy with autofocus adjustment and a miniaturized endoscopic imaging probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technique for high resolution cellular imaging in human tissues. An OCM system for high-speed en face cellular resolution imaging was developed at 1060 nm wavelength at ...

Aguirre, Aaron Dominic

273

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Method of Robotic Visual Tracking for a New Automatic Laser Welding Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An on-line visual tracking sensor system for the automation of laser welding processes in heavy industries is presented. A method of image process and features extraction for structured light image of laser welding has been developed. In order to set ... Keywords: image processing, seam tracking, structure light vision, features extraction

Yongliang Xie; Lei Zhang; Chuanyu Wu; Jianjun Yin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Photopumped x-ray laser research on Saturn  

SciTech Connect

Using Saturn as a driver, we are pursuing both photoresonantly pumped and photoionization/recombination lasers. Our lasing targets are gas cells with thin windows that are pumped by a z pinch 2 cm away radiating 10 TW. In both schemes the lasant and gas fill is neon. We will present evidence for inversion in the sodium/neon photoresonant scheme but we have yet to detect the lasing transition itself. To increase our chances of measuring this line we have introduced potassium into a sodium z-pinch and have eliminated oxygen from the gas cell windows. We have measured the spatial dependence of ionization balance across the gas cell, and this measurement is consistent with propagation of a shock front across the gas cell target. We have measured the Li-like neon 5f-3d transition to increase more rapidly with fill pressure than all other measured lines. Based on this result we have performed experiments emphasizing the photoionization/recombination laser scheme that use a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer to provide good spatial resolution of the 4f-3d, 4d-3p, and 5f-3d lines of Li-like neon. We have attempted a gain length measurement by imaging parallel to a baffle that varies the length of the target illuminated.

Nash, T.J.; Spielman, R.B.; Vargas, M.; Ruggles, L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

laser_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimensional Measurements. Laser Measurements. Rate our Services. Technical ... Laser Frequency/Wavelength (14510S-14511S). The ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

Scanned Laser Displays for Head Mounted Displays Douglas E. Holmgren  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the elements of a 1-dimensional LED array and using a moving mirror to sweep out a 2D virtual image. The Private Eye's LED array has 280 elements which are swept to form a 720 x 280 resolution image. The resolution of this display device could be improved by using more elements in the LED array and modulating

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

278

Lasers and Optoelectronic Components Used with Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... example, beam profile and relative intensity noise ... for the laser wavelengths and energies for which ... The laser power and energy measurements are ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

279

Laser Beam Delivery [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities...

280

Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Applications of laser produced ion beams to nuclear analysis of materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser produced ion beams have unique characteristics which are ultra-short pulse, very low emittance, and variety of nuclear species. These characteristics could be used for analyzing various materials like low Z ion doped heavy metals or ceramics. Energies of laser produced ion beam extend from 0.1MeV to 100MeV. Therefore, various nuclear processes can be induced in the interactions of ion beams with samples. The ion beam driven nuclear analysis has been developed for many years by using various electrostatic accelerators. To explore the applicability of laser ion beam to the analysis of the Li ion battery, a proton beam with the diameter of {approx} 1.0 {mu}m at Takasaki Ion Acceleration for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA was used. For the analysis, the PIGE (Particle-Induced Gamma Ray Emission) is used. The proton beam scans over Li battery electrode samples to diagnose Li density in the LiNi{sub 0.85}Co{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} anode. As the results, PIGE images for Li area density distributions are obtained with the spatial resolution of better than 1.5{mu}m FWHM. By the Li PIGE images, the depth dependence of de-intercalation levels of Li in the anode is obtained. By the POP experiments at TIARA, it is clarified that laser produced ion beam is appropriate for the Li ion battery analysis. 41.85.Lc, 41.75.Jv, 42.62.cf.

Mima, K.; Azuma, H.; Fujita, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Okuda, C.; Ukyo, Y.; Kato, Y.; Arrabal, R. Gonzalez; Soldo, F.; Perlado, J. M.; Nishimura, H.; Nakai, S. [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Shizuoka (Japan) and Institute de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain) and Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan); Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Gunnma (Japan); Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Aichi (Japan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Laser barometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure measuring instrument that utilizes the change of the refractive index of a gas as a function of pressure and the coherent nature of a laser light to determine the barometric pressure within an environment. As the gas pressure in a closed environment varies, the index of refraction of the gas changes. The amount of change is a function of the gas pressure. By illuminating the gas with a laser light source, causing the wavelength of the light to change, pressure can be quantified by measuring the shift in fringes (alternating light and dark bands produced when coherent light is mixed) in an interferometer.

Abercrombie, Kevin R. (Westminster, CO); Shiels, David (Thornton, CO); Rash, Tim (Aurora, CO)

2001-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

283

Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring of Si Title Laser wavelength effects in ultrafast near-field laser nanostructuring of Si Publication Type...

284

EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition, Installation and Use for Research and Development EA-1655: Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Laser Acquisition,...

285

Bayesian Image Analysis and the Disaggregation of Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The applicability of meteorological general circulation models (GCMs) is limited by their spatial resolution. In this paper, a method is developed for improving the resolution of GCM-generated rainfall fields, using ideas from Bayesian image ...

R. E. Chandler; N. G. Mackay; H. S. Wheater; C. Onof

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Sky View Factors from High-Resolution Scanned Fish-eye Lens Photographic Negatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computerized method for calculating the sky view factor from fish-eye lens photographic negatives is presented. The images are scanned and stored on CD ROM, each CD holding 100 images. The images can be retrieved at very high resolutions of up ...

Kristina Blennow

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Y High-Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y Y High-Resolution . __ DO NOT M I C PET COVER for medical science studies Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California September 1989 DlSTRlBUTlGN OF THIS DOCUMENT IS U#LIIY/ITEE Acknowledgments This booklet was prepared under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health Effects Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division. We thank Sarah Cahn and Douglas Vaughan for coordination of this booklet. esolution PET for Medical Science Studies Thomas F. Budinger Stephen E. Derenzo Ronald H. Huesman William J. Jagust Peter E. Valk CONTENTS A PET Primer Positron Emission Tomography: Evolution of a Technology 7 PET Theory: Emission, Detection, and Reconstruction

288

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Quantum Physics; Quantum Communications; Ultrafast Photon Detector; Nam. ...

289

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Energy; Fossil Fuels;Distillation Curves for Complex Fuel Mixtures. ...

290

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Scanning Electron Microscope with Spin Polarization Analysis. ...

291

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Metrology, Basic Units; Mass; Electronic Kilogram. Description ...

292

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nist.gov. 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Public safety & Smart Grid. Description: Electrical engineer ...

293

Multispectral and panchromatic images fusion by adaptive PCNN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As for low resolution of remote sensing images, a novel image fusion algorithm by adaptive PCNN was proposed. The multi-spectral image is firstly converted from RGB to l?? color space. Then, the input images are adaptively decomposed ... Keywords: adaptive parameter setting, color space conversation, image fusion, pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN)

Yong Li; Ke Wang; Da-ke Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Browse and Search Patterns in a Digital Image Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype image retrieval system with browse and search capabilities was developed to investigate patterns of searching a collection of digital visual images, as well as factors, such as image size, resolution, and download speed, which affect browsing. The ... Keywords: browsing, digital images, image retrieval, user studies

C. Olivia Frost; Bradley Taylor; Anna Noakes; Stephen Markel; Deborah Torres; Karen M. Drabenstott

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: House; Trees. Description: *BFRL. Subjects (names): ...

296

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: New Imaging Tool is Boon to Fuel Cell Research. Description: NIST ...

297

Hyperspectral imaging of microalgae using two-photon excitation.  

SciTech Connect

A considerable amount research is being conducted on microalgae, since microalgae are becoming a promising source of renewable energy. Most of this research is centered on lipid production in microalgae because microalgae produce triacylglycerol which is ideal for biodiesel fuels. Although we are interested in research to increase lipid production in algae, we are also interested in research to sustain healthy algal cultures in large scale biomass production farms or facilities. The early detection of fluctuations in algal health, productivity, and invasive predators must be developed to ensure that algae are an efficient and cost-effective source of biofuel. Therefore we are developing technologies to monitor the health of algae using spectroscopic measurements in the field. To do this, we have proposed to spectroscopically monitor large algal cultivations using LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) remote sensing technology. Before we can deploy this type of technology, we must first characterize the spectral bio-signatures that are related to algal health. Recently, we have adapted our confocal hyperspectral imaging microscope at Sandia to have two-photon excitation capabilities using a chameleon tunable laser. We are using this microscope to understand the spectroscopic signatures necessary to characterize microalgae at the cellular level prior to using these signatures to classify the health of bulk samples, with the eventual goal of using of LIDAR to monitor large scale ponds and raceways. By imaging algal cultures using a tunable laser to excite at several different wavelengths we will be able to select the optimal excitation/emission wavelengths needed to characterize algal cultures. To analyze the hyperspectral images generated from this two-photon microscope, we are using Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) algorithms to extract the spectral signatures and their associated relative intensities from the data. For this presentation, I will show our two-photon hyperspectral imaging results on a variety of microalgae species and show how these results can be used to characterize algal ponds and raceways.

Sinclair, Michael B.; Melgaard, David Kennett; Reichardt, Thomas A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Garcia, Omar Fidel; Luk, Ting Shan; Jones, Howland D. T.; Collins, Aaron M.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Quantum Cats; Photons; Quantum Physics. Description: NIST research associate Thomas Gerrits at the laser table ...

299

Active imaging system with Faraday filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an active imaging system which has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and a receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination wile eliminating solar background.

Snyder, J.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with speckle imaging  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with Speckle Imaging is a high-resolution imaging system that substantially improves resolution and contrast in images acquired over long distances. This technology will increase image resolution up to an order of magnitude or greater for video surveillance systems. The system's hardware components are all commercially available and consist of a telescope or large-aperture lens assembly, a high-performance digital camera, and a personal computer. The system's software, developed at LLNL, extends standard speckle-image-processing methods (used in the astronomical community) to solve the atmospheric blurring problem associated with imaging over medium to long distances (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers) through horizontal or slant-path turbulence. This novel imaging technology will not only enhance national security but also will benefit law enforcement, security contractors, and any private or public entity that uses video surveillance to protect their assets.

Carrano, C J

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Heterodyne laser diagnostic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heterodyne laser diagnostic system includes, in one embodiment, an average power pulsed laser optical spectrum analyzer for determining the average power of the pulsed laser. In another embodiment, the system includes a pulsed laser instantaneous optical frequency measurement for determining the instantaneous optical frequency of the pulsed laser.

Globig, Michael A. (Antioch, CA); Johnson, Michael A. (Pleasanton, CA); Wyeth, Richard W. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

The Molecular Foundry - Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fiore, R. Cingolani, L. Manna, R. Krahne, "Probe tips functionalized with colloidal nanocrystal tetrapods for high resolution atomic force microscopy imaging", Small, 4, 2123-2126...

303

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone: 609-243-2755 Download Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Fusion energy Fusion reactor design ITER Nuclear energy Plasma diagnostics Tokamaks...

304

New imaging technique provides improved insight into controlling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone: 609-243-2755 Download Select and View High Resolution Images to Download Learn More Fusion energy Fusion reactor design ITER Nuclear energy Plasma diagnostics Plasma physics...

305

Validating an imaging and analysis system for assessing torso deformities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of the numeric and functional validation of an imaging and analysis system used for assessing human torsos for deformities such as scoliosis. The system comprises of image acquisition, image reconstruction, and shape analysis components. ... Keywords: 3D surface measurement, Laser digitizer, Non-invasive measurement, Scoliosis, Torso imaging, Trunk asymmetry

Peter O. Ajemba; Nelson G. Durdle; Doug L. Hill; V. James Raso

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Laser Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Safety Home Whom to Call Analysis of Laser Safety Occurrences: 2005-2011 Laser Bio-effects Laser Classification Laser Disposal Guide Laser Forms Laser Newsletter Laser Lab...

307

Definition: Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Hyperspectral Imaging Hyperspectral sensors collect data across a wide range of the spectrum (VNIR-LWIR, plus TIR) at small spectral resolution (5-15 nm) and high spatial resolution (1-5 m). This allows detailed spectral signatures to be identified for different imaged materials - for example hyperspectral imaging can be used to identify specific clay minerals; multispectral imaging can identify only the presence of clay minerals in general. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Hyperspectral imaging, like other spectral imaging, collects and processes information from across the electromagnetic spectrum. Much as the human eye sees visible light in three bands (red, green, and blue), spectral imaging divides the spectrum into many more bands. This technique

308

Fourier plane image amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

Ko, Hyoungsoo [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Ryu, Kyunghee [Kookmin University; Park, Hongsik [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Park, Chulmin [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Jeon, Daeyoung [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Kim, Yong Kwan [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Jung, Juhwan [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Min, Dong-Ki [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Kim, Yunseok [Max-Planck-Institut fur Mikrostrukturphysik, Germany; Lee, Ho Nyung [ORNL; Park, Yoondong [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea; Shin, Hyunjung [Kookmin University; Hong, Seungbum [Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A direct electron bombarded charge coupled device for dynamic plasma imaging applications (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of plasma physics experiments require the recording of continuous time history of x-ray emission. Many laboratories have developed x-ray streak camera technology in order to time resolve x-ray spectra or images produced by laser-driven plasma experiments. These cameras record x rays by converting photons to electrons, which in turn are focused and swept across an electron sensitive area detector as a function of time. X-ray photons impinging on a transmission type photocathode generate photoelectrons which are accelerated to energies between 10 and 20 keV and focused onto a phosphor screen. The light from the phosphor image may be intensified using a microchannel plate, and is usually optically coupled directly onto film or an optical charge coupled device. We have designed and built an x-ray sensitive streak camera readout where we replaced the microchannel plate based intensifier and film package with a modified charge coupled device area detector to directly absorb accelerated photoelectrons emitted from the cathode. This system has been integrated into the streak tube arrangement. We will present a set of system performance data, which have been obtained from both bench top experiments on a dc source and dynamic measurements at the Nova laser facility. X-ray images at various exposure times show better spatial resolution, improved signal to noise ratio, and higher dynamic range. Other advantages include instantaneous data readout, which enables fast postprocessing, and no increase in overall cost for an engineered system.

Weber, F.; Celliers, P.; Bell, P.; Diamond, C.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Filtering, Sampling, and Information Content within Satellite-Derived Multispectral or Mixed-Resolution Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of an “alias-free imaging” approach to multidimensional “sounder” instrumentation is highlighted, together with its potential for improving noise-equivalent differential temperature and spatial resolution over current designs. ...

A. C. L. Lee

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Precipitable Water Estimation from High-Resolution Split Window Radiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique that uses the spatial variance of image brightness temperature to derive total column Precipitable water is applied to high-resolution multispectral aircraft scanner data for the 19 June 1986 COHMEX day. The technique has several ...

Gary J. Jedlovec

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Super-resolution wide-field optical microscopy by use of Evanescent standing waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of high resolution, high speed imaging techniques allows the study of dynamical processes in biological systems. Optical fluorescence microscopy is an essential tool for investigations in many disciplines ...

Chung, Euiheon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

High-Spatial-Resolution Surface and Cloud-Type Classification from MODIS Multispectral Band Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for automated classification of surface and cloud types using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) radiance measurements has been developed. The MODIS cloud mask is used to define the training sets. Surface and cloud-...

Jun Li; W. Paul Menzel; Zhongdong Yang; Richard A. Frey; Steven A. Ackerman

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

How do lasers work?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all the way through college physics. Let me try anyway, but first let's define what a laser and laser light are. Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated...

316

Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

Bennett, C.L.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Monolithic single GaN nanowire laser with photonic crystal microcavity on silicon  

SciTech Connect

Optically pumped lasing at room temperature in a silicon based monolithic single GaN nanowire with a two-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity is demonstrated. Catalyst-free nanowires with low density ({approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}) are grown on Si by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal that the nanowires are of wurtzite structure and they have no observable defects. A single nanowire laser fabricated on Si is characterized by a lasing transition at {lambda}=371.3 nm with a linewidth of 0.55 nm. The threshold is observed at a pump power density of {approx}120 kW/cm{sup 2} and the spontaneous emission factor {beta} is estimated to be 0.08.

Heo, Junseok; Guo Wei; Bhattacharya, Pallab [Center for Nanoscale Photonics and Spintronics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator  

SciTech Connect

A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Femtosecond Laser Frequency Combs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to all of these is the continued development of the lasers themselves. We are exploring and comparing different types of fs-laser comb technology ...

320

Physics Out Loud - Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Previous Video (Hybrid Meson) Physics Out Loud Main Index Next Video (Matter) Matter Laser Learn all about different types of lasers with Jefferson Lab's Michelle Shinn, a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Laser Music System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A Laser Music System has been created, that combines a laser and light sensor system with an infrared distance sensing system that detects the… (more)

Woodruff, Astra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Free Electron Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Electron Laser Building Exterior Top Floor Control Room RF Gallery User Lab Beam Enclosure Injector Linear Accelerator Wiggler Magnet Return Line Free Electron Laser Most...

323

Free electron lasers  

SciTech Connect

A review of experimental and theoretical concepts of a free electron laser is given. The possibilities of scaling these lasers to high powers are discussed. (MOW)

Brau, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers  

SciTech Connect

The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Fochs, S N; Rotter, M D; Pax, P H; Combs, R L; Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Online Imaging Pyrometer for Laser Deposition Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melt pool temperature distributions are measured in the final 6 through 10 passes ... Development of an Aqueous Particle Sensor (APSIII) System as a Research ...

328

Laser Propulsion - Quo Vadis  

SciTech Connect

First, an introductory overview of the different types of laser propulsion techniques will be given and illustrated by some historical examples. Second, laser devices available for basic experiments will be reviewed ranging from low power lasers sources to inertial confinement laser facilities. Subsequently, a status of work will show the impasse in which the laser propulsion community is currently engaged. Revisiting the basic relations leads to new avenues in ablative and direct laser propulsion for ground based and space based applications. Hereby, special attention will be devoted to the impact of emerging ultra-short pulse lasers on the coupling coefficient and specific impulse. In particular, laser sources and laser propulsion techniques will be tested in microgravity environment. A novel approach to debris removal will be discussed with respect to the Satellite Laser Ranging (SRL) facilities. Finally, some non technical issues will be raised aimed at the future prospects of laser propulsion in the international community.

Bohn, Willy L. [Institute of Technical Physics, German Aerospace Center (DLR) D-70569 Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, Stuttgart (Germany)

2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Description: A sheet of laser light illuminating the surface of the heat exchanger during the air velocity measurement experiment. *BFRL. ...

330

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Homeland Security; Chem., Bio, and Other Threats; Standards for Radiation Detection. ...

331

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Image Gallery : Image Details. No 72 DPI Version No 150 DPI Version 300 DPI Image. Title: Gold Nano Anchors Put Nanowires in Their Place. ...

332

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image © 150 DPI Image © 300 DPI Image ©. Title: Iron-based and Copper-Oxide High-Temperature Superconductors. ...

333

Laser Processing of Metals and Polymers  

SciTech Connect

A laser offers a unique set of opportunities for precise delivery of high quality coherent energy. This energy can be tailored to alter the properties of material allowing a very flexible adjustment of the interaction that can lead to melting, vaporization, or just surface modification. Nowadays laser systems can be found in nearly all branches of research and industry for numerous applications. Sufficient evidence exists in the literature to suggest that further advancements in the field of laser material processing will rely significantly on the development of new process schemes. As a result they can be applied in various applications starting from fundamental research on systems, materials and processes performed on a scientific and technical basis for the industrial needs. The interaction of intense laser radiation with solid surfaces has extensively been studied for many years, in part, for development of possible applications. In this thesis, I present several applications of laser processing of metals and polymers including polishing niobium surface, producing a superconducting phase niobium nitride and depositing thin films of niobium nitride and organic material (cyclic olefin copolymer). The treated materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution optical microscopy, surface profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Power spectral density (PSD) spectra computed from AFM data gives further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the treated niobium.

Senthilraja Singaravelu

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

High resolution digital delay timer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

Martin, Albert D. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially resolved catalysts, and this is supported by experimental observations with the Jacobsen hydrolytic kinetic resolution (HKR) of epoxides. The criterion for a nonlinear effect in asymmetric catalysis--a nonlinear correlation between the enantiomeric excess in a choral ligand and the product enantiomeric excess obtained from a reaction--is examined. The nonlinear effect idea is found to be generalizable to kinetic resolutions and other reactions by replacing consideration of the product enantiomeric excess with the quantity (k[]/k[]-1)/(k[]/k[]+1), a differential kinetic enantiomeric enhancement (DKEE). A nonlinear effect may then be defined by a nonlinear correlation between the DKEE and the chiral ligand enantiomeric excess. The application of these ideas to previously reported kinetic resolutions of sulfoxides and to nonlinear effects in the Jacobsen HKR is described. Relatively small nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions are sufficient to obtain large asymmetric amplifications. A catalyst modification in the Jacobsen HKR also allows for the development of a novel recyclable system for the iterative enhancement of optical activity.

Johnson, Derrell W.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Estimating Oceanic Turbulence Dissipation from Seismic Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seismic images of oceanic thermohaline finestructure record vertical displacements from internal waves and turbulence over large sections at unprecedented horizontal resolution. Where reflections follow isopycnals, their displacements can be used ...

W. Steven Holbrook; Ilker Fer; Raymond W. Schmitt; Daniel Lizarralde; Jody M. Klymak; L. Cody Helfrich; Robert Kubichek

337

Identification marking by means of laser peening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Short wavelength laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

Hagelstein, P.L.

1984-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

Narrow gap laser welding  

SciTech Connect

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Longitudinal discharge laser baffles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam.

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Dublin, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Longitudinal discharge laser baffles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The IR baffles placed between the window and the electrode of a longitudinal discharge laser improve laser performance by intercepting off-axis IR radiation from the laser and in doing so reduce window heating and subsequent optical distortion of the laser beam. 1 fig.

Warner, B.E.; Ault, E.R.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Glazing of Railroad Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails Project description: Laser glazing of rails. Category: Project with industrial partner (American Association of Railroads) Bookmark and Share

344

Laser Welding of Metals [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding of Metals Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Project description: High-speed laser welding of metals. Category: Project with industrial partner (Delphi Energy and Engine Management Systems) Bookmark and Share

345

Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light pipe for high intensity laser pulses. Phys. Rev. Lett.and relativistically strong laser pulses in an underdensefrom Thomson scat- tering using laser wake?eld accelerators.

Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonlinear laser energydepletion in laser-plasma accelerators ? B. A. Shadwick,of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma

Shadwick, B.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ion Beam Collimation For Improved Resolution In Associated Particle Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam spot size on target for a Penning ion source has been measured under different source operating pressures as a function of the extraction channel length and beam energy. A beam halo/core structure was observed for ion extraction at low extraction voltages, and was greatly reduced at higher beam energy. Collimation through use of longer extraction channels results in reduced ion current on target; the resultant reduction in neutron yield for an API system driven by such an ion source can be compensated for by use of even higher beam energies.

Sy, Amy [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ji Qing [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Synthetic aperture imaging for three dimensional resolution of fluid flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid mechanics and instrumentation have a long history together, as experimental fluids studies play an important role in describing a more complete physical picture in a variety of problems. Presently. state-of-the-art ...

Belden, Jesse (Jesse Levi)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Unique microchannel plate process doubles MCPI resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying a dielectric layer to the output of a microchannel plate (MCP) has allowed the screen voltage of a sealed microchannel-plate intensifier tube (MCPI) to be raised to over 10 kV, producing a field strength of 36 kV/mm without any detectable field emission or breakdown of the MCP/screen gap. Tube resolution exceeded 16 lp/mm at 50% modulation. Breakdown is higher in a dielectric than in a vacuum. In a concept being patented by Gary Power, a few-{mu}m-thick layer of a dielectric was sputtered onto the output surface of an 18-mm MCP, which was incorporated into a tube under a contract for four tube starts. This process is applicable to any device incorporating a proximity-focused MCP and screen, including streak tubes and gated MCP x-ray imagers. Other improvements discussed include a patented use of a collimator for eliminating the electrons that are elastically scattered from the screen. This method also provides for further improvements in screen gap limited resolution to any desired degree by eliminating electrons with high transverse energy. This occurs at the expense of output brightness, which can be recovered through an appropriate increase in screen voltage.

Thomas, S.; Power, G.

1994-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Laser ablated hard coating for microtools  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Wear-resistant coatings composed of laser ablated hard carbon films, are deposited by pulsed laser ablation using visible light, on instruments such as microscope tips and micro-surgical tools. Hard carbon, known as diamond-like carbon (DLC), films produced by pulsed laser ablation using visible light enhances the abrasion resistance, wear characteristics, and lifetimes of small tools or instruments, such as small, sharp silicon tips used in atomic probe microscopy without significantly affecting the sharpness or size of these devices. For example, a 10-20 nm layer of diamond-like carbon on a standard silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) tip, enables the useful operating life of the tip to be increased by at least twofold. Moreover, the low inherent friction coefficient of the DLC coating leads to higher resolution for AFM tips operating in the contact mode.

McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nanometer Resolution Of Three-Dimensional Motions Using Video Interference Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An interferometric video system for measuring microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with nanometer resolution is demonstrated. Interferograms are generated by combining light reflected from the target with light reflected from a reference mirror. Motions are determined from sequences of stop-action interferograms obtained with stroboscopic illumination. The system was used to measure motions of a microfabricated accelerometer. In-plane motions were determined by analysis of brightfield images using gradient methods with subpixel resolution. Results are compared for brightfield images obtained by blocking light from the reference arm of the interferometer and for brightfield images reconstructed from interferograms. Out-of-plane motions are determined by analyzing interferograms obtained with different positions of the reference mirror. Results demonstrate nanometer resolution of in-plane motions and subnanometer resolution of out-of-plane motions. Introduction A major goal of this w...

W. Hemmert; M. S. Mermelstein; D. M. Freeman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Tagged Neutron Source for API Inspection Systems with Greatly Enhanced Spatial Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently developed induced fission and transmission imaging methods with time- and directionally-tagged neutrons offer new capabilities for characterization of fissile material configurations and enhanced detection of special nuclear materials (SNM). An Advanced Associated Particle Imaging (API) generator with higher angular resolution and neutron yield than existing systems is needed to fully exploit these methods.

None

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solid-state continuous Lyman-alpha source for laser-cooling of antihydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1 S-2 P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Ongoing work to set up a solid-state continuous-wave laser source at Lyman-alpha is described.

Walz, Jochen; Beyer, Thomas; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Muellers, Andreas; Scheid, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

LANL | Physics | Trident Laser Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science at Trident Laser Facility Several important discoveries and first observations have been made at the Trident Laser Facility, a unique three-beam neodymium-glass laser...

355

High-Resolution Structure of Viruses from Random Snapshots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) has made it possible to record snapshots of biological entities injected into the X-ray beam before the onset of radiation damage. Algorithmic means must then be used to determine the snapshot orientations and reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the object. Existing approaches are limited in reconstruction resolution to at best 1/30th of the object diameter, with the computational expense increasing as the eighth power of the ratio of diameter to resolution. We present an approach capable of exploiting object symmetries to recover three-dimensional structure to 1/100th of the object diameter, and thus reconstruct the structure of the satellite tobacco necrosis virus to atomic resolution. Combined with the previously demonstrated capability to operate at ultralow signal, our approach offers the highest reconstruction resolution for XFEL snapshots to date, and provides a potentially powerful alternative route for analysis of data from crystalline and...

Hosseinizadeh, A; Dashti, A; Fung, R; D'Souza, R M; Ourmazd, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative Dispute Resolution | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution Alternative Dispute Resolution The Office of Conflict Prevention and Resolution (formerly the Office of Dispute Resolution) provides assistance throughout the Department and to its contractors on using various types of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to prevent and resolve disputes without litigation. The Director of the office offers training, provides system design support, and acts as a consultant for all types of dispute resolution, ranging from preventive techniques, such as partnering, differing professional opinion processes and ombuds, to mediation in many types of disputes, such as intellectual property, contracts, environmental, grants, equal employment opportunity (Title VII), and whistleblower complaints.

357

Emerging Technologies in Mass Spectrometry Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) as an analytical tool for bio-molecular and bio-medical research targets, accurate compound localization and identification. In terms of dedicated instrumentation, this translates into the demand for more detail in the image dimension (spatial resolution) and in the spectral dimension (mass resolution and accuracy), preferably combined in one instrument. At the same time, large area biological tissue samples require fast acquisition schemes, instrument automation and a robust data infrastructure. This review discusses the analytical capabilities of an "ideal" MSI instrument for bio-molecular and bio-medical molecular imaging. The analytical attributes of such an ideal system are contrasted with technological and methodological challenges in MSI. In particular, innovative instrumentation for high spatial resolution imaging in combination with high sample throughput is discussed. Detector technology that targets various shortcomings of conventional imaging detector systems is hig...

Jungmann, Julia H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

High Spatial Resolution Observations of Loops in the Solar Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determining how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in July 2012. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data for a subset of 79 of these loops and find that their temperature distributions are narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of proposed physical mechanisms.

Brooks, David H; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Winebarger, Amy R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Atomic-Resolution STEM at Low Primary Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) can now produce electron probes as small as 1 {angstrom} at 60 keV. This level of performance allows individual light atoms to be imaged in various novel materials including graphene, monolayer boron nitride, and carbon nanotubes. Operation at 60 keV avoids direct knock-on damage in such materials, but some radiation damage often remains, and limits the maximum usable electron dose. Elemental identification by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is then usefully supplemented by annular dark-field (ADF) imaging, for which the signal is much larger and the spatial resolution significantly better. Because of its strong dependence on the atomic number Z, ADF can be used to identify the chemical type of individual atoms, both heavy and light. We review the instrumental requirements for atomic resolution imaging at 60 keV and lower energies, and we illustrate the kinds of studies that have now become possible by ADF images of graphene, monolayer BN, and single-wall carbon nanotubes, and by ADF images and EEL spectra of carbon nanotubes containing nanopods filled with single atoms of Er. We then discuss likely future developments.

Krivanek, Ondrej L. [Nion Co; Chisholm, Matthew F [ORNL; Dellby, N. [Nion Company, WA; Murfitt, M. F. [Nion Company, WA

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {micro}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fowlkes, Jason Davidson [ORNL; Rack, Prof. Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Moore, Tom [OmniProbe, Inc.; Magel, Greg [OmniProbe, Inc.; Hartfield, Cheryl [OmniProbe, Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

In situ laser processing in a scanning electron microscope  

SciTech Connect

Laser delivery probes using multimode fiber optic delivery and bulk focusing optics have been constructed and used for performing materials processing experiments within scanning electron microscope/focused ion beam instruments. Controlling the current driving a 915-nm semiconductor diode laser module enables continuous or pulsed operation down to sub-microsecond durations, and with spot sizes on the order of 50 {mu}m diameter, achieving irradiances at a sample surface exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Localized laser heating has been used to demonstrate laser chemical vapor deposition of Pt, surface melting of silicon, enhanced purity, and resistivity via laser annealing of Au deposits formed by electron beam induced deposition, and in situ secondary electron imaging of laser induced dewetting of Au metal films on SiO{sub x}.

Roberts, Nicholas A.; Magel, Gregory A.; Hartfield, Cheryl D.; Moore, Thomas M.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Omniprobe, Inc., an Oxford Instruments Company, 10410 Miller Rd., Dallas, Texas 75238 (United States); Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) and Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Feasibility Study on Laser Microwelding and Laser Shock Peening using Femtosecond Laser Pulses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ultrafast lasers of sub-picosecond pulse duration have thus far been investigated for ablation, drilling and cutting processes. Ultrafast lasers also have the potential for laser… (more)

Lee, Dongkyun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

BNL | CO2 Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Laser CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on fast optical switching from the output of a conventional CO2 laser oscillator, and a chain of high-pressure laser amplifiers. It starts with a wavelength converter wherein a near-IR picosecond solid-state laser with l»1 μm produces a mid-IR 10-μm pulse. This process employs two methods; semiconductor optical switching, and the Kerr effect. First, we combine the outputs from a multi-nanosecond CO2 laser oscillator with a picosecond Nd:YAG laser on a germanium Brewster-plate to produce an ~200 ps, 10μm pulse by semiconductor optical switching. Co-propagating this pulse with a Nd:YAG's 2nd harmonic in a

364

Infrared laser system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

Cantrell, Cyrus D. (Santa Fe, NM); Carbone, Robert J. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Ralph S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Infrared laser system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared laser system and method for isotope separation may comprise a molecular gas laser oscillator to produce a laser beam at a first wavelength, Raman spin flip means for shifting the laser to a second wavelength, a molecular gas laser amplifier to amplify said second wavelength laser beam to high power, and optical means for directing the second wavelength, high power laser beam against a desired isotope for selective excitation thereof in a mixture with other isotopes. The optical means may include a medium which shifts the second wavelength high power laser beam to a third wavelength, high power laser beam at a wavelength coincidental with a corresponding vibrational state of said isotope and which is different from vibrational states of other isotopes in the gas mixture.

Cantrell, Cyrus D. (Richardson, TX); Carbone, Robert J. (Johnson City, TN); Cooper, Ralph (Hayward, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sub-0.1 nm-resolution quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy without adjustable parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) constitutes a powerful tool for nanostructure characterization. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative interpretation of atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field (ADF) STEM images using an approach that does not rely on adjustable parameters. We measure independently the instrumental parameters that affect sub-0.1 nm-resolution ADF images, quantify their individual and collective contributions to the image intensity, and show that knowledge of these parameters enables a quantitative interpretation of the absolute intensity and contrast across all accessible spatial frequencies. The analysis also provides a method for the in-situ measurement of the STEM's effective source distribution.

Dwyer, C. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Maunders, C. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Zheng, C. L. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Weyland, M.; Etheridge, J. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Tiemeijer, P. C. [FEI Electron Optics, P.O. Box 80066, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dielectric microscopy with submillimeter resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In analogy with optical near-field scanning methods, we use tapered dielectric waveguides as probes for a millimeter wave vector network analyzer. By scanning thin samples between two such probes we are able to map the spatially varying dielectric properties of materials with sub-wavelength resolution; using a 150 GHz probe in transmision mode we see spatial resolution of around 500 microns. We have applied this method to a variety of highly heterogeneous materials. Here we show dielectric maps of granite and oil shale.

Nathan S. Greeney; John A. Scales

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Studying the Imaging Characteristics of Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) through Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-Violet Imaging Telescope (UVIT) is one of the five payloads aboard the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO)'s ASTROSAT space mission. The science objectives of UVIT are broad, extending from individual hot stars, star-forming regions to active galactic nuclei. Imaging performance of UVIT would depend on several factors in addition to the optics, e.g. resolution of the detectors, Satellite Drift and Jitter, image frame acquisition rate, sky background, source intensity etc. The use of intensified CMOS-imager based photon counting detectors in UVIT put their own complexity over reconstruction of the images. All these factors could lead to several systematic effects in the reconstructed images. A study has been done through numerical simulations with artificial point sources and archival image of a galaxy from GALEX data archive, to explore the effects of all the above mentioned parameters on the reconstructed images. In particular the issues of angular resolution, photometric accuracy and photometric...

Srivastava, Mudit K; Tandon, Shyam N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam.

Salmon, Jr., Joseph T. (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Apparatus and method for laser beam diagnosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for accurate, real time monitoring of the wavefront curvature of a coherent laser beam. Knowing the curvature, it can be quickly determined whether the laser beam is collimated, or focusing (converging), or de-focusing (diverging). The apparatus includes a lateral interferometer for forming an interference pattern of the laser beam to be diagnosed. The interference pattern is imaged to a spatial light modulator (SLM), whose output is a coherent laser beam having an image of the interference pattern impressed on it. The SLM output is focused to obtain the far-field diffraction pattern. A video camera, such as CCD, monitors the far-field diffraction pattern, and provides an electrical output indicative of the shape of the far-field pattern. Specifically, the far-field pattern comprises a central lobe and side lobes, whose relative positions are indicative of the radius of curvature of the beam. The video camera's electrical output may be provided to a computer which analyzes the data to determine the wavefront curvature of the laser beam. 11 figures.

Salmon, J.T. Jr.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Laser Drilling with Gated High Power Fiber Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, Laser Drilling ...

372

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Proton emission imaging of the nuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A proton core imaging system has been developed and extensively used for measuring the nuclear burn regions of inertial confinement fusion implosions. These imaging cameras, mounted to the 60-beam OMEGA laser facility, use ...

DeCiantis, Joseph Loreto

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser We have demonstrated flash diffractive imaging of nanostructures using pulses from the first soft-X-ray free-electron...

375

Laser Wakefield Acceleration Experiments Using HERCULES Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a supersonic gas-jet using a self-guided laser pulse was studied by changing laser power and plasma electron density. The recently upgraded HERCULES laser facility equipped with wavefront correction enables a peak intensity of 6.1x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} at laser power of 80 TW to be delivered to the gas-jet using F/10 focusing optics. We found that electron beam charge was increased significantly with an increase of laser power from 30 TW to 80 TW and showed density threshold behavior at a fixed laser power. We also studied the influence of laser focusing conditions by changing the f-number of the optics to F/15 and found an increase in density threshold for electron production compared to the F/10 configuration. The analysis of different phenomena such as betatron motion of electrons, side scattering of the laser pulse for different focusing conditions, the influence of plasma density down ramp on LWFA are shown.

Matsuoka, T.; McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Bulanov, S. S.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Rousseau, P.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Horovitz, Y. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dynamical Experiments Group, Propulsion Division, Soreq NRC, Yavnee 81800 (Israel)

2009-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

NIST Laser Applications Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Laser Applications Group Keith Lykke, Group Leader. ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

377

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... center of the apparatus. The chamber is illuminated by a green light-emitting diode for visual effect. An ultraviolet laser ...

378

Simultaneous imaging electron- and ion-feature Thomson scattering measurements of radiatively heated Xe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uniform density and temperature Xe plasmas have been produced over >4 mm scale-lengths using x-rays generated in a cylindrical Pb cavity. The cavity is 750 {mu}m in depth and diameter, and is heated by a 300 J, 2 ns square, 1054 nm laser pulse focused to a spot size of 200 {mu}m at the cavity entrance. The plasma is characterized by simultaneous imaging Thomson scattering measurements from both the electron and ion scattering features. The electron feature measurement determines the spatial electron density and temperature profile, and using these parameters as constraints in the ion feature analysis allows an accurate determination of the charge state of the Xe ions. The Thomson scattering probe beam is 40 J, 200 ps, and 527 nm, and is focused to a 100 {mu}m spot size at the entrance of the Pb cavity. Each system has a spatial resolution of 25 {mu}m, a temporal resolution of 200 ps (as determined by the probe duration), and a spectral resolution of 2 nm for the electron feature system and 0.025 nm for the ion feature system. The experiment is performed in a Xe filled target chamber at a neutral pressure of 3-10 Torr, and the x-rays produced in the Pb ionize and heat the Xe to a charge state of 20{+-}4 at up to 200 eV electron temperatures.

Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Meinecke, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Oxford, Wellington Square, Oxford, OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Kuschel, S.; Ross, J. S.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Shaw, J. L. [University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Stoafer, C. [Columbia University, 116th Street and Broadway, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Tynan, G. R. [University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialographic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone. 1 fig.

Chang, J.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

Apparatus for precision micromachining with lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new material processing apparatus using a short-pulsed, high-repetition-rate visible laser for precision micromachining utilizes a near diffraction limited laser, a high-speed precision two-axis tilt-mirror for steering the laser beam, an optical system for either focusing or imaging the laser beam on the part, and a part holder that may consist of a cover plate and a back plate. The system is generally useful for precision drilling, cutting, milling and polishing of metals and ceramics, and has broad application in manufacturing precision components. Precision machining has been demonstrated through percussion drilling and trepanning using this system. With a 30 W copper vapor laser running at multi-kHz pulse repetition frequency, straight parallel holes with size varying from 500 microns to less than 25 microns and with aspect ratios up to 1:40 have been consistently drilled with good surface finish on a variety of metals. Micromilling and microdrilling on ceramics using a 250 W copper vapor laser have also been demonstrated with good results. Materialogroaphic sections of machined parts show little (submicron scale) recast layer and heat affected zone.

Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Dragon, Ernest P. (Danville, CA); Warner, Bruce E. (Pleasanton, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dual microchannel plate module for a gated monochromatic x-ray imager  

SciTech Connect

Development and testing of a dual microchannel plate (MCP) module to be used in the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program has recently been completed. The MCP module is a key component of a new monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic which is designed around a 4 channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope and diffraction crystals which is located at University of Rochester`s Omega laser system. The MCP module has two separate MCP regions with centers spaced 53 mm apart. Each region contains a 25 mm MCP proximity focused to a P-11 phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate. The two L/D = 40, MCPs have a 10.2 mm wide, 8 ohm stripline constructed of 500 nm Copper overcoated with 100 nm Gold. A 4 kV, 150 ps electrical pulse provides an optical gatewidth of 80 ps and spatial resolution has been measured at 20 1p/mm.

Oertel, J.A.; Archuleta, T.; Peterson, C.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

First results from the J-TEXT high-resolution three-wave polarimeter-interferometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laser-based far-infrared polarimeter-interferometer system utilizing the three-wave technique has been implemented on the J-TEXT tokamak. The polarimeter determines the Faraday effect by measuring the phase difference between two collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized laser beams. The first results of the polarimeter-interferometer designed for J-TEXT have been obtained in the most recent J-TEXT experimental campaign. Simultaneous polarimetric and interferometric measurement is achieved, with phase resolution up to 0.1 Degree-Sign , at bandwidth of 50 kHz. The temporal resolution, which is dependent on the laser's frequency offset, is {approx}1 {mu}s. Continual spatial measurement covering 45 cm (80% of the plasma cross-section) is realized by utilizing 1D parabolic beam expansion optics. Three initial test chords are installed and future plans call for expansion up to 30 chords with 1.5 cm chord spacing, providing high spatial resolution for measurement of electron density and current density profiles. Reliability of both polarimetric and interferometric measurement is confirmed by comparison with computation and data from a hydrocyanic acid (HCN) interferometer. With the high temporal and phase resolution, perturbations associated with the sawtooth cycle and MHD activity have been observed.

Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.; Gao, L.; Li, Q.; Chen, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Browsing and Placement of Multiresolution Images on Secondary Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid advances in computer and communication technologies, there is an increasing demand to build and maintain large image repositories. In order to reduce the demands on I/O and network resources, multiresolution representations of images are being proposed for the storage organization of images. Image decomposition techniques such as wavelets can be used to provide multiple resolution images. The image is represented by several coefficients, one of them with visual similarity to the original image but at a lower resolution. Thus, these visually similar coefficients can be thought of as the thumbnails or icons of the original image. This paper addresses the problem of storing these multiresolution coefficients on disk(s) so that thumbnail browsing as well as image reconstruction can be performed efficiently. Several strategies are evaluated to store the image coefficients on parallel disks. These strategies can be classified into two broad classes depending on whether the bro...

Sunil Prabhakar; Divyakant Agrawal; Amr El Abbadi; Ambuj Singh; Terence R. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

General Laser Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Measurements for Laser Meters. ... 90 to 0 dBm. 0 to 30 dBm. AO 2005, Igor Vayshenker. Laser Dose, 193 nm, SP250-56, David Livigni. ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Laser particle sorter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for sorting particles, such as biological particles. A first laser is used to define an optical path having an intensity gradient which is effective to propel the particles along the path but which is sufficiently weak that the particles are not trapped in an axial direction. A probe laser beam is provided for interrogating the particles to identify predetermined phenotypical characteristics of the particles. A second laser beam is provided to intersect the driving first laser beam, wherein the second laser beam is activated by an output signal indicative of a predetermined characteristic. The second laser beam is switchable between a first intensity and a second intensity, where the first intensity is effective to displace selected particles from the driving laser beam and the second intensity is effective to propel selected particles along the deflection laser beam. The selected particles may then be propelled by the deflection beam to a location effective for further analysis. 2 figs.

Martin, J.C.; Buican, T.N.

1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Laser induced chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division of theINFRARED LASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

Orel, Ann E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Atmospheric Laser Communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric laser communication, often referred to as free-space optics (FSO) or free-space laser (FSL) communication, is similar to fiber optic cable in terms of carrier wavelength and bandwidth capability, but data are transmitted directly ...

Kenneth W. Fischer*Michael R. Witiw; Jeffrey A. Baars+; T. R. Oke

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Laser Safety Communiques  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory, July 17-19, 2007 Registration Form Workshop Agenda DOE Laser Safety Memo and Final Report, February 28, 2005 APS Laser OJT ANL CHM OJT Example...

389

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Direct nuclear pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

FREE-ELECTRON LASERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1977. First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __Radiation from a High-Gain Free-Electeon Lasee Amplifier. ~1984. Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion.

Sessler, A.M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

IMShare: instantly sharing your mobile landmark images by search-based reconstruction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instantly sharing captured landmark images is becoming fashionable, much like when you write a blog or chat with friends by mobile phone. However, real-time transmission of high-resolution images poses a significant challenge to contemporary mobile networks. ... Keywords: image reconstruction, image sharing, partial duplicate image retrieval, sift descriptor

Lican Dai; Huanjing Yue; Xiaoyan Sun; Feng Wu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Laser Heat Treatment [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Treatment Heat Treatment Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Heat Treatment Project description: Optimization of laser beam heat treatment. Category: Project with industrial partner (Caterpillar and USCAR) Bookmark and Share Heat treatment optics

394

MOAS: An Absorption Laser Spectrometer for Sensitive and Local Monitoring of Tropospheric OH and Other Trace Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroxyl radical (OH) multipass absorption spectroscopy (MOAS) is a laser optical method for the absolute and in situ monitoring of tropospheric OH with high spatial and temporal resolution. This technique is based on direct absorption ...

W. Armerding; M. Spiekermann; J. Walter; F. J. Comes

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Laser Technology and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Major advances have been made in some areas: ? Specimen preparation using FIB ? Data collection rate ? Laser-assisted field evaporation ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Laser Measurements Seminar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Measurements Seminar. June 16, 2005. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Michael Baum 301-975-2763. The 20th annual ...

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

YAG Laser Weld  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2010. Symposium, Laser Applications in Materials Processing. Presentation Title, The Effects of ...

398

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 DPI Image 150 DPI Image No 300 DPI Version. Title: NIST Finds that Ethanol-Loving Bacteria Accelerate Cracking of Pipeline Steels. ...

399

The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a laser altimetry remote sensing method, obtained from the USDA Forest Service at Savannah River Site. The specific DEM resolutions were chosen because they are common grid cell sizes (10m, 30m, and 50m) used in mapping for management applications and in research. The finer resolutions (2m and 5m) were chosen for the purpose of determining how finer resolutions performed compared with coarser resolutions at predicting wetness and related soil attributes. The wetness indices were compared across DEMs and with each other in terms of quantile and distribution differences, then in terms of how well they each correlated with measured soil attributes. Spatial and non-spatial analyses were performed, and predictions using regression and geostatistics were examined for efficacy relative to each DEM resolution. Trends in the raw data and analysis results were also revealed.

Drover, Damion, Ryan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

LaserFest Celebration  

SciTech Connect

LaserFest was the yearlong celebration, during 2010, of the 50th anniversary of the demonstration of the first working laser. The goals of LaserFest were: to highlight the impact of the laser in its manifold commercial, industrial and medical applications, and as a tool for ongoing scientific research; to use the laser as one example that illustrates, more generally, the route from scientific innovation to technological application; to use the laser as a vehicle for outreach, to stimulate interest among students and the public in aspects of physical science; to recognize and honor the pioneers who developed the laser and its many applications; to increase awareness among policymakers of the importance of R&D funding as evidenced by such technology as lasers. One way in which LaserFest sought to meet its goals was to encourage relevant activities at a local level all across the country -- and also abroad -- that would be identified with the larger purposes of the celebration and would carry the LaserFest name. Organizers were encouraged to record and advertise these events through a continually updated web-based calendar. Four projects were explicitly detailed in the proposals: 1) LaserFest on the Road; 2) Videos; 3) Educational material; and 4) Laser Days.

Dr. Alan Chodos; Elizabeth A. Rogan

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

High-Resolution Surface Temperature Patterns Related to Urban Morphology in a Tropical City: A Satellite-Based Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution thermal data derived from Landsat's thematic mapper are evaluated for their correspondence to building geometry and landscape features in Singapore's high-rise housing estates. The image data are sufficiently detailed to reveal ...

Janet E. Nichol

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Impact of Spatial Resolution Enhancement of SSM/I Microwave Brightness Temperatures on Rainfall Retrieval Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of spatial resolution enhancement on estimates of tropical typhoon rainfall based on SSM/1 (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) measurements is evaluated with six different microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms. Passive microwave ...

Michael R. Farrar; Eric A. Smith; Xuwu Xiang

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Global Percent Tree Cover at a Spatial Resolution of 500 Meters: First Results of the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first results of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field algorithm's global percent tree cover are presented. Percent tree cover per 500-m MODIS pixel is estimated using a supervised regression ...

M. C. Hansen; R. S. DeFries; J. R. G. Townshend; M. Carroll; C. Dimiceli; R. A. Sohlberg

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Temporal multiplexing radiography for dynamic x-ray imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All current x-ray imaging devices acquire images sequentially, one at a time. Using a spatially distributed multibeam x-ray source we recently demonstrated the feasibility for multiplexing x-ray imaging, which can significantly increase the data collection speed. Here we present a general methodology for dynamic x-ray imaging of an object in cyclic motion with temporal multiplexing. Compared to the conventional sequential imaging technique, where 2N-1 phase images are required and N exposures are needed for a single phase image, a temporal multiplexing of dimension 2N-1 can reduce the imaging time by a factor of N while maintaining the temporal resolution.

Cao Guohua [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhang Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto; Lu Jianping [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the Multiphoton Laser Processing: A Unique and Simple Way to Enter the Nano-Platform Speaker(s): Andreas Ostendorf Date: January 27, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Multiphoton laser processing is one of the rapidly advancing laser technologies, providing unique possibilities for the fabrication of two- and three-dimensional microstructures. Multiphoton material processing has very important advantages over processes based on single photon absorption: an increased spatial resolution and the possibility of photofabrication inside transparent materials. Due to nonlinear nature of multiphoton processing, applications of ultrashort laser systems allow one to overcome the diffraction limit and to produce high quality 3D microstructures with a sub-wavelength resolution. This is very powerful

406

Radiometry High Spectral Resolution Fourier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Spectral Resolution Fourier High Spectral Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Instruments for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith, R. O. Knuteson, F. A. Best, R. G. Dedecker, T. P. Dirkx, R. A. Herbsleb, and J. F. Short University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin H. B. Howell National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Systems Design and Applications Branch Madison, Wisconsin D. Murcray and F. Murcray University of Denver Denver, Colorado Accurate and spectrally detailed observations of the thermal emission from radiatively important atmospheric gases, aerosols, and clouds have been identified as crucial for realizing the overall objectives of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to improve the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models. The observed

407

A Power and Resolution Adaptive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new power and resolution adaptive flash ADC, named PRA-ADC, is proposed. The PRA-ADC enables exponential power reduction with linear resolution reduction. Unused parallel voltage comparators are switched to standby mode. The voltage comparators consume only the leakage power during the standby mode. The PRA-ADC, capable of operating at 5-bit, 6-bit, 7-bit, and 8-bit precision, dissipates 69 mW at 5-bit and 435 mW at 8-bit. The PRA-ADC was designed and simulated with 0.18 m CMOS technology. The PRA-ADC design is applicable to RF portable communication devices, allowing tighter management of power and e#ciency.

Flash Analog-To-Digital Converter; Jincheol Yoo; Daegyu Lee; Kyusun Choi; Jongsoo Kim

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Automatic registration of LIDAR and optical images of urban scenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion of 3D laser radar (LIDAR) imagery and aerial optical imagery is an efficient method for constructing 3D virtual reality models. One difficult aspect of creating such models is registering the optical image with the ...

Mastin, Dana Andrew

409

Free resolutions via Gröbner bases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For associative algebras in many different categories, it is possible to develop the machinery of Gröbner bases. A Gröbner basis of defining relations for an algebra of such a category provides a "monomial replacement" of this algebra. The main goal of this article is to demonstrate how this machinery can be used for the purposes of homological algebra. More precisely, our approach goes in three steps. First, we define a combinatorial resolution for the monomial replacement of an object. Second, we extract from those resolutions explicit representatives for homological classes. Finally, we explain how to "deform" the differential to handle the general case. For associative algebras, we recover a well known construction due to Anick. The other case we discuss in detail is that of operads, where we discover resolutions that haven't been known previously. We present various applications, including a proofs of Hoffbeck's PBW criterion, a proof of Koszulness for a class of operads coming from commutative algebras, and a homology computation for the operads of Batalin--Vilkovisky algebras and of Rota--Baxter algebras.

Vladimir Dotsenko; Anton Khoroshkin

410

Development of Quantitative Measurement of Fuel Mass Distribution Using Planar Imaging Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantified fuel mass distribution of a spray was obtained from laser induced fluorescence images with optical patternation. In the dense spray region, however, the emitted fluorescence signal is significantly attenuated in the path of the detector ... Keywords: Imaging method, Laser induced fluorescence (LIF), Mass distribution, Signal Attenuation, Spray

H. Koh; K. Jung; Y. Yoon; K. Lee; K. -S. Jeong

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Measurement of probe displacement to the thermal resolution limit in photonic force microscopy using a miniature quadrant photodetector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A photonic force microscope comprises of an optically trapped micro-probe and a position detection system to track the motion of the probe. Signal collection for motion detection is often carried out using the backscattered light off the probe-however, this mode has problems of low S/N due to the small backscattering cross sections of the micro-probes typically used. The position sensors often used in these cases are quadrant photodetectors. To ensure maximum sensitivity of such detectors, it would help if the detector size matched with the detection beam radius after the condenser lens (which for backscattered detection would be the trapping objective itself). To suit this condition, we have used a miniature displacement sensor whose dimensions makes it ideal to work with 1:1 images of micrometer-sized trapped probes in the backscattering detection mode. The detector is based on the quadrant photo-integrated chip in the optical pick-up head of a compact disc player. Using this detector, we measured absolute displacements of an optically trapped 1.1 {mu}m probe with a resolution of {approx}10 nm for a bandwidth of 10 Hz at 95% significance without any sample or laser stabilization. We characterized our optical trap for different sized probes by measuring the power spectrum for each probe to 1% accuracy, and found that for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes, the noise in our position measurement matched the thermal resolution limit for averaging times up to 10 ms. We also achieved a linear response range of around 385 nm with cross talk between axes {approx_equal}4% for 1.1 {mu}m diameter probes. The detector has extremely high bandwidth (few MHz) and low optical power threshold-other factors that can lead to its widespread use in photonic force microscopy.

Pal, Sambit Bikas; Haldar, Arijit; Roy, Basudev; Banerjee, Ayan [Department of Physical Sciences, IISER-Kolkata, West Bengal 741252 (India)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

Milewski, John O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bernal, John E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Nanotechnology--Nanomanufacturing; Optical Nano Vision. Description: A new optical imaging technology under ...

414

SPIE Medical Imaging Medical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 1 Medical Imaging Fundamentals Kenneth H. Wong, Ph.D. Division of Computer Assisted Interventions and Medical Robotics (CAIMR) Imaging Science and Information Systems (ISIS) Center Department of Radiology Georgetown University SPIE Medical Imaging 2006 2 Main Themes · Describe

Miga, Michael I.

415

BNL | ATF Laser Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATF Laser Safety ATF Laser Safety To be present in a secured laser area at ATF, a person must either have the required laser training, or be continuously escorted by someone who has such training: The training consists of an eye exam, BNL general laser safety lecture, and formal ATF laser familiarization. Untrained personnel should not be instructed to enter interlocked areas or be escorted into an area and left unattended. If someone without training must enter a secured area, they must be continuously escorted, and are considered spectators, which means they may not perform any work in the area. At ATF, there are 3 classes of personnel authorized to enter secured areas: Experimental operators may secure areas, perform approved experiments with beams from facility lasers (YAG + CO2) or FEL beams, and

416

Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Laser Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame Modeling Laser Wakefield Accelerators in a Lorentz Boosted Frame VayBoost.gif An image showing the "boosted frame," in which the observer moves at near light speed. The laser pulse is represented in blue and red; the wakefields are colored pale blue and yellow. In this frame, the plasma (yellow box) has contracted and the wavefronts are fewer and farther apart, resulting in far fewer calculations and faster results. Why it Matters: Laser driven plasma waves can produce accelerating gradients orders of magnitude greater than standard accelerating structures. High quality electron beams of energy up to 1 GeV have been produced in just a few centimeters and 10-GeV stages being planned as

417

Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laser Beats Rock Laser Beats Rock Photo of the Week: Laser Beats Rock April 8, 2013 - 5:28pm Addthis On August 5, 2012, the Curiosity rover touched down on the surface of Mars. The ChemCam instrument package, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a device mounted on the Mars Curiosity rover that uses two remote sensing instruments: the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). The LIBS fires a powerful laser that determines chemical compositions of rock and soil samples, while the RMI takes photos of the samples within the rover's vicinity. In this photo, the ChemCam is being prepared in the clean room prior to the launch of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission. Learn more about the ChemCam. | Photo courtesy of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

418

First measurements of laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present our first results about laser-accelerated proton induced luminescence in solids. In the first part, we describe the optimization of the proton source as a function of the target thickness as well as the laser pulse duration and energy. Due to the ultra high contrast ratio of our laser beam, we succeeded in using targets ranging from the micron scale down to nanometers thickness. The two optimal thicknesses we put in evidence are in good agreement with numerical simulations. Laser pulse duration shows a small influence on proton maximum energy, whereas the latter turns out to vary almost linearly as a function of laser energy. Thanks to this optimisation work, we have been able to acquire images of the proton energy deposition in a solid scintillator.

Floquet, V.; Ceccotti, T.; Dobosz Dufrenoy, S.; Bonnaud, G.; Monot, P.; Martin, Ph. [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gremillet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Real-time temperature measurement during a laser annealing process featuring a microthermocouple array: Exploiting nano and micro-metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the acquisition of a real-time in situ surface thermal profile over a silicon substrate exposed to a laser beam, featuring a sub-mm spatial resolution, simultaneously recorded in six different sample points. A thin-film microthermocouple ... Keywords: Laser annealing, Microfabrication, Real-time resistivity measurement, Thermoelectric materials, Thin films

A. Chiolerio; P. Pandolfi; G. Maccioni; A. Sacco; D. Perrone; G. Grange

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Lensless imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F. Schlotter and J. Sthr (SSRL) The unprecedented properties of X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) under development world wide will open the door for entirely new classes of...

422

Smooth mixed-resolution GPU volume rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a mixed-resolution volume ray-casting approach that enables more flexibility in the choice of downsampling positions and filter kernels, allows freely mixing volume bricks of different resolutions during rendering, and does not require modifying ...

Johanna Beyer; Markus Hadwiger; Torsten Möller; Laura Fritz

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Low-Resolution CCSM4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-resolution version of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) is a computationally efficient alternative to the intermediate and standard resolution versions of this fully coupled climate system model. It employs an ...

Christine A. Shields; David A. Bailey; Gokhan Danabasoglu; Markus Jochum; Jeffrey T. Kiehl; Samuel Levis; Sungsu Park

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reflective optical imaging system for extreme ultraviolet wavelengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a projection reflection optical system having two mirrors in a coaxial, four reflection configuration to reproduce the image of an object. The mirrors have aspherical reflection surfaces to provide a very high resolution of object feature wavelengths less than 200 {mu}m, and preferably less than 100 {mu}m. An image resolution of features less than 0.05--0.1 {mu}m, is obtained over a large area field; i.e., 25.4 mm {times} 25.4 mm, with a distortion less than 0.1 of the resolution over the image field.

Viswanathan, V.K.; Newnam, B.E.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Resolution Transmission Microscopy Characterization of an Oxide ... Line Dislocation Dynamics Simulation of fundamental dislocation properties in ...

427

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

428

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

429

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

430

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution Print Analytical tools that combine spatial resolution with elemental and chemical identification at the nanometer scale along with large penetration depth are indispensable for the life and physical sciences. The XM-1 soft x-ray microscope at the ALS produces images that not only reveal structures but can identify their chemical elements and measure magnetic and other properties as well. Now a new method for creating optical devices with nanoscale accuracy has allowed researchers in Berkeley Lab's Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO), which built and operates the XM-1, to achieve an extraordinary resolution of better than 15 nm, with the promise of even higher resolution in the near future.

431

Image display device in digital TV  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

Choi, Seung Jong (Seoul, KR)

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Dust Tracking Using Composite Visible/IR Images: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visible and infrared (IR) images from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer are composited to improve the depiction of airborne dust over coastlines. On IR images, wind-raised dust ...

Thomas F. Lee

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Time-resolved diagnostics of excimer laser-generated ablation plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect

Characteristics of laser plasmas used for pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of thin films are examined with four in situ diagnostic techniques: Optical emission spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, ion probe studies, and gated ICCD (intensified charge-coupled-device array) fast photography. These four techniques are complementary and permit simultaneous views of the transport of ions, excited states, ground state neutrals and ions, and hot particulates following KrF laser ablation of YBCO, BN, graphite and Si in vacuum and background gases. The implementation and advantages of the four techniques are first described in order to introduce the key features of laser plasmas for pulsed laser deposition. Aspects of the interaction of the ablation plume with background gases (i.e., thermalization, attenuation, shock formation) and the collision of the plasma plume with the substrate heater are then summarized. The techniques of fast ICCD photography and gated photon counting are then applied to investigate the temperature, velocity, and spatial distribution of hot particles generated during KrF ablation of YBCO, BN, Si and graphite. Finally, key features of fast imaging of the laser ablation of graphite into high pressure rare gases are presented in order to elucidate internal reflected shocks within the plume, redeposition of material on a surface, and formation of hot nanoparticles within the plume.

Geohegan, D.B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A High Resolution Monolithic Crystal, DOI, MR Compatible, PET Detector  

SciTech Connect

The principle objective of this proposal is to develop a positron emission tomography (PET) detector with depth-of-interaction (DOI) positioning capability that will achieve state of the art spatial resolution and sensitivity performance for small animal PET imaging. When arranged in a ring or box detector geometry, the proposed detector module will support <1 mm3 image resolution and >15% absolute detection efficiency. The detector will also be compatible with operation in a MR scanner to support simultaneous multi-modality imaging. The detector design will utilize a thick, monolithic crystal scintillator readout by a two-dimensional array of silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) devices using a novel sensor on the entrance surface (SES) design. Our hypothesis is that our single-ended readout SES design will provide an effective DOI positioning performance equivalent to more expensive dual-ended readout techniques and at a significantly lower cost. Our monolithic crystal design will also lead to a significantly lower cost system. It is our goal to design a detector with state of the art performance but at a price point that is affordable so the technology can be disseminated to many laboratories. A second hypothesis is that using SiPM arrays, the detector will be able to operate in a MR scanner without any degradation in performance to support simultaneous PET/MR imaging. Having a co-registered MR image will assist in radiotracer localization and may also be used for partial volume corrections to improve radiotracer uptake quantitation. The far reaching goal of this research is to develop technology for medical research that will lead to improvements in human health care.

Robert S Miyaoka

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO{sub 2} (scCO{sub 2}) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ?350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO{sub 2} , precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) mineral surface in scCO{sub 2}; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10{overbar 1}4) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid–fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, A.S.; Higgins, S.R.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosso, K.M.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

A high-pressure atomic force microscope for imaging in supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables in-situ, atomic scale measurements of topography of solid surfaces in contact with supercritical CO2 (scCO2) fluids has been developed. This apparatus overcomes the pressure limitations of the hydrothermal AFM and is designed to handle pressures up to 100 atm at temperatures up to ~ 350 K. A standard optically-based cantilever deflection detection system was chosen. When imaging in compressible supercritical fluids such as scCO2, precise control of pressure and temperature in the fluid cell is the primary technical challenge. Noise levels and imaging resolution depend on minimization of fluid density fluctuations that change the fluid refractive index and hence the laser path. We demonstrate with our apparatus in-situ atomic scale imaging of a calcite (CaCO3) mineral surface in scCO2; both single, monatomic steps and dynamic processes occurring on the (10¯14) surface are presented. This new AFM provides unprecedented in-situ access to interfacial phenomena at solid-fluid interfaces under pressure.

Lea, Alan S.; Higgins, Steven R.; Knauss, Kevin G.; Rosso, Kevin M.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

Boutet, Sebastien

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider,"E.Esarey, and W.P.Leemans, "Free-electron laser driven bythe LBNL laser-plasma accelerator," in Proc. Adv. Acc. Con.

Geddes, C.G.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Dynamic Radiographic Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiographic system recently developed by American and Russian collaborators is designed to capture multiple images of a dynamic event lasting less than 10 microseconds. Various optical and electro-optical components were considered and their performance compared. The final system employed a solid crystal of lutetium oxyorthosilicate doped with cerium (LSO:Ce or LSO) for X-ray-to-light conversion with a coherent fiber optic bundle to relay the scintillator image to a streak camera with charge coupled device (CCD) readout. Resolution and sensitivity studies were carried out for this system on two different sources of X-rays: a 20 MeV microtron and a 70 MeV betatron.

Volkov, A.; Turley, D.; Veeser, L.; Lukyanov, N.; Yegorov, N.; Baker, S.A.; Mirenko, V.; Lewis, W.; Kuropatkin, Y.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "resolution laser imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Reconcile: A Coreference Resolution Research Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the availability of standard data sets and metrics, approaches to the problem of noun phrase coreference resolution are hard to compare empirically due to the different evaluation setting stemming, in part, from the lack of comprehensive coreference resolution research platforms. In this tech report we present Reconcile, a coreference resolution research platform that aims to facilitate the implementation of new approaches to coreference resolution as well as the comparison of existing approaches. We discuss Reconcile's architecture and give results of running Reconcile on six data sets using four evaluation metrics, showing that Reconcile's performance is comparable to state-of-the-art systems in coreference resolution.

Stoyanov, V; Cardie, C; Gilbert, N; Riloff, E; Buttler, D; Hysom, D

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Synthetic laser medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

Stokowski, S.E.

1987-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

An integrated method for material properties characterization based on pulsed laser generated surface acoustic waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel integrated method enabling the study of nano-structured materials is presented, which is based on the imaging and monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of short-pulse-laser-generated Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs). The method combines a 3D ... Keywords: Dynamic laser interferometry, Finite Elements, Nano-acoustics, Nanostructures

Yannis Orphanos, Vasilis Dimitriou, Evaggelos Kaselouris, Efthimios Bakarezos, Nikolaos Vainos, Michael Tatarakis, Nektarios A. Papadogiannis

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electron acceleration & laser pulse compression using a laser...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acceleration & laser pulse compression using a laser-plasma accelerator Wednesday, August 14, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Andreas Walker, Oxford...

445

BNL | Nd:YAG Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nd:YAG Laser The Nd:YAG laser is located in a class 1000 clean room (the YAG Room) near the electron gun end of the ATF accelerator. The clean area also includes a separate laser...

446

BNL | CFN Laser System Qualifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Qualification There are multiple laser systems at the CFN. Users who will work with the following class 3b or 4 laser systems are required to complete the Laser Safety...

447

Laser Program annual report 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

LCLS Injector Drive Laser  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for the LCLS injector drive laser present significant challenges to the design of the system. While progress has been demonstrated in spatial shape, temporal shape, UV generation and rep-rate, a laser that meets all of the LCLS specifications simultaneously has yet to be demonstrated. These challenges are compounded by the stability and reliability requirements. The drive laser and transport system has been installed and tested. We will report on the current operational state of the laser and plans for future improvements.

Dowell, D.H.; Castro, J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, A.; Hays, G.; Hering, P.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; White, W.; /SLAC

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fusion reactor pumped laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Robot Assisted Laser Osteotomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the scope of this thesis world's first robot system was developed, which facilitates osteotomy using laser in arbitrary geometries with an overall accuracy below… (more)

Burgner, Jessica

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Laser Induced Spectroscopy  

INL’s Laser Induced Spectroscopy technology detects and measures the composition of a material or the molecules in the material. It traces the ...

452

NIST Laser Safety Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... powered down. 5. Close coolant valves, if chilled water is used; visually check for leaks. 6. Turn off the laser warning light.

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Visualization of High Resolution Spatial Mass Spectrometric Data during Acquisition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass Spectrometric Imaging (IMS) allows the generation of 2D ion density maps that help visualize molecules present in sections of tissues and cells. The combination of spatial and mass resolution results in large and complex data sets that require powerful and efficient analysis and interpretation. In this paper, a graphical user interface (GUI) that can visualize the large data during data acquisition itself is presented. The program also has the ability to perform processing and analysis of the dataset. The various functions of the GUI including visualization of mass spectra, generation of 2D maps for selected species, manipulation of the heat maps, and peak identification are also presented.

Thomas, Mathew; Heath, Brandi S.; Laskin, Julia; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Ellen C.; Hui, Katrina L.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mixture Preparation and Nitric Oxide Formation in a GDI Engine studied by Combined Laser Diagnostics and Numerical Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through the combination of advanced imaging laser diagnostics with multi-dimensional computer models, a new understanding of the performance of direct-injection gasoline engines is pursuit. The work focuses on the fuel injection process, the breakup of the liquid into a fine spray and the mixing of the fuel with the in-cylinder gases. Non-intrusive laser diagnostics will be used to measure the spatial distribution of droplets and vaporized fuel with very high temporal resolution. These data along with temperature measurements will be used to validate a new spray breakup model for gasoline direct-injection. Experimental data on near wall fuel distributions will be used for comparison with a model that predicts the spray-wall interaction and the dynamics of the liquid film on the surface. Quantitative measurements of local nitric oxide concentrations inside the combustion chamber will provide a critical test for a numerical simulation of the nitric oxide formation process. This model is based on a modified flamelet approach and will be used to study the effects of exhaust gas recirculation.

Volker Sick; Dennis N. Assanis

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

455

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Carbon Nanotube Measurements. Description: Scanning electron microscope image of 'cleaned' carbon nanotubes at NIST (color added for ...

456

NIST Image Gallery: Image Details  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Description: Engineering design image shows a cross-section of part of the planned ITER fusion reaction vessel. Diverter ...

457

Reducing ADC Resolution by Using . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution compares the required resolution of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) when analog or digital band-pass filters are used for band separating in FDD based VDSL. It considers different band allocation scenarios, mostly for FTTCab deployment, and analyzes the reduction of the received signal dynamic range when analog filters are used. The obtained results are line code independent and show that a significant possible relaxation in ADC requirements may be achieved if analog band-pass filters are used instead of digital ones. Notice This document has been prepared to assist the Standard Committee T1-Telecommunications. It is offered to the Committee as a basis for discussion and is not a binding proposal on the companies involved. The requirements presented in this document are subject to change in form and numerical value after more study. The companies involved specifically reserve the right to add to, or amend, the statements contained herein. ----------------------...

Vladimir Oksman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Laser Power and Energy Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... calibration services for meters used with the lasers, wavelengths, and power ranges shown in the following table. Other laser wavelengths, power ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

459

Laser Ablation: Fundamentals and Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 This seminar will include both experimental and theoretical topics of ultrafast laser ablation. In the first part, fundamental physics of ultrafast laser-material...