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1

Charcoal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charcoal Charcoal Nature Bulletin No. 310 June 9, 1984 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHARCOAL The use of charcoal is as old as the written history of mankind. There are many folk tales about the queer lonely men who lived in the forests, cutting wood and converting it into charcoal. In Europe it is still an important fuel for such purposes, for heating homes and, in some countries, for special motors on small automobiles. As late as our Civil War, gunpowder was made from a mixture of saltpeter, charcoal and sulfur -- the charcoal being specifically prepared from the wood of such trees as willow, alder and soft maple. Until 1337, when the hotblast process was discovered, using coke made from coal, charcoal was the only fuel that could be used in the smelting of iron ore. Charcoal burning was an important industry and the "colliers" who supervised the process were respected as craftsmen. Iron making flourished in early New England but by 1750, Pennsylvania, with its wealth of iron ore, limestone, water power and hardwood timber for charcoal. took the lead and became the richest of the thirteen colonies. It supplied most of the pig iron for the armies of General Washington, and rusting cannonballs are still to be found at the remains of some of those old charcoal-fired furnaces. In those days the woodlands of Pennsylvania were always covered with the thin blue haze of smoke from burning charcoal "pits" and the colliers' huts.

2

Charcoal from agricultural residues as alternative reducing agent in metal recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical carbonization units have the target to produce a charcoal which is in nearly all cases used as energy carrier for the production of heat in different forms. These often very old and not efficient processes are in most cases operated at temperatures between 350 and 500 °C and generate a charcoal with only medium quality. To realize an application of charcoals as CO2-neutral reducing agent in metallurgical processes special high quality charcoals are needed, which meet metallurgical requirements - fixed carbon content of more than 85%, low ash amount and low content of volatiles. Therefore carbonization processes at higher temperature are required. The performed carbonization experiments with agricultural residues at temperatures up to 1000 °C show the possibility of the production of a charcoal which meets the requirements of various metallurgical processes and can act in these industry sector as reducing agent and substitute the so far used fossil coals and cokes. This was realized with some first reduction tests of heavy metal containing residues where charcoals showed a better performance than petroleum coke typically used in such reduction processes. The charcoal application in metal production and recycling processes as substitute of fossil carbon carriers leads to an enormous potential of saved fossil based CO2-emissions because of the high energy and reducing agent demands in these industry sector. So the metal industry has the opportunity to fulfill environmental regulations and restrictions to reduce their CO2-footprint and guarantee the supply of metals in Central Europe in future.

Thomas Griessacher; Jürgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from households and industry by the use of charcoal from sawmill residues in Tanzania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania faces considerable challenges in meeting the future energy demands of its rapidly growing urban population without depleting its forests. Nonindustrial charcoal production generates large emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the form of CO2 from forest degradation and methane from oxidation in traditional kilns. On a global scale, the GHG emissions from cement production are of considerable magnitude and are increasing rapidly. In this study, the impact of converting sawmill residues into charcoal briquettes and charcoal powder in Tanzania was assessed, using a cradle-to-grave approach. Furthermore, the net effects on GHG of substituting more GHG-intensive fuels with these charcoal products were evaluated. Replacing coal in cement manufacturing with this sawmill charcoal powder may reduce GHG emissions by 455–495 kg of CO2eq MWh?1, corresponding to an 83–91% decrease. The net GHG emission reduction when replacing charcoal from miombo woodlands with these sawmill charcoal briquettes is 78–557 kg of CO2eq MWh?1, or 42–84%, depending on whether the substituted charcoal can be considered carbon neutral or not. These replacements may considerably reduce the GHG emissions from the cement industry and in charcoal-dependent households in Tanzania. Due to the significant problems related to energy supply and forest deterioration in sub-Saharan countries, as well as the global growth of GHG emissions from the cement industry, this study might of relevance also outside Tanzania.

Hanne K. Sjølie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Use of Residual Solids from Pulp and Paper Mills for Enhancing Strength and Durability of Ready-Mixed Concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted to establish mixture proportioning and production technologies for ready-mixed concrete containing pulp and paper mill residual solids and to study technical, economical, and performance benefits of using the residual solids in the concrete. Fibrous residuals generated from pulp and paper mills were used, and concrete mixture proportions and productions technologies were first optimized under controlled laboratory conditions. Based on the mixture proportions established in the laboratory, prototype field concrete mixtures were manufactured at a ready-mixed concrete plant. Afterward, a field construction demonstration was held to demonstrate the production and placement of structural-grade cold-weather-resistant concrete containing residual solids.

Tarun R. Naik; Yoon-moon Chun; Rudolph N. Kraus

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

5

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Designing the Sugar Cane Charcoal Extruder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sugar Cane Charcoal Extruder compresses carbonized sugar cane into charcoal briquettes. that are environmentally-friendly and comparable to wood charcoal in burn performance, cost, and durability. Originally developed ...

Ang, Dexter W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Process for preparing oxine impregnated-activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is, herein, disclosed for preparing oxine impaegnated activated charcoal comprising contacting solid oxine with activated charcoal.

Kamiyama, H.; Motojima, K.; Tachikawa, E.

1980-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Waste to energy by industrially integrated supercritical water gasification – Effects of alkali salts in residual by-products from the pulp and paper industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a method by which biomass can be converted into a hydrogen-rich gas product. Wet industrial waste streams, which contain both organic and inorganic material, are well suited for treatment by SCWG. In this study, the gasification of two streams of biomass resulting from the pulp and paper industry, black liquor and paper sludge, has been investigated. The purpose is to convert these to useful products, both gaseous and solids, which can be used either in the papermaking process or in external applications. Simple compounds, such as glucose, have been fully gasified in SCWG, but gasification of more complex compounds, such as biomass and waste, have not reached as high conversions. The investigated paper sludge was not easily gasified. Improving gasification results with catalysts is an option and the use of alkali salts for this purpose was studied. The relationship between alkali concentration, temperature, and gasification yields was studied with the addition of KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and black liquor to the paper sludge. Addition of black liquor to the paper sludge resulted in similarly enhancing effects as when the alkali salts were added, which made it possible to raise the dry matter content and gasification yield without expensive additives.

I. Rönnlund; L. Myréen; K. Lundqvist; J. Ahlbeck; T. Westerlund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

A comparative analysis of emissions from bagasse charcoal and wood charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and is in need of cheap cooking fuel source. Currently, lump charcoal, the cooking fuel of Haiti, is made by carbonizing trees in ditches before selling the charcoal ...

Ramírez, Andrés, 1982-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Biosolids recycling at a pulp and paper mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bio Gro Division of Wheelabrator Water Technologies Inc. has traditionally been involved in recycling biosolids from domestic wastewater treatment plants. The biosolids, or primarily organic residuals that result from the treatment of wastewater, have long been used in agriculture as a soil conditioner, fertilizer, organic lime material and also for other soil fertility practices. It has long been known that residuals from certain industrial wastewater processes are very high in nutrients and organic matter which can also be successfully used in agricultural activities. One of these industrial biosolids with well-documented agricultural value is the organic residual from the treatment of wastewater from pulp and paper mills. Most pulp and paper producers in the US recognize the value of pulp and paper biosolids as a material that can fertilize their own tree stands or can be used in normal agricultural practices. In 1995, Bio Gro entered into a contract with a two large pulp and paper mills in Maine for the management of its pulp and paper biosolids. Bio Gro was responsible for implementing the beneficial use options for a mixture of primary and secondary biosolids from the wastewater treatment process which was combined with combustion ash from the facility`s power generation facilities. The contract included the layout of spreading areas, mixing of the residuals and spreading the material on the sites. This paper will explain the process that Bio Gro employed to manage the pulp and paper biosolids generated at the mill.

Gratton, P.F. [Wheelabrator Water Technologies Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States). Bio Gro Div.; Montgomery, K.L. [Wheelabrator Water Technologies Inc., Fredericksburg, VA (United States). Bio Gro Div.; Page, S.H. [Wheelabrator Water Technologies Inc., Portland, ME (United States). Bio Gro Div.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Charcoal Rot of Plants in East Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was worst at 101" F. (40). Low soil moisture in the latter part of the growing season favored dam- age by charcoal rot. Charcoal rot often is destructive to sorghum in the usual dry seasons in West Texas. Lodging of the stalks increases losses (19, 16...-stalked, leafy varieties showed least damage from char- coal rot (19). Thick stalks may give mechanical resistance to lodging. A stalk rot of sorghum that sometimes is associated with charcoal rot in West Texas is caused by Fzcsam~um moniliforme (75, 16...

Young, P. A. (Paul Allen)

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Converting sugarcane waste into charcoal for Haiti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Haiti, most families have traditionally relied on wood and wood-derived charcoal as their primary fuel source for indoor cooking. This resource has proven to be unsustainable, however, as over 90% of the Haitian countryside ...

Toussaint, Etienne Clement

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd Place Yunnan Province, China Sector Solar Product Yunnan-based bamboo charcoal products producer that is building a 10MW solar power plant. References Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd is a company located in Yunnan Province, China . References ↑ "[ Yunnan Yintong Bamboo Charcoal Co Ltd]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Yunnan_Yintong_Bamboo_Charcoal_Co_Ltd&oldid=353426" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies

14

Coupling of solar-assisted advanced oxidative and biological treatment for degradation of agro-residue-based soda bleaching effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluates the effect of integrated solar-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) and biological...1) stages of soda pulp bleaching in agro-residue-based pulp and paper mill. Biodegradation of the eff...

Amit Dhir; Nagaraja Tejo Prakash…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Effects of recycling peroxide liquor on brightness of mechanical pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high cost of bleaching softwood mechanical pulps to 80% brightness with peroxide can be partly offset by recycling the unreacted peroxide in the effluent. However, the situation is complicated by the presence of dissolved organic material, aged silicate, and calcium extracted from the pulp. This study examines the effects of these materials on brightening efficiency. Dissolved organic material did not consume peroxide in subsequent cycles. Aged silicate stabilized peroxide as efficiently as fresh silicate. Interaction of silicate with calcium and magnesium caused silicon residue to precipitate on the fibers, with deposition increasing with the number of cycles. Calcium silicate adhered strongly to stainless steel, while magnesium silicate did not.

Froass, W.C. (International Paper Co., Tuxedo, NY (United States)); Omori, S.; Francis, R.C.; Dence, C.W. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (United States). Empire State Paper Research Inst.)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimating the Thickness of Pulped Wood Fibres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... J. Tech. Assoc. Pulp. and Paper Indust., 43, 143 (1960).TAPPI Standards and Suggested Methods (Tech. Assoc. Pulp and Paper Indust., New York, ...

O. J. KALLMES; G. A. BERNIER

1963-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

17

Methanol-reinforced kraft pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of methanol to a high-sulfidity kraft cook on Scandinavian softwood chips was studied under different process conditions. Delignification and the degradation of carbohydrates were accelerated, but the effect on delignification was greater. Thus, methanol addition improved selectivity. The positive effect of methanol could also be observed for modified kraft cooks having a leveled out alkali concentration and lower concentration of sodium ions and dissolved lignin at the end of the cook. Methanol addition had no discernible effect on pulp strength or on pulp bleachability.

Norman, E.; Olm, L.; Teder, A. (STFI, Stockholm (Sweden))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy Conservation Progress and Opportunities in the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1980 the pulp and paper industry was the third ranking consumer of total purchased fuels and energy in the U.S. industrial sector and the highest single industry in terms of residual oil consumption. Over the past decade in response to rapidly...

Watkins, J. J.; Hunter, W. D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Urinary Biomarkers in Charcoal Workers Exposed to Wood Smoke in Bahia State, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The World Bank Group, FPD Energy note n. 1. Available from...worlbank.org/html/fpd/energy/energynotes/energy01...charcoal dilemma. Finding sustainable solutions for Brazilian industry...Charcoal is an important source of energy for domestic and industrial...

Mina Kato; Dana Loomis; Lance M. Brooks; Gilka F.J. Gattas; Leni Gomes; Albertinho B. Carvalho; Marco A.V. Rego; and David M. DeMarini

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pulp & Paper Industry- A Strategic Energy Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The pulp and paper industry with yearly energy purchases of $5 billion per year including 50 billion kWh of power is one of the largest industrial energy producers in the U.S. However, structural changes in the global pulp and paper industry could...

Stapley, C. E.

22

HPLC of Anthraquinone in Wood Pulps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......anthraquinone content: Analysis of pulp and paper-type materials and pulping liquors by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Tappi 62(8): 73-76 (1979). 2. J.O. Broenstad, K.H. Schroeder, and H.D. Friestad. Determina- tion of trace amounts......

K.H. Nelson; D. Schram

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Sulfur-Free Selective Pulping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technoeconomic Appraisal," December 1991. 5. DOE Annual Report on Contract No. AC02-83CH10093, Bozell, J. J., Hames, B., Chum, H. L., Dimmel, D. R, Althen, E., Caldwell, P. L., Daube, Oxidation ;; Diels-Alder .. I I -Methanol .. ~ 5 I 3 (C~O) OCH... - Hydrogen 3 (Q-IP) # Q-I 3 o o ~ o 1 2 ~ (H) Lignin DMBQ =two OCH3 groups Anthraquinone MMBQ =one OCH3 group A. K, and Kuroda, K-I.,"Sulfur-free Selective Pulping," March 1992. 6. DOE Annual Report on Contrac No. DE-AC02-83CH10093, Bozell, J. J...

Dimmel, D. R.; Bozell, J. J.

24

Advanced Oxidation Technology for Pulp Mill Effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parameters. The dissolved solids consist of the chemicals derived from the wood material plus the chemicals added to the specific pulping process. No one technology can adequately treat these effluent streams, rather a combination of treatment methods... suspended or dissolved solids. We are herein considering only the treatment of the dissolved solids portion, assuming the removal of the suspended material by some other means. Dependent upon the nature of the pulping process and the particular...

Hart, J. R.

25

Assessment of secondary crop residues. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first of three reports assessing the feasibility of converting secondary agricultural residues to energy in the form of either methane gas or ethyl alcohol. Secondary agricultural residues are defined in this study as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, residues from paper pulping, etc. This report summarizes the first two phases of this study, data compilation, and evaluation. Subsequent reports will analyze the technical and economic feasibility of converting these residues to energy and the implementability of this technology. The industries for which data has been compiled in this report include vegetable, fruit, seafood, meat, poultry, and dairy processing and the pulp, paper, and paperboard industry. The data collected include raw product input, final processed product output, residue types, and quantity, residue concentration, biodegradability, seasonality of production, and geographic distribution of processing facilities. In general, these industries produce a relatively solid residue ranging in total solids concentration from 10 to 50% and a dilute liquid residue with an organic content (measured as COD or BOD) ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/l. Due to the significant quantities of residues generated in each of the industries, it appears that the potential exists for generating a substantial quantity of energy. For a particular industry this quantity of energy can range from only one percent upwards to nearly thirty-five percent of the total processing energy required. The total processing energy required for the industries included in this study is approximately 2.5 quads per year. The potential energy which can be generated from these industrial residues will be 0.05 to 0.10 quads per year or approximately 2 to 4 percent of the total demand.

Ashare, E.; Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Langton, B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Some Investigations of the Reaction of Activated Charcoal with Fluorine and Uranium Hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been shut down since 1969, when the fuel salt was drained from the core into two Hastelloy N drain tanks at the reactor site. Over time, fluorine (F{sub 2}) and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) moved from the salt through the gas piping to a charcoal bed, where they reacted with the activated charcoal. Some of the immediate concerns related to the migration of F{sub 2} and UF{sub 6} to the charcoal bed were the possibility of explosive reactions between the charcoal and F{sub 2}, the existence of conditions that could induce a criticality accident, and the removal and recovery of the fissile uranium from the charcoal. This report addresses the reactions and reactivity of species produced by the reaction of fluorine and activated charcoal and between charcoal and F{sub 2}-UF{sub 6} gas mixtures in order to support remediation of the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) and the recovery of the fissile uranium. The chemical identity, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, and potential for explosive decomposition of the primary reaction product, fluorinated charcoal, was determined.

Del Cul, G.D.; Fiedor, J.N.; Simmons, D.W.; Toth, L.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.; Williams

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBNL-5021E Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test Kayje Booker, Tae Won Han, Jessica Granderson, Jennifer Jones, Kathleen Lask, Nina Yang, Ashok Gadgil Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 June 2011 Research funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and partially by the support of NDSEG Fellowship. 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

28

Analysis of chemical competition for binding sites on activated charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This interaction of adsorbates (6) is known as co-adsorption. The function of a co-adsorbate is not entirely clear, holm, it may be seen as a modification or The citations follow the style of the American Industrial ene Association Journal. deactivation... of the adsorbent. Since activated charcoal is a non-polar sorbent, the adsorbed oznpaund with the highest toiling point or largest nal~ volunN will be most strongly held, and wi11 displace other adsorbed carpounds in decreasing order down the length...

Gallerani, Susan Jane

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Charcoal Making in the Brazilian Amazon: Economic Aspects of Production and Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2004). The efficiency of biomass conversion into charcoal becomes important in con- junction, biomass conversion efficiency, the WI Woods et al. (eds.), Amazonian Dark Earths: Wim Sombroek's Vision Conversion Efficiencies of Kilns SN Swami, C Steiner, WG Teixeira, and J Lehmann 23.1 Introduction Charcoal

Lehmann, Johannes

30

Urinary Biomarkers in Charcoal Workers Exposed to Wood Smoke in Bahia State, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...source of energy for domestic...charcoal in the world, with 350...alcohol consumption, and smoking...cooked-meat consumption (22...Issues. The World Bank Group, FPD Energy note n...source of energy for domestic...charcoal in the world, with approximately...alcohol consumption, and smoking...

Mina Kato; Dana Loomis; Lance M. Brooks; Gilka F.J. Gattas; Leni Gomes; Albertinho B. Carvalho; Marco A.V. Rego; and David M. DeMarini

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pre-industrial charcoal production in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, Germany): Detection and evaluation of a large charcoal-burning field by combining archaeological studies, GIS-based analyses of shaded-relief maps and dendrochronological age determination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In pre-industrial times, charcoal burning was a common source of energy across Europe. Charcoal production and its related consequences for the upland environment are well known due to historical and palaeoenvironmental research. In recent years, awareness has grown regarding the use of woods in the lowlands for charcoal production. In the last 20 years, a large charcoal-burning field in Lower Lusatia (Brandenburg, North German Lowlands) was discovered by systematic archaeological excavations of the opencast mine of Jänschwalde. However, the excavations are limited to the mine, which only covers a portion of the Jänschwalder Heide and the surrounding forests. In this paper, we present the results of our study regarding the spatial extension and timing of charcoal production in the Jänschwalder Heide and its surrounding areas. We applied a combined approach using archaeological research results, GIS-analyses of shaded-relief maps (SRMs) and tree-ring dating of selected charcoal kiln remains. Approximately 900 excavated charcoal kiln ground plans were analysed, which provided a solid data basis for our GIS analyses. For an extensive evaluation, we enlarged our study area beyond the limits of the lignite mine. We identified and digitised the remains of the charcoal kilns by creating \\{SRMs\\} from digital elevation models (DEMs) that were based on high-resolution airborne laser scanning data (ALS). The data from the excavated and digitised charcoal kiln remains were analysed in terms of their sizes and spatial distributions. In addition, the dendrochronological ages of 16 selected charcoal kiln remains were determined. This study shows that charcoal production was more extensive than initially proven by archaeological excavations. The remains of more than 5000 charcoal kilns were detected on the \\{SRMs\\} across an area that was twice as large as the excavated charcoal-burning field. In the Jänschwalder Heide, considerably more charcoal kiln relicts exist compared with the surrounding communal areas. Furthermore, the charcoal kiln remains in the Jänschwalder Heide have larger diameters, suggesting large-scale charcoal production for supplying energy to the nearby ironworks at Peitz. However, the charcoal production on the communal land was most likely for local crafts. The ages of the charcoal kiln remains indicated that charcoal production occurred between the 17th and 19th centuries, corresponding with the main period of charcoal burning. Overall, our study suggested that charcoal production sites are underestimated in the modern landscapes of the North German Lowlands.

A. Raab; M. Takla; T. Raab; A. Nicolay; A. Schneider; H. Rösler; K.-U. Heußner; E. Bönisch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The response of mechanical and chemical pulps to refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on theoretical equations describing the flow of pulp in refiners were used to analyze the experimental results obtained in a series of pilot plant trials. Western red cedar and loblolly pine wood chips were refined in 1-3 stages at rotational speeds of 1200 and 1800 rpm to produce thermomechanical pulps (TMP). Also, sulfate semibleached and low-yield sulfite pulps were refined at low (5%), medium (12%), and high (25%) consistency. The results indicate that the number of refining stages did not affect mechanical pulp quality. At a given specific energy, increasing the rotational speed increased the specific energy per impact and decreased the total number of impacts, resulting in a faster rate of fines generation for mechanical pulps. For chemical pulps higher pulp consistency produced gentler refining and yielded a higher rate of freeness decrease.

Miles, K.B.; Karnis, A. (Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, 570 St. John's Rd., Pointe Claire, Quebec H9R 3J9 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Report Review of Technologies for the Production and Use of Charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory Report Review of Technologies for the Production of Charcoal Production __________________________________5 The Petroleum Link developing nations. In this paper, we review the current status of biomass harvesting and transport

Kammen, Daniel M.

34

Gasification of Organosolv-lignin Over Charcoal Supported Noble Metal Salt Catalysts in Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Charcoal supported metal salt catalysts showed activities for the lignin gasification at 673 K, especially the catalysts without chloride anion showed the complete gasification. The order of activity for the gasification

Aritomo Yamaguchi; Norihito Hiyoshi; Osamu Sato; Masayuki Shirai

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Design of a bagasse charcoal briquette-making device for use in Haiti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charcoal made from bagasse, the fibrous remains of sugarcane production, has the potential to serve as an alternate cooking fuel in Haiti, where the reliance on wood has led to severe deforestation. Current production ...

Vechakul, Jessica

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

residual magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetization, i.e., the magnetic polarization, that remains in a magnetized material after all attempts to remove the magnetization have been made. Note: An example of residual magnetization is the magnetiza...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The effect of humidity on the collection efficiency for oxygenated compounds adsorbed on activated charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EPPECT OP HUMIDITY ON THE COLIECTION EFFICIENCY POR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CHARCOAL A Thesis by ROBERT BRUCE WALTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECT OF HUMIDITY ON THE COLLECTIOM EFFICIENCY FOR OXYGENATED COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON ACTIVATED CHARCOAL A Thesis by ROBERT BRUCE WALTON Approved...

Walton, Robert Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Final Technical Report Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Abstract for “Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp” When completed, the patented SC Washer will provide an innovative, energy efficient demonstration project to wash unbleached pulp using a pressure vessel charged with steam. The Port Townsend Paper Corporation’s pulp mill in Port Townsend, WA was initially selected as the host site for conducting the demonstration of the SCW. Due to 2006 and 2007 delays in the project caused by issues with 21st Century Pulp & Paper, the developer of the SCW, and the 2007 bankruptcy proceedings and subsequent restructuring at Port Townsend Paper, the mill can no longer serve as a host site. An alternate host site is now being sought to complete the commercial demonstration of the Steam Cycle Washer for Unbleached Pulp. Additionally, estimated costs to complete the project have more than doubled since the initial estimates for the project were completed in 2002. Additional grant funding from DOE was sought and in July, 2008 the additional DOE funds were procured under a new DOE award, DE-PS36-08GO98014 issued to INL. Once the new host site is secured the completion of the project will begin under the management of INL. Future progress reports and milestone tracking will be completed under requirements of new DOE Award Number DE-PS36-08GO98014. The following are excerpts from the project Peer Review completed in 2006. They describe the project in some detail. Additional information can be found by reviewing DOE Award Number: DE-PS36-08GO98014. 5. Statement of Problem and Technical Barriers: The chemical pulping industry is one of the major users of fresh water in the United States. On average the industry uses over 80 tons of water to produce one ton of pulp, some states use up to 50% more (Washington 120 and Wisconsin 140). In order to process one ton of pulp using 80 tons of process water, a large amount of: • energy is used in process heat and • power is required for pumping the large volume of pulp slurries through the pulping phases. Most water used in the pulping process ends up as warm waste water in the mill’s effluent discharge, which subsequently pollutes receiving waterways and carries an enormous amount of energy with it. Wash water reduction in brown stock washing with the Steam Cycle Washers (SCW) will save energy, up to 1+ million BTUs per ton of pulp in the evaporators alone. Reduction of liquid volume through bleaching stages will save process heat energy in the amount of 2+ million BTUs per ton of pulp, and as much as 80 – 100 kWhrs of electrical power per ton of pulp due to reduced pumping costs. Currently, the technical barriers to water reduction in chemical pulping are basically as follows: • conventional pulp washers wash the pulp at 10 - 14% consistency, • conventional pulp washers use 12 – 16 tons of wash water per ton of pulp, and • they leave 30 – 70 lbs of soda (Na2SO4) per ton of pulp as soda loss into the washed pulp. The amount of wash water in excess of the amount of process liquid in the pulp is called Dilution Factor (DF), even though it is not a factor in the mathematical sense but an addition. Modern pulp washing lines can wash efficiently with a DF of 3 but most pulp mills in the United States are washing with a DF of 5-7. Therefore, at 10% washing consistency 14-16 tons of wash water is required and 14% consistency requires 11-13 tons of wash water.

Starkey, Yvonne; Salminen, Reijo; Karlsnes, Andy

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sorption of Chlorophenols to Wood Pulp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The good fit indicates that the ionized form of 2,4,5-TCP does not sorb to the pulp fibers, at least not under the low ionic strength conditions used. Figure 4, which plots the sorption of both 2,4-DCP and 2,4,5-TCP to a ? number 69.8 softwood pulp as a function of pH, further confirms these results and also shows an interesting situation in which the sorption of the trichlorophenol, which typically has the higher sorption, drops below that for the dichlorophenol in the pH range of about 7.7?9. ... Increasing quantities of sorbed humic substances increased the sorption of HOC. ... The present work demonstrates that a 3rd variable is important, i.e., the concn. of the sorbing solid phase in the system. ...

Steven J. Severtson; Sujit Banerjee

1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

40

Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Pulp and Paper Corrosion Symposium Georgia Tech Renewable Bioproducts Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Pulp and Paper Corrosion Symposium Georgia Tech Renewable Bioproducts Institute November 2014 Digester Corrosion Margaret Gorog Federal Way, WA 2 · Chips plus a mixture of white and black liquor · The pulp is then blown from the bottom of the vessel into a blow tank · Corrosion occurs during filling

Das, Suman

42

Emissions from street vendor cooking devices (charcoal grilling). Final report, January 1998--March 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses a joint US/Mexican program to establish a reliable emissions inventory for street vendor cooking devices (charcoal grilling), a significant source of air pollutants in the Mexicali-Imperial Valley area of Mexico. Emissions from these devices, prevalent in the streets of Mexicali, Mexico, were investigated experimentally by measuring levels of particulate matter, particle size distributions, volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, aldehydes, and oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, emitted when meat is cooked on a grill over a charcoal fire. To investigate the emission rate, both beef and chicken were tested. Furthermore, both meats were marinated with a mixture similar to that used by the street vendors. Some tests were conducted with non-marinated beef for comparison. Two blank runs were performed sampling charcoal fires without meat. Finally, a simple control device, normally used in an exhaust fan to trap grease over a kitchen stove, was evaluated for its effectiveness in reducing emissions.

Lee, S.Y.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Sorption Characteristics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Aluminum Smelter Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. ... Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35?50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11?16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. ... To determine the BC levels, the Gelinas modification (15) of the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO) method by Gustafsson (16) was applied. ...

Gijs D. Breedveld; Émilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

CHARCOAL AND MICROCHARCOAL :CONTINENTAL AND MARINE RECORDS 4th International Meeting of Anthracology, Brussels , 8-13 September 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARCOAL AND MICROCHARCOAL :CONTINENTAL AND MARINE RECORDS 4th International Meeting, little is known of the traditional production of lime, in terms of fuel management and lay out (calcium oxide), which is chemically unstable in #12;CHARCOAL AND MICROCHARCOAL :CONTINENTAL AND MARINE

Boyer, Edmond

45

Gas turbine considerations in the pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulp and paper industry is one of the largest users of energy in the industrial arena, requiring large quantities of process steam and electrical energy per unit of production. Developing power generation as an integral part of its power plant systems is one way for the industry to meet these requirements. Gas turbine-based cogeneration systems can also be a desirable approach. In recent years, competitive pressures, environmental concerns, the cost and availability of various fuels, and new power generation opportunities have awakened interest in power generation in the pulp and paper industry and other industries. This paper provides a strategic review of these issues of the pulp and paper industry.

Anderson, J.S. (International Paper Co., Purchase, NY (US)); Kovacik, J.M. (GE Co., Schenectady, NY (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Organosolv pulping: a versatile approach to wood refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fractionation of hardwoods into pulp, lignin, and hemicellulose has been studied in a multi-stage alcohol extraction pilot plant. By adjusting processing conditions, pulps of different properties were obtained. They have been found to be suitable to furnish components for writing, printing, and high-absorbency papers and as dissolving grades. By-product lignin and hemicelluloses are recovered in separate, high-yield fractions for which several potential commercial applications have been identified. The process is a low-capital-cost, low-environmental-impact alternative to kraft and sulfite pulping.

Lora, J.H.; Aziz, S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effects of pulp consistency and mixing intensity on ozone bleaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional wisdom holds that ozone bleaching is feasible only at low or high pulp consistencies. However, recent research suggests that ozone bleaching at medium consistency is possible under conditions of high-intensity mixing. This article presents experimental results for softwood and hardwood pulps that were ozone-bleached over a range of consistencies (3-40%) and mixing conditions. Ozone was pressurized and delivered by a proprietary automated system. Results indicate that ozone bleaching at medium consistency can be as effective as bleaching at high consistency. Medium-consistency bleaching has the advantage of greater selectivity, resulting in higher pulp viscosity.

Hurst, M.M. (Quantum Technologies, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Preventing Strength Loss of Unbleached Kraft Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft pulp fibers lose inter-fiber bonding ability when they are dried during the manufacture of paper. Adverse environmental consequences of this loss include (a) limitations on the number of times that kraft fibers can be recycled, (b) reduced paper strength, sometimes making it necessary to use heavier paper or paperboard to meet product strength requirements, increasing the usage of raw materials, (c) decreased rates of paper production in cases where the fiber furnish has been over-refined in an attempt to regain inter-fiber bonding ability. The present study is the first of its type to focus on unbleached kraft fibers, which are a main ingredient of linerboard for corrugated containers. About 90 million tons of unbleached kraft fiber are used worldwide every year for this purpose.

Martin Hubbe; Richard Venditti; John Heitmann

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

Low Odor, High Yield Kraft Pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laboratory cooks pure oxygen was profiled into the circulation line of a batch digester during two periods of the cooking cycle: The first injection occurred during the heating steps for the purpose of in-situ generation of polysulfide. This chip treatment was studied to explore stabilization against alkaline induced carbohydrate peeling and to increase pulp yield. Under optimum conditions small amounts of polysulfide were produced with yield increase of about 0.5% These increases fell below earlier reports suggesting that unknown differences in liquor composition may influence the relative amounts of polysulfide and thiosulfate generated during the oxidation. Consequently, further studies are required to understand the factors that influence the ratios of those two sulfur species.

W.T. McKean

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pulp Biomass Facility Pulp Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility Facility Alabama Pine Pulp Sector Biomass Location Monroe County, Alabama Coordinates 31.5119068°, -87.460397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.5119068,"lon":-87.460397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

51

Energy Management and Computers in the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dryer hood waste heat. o Biomass feedstocks for the production of specialized chemial products. o Crossing of the stone groundwood process with the thermomechanical pulping process. 236 ESL-IE-81-04-42 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy...

Sommerfeld, J. T.; Hartley, E. M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measuring the moisture content of wood chips. pulp or blackmeasurements of the moisture content in wood chips and blackwood species in the incoming chip stream, 3) a measurement of the moisture content

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Biotechnology in the pulp and paper industry; A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews biotechnology in the pulp and paper industry. As to biopulping and biobleaching, little effort is being devoted to improving strength properties of pulps. However, positive results have been reported in improving tensile properties by treating mechanical pulps with white-rot organisms and in enzymatic beating of chemical pulps with hemicellulase enzymes. Papermaking is another seemingly overlooked area, although biological systems and processes have been used in the past and ought to be important still. On the other hand, waste treatment has been a stronghold of biotechnology within the industry for years. New possibilities may emerge via biotechnology for removing color and AOX from bleach plant effluents. New research on the use of white-rot organisms and soil bacteria to detoxify chlorinated organics in soils and groundwater may yield technologies that the industry can apply.

Trotter, P.C. (Biotechnology Awareness, Weyerhaeuser Co., Technology Center, Tacoma, WA (US))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

55

Creating a low-cost, low-particulate emissions corn cob charcoal grinder for use in Peru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indoor air pollution is a serious health risk in developing countries, and is the leading cause of death for children under five. By replacing traditional cooking fuels with charcoal, one can significantly reduce a user's ...

Thomas, Ashley Elizabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The effect of low flowrates on the adsorption efficiency of hexane on charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

trogen at a concentrati on of 689 ppm was passed through a series of sampling tubes contain1ng, 0. 200 gm, 0. 250 gm, 0. 300 gm and 0. 350 gm beds of 20-40 mesh act1vated coconut shell charcoal at flowrates ranging from 290 mL/min to 6670 mL/m1n... trogen at a concentrati on of 689 ppm was passed through a series of sampling tubes contain1ng, 0. 200 gm, 0. 250 gm, 0. 300 gm and 0. 350 gm beds of 20-40 mesh act1vated coconut shell charcoal at flowrates ranging from 290 mL/min to 6670 mL/m1n...

Easley, Larry David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills December 13, 2011 - 4:12pm Addthis Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Neil Rossmeissl General Engineer What does this project do? Breathes new life into shuttered factories and mills. Saves and creates jobs. Despite Americans' voracious appetite for paper products -- a staggering 700 pounds per person annually -- America's pulp and paper industry has been struggling as of late due to competition from countries where

58

Core Fluxome and Metafluxome of Lactic Acid Bacteria under Simulated Cocoa Pulp Fermentation Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Metabolic network simulation using logical loop algorithm and Jacobian matrix. Metab. Eng. 6...grown in cocoa pulp simulation medium, and fermentation...cultures in cocoa pulp simulation medium (Fig. S1). PDF, 440K Supplemental...

Philipp Adler; Christoph Josef Bolten; Katrin Dohnt; Carl Erik Hansen; Christoph Wittmann

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Highly Energy Efficient Directed Green Liquor Utilization (D-GLU) Pulping  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a project that seeks to develop feasible chemical modifications during kraft pulping operations to obtain significant energy and product benefits for U.S. kraft pulp and paper mills.

60

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills Bioenergy Pumps New Life into Pulp and Paper Mills December 13, 2011 - 4:12pm Addthis Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Old Town Fuel and Fiber, a former pulp mill, converts a portion of the wood chips used to make pulp to biofuels. | Energy Department photo. Neil Rossmeissl General Engineer What does this project do? Breathes new life into shuttered factories and mills. Saves and creates jobs. Despite Americans' voracious appetite for paper products -- a staggering 700 pounds per person annually -- America's pulp and paper industry has been struggling as of late due to competition from countries where

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8 Figure 8. Final energy mix in China's pulp and paperFigure 8 shows the final energy mix in China’s pulp andstatistics). Although the energy mix shows a trend toward

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Storage effects on desorption efficiencies of methyl ethyl ketone and styrene collected on activated charcoal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficier&cy nf methyl etiiy', Ketone and styrene monomer adsorbed on activated charcoal samples, and stored under isotherm&al condit'ions, were investigated as a function of storage time. The dependence of the storage time effects on the storage temp...- erature and compound concentration were also studied. Results showed no siqnif', cant storag&e time effects on adsorbed styrene after sixty days of storage. A very significant decrease in the desorption ef iciency of methyl ethyl ketone was observed...

Dommer, Richard Alvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

A theoretical model for adsorption capacities of charcoal beds: I, Relative humidity effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water vapor is the major interferent in the adsorption of other vapors from air when that air is passed through an activated charcoal bed. A limited amount of data (published and unpublished) is available on the magnitudes of capacity (or service life) reduction as a function of relative humidity (water vapor concentration) and preadsorbed water. A simple equilibrium model has been developed which quantitatively explains observed humidity effects and allows extrapolation of data to untested conditions. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Wood, G.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United States is the world's leading producer, consumer, and exporter of pulp, paper, and paperboard products.

65

Social Movements and Ecological Modernization: The Transformation of Pulp and Paper Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) short-course, “IntroductionInternational (PPI), the TAPPI Journal, and others. The

Sonnenfeld, David A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBERAND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH OPACITY PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in situ within pulp fibers. Because paper made from fiber-loaded pulp increasing the recovery and utilization of recycled fiber and optimizing virgin fiber yield by relying moreEXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBERAND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH

Abubakr, Said

67

Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic field. The applications for magnetic sensors that have studied include (1) sensors for the measurement of the water and ice content of wood chips entering the pulping mill, (2) sensors for measuring the water content and other constituents of the black liquor leaving the paper digester, and (3) sensors for measuring paper thickness and water content as the paper is being processed. These tasks can be done using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The magnetic field used for doing the NMR can come from either permanent magnets or superconducting magnets. The choice of the magnet is dependent on a number of factors, which include the size of the sample and field strength needed to do the sensing task at hand. This paper describes some superconducting magnet options that can be used in the pulp and paper industry.

Green, M.A.; Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Luft, P.A.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.S.

2001-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Continuous on-line measurement of lignin concentration in wood pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are working toward the development of an instrument for the continuous, on-line measurement of the lignin concentration in wood pulp. The instrument is based on laser induced fluorescence of the wood pulp and is to be used as a primary sensor for both feedback control of the pulping and feedforward control of bleaching. We report here the results of a series of laboratory tests that characterized the fluorescence properties of wood pulp and demonstrated a correlation between various fluorescence functions and the Kappa number of the pulps as determined by TAPPI Procedure T236.

Jeffers, L.A.; Roman, G.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nanocellulose A sustainable nanomaterial derived from wood pulp with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanocellulose A sustainable nanomaterial derived from wood pulp with applications in composites, sensors, and biomedical devices. The Sustainable Nano-Biocomposites lab in the chemical engineering-renewable resources while offering better performance. #12;Research Program Research in the Sustainable Nano

Thompson, Michael

70

Comparative radiocarbon dating of lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples from Babeldaob Island, Republic of Palau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is difficult to construct archaeological chronologies for Babeldaob, the main island of Palau (western Micronesia), because the saprolitic clays of the dominant terraced-hill sites and associated ceramic sherds often contain old carbon that originated in lignites. This has implications, as well, for chronologies of sedimentary sequences. Comparative analysis of the dating problem using lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples indicates that, in fact, there are both old and young sources of potential contamination. It is concluded that radiocarbon samples from Babeldaob need to be tested for appropriate carbon content rather than relying solely upon material identification.

Anderson, A.; Chappell, J.; Clark, G.; Phear, S. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Trends and guidelines in water pollution control in the Finnish pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are about 50 paper and pulp mills in Finland. In this paper, their production capacities in 1988 are illustrated. Pulp and paper production has increased quite rapidly during the last few decades. The greatest increase incurred in the production of bleached kraft pulp and mechanical pulp. The production of sulfite pulp has decreased during recent years. Within paper the production of printing papers has had the biggest increase. Estimates predict that the production capacity of the finish pulp and paper industry will show an average increase of 4% per year by the middle of this decade. Final production in 1987 and one estimate of production in 1992 are given. Wastewater loadings per production output are decreasing.

Junna, J. (National Board of Waters and the Environment, P.O. Box 250, SF-00101 Helsinki (FI)); Ruonala, S. (Environmental Research and Development Programme of the Finnish Forest Industry, P.O. Box 250, SF-00101 Helsinki (FI))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Microsoft Word - Pulp and Paper EPI Documentation FINAL 05212012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE - DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE DEVELOPMENT OF ENERGY STAR® ENERGY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR PULP, PAPER, AND PAPERBOARD MILLS GALE A. BOYD AND YI FANG GUO DUKE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS BOX 90097, DURHAM, NC 27708 MAY 21, 2012 SPONSORED BY THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AS PART OF THE ENERGY STAR PROGRAM. 1 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This work was sponsored by the U.S. EPA Climate Protection Partnerships Division's ENERGY STAR program. The research has benefited from comments by participants involved with the ENERGY STAR Pulp, Paper, and Paperboard Industry Focus meetings. The research in this paper was conducted while the author was a Special Sworn Status researcher of the U.S. Census Bureau at the Triangle Census

73

Production of high quality and low energy chemithermomechanical pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemithermomechanical pulps (CTMP) were produced from Eastern black spruce chips in a two-stage pilot plant using different conditions of chemical pretreatment and refining intensity. The conventional CTMP was produced by impregnating chips with sulfite liquor at a pH of approximately 10 and the conducting the first-stage refining in a double disc refiner at 1,200 rpm. The distribution of specific energy and refining intensity was about the same in the two stages. The experiments showed that, by decreasing the impregnating liquor pH to approximately 4.5 and conducting the first-stage refining at a relatively low specific energy and high refining intensity (by operating the refiner at 1,800 rpm), an energy saving of up to 33% could be achieved without any adverse effect on the pulp quality.

Stationwala, M.I. (Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada, Pointe Claire, PQ (Canada))

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mineral phases of green liquor dregs, slaker grits, lime mud and wood ash of a Kraft pulp and paper mill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four residues generated in a Kraft, pulp and paper plant, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XFA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimmetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A quantitative phase composition model, that accounts for the observed data and for the physico-chemical conditions of formation, was postulated for each material. Emphasis was given on the identification of the mineral components of each material. The green liquor dregs and the lime mud contain Calcite and Gipsite. The slaker grits contains Calcite, Portlandite, Pirssonite, Larnite and Brucite. The Calcite phase, present in the dregs and in the lime mud, has small amounts of magnesium replacing calcium. The wood ash contains Quartz as the major crystalline mineral phase.

Fernanda Machado Martins; Joaniel Munhoz Martins; Luiz Carlos Ferracin; Carlos Jorge da Cunha

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007. Dual pressure recovery boiler. Patent No. : US 7243619Cycle Power or Recovery Boiler into an Existing Pulp Mill".Monacelli. 2009. "Recovery Boiler Reheat Steam Cycle". Paper

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Effect of raw material and Kraft Pulping Conditions on Characteristics of Dissolved Lignin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Lignin is one of the main components in wood and during the chemical pulping processes it is degraded and dissolved into the cooking liquor.… (more)

Svärd, Antonia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Dried Citrus Peel and Pulp as a Feed for Lactating Cows.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the three esperiments. DISCUSSION diffi grol I!! i>n 14 ,>,,. ( t!le:: ftl![l fere esults of the effects of feeding citrus peel and pulp in the dairy :entrate mixture using 5070 of the entire concentrate mixture as us pulp as compared... between the three esperiments. DISCUSSION diffi grol I!! i>n 14 ,>,,. ( t!le:: ftl![l fere esults of the effects of feeding citrus peel and pulp in the dairy :entrate mixture using 5070 of the entire concentrate mixture as us pulp as compared...

Copeland, O. C. (Orlin Cephas); Shepardson, C. N. (Charles Noah)

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wastewater treatment and sludge handling at pulp and paperutilization b -2.52 e Sludge recovery and utilization butilization, incorporating sludge recovery and utilization,

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ENERGY EFFICIENCY OPPORTUNITIES IN THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAICS Code Sub-Sector Pulp mills Paper (except newsprint) mills Newsprint mills Paperboard mills Total % of Total Total Black Liquor Natural Gas

Kramer, Klaas Jan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 26312643 Charcoal and fly-ash particles from Lake Lucerne sediments (Central  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the fire-derived carbon from biomass combustion (Thevenon et al., in press), and (2) new developments Abstract In order to link the charcoal record from sedimentary archives with the combustion processes. It allows a detailed quantification and morphological analysis of the combustion-derived products that were

Gilli, Adrian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effect of TMP refining using an adjustable-speed drive on energy consumption and pulp quality. [ThermoMechanical Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted to study the effect of TMP refining using adjustable-speed drive (ASD) on energy consumption and pulp quality. The project is based on the studies of disc refiner models at high- and low-consistency refining. The primary objectives is to examine the potential energy efficiency improvement of a TMP system by evaluating the effect of TMP refining using ASD in pilot scale at the Center for High Yield Pulping Science. The pilot experimental results show that certain benefits of TMP refining using ASD can be obtained. Preliminary results demonstrate that increasing the first stage of refining speed reduces electrical energy at similar pulp quality.

Su, W.; Hsieh, J. (Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the US Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies, June 1999  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assessment of the potential of CHP technologies to reduce carbon emissions in the US chemicals and pulp and paper industries.

84

EXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBER AND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH OPACITY PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alkalinity, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in situ within pulp fibers. Because paper made from fiber include increasing the recovery and utilization of recycled fiber and optimizing virgin fiber yieldEXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBER AND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH

Abubakr, Said

85

Color Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/0702/citing-global- warming-georgia-judge-blocks-coal-plant/picture1.jpg/5307532-1-eng-US/picture1.jpgColor Removal from Pulp Mill Effluent Using Coal Ash Produced from Georgia Coal Combustion Power color from pulp mill effluent using coal ash. Prevent coal ash adsorbent from leaching arsenic

Hutcheon, James M.

86

Department of Energy Awards $2.2 Million to Save Energy in the Pulp and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Awards $2.2 Million to Save Energy in the Pulp Awards $2.2 Million to Save Energy in the Pulp and Paper Industry Department of Energy Awards $2.2 Million to Save Energy in the Pulp and Paper Industry December 20, 2005 - 4:50pm Addthis Total Cost-Shared Value of Research is $4.3 Million WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $2.2 million in research and development grants for projects to save energy in the pulp and paper industry. The research will focus on removing water from pulp in the paper making process and determining the technical and commercial feasibility of next generation manufacturing concepts. "New efficient technologies and processes are key to reducing our energy consumption now and in the future," said Douglas L. Faulkner, Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

87

The Fractionation of Loblolly Pine Woodchips Into Pulp For Making Paper Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to test the PureVision biomass fractionation technology for making pulp from loblolly pine. A specific goal was to produce a pulp product that is comparable to pulp produced from the kraft process, while reducing the environmental effects of the kraft process, known to be a highly pollutant process. The overall goal of the project was met by using the biomass fractionation concept for making pulp product. This proof-of-concept study, done with Southern pine pinchips as feedstock, evaluated NaOH concentration and residence time as variables in single-stage cocurrent pulping process. It can be concluded that 1% NaOH is adequate for effective delignification using the PureVision process; this is about ? of that used in the kraft process. Also, the PureVision process does not use sulfur-based chemicals such as N2S and hence, is environmentally more benign.

Kiran Kadam, PhD

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Cogeneration handbook for the pulp and paper industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the pulp and paper industry. Appendices B and O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Griffin, E.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Compaction of wood chips - physical and pulping characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperatures of the uncompacted chips of Pinus taeda were, in general, higher than those of compacted chips when stored outdoors in containers for 236 days. The results of the study after storage indicated that the moisture content (MC) of compacted chips is the same as that of green chips, the uncompacted equivalent mass of chips exhibits a substantial loss in MC, and there is approximately 18% increase in MC of the uncompacted chips simulating a stockpile when compared with MC of green chips. The compaction process neither damaged wood fibers nor altered the chip response to conventional pulping.

Hassan, A.E.; Reeves, R.H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The Radioactivity Characteristics of the NPP Charcoal Sample Contaminated by Carbon-14 - 13531  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radioactivity of {sup 14}C-contaminated charcoal sample was analyzed by using a high temperature oxidation and liquid scintillation counting method. The radioactivity of the sample was monotonically increased according to the increase of the combustion time at each temperature where the experimental uncertainty was calculated in the 95 % confidence level. It showed that the {sup 14}C radioactivity was not completely extracted from the sample by simply increasing the combustion time unless the combustion temperature was high enough. The higher the combustion temperature was, the higher the recovery during the first 30 minutes was. The first 30 minute recoveries were 100 % at a temperature equal to or greater than 450 deg. C. The ratios of the recovery during the first 30 minutes to the total recovery during whole duration were more than 90 % at each experiment temperature. It was understood that the temperature was a critical factor for the complete removal of the {sup 14}C from the waste sample. (authors)

Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

94

Continuous On-Line Measurement of Lignin Concentration in Wood Pulp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In the second, the pulp is loaded into an open j so that the laser directly illuminates the pulp. Res Il~ obtained with the two methods are comparable e ut the open jar approach allows better control and wider variation of the pulp consistency. In both... spanning the range of Kappa numbers from approximately 15 to 55. The range of Kappa numbers was achieved by removing samples from the digester at different times so that within a set. each of the samples came from the same parent wood-chip stock...

Jeffers, L. A.; Roman, G. W.

95

Refining intensity, energy consumption, and pulp quality in two-stage chip refining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on thermomechanical pulps produced in two pilot plant installations. Both installations were conventional two-stage systems in which the first stage was pressurized and the second was atmospheric. At a given specific energy, pulp quality was improved. Alternatively, for a given pulp quality, the energy consumption was reduced when refining in the first stage was carried out at a high refining intensity. High refining intensity was reached by operating the first stage either at a high rotational speed or low consistency. There were indications that these benefits could be enhanced if the second stage were operated at a low refining intensity.

Miles, K.B.; May, W.D.; Karnis, A. (Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, 570 St. John's Boulevard, Pointe Claire, Quebec H9R 3J9 (CA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Emerging Energy-Efficiency and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Technologies for the Pulp and Paper Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency with regard to carbon capture". Energy 31 (15):67 3.6. Emerging Carbon Capture Technologies for the Pulp2011. Technology Roadmaps: Carbon Capture and Storage in

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Surface selective removal of xylan from refined never-dried birch kraft pulp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of enzyme treatment on refined, never-dried bleached birch kraft pulp was investigated, using an endo-1,4-?-xylanase, that is substantially free from cellulase activity. The xylanase tre...

Esa Saukkonen; Katja Lyytikäinen; Pavel Geydt; Kaj Backfolk

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report assesses steam generation and use in the pulp and paper, chemical manufacturing, and the petroleum refining industries. The report also estimates the energy savings potential available from implementing steam system performance and efficiency improvements.

99

Advanced Powerhouse Controls Save Pulp Mill $500 in Purchased Energy in First Month  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This case study describes the application of advanced regulatory and supervisory controls to powerhouse operations at a large pulp mill in central British Columbia. Substantial reductions in mill operating costs were achieved by actively managing...

Morrison, R.; Hilder, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A method for detecting breakthrough of organic solvent vapors in a charcoal tube using semiconductor gas sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a method for detecting organic vapors that break through charcoal tubes, using semiconductor gas sensors as a breakthrough detector of vapors. A glass column equipped with two sensors was inserted in Teflon tubing, and air containing organic vapor was introduced at a constant flow rate. After the output signal of the sensors became stable, a charcoal tube was inserted into the tubing at the upstream of the sensors. The resistance of the sensors was collected temporally in an integrated circuit (IC) card. The vapor concentration of the air near the sensors was measured with a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) at intervals of 5 minutes to obtain the breakthrough curve. When the relative humidity was zero, the output signals of the sensors began to change before the breakthrough point (1% breakthrough time). This tendency was almost the same for methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, isopropyl alcohol (IPA), toluene, and chloroform. For dichloromethane and 1,1,1-trichloroethane, the time when the sensor output signals began to rise was almost the same as the breakthrough point. When the relative humidity was 80 percent, the sensors could also detect many vapors before the breakthrough point, but they could not perceive dichloromethane and chloroform vapors. A personal sampling system with a breakthrough detector was developed and its availability is discussed.

Hori, Hajime; Noritake, Yuji; Murobushi, Hisako; Higashi, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Isamu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Treatment of pulp mill sludges by supercritical water oxidation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is new process that can oxidize organics very effectively at moderate temperatures (400 to 650{degree}C) and high pressure (3700 psi). It is an environmentally acceptable alternative for sludge treatment. In bench scale tests, total organic carbon (TOC) and total organic halide (TOX) reductions of 99 to 99.9% were obtained; dioxin reductions were 95 to 99.9%. A conceptual design for commercial systems has been completed and preliminary economics have been estimated. Comparisons confirm that SCWO is less costly than dewatering plus incineration for treating pulp mill sludges. SCWO can also compete effectively with dewatering plus landfilling where tipping fees exceed $35/yd{sup 3}. In some regions of the US, tipping fees are now $75/yd{sup 3} and rising steadily. In the 1995 to 2000 time frame, SCWO has a good chance of becoming the method of choice. MODEC's objective is to bring the technology to commercial availability by 1993. 10 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

Modell, M.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

Simo Sarkanen

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ketchikan Pulp's hog-fuel-boiler energy retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ketchikan Pulp Co. (KPC) is a 600-b.d. Ton/day sulfite mill located 679 Alaska Airlines miles north of Seattle on the island of Revillagigedo. Designed to produce 860 psig steam at 825[degrees]F, each of the boilers is fired off a combination of No. 6 oil and waste wood. This paper reports that in 1984, a rotary bark dyer was installed in series between the existing boiler I.D. fans and the boiler stack. This system consists of a direct-contact rotary dryer unit followed by an additional I.D. fan and four cyclone separators. The combustion gases then return to the existing stack by way of the existing I.D. fan discharge ducting. This unit was designed to operate at a flue-gas inlet temperature of 550[degrees]F and maintained a discharge temperature of 300[degrees]F. The unit was designed to process approximately 360 units of hog fuel per day, drying it from 60% moisture to 40% moisture in a single-pass operation.

Sweet, R.N. (Howard Needles Tammen and Bergendoff, Bellevue, WA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Overview of the government/industry workshop on opportunities for new materials in pulp and paper processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a synopsis of the presentations made at the two-day workshop conducted in Portland, Oregon, on August 12 and 13, 1993, for the Advanced Industrial Concepts division (AICD) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) and DOE national laboratory representatives from the pulp and paper industry. The information from the presentations is supplemented by additional statistics, as appropriate. The workshop objectives were (1) to develop a strategy and framework for collaboration between the pulp and paper industries and DOE`s national laboratories, (2) to identify major challenges to pulp and paper industry modernization, and (3) to identify research objectives for DOE national laboratories to improve materials and process technology in pulp and paper mills. Prior to the workshop, participants had the opportunity to tour paper mills and gain familiarity with pulp and paper processing methods. During the workshop, research needs for materials and processing that were identified at earlier AICD workshops were reviewed. Major problems of the pulp and paper industry were addressed, and ways in which DOE national laboratories are interacting with other industries to foster innovation and solve problems were presented. As a result of this and other workshops, a Pulp Paper Mill of the future strategy is being developed to address challenges identified in these proceedings. Continued efforts are expected by AICD to match candidate materials and processes from DOE national laboratories with the technology needs of pulp and paper mills.

Young, J.K.; Fowler, R.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proceedings of the 6th international Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry: Advances in Applied and Fundamental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of the 6th international Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry during refining, improved paper strength properties, and reduced the environmental impact of pulping (2 for pulping. The chemical demand can also be lessened due to prior degradation of the lignin by the fungus

Abubakr, Said

106

Low effluent processing in the pulp and paper industry: Electrodialysis for continuous selective chloride removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pollution prevention is currently a major focus of the United States pulp and paper industry. Significant process changes are inevitable to implement low effluent processing. The kraft pulping process is prevalent for the production of wood pulp. About 50 million tons of wood pulp are produced annually in the United States alone using the kraft process. Water consumption is currently roughly between 30 and 200 m{sup 3} of water per ton of air dry bleached kraft pulp. In-process recycling of water is now being implemented by many mills to reduce the use of increasingly scarce water resources and to reduce the need for waste-water treatment. Mass balance considerations and industrial experience show that nonprocess elements, which are detrimental to the kraft process, such as chloride and potassium, will quickly build up once water use is significantly reduced. High concentrations of chloride and potassium can cause corrosion and lead to more frequent mill shutdowns due to fouling of heat exchanger surfaces in the kraft recovery furnace. Electrodialysis will monovalent selective anion and cation exchange membranes was explored here to selectively remove chlorine as sodium and potassium chloride from a feed stream with very high ionic strength. Experiments with model solutions and extended tests with the actual pulp mill materials were performed. Very good selectivities and current efficiencies were observed for chloride over sulfate. The outstanding performance of the process with actual mill materials containing organic and inorganic contamination shows great promise for rapid transfer to the pilot scale. This work is an example of the usefulness of membrane separations as a kidney in low effluent industrial processing.

Pfromm, P.H. [Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Pulp and Paper Mills: Profiting for Efficient Motor System Use | ENERGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pulp and Paper Mills: Profiting for Efficient Motor System Use Pulp and Paper Mills: Profiting for Efficient Motor System Use Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

108

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

109

“What Efficiency Projects are Being Installed in the Pulp and Paper Industry”  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Wisconsin Focus on Energy program has seven years of experience on the actual projects that are being installed in the Pulp and Paper industry. The program has a broad perspective on the types and trends of investments in energy efficiency...

Nicol, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Study on the modification of bleached eucalyptus kraft pulp using birch xylan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, birch xylan was deposited onto elementally chlorine free (ECF) bleached eucalyptus kraft pulp, and the corresponding changes in physical properties were determined. An aqueous 5% birch xylan solution at pH 9 was added to 5 wt% slurry of bleached kraft eucalyptus fibers, with stirring at 70 °C for 15 min after which the pH was adjusted to 5–6. The xylan enriched fibers were isolated by filtration and used for physical testing. A 1.15 wt% adsorption of birch xylan on the kraft fibers at 8% xylan addition increased the tensile index, strain and tensile energy absorption values by ?10%, while the burst index increased by 20.15%. The tear index increased by 2.55% with the adsorption of 0.87 wt% birch xylan on the eucalyptus kraft pulp at 3% xylan addition. The pulp beatability was also improved by adding birch xylan. The surface morphology of the unmodified and modified pulp samples were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the tapping mode. The analysis revealed the differences in the fine structure of fibers which showed micrometer-sized xylan structures spreading over the fiber surfaces.

Wenjia Han; Chuanshan Zhao; Thomas Elder; Kefu Chen; Rendang Yang; Dongho Kim; Yunqiao Pu; Jeffery Hsieh; Arthur J. Ragauskas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

In situ SEM micro-indentation of single wood pulp fibres in transverse direction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Fibre deformation and sheet strength. TAPPI (1996) 79:105-111. 4 Page DH , El-Hosseiny...compression loading of single pulp fibres. TAPPI (1986) 69:98-102. 6 Dunford JA...method, yield, beating, and drying. TAPPI (1970) 53:820-823. 11 Sedighi Gilani......

Ramesh-Babu Adusumalli; Rejin Raghavan; Patrick Schwaller; Tanja Zimmermann; Johann Michler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

In situ SEM micro-indentation of single wood pulp fibres in transverse direction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......loading of single pulp fibres. TAPPI (1986) 69:98-102. 6 Dunford...yield, beating, and drying. TAPPI (1970) 53:820-823. 11...ESEM and video image analysis. TAPPI (1995) 78:143-148. 14...Fiber Sci. (1996) 28:429-437. 15 Gindl W , Gupta HS. Cell-wall......

Ramesh-Babu Adusumalli; Rejin Raghavan; Patrick Schwaller; Tanja Zimmermann; Johann Michler

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Selective enrichment of a methanol-utilizing consortium using pulp & paper mill waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient utilization of carbon inputs is critical to the economic viability of the current forest products sector. Input carbon losses occur in various locations within a pulp mill, including losses as volatile organics and wastewater . Opportunities exist to capture this carbon in the form of value-added products such as biodegradable polymers. Waste activated sludge from a pulp mill wastewater facility was enriched for 80 days for a methanol-utilizing consortium with the goal of using this consortium to produce biopolymers from methanol-rich pulp mill waste streams. Five enrichment conditions were utilized: three high-methanol streams from the kraft mill foul condensate system, one methanol-amended stream from the mill wastewater plant, and one methanol-only enrichment. Enrichment reactors were operated aerobically in sequencing batch mode at neutral pH and 25°C with a hydraulic residence time and a solids retention time of four days. Non-enriched waste activated sludge did not consume methanol or reduce chemical oxygen demand. With enrichment, however, the chemical oxygen demand reduction over 24 hour feed/decant cycles ranged from 79 to 89 %, and methanol concentrations dropped below method detection limits. Neither the non-enriched waste activated sludge nor any of the enrichment cultures accumulated polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) under conditions of nitrogen sufficiency. Similarly, the non-enriched waste activated sludge did not accumulate PHAs under nitrogen limited conditions. By contrast, enriched cultures accumulated PHAs to nearly 14% on a dry weight basis under nitrogen limited conditions. This indicates that selectively-enriched pulp mill waste activated sludge can serve as an inoculum for PHA production from methanol-rich pulp mill effluents.

Gregory R. Mockos; William A. Smith; Frank J. Loge; David N. Thompson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Mineralized and osteoid tissue from dental pulp stem cells on micro-arc oxidation titanium in vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presence of insufficient bone volume affects the implant healing and success. The aim of this study was to evaluate osteogenic capacity of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) on micro-arc oxidation (MAO) titanium ...

Yi Huang ? ?; Ting Chang ? ?; Cheng Yang ? ?…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Opportunities to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

primary stage consistency” TAPPI Journal 80 (1). Allan, G. ;drying of pulp and paper,” TAPPI Journal 8 (80). Pp. 175-impulse- drying temperature,” TAPPI Journal 77(2). Pages:

Martin, Nathan; Anglani, N.; Einstein, D.; Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bleaching Miscanthus x giganteus Acetosolv Pulps with a New Totally Chlorine-free Sequence and the Effect of Carbohydrate Protectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The bleaching of semibleached Miscanthus x giganteus Acetosolv pulp, after alkaline and peroxyacetate treatments, was investigated by a novel totally chlorine-free (TCF) sequence. Oxygen delignification (O-stage), peroxide (P-stage), and oxygen-...

Juan José Villaverde; Pablo Ligero; Alberto de Vega

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

Essential Substrate Residues for Action of Endopeptidases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endopeptidases, which are influenced in their specificity primarily by basic residues of arginine or lysine are treated in seven sections, according to the position of the essential residue: ...

Prof. Dr. Borivoj Keil

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors by the addition of pulverized coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the reductive burning of high-yield spent pulping liquors which can be accomplished by the addition of pulverized coal to increase the heat content and generate the proper reducing conditions. Samples from a 78%-yield sodium bisulfite pulping process employing a hardwood furnish were mixed with 10-50% pulveriized coal and burned at 950[degrees]C under reducing conditions in a box furnace. Even in these uncontrolled combustion conditions 76. 5% of the sulfur found in the soluble portion of the smelt was converted from lignousulfonates to useful sulfide ion. For the remainder of the sulfur, analyses determined it to be 19. 5% as sulfite ion, 3. 1% as thiosulfate ion, and 0.9% as sulfate ion.

Sell, N.J.; Norman, J.C. (Natural and Applied Sciences, Univ. of Wisconsin-Green Bay, Green Bay, WI (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pulp and paper research energized by DOE and IPST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced its partnerships with the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research, University of Florida, Weyerhaeuser Co., and Wood Industries Co. for cost-shared projects to study the production of ethanol form dedicated energy crops and forestry product wastes. Weyerhaeuser, in collaboration with Amoco Corp., proposes to investigate expanding the use of biomass at the Weyerhaeuser facility in New Bern, NC. Weyerhaeuser will provide saw-mill wastes and other forestry residues to produce ethanol and electricity which would help the forestry industry attain self-sufficiency. Wood Industries Co. (WICO) of Visalia, CA, proposes to operate a 100-acre demofarm using plantation crops of seed sorghum, kenaf and hybrid poplar, willow, and eucalyptus to produce ethanol for gasoline blending and solid fuel for generating electricity. WICO will investigate cost-reduction strategies for the biomass-to-energy process. According to IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) President Richard A. Matula, the institute's research efforts can be categorized as follows: Fundamental, long-term research; Applied, mid-term research; Commercialization of new technology; and Process engineering products.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Conifer tissue culture and how it may impact the pulp and paper industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report on the state-of-the-art of tissue culture of conifers. Developments in organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis are looked at. This technology is expected to help the pulp and paper industry in achieving its goal of maximum productivity in two principal ways: (a) by providing rapid and efficient in vitro propagation methods for elite trees, and (b) by providing a technology for producing desired hybrids via somatic cell genetics and hybridization.

Verma, D.C.; Einspahr, D.W.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Recycling of water in bleached kraft pulp mills by using electrodialysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conservation of water in bleached kraft pulp mills by recycling the bleach plant effluent directly without treatment will cause accumulation of inorganic ''non-process elements'' (NPEs) and serious operational problems. In this work, an electrodialysis process is being developed for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached kraft pulp mills. In this process, electrodialysis functions as a selective kidney to remove inorganic NPEs from bleach plant effluents, before they reach the recovery cycle. Acidic bleach plant effluents from several mills using bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The total dissolved solids were mostly inorganic NPEs. Sodium was the predominant cation and chloride was present at significant levels in all these effluents. In laboratory electrodialysis experiments, selective removal of chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently. Rejection of organic compounds was up to 98%. Electrodialysis was shown to be resistant to membrane fouling and scaling, in a 100-hour laboratory experiment. Based on a model mill with 1,000 ton/day pulp production, the economic analysis suggests that the energy cost of electrodialysis is less than $200/day, and the capital cost of the stack is about $500,000.

Fracaro, A. T.; Henry, M. P.; Pfromm, P.; Tsai, S.-P.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Residual stresses in annealed zircaloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the lattice constants of single crystal and rod-textured polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 in the temperature range 300-900 K. While the single crystal remains strain-free during heating or cooling, large residual grain-interaction strains occur in the polycrystalline sample as the result of compatibility being maintained among grains with anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients. These residual thermal strains have been determined as a function of temperature from the difference between the single and polycrystal lattice constants. Analysis of the data has been done using a polycrystalline deformation model, QUEST, which accounts for anisotropic elasticity, plasticity and thermal expansion, and for crystallographic texture of the sample. It is found that slow cooling from 900 K introduces residual stresses of the order of 100 MPa in the polycrystalline sample. The calculations demonstrate that these residual stresses can explain not only the difference in the proportional limits in tension and compression (strength differential) but also differences in the initial work hardening behaviour when Zircaloy-2 is deformed in tension or compression.

Tome, C.; Faber, J.; MacEwen, S.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Activated-charcoal filters: water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. January 1970-July 1988 (citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-July 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated-charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic gases and pollutants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, swimming pool filtration, waste conversion, automobile fuel and exhaust systems, and footwear deodorizing. (Contains 129 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database with exemplary claims. ) Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, waste conversion, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, swimming pool filtration, tobacco smoke filters, kitchen ventilators, medical filtration treatment, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

Conner, W.V.

1994-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Residue management at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

Olencz, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Formation of chlorinated dioxins during production of bleached kraft pulp from sawmill chips contaminated with polychlorinated phenols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, sawmills used polychlorinated phenol (polyCP) formulations to prevent sap-staining of undried lumber. Bleached kraft pulp mills that used chips from polyCP-treated lumber were found to have elevated levels of hexachlorinated dioxins (hexaCDD) in their pulps, effluents, and sludges. This report presents the results of an investigation to elucidate the mechanism of hexaCDD formation during kraft pulping of polyCP-contaminated sawmill chips. The major constituents of the polyCP formulations- tetraCP and pentaCP-play a negligible role in hexaCDD formation. Polychlorinated phenoxyphenol (polyCPP) contaminants in the polyCP formulations are the key contributing factors, with hexaCDD contamination occurring as a consequence of digester-mediated condensation of polyCPP (i.e., predioxin) contaminants.

Luthe, C.E.; Berry, R.M.; Voss, R.H. (Paprican, Pointe Claire, Quebec (Canada))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A New Freeze Concentration Process for Minimum Effluent Process in Bleached Pulp  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project researches freeze concentration as a primary volume reduction technology for bleaching plant effluents from paper-pulp mills before they are treated by expensive technologies, such as incineration, for the destruction of the adsorbable organic halogens. Previous laboratory studies show that freeze concentration has a greater than 99.5% purification efficiency for volatile, semivolatile, and nonprocess elements, or any other solute, thus producing pure ice that can be reused in the mill as water. The first section evaluates the anticipated regulatory and public pressures associated with implementing the technology; the remaining sections deal with the experimental results from a scaled-up freeze concentration process in a 100-liter pilot-plant at Tufts University. The results of laboratory scale experiments confirmed that the freeze concentration technology could be an efficient volume reduction technology for the above elements and for removing adsorbable organic hologens and or nonprocess elements from recycled water. They also provide the necessary data for designing and operating a larger pilot plant, and identify the technical problems encountered in the scale-up and the way they could be addressed in the larger scale plants. This project was originally planned to include the operation of a large pilot plant in the facilities of Swenson Process Equipment Inc., and a field test at a pulp mill, but the paper company withdrew its financial support for the field test. In place of a final economic evaluation after the field test, a preliminary evaluation based on the small pilot plant data predicts an economically reasonable freeze concentration process in the case of reduction of the bleaching-effluent flow to less than 5 m3/kkg pulp, a target anticipated in the near future.

Qian, Ru-Ying; Botsaris, Gregory D.

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

132

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Survey of hydrogen peroxide bleaching of mechanical and chemimechanical pulp - factors affecting brightness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature upon which this survey is based covers the period from 1975 to June 1985 and was searched both manually and by computer. More than 100 articles and patents were examined, and of these almost half were singled out as meriting citation. Several recent surveys can be identified as sources that provide a general overview of current peroxide bleaching practice as specifically applied to mechanical and chemimechanical pulps. Additionally, an article by Allison, although not intended as a review, nevertheless serves as one by virtue of the broad scope of its content. 44 references.

Dence, C.W.; Omori, S.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Biomechanical pulping of aspen chips; Energy savings resulting from different fungal treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Besides increasing paper strength, fungal treatments can also reduce the electrical energy needed for fiberizing chips during mechanical pulping. Fungal species, chip movement, and treatment duration affected the extent of energy savings. This paper reports that four-week-long treatment with white-rot fungi, including Phlebia species or Pholiota mutabilis, in a stationary wire tray bioreactor resulted in at least 35% energy savings for pulping chips to 100 mL CSF in a 300-mm-diameter disc refiner. With Phanerochaete chrysosporium in a rotating-drum bioreactor, the optimal treatment duration was four weeks. Treatment with a brown-rot fungus also resulted in energy savings. Over the range of fungi and conditions tested, neither chip weight loss nor lignin loss correlated with energy savings. Some treatments giving the least chip weight loss ({lt}5%) saved the most energy. Wood modifications responsible for energy savings differed from those that increased strength. Treatments that saved the most energy did not necessarily give the highest strength properties.

Leatham, G.F.; Myers, G.C.; Wegner, T.H. (USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (US))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Presentation 3.1: Report on energy efficient technologies and CO2 reduction potentials in the pulp and paper industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, at the International Energy Agency in Paris. The goal of the workshop is to better quantify the global potentialPresentation 3.1: Report on energy efficient technologies and CO2 reduction potentials in the pulp, and it will imply a fundamental rethinking of the sector's strategy. 251 #12;#12;INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY AGENCE

138

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

139

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Residual Gas Mobility in Ormen Lange.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The topic of this report is "Mobility of Residual Gas in Ormen Lange" and it has been prepared as a part of the course… (more)

Undeland, Elisabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

143

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE Joint Genome Institute. Pulp NonFiction: Fungal Analysis Reveals Clues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 22, 2012 March 22, 2012 Pulp NonFiction: Fungal Analysis Reveals Clues for Targeted Biomass Deconstruction Without fungi and microbes to break down dead trees and leaf litter in nature, the forest floor might look like a scene from TV's "Hoarders." Ceriporiopsis subvermispora mycelium on wood Photo: Scanning electron micrograph of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora mycelium on wood. (R. Blanchette, University of Minnesota) Massive-scale genome sequencing projects supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and being carried out at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI) highlight the importance of learning how the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin that serve as a plant's infrastructure can be broken down by these forest organisms to extract needed nutrients. Among the fungi being

145

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Predicting protein residue–residue contacts using deep networks and boosting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure prediction, protein residue-residue contacts...i.e. homologous proteins with known structure...train large boosted ensembles of DN classifiers achieving...advanced search of the Protein Data Bank filtering...contained fewer than 20% disordered residues (i.e. coordinates......

Jesse Eickholt; Jianlin Cheng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Seismic Travel-Time Residuals and Plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......United States, Canada and Greenland under the auspices of Project Vela Uniform (Long Range Seismic Measurements 1966). Arrival...1 that if we plot residuals on the focal sphere, we are at liberty to ascribe these residuals to source effects, receiver effects......

D. Davies; D. P. McKenzie

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

4-O-Methyl-?-l-idopyranosyluronic acid linked to xylan from kraft pulp: isolation procedure and characterisation by NMR spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tetrasaccharide 2?-O-(4-O-methyl-?-l-idopyranosyluronic acid)xylotriose was isolated from enzymatically hydrolysed, unbleached, birch kraft pulp by anion-exchange chromatography in two steps. The primary structure of the tetrasaccharide was determined by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, using homonuclear and heteronuclear two-dimensional techniques. NOE data and 3JH.H coupling constants show that the 4-O-methyl-?-l-idopyranosyluronic acid in the tetrasaccharide is predominantly in the 1C4 chair conformation. The pKa value (3.17) for 4-O-methyliduronic acid attached ?-(1 ? 2) to xylose was determined from the pH-dependent chemical shift of H-5. The amount of 4-O-methyliduronic acid (0.1–0.5 mol%) in surface xylan of unbleached birch and pine kraft pulps was determined by extensive xylanase treatment and further analysis by NMR spectroscopy and high-performance anion-exchange chromatography.

Anita Teleman; Matti Siika-aho; Harri Sorsa; Johanna Buchert; Marjukka Perttula; Tiina Hausalo; Maija Tenkanen

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Mapping Residual Structure in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins at Residue Resolution Using Millisecond Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Residue Averaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of residual structure in intrinsically disordered proteins can provide insights into the mechanisms by which such proteins undergo coupled binding and folding. The present ... describes an approach to...

Theodore R. Keppel; David D. Weis

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Effect of radiation on the response of dental pulp to operative and endodontic procedures: an experimental study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-six 56-day-old male Sprague-Dawley albino rats served as two groups of experimental animals. Group 1 was irradiated with 400 rads delivered as total-body radiation from a cesium source. Group 2 served as the control group and was not irradiated. Three weeks later, the dental microscope was used to facilitate various dental procedures in both groups of animals (cavity preparation filled with zinc oxide-eugenol, pulp exposure capped with zinc oxide-eugenol, and pulp exposure left open). Two animals for each procedure from Groups 1 and 2 were killed at time intervals of 2, 4, and 8 weeks. The results showed that (1) radiation at this dose resulted in a depression of the normal response of the dental pulp to the trauma and infection induced by pulpal exposure, (2) there were no pathologic changes in the untreated molars of the irradiated animals, and (3) the use of the dental microscope greatly facilitated cavity preparation in the molars of rats.

Fawzi, M.I.; Shklar, G.; Krakow, A.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Predicting residual stresses in gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes work carried out by a major aircraft-engine builder and one of its suppliers to validate the numerical prediction of heat-treatment-induced residual stresses. For verification, the proje...

R. A. Wallis Ph.D.; I. W. Craighead B.Sc. Eng.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Mechanisms of hydrocracking of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on research data, a technology of low-pressure residual fuel oil hydrocracking with a suspended catalyst has been developed. The process has been refined on a laboratory setup. The reaction kinetics has ...

Kh. I. Abad-zade; F. M. Velieva…

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

156

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

159

Greenhouse gas emission by wastewater treatment plants of the pulp and paper industry – Modeling and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission and energy consumption in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) of the pulp and paper industry were modeled and estimated. Aerobic, anaerobic, and hybrid biological processes were used for the removal of contaminants. In addition to the removal of carbonaceous compounds, anaerobic digestion of the produced sludge and the removal of excess nitrogen in the effluent of treatment plants by nitrification/denitrification processes were incorporated in the model. Carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide were the major \\{GHGs\\} generated during the biological treatment, combustion, energy generation, and transportation. The generated biogas from the anaerobic processes was assumed to be recovered and used as a source of energy for the treatment plant, in an effort to reduce GHG emissions while decreasing the total energy needs of the WWTP. The established kinetic relationships of wastewater treatment processes along with mass and energy balances were employed for the simulation of different treatment systems and estimation of GHG emissions. Various sources of GHG emission were divided into on-site and off-site sources to simplify the modeling and simulation procedure. The overall GHG generation in the presence of biogas recovery was equal to 1.576, 3.026, and 3.271 kg CO2-equivalent/kg BOD by the three examined systems. The energy produced by the recovery and combustion of biogas could exceed the energy demands of all different treatment plants examined in this study and reduce off-site GHG emission. The generation of \\{GHGs\\} from aerobic and hybrid processes increased by 27% and 33.2%, respectively, when N2O emission from nitrogen removal processes was taken into consideration.

Omid Ashrafi; Laleh Yerushalmi; Fariborz Haghighat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Minimal Residual Disease in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, invisible to the microscopist, are the components of an important clinical problem termed "minimal residual disease." The concept of minimal residual disease... For many years hematologists have used the microscope to identify a complete remission of leukemia after treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, ...

Löwenberg B.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

163

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover :- The neutron diffraction is determined from Bragg's law. When neutron propagate through crystal sample, Coherent, Incoherent and Absorption Scattering phenomena take place Weld MaterialsPlate materials Stress

Bandara, Arosha

164

Specific Nucleoprotein Residues Affect Influenza Virus Morphology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these residues to the crystal structure of NP, we...in the production of spherical virions, as indicated...WSN-AichiM1 virus. (A) Crystal structure of NP highlighting...M1 to form straight or bent elongated ribbons and...filamentous virions to spherical ones. We anticipate...

Kristy M. Bialas; Kendra A. Bussey; Raychel L. Stone; Toru Takimoto

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residue Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residue...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residues Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residues...

167

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

168

A critical review of developments in the pyrolysis of automotive shredder residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Worldwide, automotive shredder residue (ASR) is considered an increasingly problematic mixture of materials that needs the development of a processing solution. Pyrolysis is a process that has many advantages to offer, but despite many studies and developments in recent years at various levels of commercialisation, it is still generally considered unproven for this purpose. This paper critically considers developmental work published in the field, presents new results, and suggests that a major reason for the lack of development is the complexity of the landscape created by strong, competing, economic, legislative, environmental and commercial drivers, which in turn make it unclear which products and processes are optimal. This is made doubly complex by the natural variation in the material composition of ASR, with contaminants that can critically affect its potential fate to anywhere in the range from hazardous waste, to energy source, to useful raw material for major cement or steel industries. New data on critical factors such as levels of chlorine and metals in raw and pyrolysed ASR are presented, alongside a much-needed summary of previously published values from references that are often difficult to source. The summaries emphasise the variation in the material, but also indicate rough boundaries for values, which are needed for the design of any potentially successful process. It is suggested that the heterogeneity seen across ASR types implies that specialised processing of SR on its own is unlikely. It is pointed out that small-scale processes that could be suitable for local requirements should be considered for development as they could be able to optimise a process sufficiently to make it viable, e.g. specialised local waste streams of paper pulp and a particular fraction of SR.

Marie K. Harder; Osric Tening Forton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Photo-Catalytic Degradation of Wastewater from Straw Pulp and Paper Mill by Fe2O3/UV/H2O2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to examine the photo catalytic degradation of real effluents from wheat straw pulp and paper mill by nano-Fe2O3 catalyst. Four different ferric oxide samples were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation of reflux at different ... Keywords: potocatalysis, ?-Fe2O3, efluent, COD

Aimei Li; Haizhen Yang; Yiren Zhu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131 million tons of coal combustion residuals—including 71 million tons of fly ash, 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material—were generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic liners—would not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

174

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

176

Heat transport by residual gases in multilayer vacuum insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of an experimental investigation of residual gas heat-transfer in multilayer vacuum insulation are reported. The “thermal paradox” observed ... variation of the residual gas pressure in the insulation

R. S. Mikhal'chenko; A. G. Gerzhin; V. T. Arkhipov…

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Quantifying Residual Strains in Specimens Prepared by Additive Layer Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residual stresses and strains are prevalent in many components, especially those that are made using additive layer manufacturing. The residual strains are superposed onto any ... analysis may lead to inaccurate ...

A. N. Okioga; R. J. Greene; R. A. Tomlinson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

180

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

183

Influence of Combustion Conditions on Yields of Solvent-Extractable Anhydrosugars and Lignin Phenols in Chars: Implications for Characterizations of Biomass Combustion Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anhydrosugars, such as levoglucosan and its isomers (mannosan, galactosan), as well as the solvent-extractable lignin phenols (methoxylated phenols) are thermal degradation products of cellulose/hemicellulos and lignin, respectively. These two groups of biomarkers are often used as unique tracers of combusted biomass inputs in diverse environmental media. However, detail characterization of the relative proportion and signatures of these compounds in highly heterogeneous plant-derived chars/charcoals are still scarce. Here we conducted a systematic study to investigate the yields of solvent-extractable anhydrosugars and lignin phenols in twenty-five lab-made chars produced from different plant materials under different combustion conditions. Solvent extractable anhydrosugars and lignin phenols were only observed in chars formed below 350 C and yields were variable across different combustion temperatures. The yields mannosan (M) and galactosan (G) decreased more rapidly than those of levoglucosan (L) under increasing combustion severity (temp. and duration), resulting in variable L/M and L/(M+G) ratios, two diagnostic ratios often used for identification of combustion sources (e.g. hardwoods vs. softwoods vs. grasses). On the other hand, the results of this study suggest that the ratios of the major solvent-extractable lignin phenols (vanillyls (V), syringyls (S), cinnamyls (C)) provide additional source reconstruction potential despite observed variations with combustion temperature. We thus propose using a property property plot (L/M vs. S/V) as an improved means for source characterization of biomass combustion residues. The L/M-S/V plot has shown to be effective in environmental samples (soil organic matter, atmospheric aerosols) receiving substantial inputs of biomass combustion residues.

Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. Place Nanping City, Fujian Province, China Zip 365001 Sector Biomass Product Chinese developer of a CDM registered biomass plant. References Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. is a company located in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China . References ↑ "[ Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kaisheng_Biomass_Residue_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=347879" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

185

Results of multiyear studies on the dynamics of pollution of lake Baikal by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the area waste water discharge from the Baikal Pulp and Paper Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New data on the concentration and spatial distribution of the benz(a)pyrene and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bottom sediments in the testing area ... Baikal Pulp and Paper Plant (BPPP) waste water discharg...

A. M. Nikonorov; A. A. Matveev; S. A. Reznikov; V. S. Arakelyan…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50 million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S = 3 and 5 L/kgTS; t = 3 and 6 h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4 mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

Raffaello Cossu; Tiziana Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six tasks are reported: capillary number relationships for rock samples, residual oil saturation near wellbore, residual oil structure, effect of gravity on residual saturation, magnitude of residual oil saturation, and effects of wettability on capillary number relationships. (DLC)

Morrow, N.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Chapter 9 - Zinc and Residue Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Annual global production of zinc is more than 13 million tons. More than 50% of this amount is used for galvanizing while the rest is mainly split into brass production, zinc-based alloys, semi manufacturers and zinc compounds such as zinc oxide and zinc sulfate. For the zinc and steel industries, recycling of zinc-coated steel provides an important new source of raw material. Historically, the generation of zinc-rich dusts from steel recycling was a source of loss from the life-cycle (landfill); however, technologies today provide incentive for steel recyclers to minimize waste. Thus, the recycling loop is endless—both zinc and steel can be recycled again and again without losing any of their physical or chemical properties. Depending on the composition of the scrap being recycled, it can either be remelted or returned to the refining process. This chapter describes the main processes for zinc recycling from different scraps and residues.

Jürgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner; Alois Unger; Gernot Rösler; Christoph Pichler; Rene Rumpold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

190

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

191

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

192

Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between Instrument Observations and Line-by-Line Calculations S. A. Clough and P. D. Brown Atmospheric and Environmental...

193

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural...

195

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Carbon emissions reduction potential in the US chemicals and pulp and paper industries by applying CHP technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical and the pulp/paper industries combined provide 55% of CHP generation in the US industry. Yet, significant potential for new CHP capacities exists in both industries. From the present steam consumption data, the authors estimate about 50 GW of additional technical potential for CHP in both industries. The reduced carbon emissions will be equivalent to 44% of the present carbon emissions in these industries. They find that most of the carbon emissions reductions can be achieved at negative costs. Depending on the assumptions used in calculations, the economic potential of CHP in these industries can be significantly lower, and carbon emissions mitigation costs can be much higher. Using sensitivity analyses, they determine that the largest effect on the CHP estimate have the assumptions in the costs of CHP technology, in the assumed discount rates, in improvements in efficiency of CHP technologies, and in the CHP equipment depreciation periods. Changes in fuel and electricity prices and the growth in the industries' steam demand have less of an effect. They conclude that the lowest carbon mitigation costs are achieved with the CHP facility is operated by the utility and when industrial company that owns the CHP unit can sell extra electricity and steam to the open wholesale market. Based on the results of the analyses they discuss policy implications.

Khrushch, M.; Worrell, E.; Price, L.; Martin, N.; Einstein, D.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

198

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Maximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

node consumes energy, but the receiving node does not. This assumption is not true if acknowledgementsMaximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost Qiling Xie, Chin-Tau Lea, Mordecai J-The Maximum Residual Energy Path (MREP) routing has been shown an effective routing scheme for energy

Fleischer, Rudolf

200

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fit of the two. Direct lifetime under a variety of loads spectra for wind tests of residual strength for a modified standard wind bone coupons were manufactured, tested and favorably turbine spectrum. When a single and residual strength. Over 900 tests spectrum loading and fatigue lifetimes of a typical wind have been run

202

Chemical Characterization of Lignin and Lipid Fractions in Industrial Hemp Bast Fibers Used for Manufacturing High-Quality Paper Pulps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Klason lignin was estimated as the residue after sulfuric acid hydrolysis of the pre-extracted material, and neutral sugars from polysaccharide hydrolysis were analyzed as alditol acetates by GC according to Tappi rules T222 om-88 and T249 om85 (14), respectively. ... 57/341/369/437/453/760 ...

Ana Gutiérrez; Isabel M. Rodríguez; José C. del Río

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

MINIMIZING WASTE AND COST IN DISPOSITION OF LEGACY RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which is directed toward development of a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues (both legacy residues and residues generated from ongoing programmatic operations). This research is focused in two directions: (1) identifying minimum negative consequence (waste, dose, cost) dispositions working within regulatory safeguards termination criteria, and (2) evaluating logistics/consequences of across-the-board residue discards such as authorized at Rocky Flats under a safeguards termination variance. The first approach emphasizes Laboratory commitments to environmental stewardship, worker safety, and fiscal responsibility. This approach has been described as the Plutonium Disposition Methodology (PDM) in deference to direction provided by DOE Albuquerque. The second approach is born of the need to expedite removal of residues from storage for programmatic and reasons and residue storage safety concerns. Any disposition path selected must preserve the legal distinction between residues as Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and discardable materials as waste in order to insure the continuing viability of Laboratory plutonium processing facilities for national security operations.

J. BALKEY; M. ROBINSON

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Characterisation of rotary kiln residues from the pyrolysis of shredder residues: Issues with lead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stringent legislation is being to be implemented across Europe relating to heavy metal contamination into the environment. This study thus focuses on developing a method for reliably determining the lead content of automotive shredder residue (ASR). The material is first pyrolysed to remove organic fractions. Different analytical methods were then used to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in the burned char, which varies from chunks of metals in larger sized fractions to fine powders of mostly non-metals. By considering results from ICP-MS, EDXRF, WDXRF and a portable EDXRF, it was found that varying values were obtained but that consistent ‘consensus values’ could be determined. Such ‘consensus’ values of lead, copper, iron and zinc are thus reported, and show that properly depolluted \\{ELVs\\} have significantly lower lead levels than normal shredder residue (SR) feed ?8000 ppm versus 16,000 ppm. The finest fraction, <850 ?m, makes up around half of the mass of the SR and has only 2700 ppm and 5400 ppm lead concentration values for depolluted \\{ELVs\\} and normal SR, respectively, making it of interest for further work to develop uses as a feed in other industries.

Osric T. Forton; Lucas McGrady; M.M. Singh; E.R.M. Taylor; Norman R. Moles; Marie K. Harder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pesticide and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chromatography. Hercury levels averaged 1. 29 porn in liver (N=100) and 3. 88 ppm in hair (N=24), Liver and hair mercury residues were highly correlated (r=0. 98). Fetal whole body mercury levels averaged 0. 07 ppm (N=4). Fetal and maternal mercury levels... correlations between ani- mal weights and residue levels were observed for mercury, dieldrin, and mirex. There were no apparent relationships between residue levels of mercury and liver weight or liver:carcass weight ratio. There was no significant...

Beck, Debra Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR) destruction in a plasma gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test results on Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR), or car fluff, demonstrated destruction efficiency and safe conversion to synthesis gas and a glass residue, in a plasma gasification system. The synthesis gas consists primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the range between 20 and 22 vol-% respectively, or 45 and 55 vol-% dry basis, when corrected for nitrogen. In dry reforming operation, carbon dioxide conversion approached 90%. The system is designed to work with oxygen in autothermal conditions, reducing thus the electric power requirement for the plasma reactor. The vitrified residue leach rate makes the product suitable for construction works.

Marco G. Tellini; Paolo Centola; James A. Batdorf; William J. Quapp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Bal, M.-C., Rendu C., Ruas M.-P., Campmajo P., 2010, Paleosol charcoal : Reconstructing vegetation history in relation to agro-pastoral activities since the Neolithic. A case study in the Eastern French Pyrenees. Journal of Archaeological Science, 37(2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bal, M.-C., Rendu C., Ruas M.-P., Campmajo P., 2010, Paleosol charcoal : Reconstructing vegetation-Pierre Ruas UMR 7209 CNRS-MNHN, 55 rue Buffon, 75231 Paris cedex 05, France Pierre Campmajo Chercheur associé of Archaeological Science 37 (2010) 1785-1797" DOI : 10.1016/j.jas.2010.01.035 #12;Bal, M.-C., Rendu C., Ruas M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

209

Sustainable Heat and Electricity from Sugarcane Residues Gasification in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sugarcane residues, in the form of bagasse and cane tops and leaves, represent a large renewable biomass energy resource in Brazil. Bagasse is currently used to satisfy the energy needs of the sugar and alcohol i...

Ausilio Bauen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in ... the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and m...

C. Meola; G.M. Carlomagno; M. Di Foggia; O. Natale

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Erratum to: Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two regrettable errors occurred in citing a critical funding source for the multi-location research summarized in the 2014 article entitled “Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplie...

Douglas L. Karlen; Jane M. F. Johnson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

213

Tropical Residual Soils Geological Society Engineering Group Working Party Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clanan, M. B. 1982. Settlement of a tower on residual soil. Proceedings of Conference...i trench [ ] ~-~=___ ,~'A dolly ;' ;i i [ l Jacking undisturbed core-cutter sampler. excavation...

214

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facility’s residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Present safeguards in Great Britain against pesticide residues and hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of the direct legislative measures taken in Great Britain to protect the public from contamination of food by pesticide residues would be brief for, today, but two regulations exist, specifying t...

H. Martin

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

219

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Residual strain measurements on drill cores from Reydarfjordur, Iceland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAND A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Submitted to the Office oi' Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements I' or the degree of MAST...'ER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geophysics RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASLREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAVD A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Approved as to style and content by: Earl R. Hoskins (Chair of Committee) Richard L. Carlson (Member...

Baslangic, Besim

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P±H phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evidence for residual elastic strain in deformed natural quartz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual elastic strain in naturally deformed, quartz-containing rocks can be measured quantitatively in a petrographic thin section with high spatial resolution using Laue microdiffraction with white synchrotron x-rays. The measurements with a resolution of one micrometer allow the quantitative determination of the deviatoric strain tensor as a function of position within the crystal investigated. The observed equivalent strain values of 800-1200 microstrains represent a lower bound of the actual preserved residual strain in the rock, since the stress component perpendicular to the cut sample surface plane is released. The measured equivalent strain translates into an equivalent stress in the order of {approx} 50 MPa.

Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Tamura,Nobumichi; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product/Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1983-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1983-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1983-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1983-2013

227

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) characterization for a valuable management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Car fluff is the waste produced after end-of-life-vehicles (ELVs) shredding and metal recovery. It is made of plastics, rubber, glass, textiles and residual metals and it accounts for almost one-third of a vehicle mass. Due to the approaching of Directive 2000/53/EC recycling targets, 85% recycling rate and 95% recovery rate in 2015, the implementation of automotive shredder residue (ASR) sorting and recycling technologies appears strategic. The present work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant, representative of the Italian situation, as for annual fluxes and technologies involved. The aim of this study is to characterize ASR in order to study and develop a cost effective and environmentally sustainable recycling system. Results show that almost half of the residue is made of fines and the remaining part is mainly composed of polymers. Fine fraction is the most contaminated by mineral oils and heavy metals. This fraction produces also up to 40% ashes and its LHV is lower than the plastic-rich one. Foam rubber represents around half of the polymers share in car fluff. Moreover, some chemical–physical parameters exceed the limits of some parameters fixed by law to be considered refuse derived fuel (RDF). As a consequence, ASR needs to be pre-treated in order to follow the energy recovery route.

Luciano Morselli; Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues: a lumped kinetic characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lumped kinetic model for the pyrolysis of industrial wastes of unknown chemical composition is developed. The model is applied to the pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues (ASRs), studied by means of thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

Oreste Patierno; Paola Cipriani; Fausto Pochetti; Massimiliano Giona

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric acid leaching processes were evaluated for removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge from an industrial and municipal wastewater plant. The study showed that an acid:water ratio of 1:1 and a nitric acid concentration of 2 mol 1?1 gave efficient removal of 86.7%, 100% and 100% of copper, nickel and arsenic.

Jose Abrego

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

232

Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

FIRST DRAFT OF OUTLINE: RPSEA 1 RESIDUAL OIL ZONE RESEARCH  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas RPSEA PROJECT NUMBER.FINAL Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas Contract 81.089 08123-19-RPSEA June 28, 2012 Dr. Robert Trentham Director, Center for Energy and Economic Diversification The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Odessa, Texas 79762 L. Steven Melzer Melzer Consulting Midland, Texas 79701 David Vance Arcadis, U. S. Midland, Texas 79701 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Dr Robert Trentham as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA

235

The Particle Adventure | What holds it together? | Residual EM force  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EM force EM force Residual EM force Atoms usually have the same numbers of protons and electrons. They are electrically neutral, therefore, because the positive protons cancel out the negative electrons. Since they are neutral, what causes them to stick together to form stable molecules? The answer is a bit strange: we've discovered that the charged parts of one atom can interact with the charged parts of another atom. This allows different atoms to bind together, an effect called the residual electromagnetic force. So the electromagnetic force is what allows atoms to bond and form molecules, allowing the world to stay together and create the matter you interact with all of the time. Amazing, isn't it? All the structures of the world exist simply because protons and electrons have opposite charges!

236

In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for her help in typing and proofreading the text, and especially for her undying moral support during our stay in College Station. ACKNOWLED6NENTS The author is grateful to Drs. John B. Herbich and Wayne A. Dunlap for their advice and guidance... Size Analysis for Glass Beads . . . . . . . . 24 Waterproof Housing for Pressure Transducers 27 10 Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Experiment 3 Experiment 4 Experiment 5 Experiment 6 32 33 34 35 36 37 12 13 Effect of Residual Pore...

DeVries, Jack Walter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spec- trophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement the Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.045 ? 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch param- eters: Steps at> 2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light- curve width and color around peak (similar to the?m15 and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20 to 30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

Nearby Supernova Factory; Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fleury, M.; Gangler, E.; Greskovic, P.; Guy, J.; Kowalski, M.; Lombardo, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Crop Residue Removal for Bioenergy Reduces Soil Carbon Pools: How Can We Offset Carbon Losses?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue removal for bioenergy can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) ... been, however, widely discussed. This paper reviews potential practices that can be used to offset the SOC lost with residue removal. Literature

Humberto Blanco-Canqui

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Systematic Investigation for Reducing Shredder Residue for Complex Automotive Seat Subassemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue is a byproduct of the automotive recycling infrastructure and represents 15% of the ... in order to remove a large portion of automotive shredder residue before the shredding process i...

Siobhan Barakat; Jill Urbanic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

246

Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology May 15, 2008 ARTICLE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural...alkanes by anaerobic microorganisms. Nature 401: 266-269. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Lisa M. Gieg; Kathleen E. Duncan; Joseph M. Suflita

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Techniques for identifying long-range residue correlations in the fifth binding module of LDLR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of correlations between residues in distal regions of a protein structure may provide insights into the mechanism of protein folding. Such long-range correlations may exist between distant residues that are ...

Lin, Jennifer W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

249

History and Fundamentals of the Charcoal Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prehistoric finds, dating back six thousand years, have shown that arrow-heads were attached to their shafts by employing wood tar, a material then obtainable only by the charring of wood. Although we may neve...

Walter Emrich

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Gasification of Ponderosa Pine Charcoal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of wood chars with CO2 and steam is an important process step in the conversion of biomass to fuel and synthesis gases. Wood fuels can be gasified in a wide variety of sizes, shapes and densities...

Richard Edrich; Timothy Bradley…

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Gasification of Charcoal: Influence of Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct use of biomass as a fuel offers a limited field of applications. Conversion of biomass to gases and liquids is of great importance to make transport of energy cheaper, gases and liquids being more easil...

J. R. Richard; M. Cathonnet; J. P. Rouan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Residual Strain Distribution in Bent Composite Boiler Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kraft recovery boilers are typically constructed of carbon steel boiler tubes clad with a corrosion resistant layer, and these composite tubes are bent and welded together to form air port panels which enable the combustion air to enter the boiler. In this paper, the through-thickness residual strain in the carbon steel layer of non-heat-treated and heat-treated composite bent tubes were measured by neutron diffraction techniques and modeled by finite element modeling. The results can be used to optimize material selection and manufacturing processes to prevent stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking in the boiler tubes.

Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Tang, Fei [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Heavy residue properties in intermediate energy nuclear collisions with gold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the target fragment production cross sections and angular distributions for the interaction of 32, 44 and 93 MeV/nucleon argon, 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon krypton with gold. The fragment isobaric yield distributions, moving frame angular distributions and velocities have been deduced from these data. This fission cross section decreases with increasing projectile energy and the heavy residue cross section increases. The ratio v{sub {parallel}}/v{sub cn} increases approximately linearly with mass removed from the target. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Uppsala Univ., Nykoeping (Sweden). Studsvik Neutron Research Lab.); Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA)); Liljenzin, J.O. (Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden)); Seaborg, G.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Subsidiary Regge Trajectories with Singular Residues. Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the existence of secondary Regge trajectories with intercepts ?(0) which differ by integers from that of the leading trajectory at t=0, and residues which are singular at that point, is a very general phenomenon which should occur both in the scattering of particles with spin, and in the scattering of particles of unequal mass. Rules are given for determining if such trajectories exist, and for determining their properties. The case of nucleon-nucleon scattering is discussed as an example.

Loyal Durand; III

1967-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

X-ray Studies of Regenerated Cellulose Fibers Wet Spun from Cotton Linter Pulp in NaOH/Thiourea Aqueous Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerated cellulose fibers were fabricated by dissolution of cotton linter pulp in NaOH (9.5 wt%) and thiourea (4.5 wt%) aqueous solution followed by wet-spinning and multi-roller drawing. The multi-roller drawing process involved three stages: coagulation (I), coagulation (II) and post-treatment (III). The crystalline structure and morphology of regenerated cellulose fiber was investigated by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. Results indicated that only the cellulose II crystal structure was found in regenerated cellulose fibers, proving that the cellulose crystals were completely transformed from cellulose I to II structure during spinning from NaOH/thiourea aqueous solution. The crystallinity, orientation and crystal size at each stage were determined from the WAXD analysis. Drawing of cellulose fibers in the coagulation (II) bath (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O) was found to generate higher orientation and crystallinity than drawing in the post-treatment (III). Although the post-treatment process also increased crystal orientation, it led to a decrease in crystallinity with notable reduction in the anisotropic fraction. Compared with commercial rayon fibers fabricated by the viscose process, the regenerated cellulose fibers exhibited higher crystallinity but lower crystal orientation. SAXS results revealed a clear scattering maximum along the meridian direction in all regenerated cellulose fibers, indicating the formation of lamellar structure during spinning.

Chen,X.; Burger, C.; Fang, D.; Ruan, D.; Zhang, L.; Hsiao, B.; Chu, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

260

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

262

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; microfibers; pulp and paper mills; recycling; deicing salt scaling; sludge; wastewater treatment residuals with Recycled Materials. Yoon-moon Chun is a postdoctoral fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include residuals from the pulp and paper industry in concrete. INTRODUCTION Pulp and paper mill wastewater

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

268

Recycling waste polymers from automotive shredder residue (ASR); application in iron making.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation was performed on characterisation of automotive shredder residue which resulted in application of its polymeric fraction as a substitute for coke, as reducing… (more)

Fahandej Sadi, Seyed Habib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Methods of analysis modified size exchange chromatography method for analysis of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified size exchange chromatography method is used to obtain molecular weight distributions, average molecular weight, and other characteristics of heavy oil residues: coal asphalt, petroleum asphalt, vacu...

Changming Zhang; Adnan Alhajji…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An Experimental Investigation into Additive Manufacturing-Induced Residual Stresses in 316L Stainless Steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology provides unique opportunities for...i.e., neutron diffraction). Good agreement between the two measurement techniques is observed. Furthermore, a reduction in residual stres...

Amanda S. Wu; Donald W. Brown; Mukul Kumar…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI safeguarded by additional asymptotically higher order a posteriori terms. In particular, the enhanced

Nochetto, Ricardo H.

272

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

273

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

274

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

275

Residual Stress Evaluation of Materials Manufactured by High-Energy Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents several applications of the step by step hole drillling method for measuring residual stress distribution introduced in different components manufactured by the high energy process.

J. F. Flavenot; J. Lu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The preparation of a cabbage candidate reference material to be certified for residues of agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new cabbage candidate reference material has been prepared for the determination of residues of agrochemicals. The cabbage was grown with deliberate application...

Rolf Zeisler; Vladimir Strachnov…

277

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa quantifying residual Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: africa quantifying residual Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Satellite observations of the...

278

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

279

Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

Livingston, R.R.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Continued development of the residue baler. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baling concept discussed in this report has evolved from work started in 1975. The objective of this activity was to develop a method for transporting entire above ground portions of both pine and hardwood stems to a mill or centralized processing point in a form that was compatible with truck, trailer, rail and barge hauls and with sufficient bulk density to optimize load sizes on the various carriers while expending a minimum amount of capital and energy in the woods operations. The year's work resulted in the baling concept and a prototype baler being tested under a wide variety of field conditions material types and operating scenarios. The work in the Pacific Northwest demonstrated that baling offers a means of preparing forest residues for transport which results in a near maximum solid wood content in a load. The reworking of the hydraulic circuits significantly reduced the cycle time on the prototype without increasing the power requirements. The installation of the wire feed assembly moved the development of an automatic banding and tying system one step closer. Both sets of field trials also pointed out that a true field demonstration of the commercial ability of the baline concept will have to await the construction of a second generation prototype producing a larger bale and designed to accept several different infeed types. 7 figures, 3 tables.

Stuart, W.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15 wt.% NiO/Al2O3 catalysts at 760–900 K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have Ni–O and Ni–Ni bonds with bond distances of 2.03 ± 0.05 and 2.46 ± 0.05 Å, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220 kg h?1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760–900 K and 46.2 atm with the reactor volume 0.27 m3 to obtain approximately 3.42 × 105 kcal h?1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100 kW electric powers.

Kuen-Song Lin; Sujan Chowdhury; Ze-Ping Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions ?  < 6 mm produced by the shredding of end of live vehicles. The approval of Directive 2000/53/EC and its transposition to the European Union member states requires an analytical technique for in-situ checking of the content of some metals in ASR wastes. The objective of this study is the evaluation of total Pb content in the different fractions using a rapid measurement method to easily accomplish the current legislation. An experimental Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer with tri-axial geometry was used to analyse the ASR in order to test the feasibility of this analytical technique. Likewise, a correction of the intensities by the incoherent scattering (Compton) radiation was made to compensate the matrix effects. The results show that values in the smaller fractions are bigger (11,600 mg kg?1 in the fraction <125 ?m) than in the coarser fractions (4600 mg kg?1 in the fraction between 2 and 6 mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1 mg kg?1 for 1000 s measurement).

Oscar Gonzalez-Fernandez; Sofia Pessanha; Ignacio Queralt; Maria Luisa Carvalho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Valorization of automotive shredder residue in building materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year in EU nations, it is estimated that 3 million tonnes of automotive shredder residue (ASR) are generated. Half of the ASR is composed of rubber, textiles and plastics, which can be either transformed into alternative fuel or recycled. The second half, which is landfilled, is incombustible and has not yet been valorized. This waste contains 30% organic matter, as well as inorganic compounds such as quartz, calcite, magnetite, hematite, and anhydrite. It is also very rich in zinc (1–3.5%) and lead (0.7–3.3%). These elements are powerful retarders of ordinary Portland cement. For this reason, two ways of processing of this waste have been investigated: (1) transformation into aggregates after a thermal treatment followed by a chemical treatment or (2) directly into concrete with the use of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. This second way is especially very interesting for engineers and scientists. As established by leaching tests, zinc and lead are integrated and fixed in the structure of ettringite, the main hydration product of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. Therefore, it is possible to produce concrete for some applications including road construction from this currently landfilled “waste” (i.e., the ASR is shown to be useful recyclable material that can be converted into an environmentally friendly “green” concrete).

J. Péra; J. Ambroise; M. Chabannet

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directive 2000/53/EC sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a “waste-to-chemicals” perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura; David Serrano; Javier Dufour; Luciano Morselli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Production of aggregate from non-metallic automotive shredder residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the results of an experimentation on the production of granules suitable to be used as aggregates in cementitious or asphalt mixes are presented and discussed. The granules were obtained by granulating the non-metallic fraction of automotive shredder residues. In a preliminary separation step the fluff fraction containing mainly inert and non-metallic materials was sieved and analyzed for the metal content. In the following granulation step, the sieved fraction was mixed with binding materials, fly ash and a densifier agent, to produce granules of 5–30 mm of diameter and up to 1400 kg/m3 of specific weight. The granulation was carried out at room temperature in a rotating tank. Concrete samples prepared using as aggregates the produced granules showed a specific weight up to 1800 kg/m3 and a compressive strength up to about 55% of reference samples prepared using a calcareous aggregate, depending on the fluff content of the mixes, and on the nature of the binder and of the other components used.

Vito Alunno Rossetti; Luca Di Palma; Franco Medici

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

288

Experimental program to assess the effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of ``model material`` tests were previously undertaken on aluminium alloy tensile loaded plate specimens containing a central through-thickness crack to investigate the effect of in-plane self-balancing residual stresses on ductile tearing behavior in the context of the R6 methodology. Residual stresses were generated by an electron-beam welding method and this resulted in stress levels of the order of 1/3 yield stress in the test specimens. Provisional results of these tests were presented at the 1993 ASME PVP conference. The value of 1/3 yield is commonly considered as the level of residual stress for fracture assessments of structural components which have been stress relieved. For non stress relieved components, higher values of residual stress need to be considered. A new design of test specimen has therefore been developed. Further ductile tearing experiments have been undertaken on this new design of specimen. The results obtained from these, and the previous tests, have quantitatively demonstrated the influence of residual stress on fracture behavior in terms of both the level of residual stress and the region under consideration on the R6 failure assessment diagram. The general conservatism of the current R6 method for dealing with residual stresses has been confirmed for the type of geometry, loading and residual stress field under consideration.

Sharples, J.K.; Sanderson, D.J.; Bowdler, B.R.; Wightman, A.P. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Technical Services Division; Ainsworth, R.A. [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Residual stress and self-assembly during deposition and etching of MEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with no residual stresses. Residual stresses are investigated as a means of self-assembling MEMS and NEMS during material deposition and etching. The assembly of two components is considered: one component is subjected to deposition or etching and is modeled...

Mani, Sathyanarayanan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

291

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

292

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says July 20, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Billions of barrels of oil that could increase domestic supply, help reduce imports, and increase U.S. energy security may be potentially recoverable from residual oil zones, according to initial findings from a study supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The recently completed study, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas-Permian Basin (UTPB), is one of several FE-supported research projects providing insight that will help tap this valuable-but-overlooked resource. Residual oil zones, called ROZs, are areas of immobile oil found below the oil-water contact of a reservoir. ROZs are similar to reservoirs in the

293

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

294

Model for Gasification of Residual Fuels from Petroleum Refineries Using the Equation Oriented (EO) Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attractive way to use residual fuels from petroleum refineries (vacuum residue and petcoke) is their gasification to produce syngas, which contains mainly H2, CO and small quantities of CH4, CO2, as well as nitrogen and sulfur compounds. ... Vacuum residue and petroleum coke (petcoke) are, respectively, heavy liquid and solid byproducts from crude oil refining, they are often used as fuel in boilers for power production, natural gas has been more commonly used in the past few years in power generation; reducing the market for both vacuum residue and petcoke. ... Regarding petroleum refinery residuals Uson et al.(1) developed a model for cogasification of coal, petcoke and biomass, based on reaction kinetics. ...

Jorge E. Marin-Sanchez; Miguel A. Rodriguez-Toral

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats

297

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Investigations of release phenomenon of volatile organic compounds and particulates from residual storage chip piles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the method for estimating Particulate Matter and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from wood handling and storage operations at a pulp mill. Fugitive particulate matter emissions from wood handling and storage operations are due to material load/dropout operations, wind erosion from storage piles and vehicular traffic on paved roads. The particulate matter emissions are a function of a number of variables like windspeed, surface moisture content, material silt content, and number of days of precipitation. Literature review attributes VOC emissions to biological, microbiological, chemical, and physical processes occurring in wood material storage pile. The VOC emissions are from the surface of these piles and the VOC released during retrieval of chips from the pile. VOC emissions are based on the chip throughput, number of turnovers, moisture content and surface area of the pile. The emission factors with the requisite calculation methodology to be utilized for quantifying VOC emissions from chip piles has been discussed in this paper.

Mohan, S.; Nagarkatti, M. [Trinity Consultants, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B. [University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

A process for incorporating automotive shredder residue into thermoplastic mouldings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a process for utilising the waste that remains when all of the economically reclaimable materials have been recovered from automobiles that have reached the end of their lives. This waste material, known as automotive shredder residue (ASR), is currently disposed of in landfill sites but forthcoming environmental legislation in the European Union and elsewhere will drastically restrict the amount that can be disposed of in this way. By 2015, 80% of the ASR currently going to landfill must be recycled. The dual injection moulding process is used to mould a skin of virgin polymer over a compound containing the ASR which forms the core of a new component. Polypropylene (PP) was used as the skin material and also as the material to compound with the ASR. A 50%/50% mix by volume of PP and ASR granules was found to produce good results as the core material. Experiments were performed to vary the skin to core ratio in order to establish the effect of varying the proportion of ASR on the mechanical properties of mouldings. It was found that mouldings produced containing 25% by volume of ASR were visually excellent due to the pure PP skin. Inclusion of higher proportions of ASR by decreasing the skin:core thickness ratio was found to produce “breakthrough” of the ASR particles into the skin and test results were highly inconsistent. Using smaller proportions of ASR can be predicted to produce better mechanical properties but would have been contrary to the aim of developing a process capable of disposing of large quantities of ASR. It is concluded that recycling of ASR by using it as a core material in the dual injection moulding process is a feasible option for mouldings requiring good visual appearance but is not suited to components requiring significant strength.

S. Robson; T.C. Goodhead

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) residues in transformer carcasses: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had three objectives. The first was to assess the population of PCB-containing transformers remaining in service in the US in 1988. While this could not be done with great precision, it appears that the population of oil-filled transformers containing > 50 /mu/g PCB/g oil has decreased by some 15% since 1982 and that the population of askarel-filled transformers has decreased by some 40% in the same time period. This progress could be continued and accelerated if additional reliable and accepted routes for disposal of PCBs contained in transformers would be developed. The second and third objectives of this project have been to examine two simplified approaches to this end. The second objective was to determine if, by draining PCB-containing oil from transformers and refilling with PCB-free oil, a level of PCBs below 50 ppM (/mu/g/g oil) could be reached with assurance. It appears that reclassification of ''PCB-contaminated'' oil-filled transformers (50--500 /mu/g PCB/g oil) of all ratings by draining and refilling could be done routinely. The third objective was to determine the level of residual PCBs left on the metallic surfaces of askarel-filled transformers which, if these units were refilled with PCB-free mineral transformer oil, would have resulted in concentrations of <50 /mu/g PCB/g oil. It appears that cleaning the surfaces of the metallic components, after careful separation and disposal of the liquid and impregnated solid insulations, to a level of 400 /mu/gPCB/100 cm/sup 2/ would result in transformer carcasses of all sizes which would contain less PCBs than would be found were these transformers to have contained oil at the level of 50 /mu/gPCB/g oil. 7 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Rouse, T.O.; Raymond, C.T.; Fessler, W.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Pretreatment of automobile shredder residue (ASR) for fuel utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automobile shredder residue (ASR) was pretreated to improve its quality for fuel utilization. Composition analysis revealed that ASR components could be classified into four groups: (1) urethane and textile—light fraction and combustibles containing low levels of ash and Cl; (2) plastics and rubber—light or heavy fraction and combustibles containing high levels of Cl; (3) metals and electrical wire—heavy fraction and incombustibles, and (4) particles smaller than 5.6 mm with high ash contents. Based on these results, we successively performed sieving to remove particles smaller than 5.6 mm, float and sink separations to reject the heavy fraction and plastics and rubber containing Cl, thermal treatment under an inert atmosphere to remove Cl derived from PVC, and char washing to remove soluble chlorides. This series of pretreatments enabled the removal of 78% of the ash and 91% of the Cl from ASR. Sieving using a 5.6-mm mesh removed a considerable amount of ash. Product quality was markedly improved after the float and sink method. Specifically, the sink process using a 1.1 g cm?3 medium fluid rejected almost all rubber containing Cl and a large amount of PVC. The remaining Cl in char, after heating at 300 °C under an inert atmosphere and washing, was considered to be present as insoluble chlorides that volatilized at temperatures above 300 °C. Based on a tradeoff relationship between product quality and treatment cost, ASR may be utilized as a form of refuse plastic fuel or char.

I.H. Hwang; S. Yokono; T. Matsuto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effects of the components of coal hydro-liquefaction residue on its rheological characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four kinds of typical coal liquefaction residue samples, coming from Shenhua coal liquefaction pilot plant, were used to investigate the effects of components of residue, separation time, and temperature on its rheological characteristics. Coal liquefaction residue is a non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluid whose apparent viscosity decreases with increasing shear rate. Moreover, the residue has high viscosity at the initial softening temperature, and its viscosity drops greatly with increasing temperature. The oil content in residue has a great effect on the decline of the apparent viscosity of residue. The asphaltene can increase the apparent viscosity at lower temperatures but decrease it at higher temperatures. However, the solid only increases the apparent viscosity as it can be neither softened nor dissolved to become fluid. After simulating the separation condition, it is found that prolonging the separation time and enhancing the separation temperature will increase the apparent viscosity of residue, which is bad for preventing pipes from being blocked. So choosing the right separation time and separation temperature is necessary to actual industrial production.

Ren, Y.; Jin, S.; Xu, Y.; Wei, A.; Zhang, D.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science & Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Repair welding influence on offshore pipelines residual stress fields: An experimental study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Repair welds, are frequently used in steel structures either to remedy initial fabrication defects, or to rectify in-service degradations of the components. Some previous investigations indicated that repair welding is likely to pose adverse effects on the long-term integrity of the structure exposed to high pressure and temperature actions. It is believed that high residual stresses, associated with the repair process, most probably play an important role in many of subsequent failures. Repair welds might aggravate the size, magnitude and distribution of the tensile residual stresses in the weldments. These adversely affect the component structural integrity and remaining life. So far, no generally accepted guideline is available to provide reliable evaluations on the possible side effects from the repair welding in offshore oil/gas pipelines. This paper reports the result of residual stress measurement on single/double and partial/full repair welds in offshore pipelines. The semi destructive blind hole drilling and destructive sectioning methods have been employed to measure the residual stress fields in each case. In general, the results of the two measurement methods are in reasonable agreement. Residual stresses which are caused by full and partial repairs in the studied samples slightly increased the residual stress distribution when compared to the as-welded condition. Repetition of repair welding in same area influenced the residual stresses' magnitude and distribution especially in areas close to the weld centre line.

M. Zeinoddini; S. Arnavaz; A.P. Zandi; Y. Alizadeh Vaghasloo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Development of the Neutron Diffraction Technique for the Determination of Near Surface Residual Stresses in Critical Gas Turbine Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near surface residual stresses contribute significantly to the life of structural engineering components. A method of producing compressive residual stresses in the surface region of components to give improve...

A. N. Ezeilo; P. S. Webster; G. A. Webster…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Determination of an acceptable assimilable organic carbon (AOC) level for biological stability in water distribution systems with minimized chlorine residual  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in minimizing the chlorine residual in Japan because of increasing complaints about a chlorinous odor in drinking water. However, minimizing the chlorine residual causes the microbi...

Yumiko Ohkouchi; Bich Thuy Ly; Suguru Ishikawa…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fractionation and transport of nutrients among coal ash residues and in soil covered with fly ash-amended organic compost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate different types of ash residues and discharge small particles and vapors to the atmosphere. The ash residues which account for the major part ... the byproducts are collected and ...

M. P. Menon; K. S. Sajwan; G. S. Ghuman; J. James…

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Microstructure and residual stress evaluation of ductile cast iron using the critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave propagation technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual stress and microstructure evaluation of ductile cast iron using a nondestructive method (Critically Refracted Longitudinal Ultrasonic Wave Technique) was approached. Residual stresses, both good and bad graphite nodules, and different...

Bennett, Robert Jeffrey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

Experimental and theoretical study on the characteristics of vacuum residue gasification in an entrained-flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

About 200,000 bpd (barrel/day) vacuum residue oil is produced from oil refineries in Korea. These are supplied to use asphalt, high sulfur fuel oil, and upgrading residue hydro-desulfurization units. High sulfur ...

Young-Chan Choi; Jae-Goo Lee; Sang-Jun Yoon…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Third Law of Thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice: "Stillwater" or ?SH2Of,T=0 = 0  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Third Law of Thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice: "Stillwater" or ?SH2Of,T=0 = 0 ... This paper will explore the connection between the third law of thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice. ... Thermodynamics ...

Maureen M. Julian; Frank H. Stillinger; Roger R. Festa

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

314

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas ... Thus, the terminology of heavy oil or heavy residue can be also used to indicate all such heavy petroleum oils. ... Notwithstanding, for the RCG process it is ideal to develop the catalyst that has moderate cracking activity for heavy residues or heavy oils but meanwhile good activity for catalyzing the deposited coke gasification so that the gasification can be at reasonably low temperatures to maintain the catalytic activity for cracking heavy fractions. ...

Yuming Zhang; Deping Yu; Wangliang Li; Yin Wang; Shiqiu Gao; Guangwen Xu

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

315

Potential of crop residue in India as a source of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here is given an estimate of crop residue production and different recycling options as a source of renewable energy. India produces 388 Tg crop residues but only 182 Tg equivalent to 2818 PJ is usable. Recycling as manure can replace 15% of 595 PJ national fertiliser energy. Recycling in digester can produce 20.32 billion m³ biogas. It can be converted into 182 Tg of biocoal generating 156â??258.3 billion unit (kWh) electricity. It can lead to 16 billion dm³ ethanol productions. Having less environmental consequences, different recycling options can make the crop residue an environmentally sound sustainable energy system.

Apurba Sarkar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

317

Smoking Status and Occupational Exposure Affects Oxidative DNA Injury in Boilermakers Exposed to Metal Fume and Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitization by residual oil fly ash particles...composition of residual oil fly ash determines...coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry...particulate-mediated cytokine production in lung epithelial...et al. Residual oil fly ash induces cytotoxicity...probably through cumulative oxidative DNA damage...

Sutapa Mukherjee; Lyle J. Palmer; Jee Young Kim; David B. Aeschliman; Robert S. Houk; Mark A. Woodin; and David C. Christiani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

EIS-0277: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

77: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy 77: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site EIS-0277: Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential alternatives and impacts associated with a proposal to process certain plutonium residues and all of the scrub alloy currently stored at Rocky Flats. While ongoing stabilization activities at Rocky Flats are addressing immediate health and safety concerns associated with existing storage conditions, the indefinite storage of these materials, even after stabilization, would continue to present health and safety concerns that could only be eliminated by disposal or other disposition of the materials. Thus, this

319

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

20: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 20: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact

320

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GUIDELINES FOR RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL AT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GUIDELINES FOR RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL AT FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM AHD REMOTE SURPLUS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM SITES (Revision 2, March 1987) A. INTRODUCTION This document presents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radiological protection guidelines for cleanup of residual radioactive material and management of the resulting wastes and residues. It is applicable to si~es - "C-- identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites l{emedia1 Ac:tionProgram (FUSRAP) .and remote sites identified by the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP).* The topics covered are basic dose limits, guidelines and authorized limits for allowable levels of residual radioactive material, and requirements for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hanford Tank 241-S-112 Residual Waste Composition and Leach Test Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of laboratory characterization and testing of two samples (designated 20406 and 20407) of residual waste collected from tank S-112 after final waste retrieval. These studies were completed to characterize the residual waste and assess the leachability of contami¬nants from the solids. This is the first report from this PNNL project to describe the composition and leach test data for residual waste from a salt cake tank. All previous PNNL reports (Cantrell et al. 2008; Deutsch et al. 2006, 2007a, 2007b, 2007c) describing contaminant release models, and characterization and testing results for residual waste in single-shell tanks were based on samples from sludge tanks.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

An X-ray study of residual macrostresses in protective coatings for gas-turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The x-ray method is used to determine residual macrostresses in the surface layer of protective coatings on high-temperature alloys. Coatings deposited by the high-energy vacuum-plasma (HEVP) method were subje...

Yu. D. Yagodkin; K. M. Pastukhov; E. V. Milyaeva…

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recovery of the Shear Modulus and Residual Stress of Hyperelastic Soft Tissues by Inverse Spectral Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequencies of the vessel wall material. As the IVUS is interrogating inside the artery, it produces small amplitude, high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on the quasistatic deformation of the blood pressure pre-stressed and residually...

Gou, Kun 1981-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Treating electrolytic manganese residue with alkaline additives for stabilizing manganese and removing ammonia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) from the electrolytic manganese industry is a solid waste containing mainly calcium sulfate dihydrate and quartzite. It is impossible to directly use the EMR as a building mat...

Changbo Zhou; Jiwei Wang; Nanfang Wang

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This abstract from AGCO presents the project objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale format.

326

Reburning Characteristics of Residual Carbon in Fly Ash from CFB Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The content of residual carbon in fly ash of CFB boilers is a litter high especially when ... of fly ash through collection, recirculation in CFB furnace or external combustor is a possibly ... ash and correspond...

S. H. Zhang; H. H. Luo; H. P. Chen…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp binding residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp binding residues Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Asymmetric deceleration of ClpB or Hsp104...

328

Determination of metals in heavy oil residues by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is proposed for the sample preparation of heavy oil residues characterized by viscosity of more than 700 mm2/sec at 100°C to study their elemental composition. It is shown that a wide range of elements c...

T. A. Maryutina; N. S. Musina

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydroconversion of polyethylene and tire rubber in a mixture with heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of studies on the processing of solid polymer wastes in a mixture with the heavy petroleum residues by hydroconversion with the use of the precursors of nanosized catalysts are given. It was found ...

Kh. M. Kadiev; A. U. Dandaev; A. M. Gyul’maliev; A. E. Batov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

55.1 47.1 W W 55.1 46.2 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

331

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in combusted residues and soils from an open burning site of electronic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants due to their extensive use. Combusted residue from electronic waste (e-waste) combustion is one of the contamination sources ... tr...

Qian Luo; Ming Hong Wong; Zijian Wang; Zongwei Cai

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Feature-incorporated alignment based ligand-binding residue prediction for carbohydrate-binding modules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of hydrogen bonding in the interaction between a xylan binding module and xylan. Biochemistry (2001) 40:5700-5707. Yang...predicted ligand-binding residues residing on the surface in the hypothetical structures were verified to......

Wei-Yao Chou; Wei-I Chou; Tun-Wen Pai; Shu-Chuan Lin; Ting-Ying Jiang; Chuan-Yi Tang; Margaret Dah-Tsyr Chang

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Experimental Study on Co-gasification of Coal Liquefaction Residue and Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study on co-gasification of coal liquefaction residue and petroleum coke in carbon dioxide was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The temperature of the experiment was 1173–1323 K, and the isothermal (1273 K) kinetics were ...

Xin Liu; Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Zheng-hua Dai; Fu-chen Wang

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Laser surface-contouring and spline data-smoothing for residual stress measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe non-contact scanning with a confocal laser probe to measure surface contours for application to residual stress measurement. (In the recently introduced contour method, a part is cut in two with a ...

M. B. Prime; R. J. Sebring; J. M. Edwards; D. J. Hughes…

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable residual magnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the shaking coils was set to 35 mA at 200 Hz. Profiles of the residual magnetic field measured along... shielding factor of only 8. Figure 3 shows results of compensating...

336

Multispectral detection of organic residues on poultry processing plant equipment based on hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Diluted organic residues, such as feces, ingesta and other biological substances on poultry processing plant equipment surfaces, not easily discernible by human eye, are potential contamination sources for poultry carcasses. Development of sensitive ... Keywords: Fecal contamination, Hyperspectral, Multispectral, Reflectance image

Byoung-Kwan Cho; Yud-Ren Chen; Moon S. Kim

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The influence of calcium on the inhibition of arsenic desorption from treatment residuals in extreme environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surface properties of the oxy-hydroxide solid in solution. Results show that calcium enhances the removal by iron oxides and prevents the leaching of arsenic from the residuals. Isotherm experiments show that arsenic adsorption can be described...

Camacho, Julianna G.

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

338

Ecotoxicological Implications of Aquatic Disposal of Coal Combustion Residues In the United States: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide an overview of research related to environmental effects of disposal of coal combustion residues (CCR) in sites in the United States. Our focus is on aspects of CCR that have the potential to negati...

Christopher L. Rowe; William A. Hopkins…

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microstructure and nanoindentation measurement of residual stress in Fe-based coating by laser cladding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laser cladding is a surface modification technique for improving ... always originated, which can create cracks in cladding coatings. The through-thickness residual stresses in Fe-based coating prepared by laser

Li-Na Zhu; Bin-Shi Xu; Hai-Dou Wang; Cheng-Biao Wang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Experimental study of the residual stress-induced self-assembly of MEMS structures during deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of using residual stresses favorably as a means of self-assembling MEMS during material deposition is experimentally investigated. Two atomic force microscope cantilevers are placed in contact at their free ends. Material...

Kim, Sang-Hyun

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End...

343

Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improper or unnecessary heat-treatments extremely costly. Knowledge of the residual stress ipudient can make production of the component much more efficient and economicaL This knowledge could also be used to predict service life of components...

Pfluger, Ron Atlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

An HPLC Method for the Determination of Bromadiolone Plasma Kinetics and its Residues in Hen Eggs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......residues of this compound, which is dangerous for human health. Previous studies on warfarin...transmitted to Italian Ministry of Health. A flock (n = 48) of laying...were monitored daily for general health by qualified personnel supervised......

Mario Giorgi; Grazia Mengozzi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Residual Stress of Bimetallic Joints and Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about residual stress...

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylated lysine residues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

575586, March, 2002, Copyright 2002 by Cell Press Structural Basis of Lysine-Acetylated HIV-1 Summary: ). Peptide residues flanking the acetyl-lysine contact the protein.to...

347

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Swelling related to ettringite crystal formation in chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several million tons of Chromite Ore Processing Residue (COPR) were deposited at two sites in New Jersey and Maryland, USA, and over time they exhibited extensive heaving phenomena. Ettringite, a needle-shaped mi...

Deok Hyun Moon; Dimitris Dermatas; Mahmoud Wazne…

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of ettringite-related swelling mechanisms for treated chromite ore processing residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accelerated one-dimensional unconfined swell tests were conducted for ferrous sulfate chromite ore processing residue (COPR) field-treated samples. The field-treated samples were subjected to wet and dry cycle...

Deok Hyun Moon; Mahmoud Wazne…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of Residual Stresses in the Bulk of Materials by High Energy Synchrotron Diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High energy synchrotron diffraction is introduced as a new ... for residual stress analysis in the bulk of materials. It is shown that energy dispersive measurements are sufficiently precise so that...?4...can be...

W. Reimers; M. Broda; G. Brusch; D. Dantz…

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of residual stresses in the bulk of materials by high energy synchrotron diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High energy synchrotron diffraction is introduced as a new ... for residual stress analysis in the bulk of materials. It is shown that energy dispersive measurements are sufficiently precise so that...?4...can be...

W. Reimers; M. Broda; G. Brusch; D. Dantz…

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005. The Role of Dissolved Aluminum in Silica Chemistry forDraft Public Health Goal for Aluminum in Drinking Water .1994. Control of Residual Aluminum in Filtered Water . AWWA,

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

Harper, Brian Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

354

Development of source functions for modeling dissolution of residual DNAPL fingers in the saturated zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT OF SOURCE FUNCTIONS FOR MODELING DISSOLUTION OF RESIDUAL DNAPL FINGERS IN THE SATURATED ZONE A Thesis by BRIAN SCOTT JOHNSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Geology DEVELOPMENT OF SOURCE FUNCTIONS FOR MODELING DISSOLUTION OF RESIDUAL DNAPL FINGERS IN THE SATURATED ZONE A Thesis by BRIAN SCOTI' JOHNSON Submitted to Texas Agt...

Johnson, Brian Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Time dependent ellipsoidal residual velocity distributions for self-gravitating systems of collisionless particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIME DEPENDENT ELLIPSOIDAL RESIDUAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SELF-GRAVITATING SYSTEMS OF COLLISIONLESS PARTICLES A Thesis by FRANK ROBERT SINS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Physi cs TIME DEPENDENT ELLIPSOIDAL RESIDUAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SELF-GRAVITATING SYSTEMS OF COLLISIONLESS PARTICLES A Thesis by FRANK ROBERT SIMMS Approved as to style...

Simms, Frank Robert

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using ultrasonics was approached. Residual stresses in castings are developed for various reasons. The presence of these stresses, coupled with applied stresses in service, sometimes results in the yield of material and subsequent failure of component.... Present work was focussed on development of an ultrasonic technique using critically refracted longitudinal (L g waves for evaluating residual stresses in ductile cast iron. An L probe suitable to work with ductile cast iron was designed and fabricated...

Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF GEL RESIDUE ON HYDRAULIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by FIVMAN MARPAUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECT OF GEL RESIDUE ON HYDRAULIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

Marpaung, Fivman

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

Conversion of Residual Biomass into Liquid Transportation Fuel: An Energy Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of Residual Biomass into Liquid Transportation Fuel: An Energy Analysis ... An energy balance, in broad outline, is presented for the production of a high-quality liquid transportation fuel from residual crop biomass. ... That is, 40% of the initial energy in the biomass will be found in the final liquid fuel after subtracting out external energy supplied for complete processing, including transportation as well as material losses. ...

J. Manganaro; B. Chen; J. Adeosun; S. Lakhapatri; D. Favetta; A. Lawal; R. Farrauto; L. Dorazio; D. J. Rosse

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ocean Sequestration of Crop Residue Carbon: Recycling Fossil Fuel Carbon Back to Deep Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

burial of crop residues in the deep ocean (hereafter, CROPS: Crop Residue Oceanic Permanent Sequestration). ... As long as fuels exist with higher energy yield-to-carbon content (E/C) ratios than biomass, it will always be more energy efficient and less carbon polluting to sequester the biomass in the deep oceans, and use those fuels with higher E/C ratios for power generation, rather than to burn biomass for power generation. ...

Stuart E. Strand; Gregory Benford

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

360

A survey of DDT residues in fish from the Brazos and Navasota Rivers and Somerville Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues found in fish. Land along the Navasota River bottom is almost exclusively rangeland. The soil has not been exposed to agrochemicals, at least not in the last 37 50 years. In general, samples of fish reflect this absence of extensive... residues found in fish. Land along the Navasota River bottom is almost exclusively rangeland. The soil has not been exposed to agrochemicals, at least not in the last 37 50 years. In general, samples of fish reflect this absence of extensive...

Kramer, Robert Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Interlaboratory comparisons of petrography of liquefaction residues from three Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Argonne Premium coal samples, the Beulah-Zap lignite (North Dakota), the high volatile A bituminous Stockton (West Virginia), and the low volatile Pocahontas No. 3 Virginia), were ground to three initial sizes: ?20 mesh, ?100 mesh, and “micronized”. The samples were each subjected to liquefaction at 673 K for 30 min at a 2:1 tetralin: coal ratio and in an H2 atmosphere at 13.79 \\{MPa\\} (?2000 psi). Polished pellets of the uncoverted residues were circulated to three laboratories for a study designed to determine, albeit on a limited scale, the interlaboratory consistency in constituent identification and the problem areas in maceral/neo-maceral/mineral recognition. Within broad categories, the agreement for the Beulah-Zap and Pocahontas No. 3 residues is good. The high volatile A bituminous Stockton coal was the most plastic and most altered, resulting in a residue lending itself to more subjective interpretations. The biggest discrepancy between the laboratories is in the distinction of granular residue and mineral matter and in the transitions between “partially reacted macerals” and “vitroplast” and between “vitroplast” and “granular residue”. The initial size of the feed coal appears to influence the recognition of material in the residue.

James C. Hower; Ken B. Anderson; Glenda Mackay; Henrique Pinheiro; Deolinda Flores; Manuel J. Lemos de Sousa

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effects of residual stresses on the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2 tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data applicable to evaluating the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes were evaluated according to the criteria in ASTM Standards E399 and E813. It was found that the data did not meet the criteria specified in the standards, thus making it necessary to account for residual stress in determining the fracture toughness of the tubes. Therefore, residual stress in pressure tube specimens was experimentally determined to allow the incorporation of residual stresses in the calculation of fracture toughness. Sections of as fabricated 82.5 mm OD Zircaloy-2 tubes in the 30% cold worked condition were used in testing. Electrochemical Machining (ECM) was used to remove material from the interior of the tube, while measuring the resulting change in strain on the exterior of the tube with delta rosette strain gages. Utilization of this technique to reduce the cross sectional area of a tube without introducing additional stresses offers an accurate procedure for obtaining data to calculate the residual stress distribution. Assuming elastic anisotropy, the stress equations developed by Voyiadjis, Kiousis, and Hartley were used to determine the residual tangential, radial, and longitudinal stresses as a function of wall thickness. Additionally, these equations allow the determination of the shear stress and subsequently the principal stress profiles. It was found that the measured residual stress level was high enough that it must be accounted for when determining the fracture toughness of the subject Zircaloy-2 tubes. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Mohamadian, H.P.; Mirshams, A.R. (Southern Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Cunningham, M.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Thermodynamic Model for Uranium Release from Hanford Site Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model of U phase solubility and paragenesis was developed for Hanford tank residual waste that will remain after tank closure. The model was developed using a combination of waste composition data, waste leach test data, and thermodynamic modeling of the leach test data. The testing and analyses were conducted using actual Hanford tank residual waste. Positive identification of the U phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) was generally not possible because solids in the waste were amorphous, or below the detection limit of XRD for both as-received residual waste and leached residual waste. Three leachant solutions were used in the studies, dionized water, CaCO3 saturated solution, and Ca(OH)2 saturated solution. Thermodynamic modeling verified that equilibrium between U phases in the initial residual waste samples and the leachants was attained in less than a month. The paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that occur as waste leaching progresses for two closure scenarios was identified. These results have significant implications for tank closure design.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

A hierarchical structure through imprinting of a polyimide precursor without residual layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A patterned polyimide without a residual layer is obtained by imprinting with the assistance of a residual solvent. The effects of the wetting behaviors of the poly-amic acid (PAA) solution coated on various surfaces are examined and the formation of hierarchical patterns without residual layers is demonstrated. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and PEI/PDMS are used as imprinting molds with Si and 300 nm SiO2/Si as substrates. The results indicate that the various ambits of patterns without a residual layer are formed due to the dewetting phenomena caused by surface tension (Suh 2006 Small 2 832). During imprinting, PDMS with a low surface energy makes the PAA solution flow away from its surface exposing the contact area due to dewetting. Self-organized hierarchical structures are also obtained from this process due to effective dewetting. The present study provides a new approach for fabricating patterns without residual layers and the consequent preparation of hierarchical structures, which is considered to be impossible using the lithographic technique.

I-Ting Pai; Ing-Chi Leu; Min-Hsiung Hon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cofiring lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, cofiring of high ash and sulfur content lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue was investigated in 0.3 MWt METU Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig in terms of combustion and emission performance of different fuel blends. The results reveal that cofiring of hazelnut shell and cotton residue with lignite increases the combustion efficiency and freeboard temperatures compared to those of lignite firing with limestone addition only. CO{sub 2} emission is not found sensitive to increase in hazelnut shell and cotton residue share in fuel blend. Cofiring lowers SO{sub 2} emissions considerably. Cofiring of hazelnut shell reduces NO and N{sub 2}O emissions; on the contrary, cofiring cotton residue results in higher NO and N{sub 2}O emissions. Higher share of biomass in the fuel blend results in coarser cyclone ash particles. Hazelnut shell and cotton residue can be cofired with high ash and sulfur-containing lignite without operational problems. 32 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs.

Zuhal Gogebakan; Nevin Selcuk [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl{sub 4}. Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet.

Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and...

368

,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.25;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Reasons that Made Residual Fuel Oil Unswitchable" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,," " ,,"Total Amount of ","Total Amount of","Equipment is Not","Switching","Unavailable ",,"Long-Term","Unavailable",,"Combinations of " "NAICS"," ","Residual Fuel Oil ","Unswitchable Residual","Capable of Using","Adversely Affects ","Alternative","Environmental","Contract ","Storage for ","Another","Columns F, G, " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Consumed as a Fuel","Fuel Oil Fuel Use","Another Fuel","the Products","Fuel Supply","Restrictions(b)","in Place(c)","Alternative Fuels(d)","Reason","H, I, J, and K","Don't Know"

369

Residual stress profiles for mitigating fretting fatigue in gas turbine engine disks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The driving force for fretting fatigue in engine disks is the contact stresses generated by fretting of the blade and the disk surfaces in the attachment region. This paper examines the use of different residual compressive stress profiles to counteract the undesirable effects of contact stresses and to mitigate fretting fatigue. A global finite-element analysis of the disk blade assembly is first performed. The contact pressure and shear traction at the attachment region are extracted from the FEM results and used to compute the contact stress distribution. The contact stresses are then combined with the residual stresses and the bulk stresses. The overall stress distribution is then utilized in a probabilistic crack growth model to predict the risk of disk failure for a military engine under simulated loading conditions. The results are used to identify the minimum residual stress profile for mitigating fretting fatigue in engine disks.

Kwai S. Chan; Michael P. Enright; Jonathan P. Moody; Patrick J. Golden; Ramesh Chandra; Alan C. Pentz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The National Nuclear Laboratory's Approach to Processing Mixed Wastes and Residues - 13080  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) treats a wide variety of materials produced as by-products of the nuclear fuel cycle, mostly from uranium purification and fuel manufacture but also including materials from uranium enrichment and from the decommissioning of obsolete plants. In the context of this paper, treatment is defined as recovery of uranium or other activity from residues, the recycle of uranium to the fuel cycle or preparation for long term storage and the final disposal or discharge to the environment of the remainder of the material. NNL's systematic but flexible approach to residue assessment and treatment is described in this paper. The approach typically comprises up to five main phases. The benefits of a systematic approach to waste and residue assessments and processing are described in this paper with examples used to illustrate each phase of work. Benefits include early identification of processing routes or processing issues and the avoidance of investment in inappropriate and costly plant or processes. (authors)

Greenwood, Howard; Docrat, Tahera; Allinson, Sarah J.; Coppersthwaite, Duncan P.; Sultan, Ruqayyah; May, Sarah [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)] [National Nuclear Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, UK, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geochemical Modeling of Leaching from MSWI Air-Pollution-Control Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abbreviations are:? gyp, gypsum; bar, barite; Ba(S,Cr)O4(1), XCr = 0.23; cal, calcite; ett, ettringite; leu, leucite; por, porlandite; qtz, quartz; wai, wairakite; wol, wollastonite. ... Comparing measured data with the solubilities of Al(OH)3, Al2O3, and ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3OH12·26H2O), it was found that ettringite likely controlled Al leaching at pH-values above 9.5?10 for both residues. ... Al(OH)3, Al2O3, and ettringite have previously been identified in waste incineration APC residues (13, 22); however, only amorphous Al(OH)3 has been suggested to control leaching in nonstabilized APC residues (13, 18). ...

Thomas Astrup; Joris J. Dijkstra; Rob N. J. Comans; Hans A. van der Sloot; Thomas H. Christensen

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Recovery of Plutonium from Refractory Residues Using a Sodium Peroxide Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycle of plutonium from refractory residues is a necessary activity for the nuclear weapon production complex. Traditionally, high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO2) was leached from the residue matrix using a nitric acid/fluoride dissolving flowsheet. The recovery operations were time consuming and often required multiple contacts with fresh dissolving solution to reduce the plutonium concentration to levels where residual solids could be discarded. Due to these drawbacks, the development of an efficient process for the recovery of plutonium from refractory materials is desirable. To address this need, a pretreatment process was developed. The development program utilized a series of small-scale experiments to optimize processing conditions for the fusion process and demonstrate the plutonium recovery efficiency using ceramic materials developed as potential long-term storage forms for PuO2 and an incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) as te st materials.

Rudisill, T.S.

2003-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neutron diffraction determination of the residual stress redistribution in cracked autofrettaged tubing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the residual stress distributions in uncracked and fatigue cracked rings taken from a high strength, low alloy steel autofrettage tube with a bore diameter of 60mm and a wall thickness of 32mm. Stresses were determined to a precision of {plus minus} 10MPa. Three crack sixes were examines. No appreciable stress redistribution was observed until the crack was grown into a region which originally contained tensile residual hoop stress. When this occurred an increase in residual hoop tension was observed ahead of the crick tip. Qualitative agreement was achieved between the measured hoop stress distribution and values predicted using a boundary element method. 9 refs., 12 figs.

Bourke, M.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); McGillivray, H.J.; Webster, G.A. (Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (UK). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Webster, P.J. (Salford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Constant residual electrostatic electron plasma mode in Vlasov-Ampere system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a collisionless Vlasov-Poisson (V-P) electron plasma system, two types of modes for electric field perturbation exist: the exponentially Landau damped electron plasma waves and the initial-value sensitive ballistic modes. Here, the V-P system is modified slightly to a Vlasov-Ampere (V-A) system. A new constant residual mode is revealed. Mathematically, this mode comes from the Laplace transform of an initial electric field perturbation, and physically represents that an initial perturbation (e.g., external electric field perturbation) would not be damped away. Thus, this residual mode is more difficult to be damped than the ballistic mode.

Xie, Hua-sheng [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Distribution and fate of technical chlordane and mirex residues in a central Texas aquatic ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIST!(IDU!'IO;l AitlD l=A! E OF TEC;lN!CAL CNLOROAN. Al, 'D illREX RESIDUES IiN A CEiNTRAL TLXAS AQUA IC ECOSYSTEH A Thesis by HAROLD ERLE JANSSEN, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College o F Texas Anil Universi ty in partia1 fulfillment... of the requirement for the dec!ree of NASTER OF SC1El&CE Nay 1976 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering DISTRIBUTION AND FATE OF TECHNICAL CHLORDAI'lE AND llIREX RESIDUES IN A CENTRAl TEXAS AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by HAROLD ERLE JANSSEN, JR. Approved...

Janssen, Harold Erle

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING A Thesis BY E. 0, BUR JA Approved as to style and content by: (Cha rman of C mmittee (Head of Department) (Mo th (Year) THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS... OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING By E. O. Burja A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject...

Burja, Edward Oscar

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

379

Identification of the amino acid residues at the active site of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF THE AMINO ACID RESIDUES AT THE ACTIVE SITE OF E. COLI CARBAMYL PHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE A Thesis by HEJUNG YOUN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8tM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Chemistry IDENTIFICATION OF THE AMINO ACID RESIDUES AT THE ACTIVE SITE OF E. COLI CARBAMYL PHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE A Thesis by HEJUNG YOUN Approved as to style and content by: Frank M...

Youn, Hejung

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S. [Toyo Engineering Corp., Chiba (Japan). Technological Research Center

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Application of the residue number system to the matrix multiplication problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Considerations 96 97 98 98 100 Design Comparison 6. 4. 1 Comparison Structure 101 102 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) 6. d. 2 Time and Area Comparison VII CONCLUSION Page 103 105 7. 1 Contributions 7. 2 Future Research 106 108... to Residue 2. 4 The Chinese Remainder Theorem 2. 5 Sign Representation of a Residue Number 2. 6 Introduction to Matrix Multiplication 15 16 18 19 21 22 2. 7 The Matrix Multiplication Algorithm 2. 7. 1 The Multiply and Add Cell 2. 7. 2 Formulation...

Chard, Gary Franklin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Approaching zero cellulose loss in cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) production: recovery and characterization of cellulosic solid residues (CSR) and CNC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study demonstrated the potential of simultaneously recovering cellulosic solid residues (CSR) and producing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) by strong sulfuric acid hydrolysis to minimize cellulose loss to near...

Q. Q. Wang; J. Y. Zhu; R. S. Reiner; S. P. Verrill; U. Baxa; S. E. McNeil

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of the residual gas tolerance of homogeneous combustion processes with high exhaust-gas recirculation rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of concepts with low emissions and fuel consumption for gasoline engines requires an early knowledge of the combustion process’ residual gas tolerance. At the Institute...

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. techn. Thomas Lauer…

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

RCS pressure under reduced inventory conditions following a loss of residual heat removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-reactor coolant system to loss of residual heat removal (RHR) cooling is investigated. The processes examined include: core coolant boiling and steam generator reflux condensation, pressure increase on the primary side, heat transfer mechanisms on the steam generator primary and secondary sides, and effects of noncondensible gas on heat transfer processes.

Palmrose, D.E.; Hughes, E.D.; Johnsen, G.W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D is to determine how (major and minor) mergers, gas, star formation and feedback affect the transformation

Bureau, Martin

386

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron and neutron diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron Received in final form 29 September 2005 ABSTRACT Cold drawing of steel wires leads to an increase proposed that cold drawing would induce a phase transformation of the steel, possibly a martensitic

387

PROTEIN FOLD RECOGNITION USING RESIDUE-BASED ALIGNMENTS OF SEQUENCE AND SECONDARY STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTEIN FOLD RECOGNITION USING RESIDUE-BASED ALIGNMENTS OF SEQUENCE AND SECONDARY STRUCTURE Zafer methods [3,4]. Index Terms- protein fold recognition, secondary structure alignment, amino acid alignment &sabanciuniv.edu culated for each sequence-structure alignment. Protein fold recog- nition problem can

Erdogan, Hakan

388

Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding energy of protein folding is not well understood. We have developed empirical scales for the loss; protein folding; pro- tein engineering INTRODUCTION When a protein folds into a compact globule, the resi

Pal, Debnath

389

Logging Residue Volumes and Characteristics following Integrated Roundwood and Energy-Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considered waste material. In recent years, however, the reemergence of the bioenergy industry has revived the market for these residues, and demand for this ma- terial is likely to increase with increasing oil are projected to provide one-third of the billion-ton biomass feedstock needed for the emerging bioenergy

Wagner, Robert G.

390

Investigation of residual stresses induced during the selective laser melting process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

jean-claude.boyer@insa-lyon.fr Keywords: Selective laser melting, layer additional method, Residual stresses. Abstract. The selective laser melting process (SLM), belonging to the family of additive manufacturing processes, can create complex geometry parts from a CAD file. Previously, only prototypes were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Nuclear reactor with makeup water assist from residual heat removal system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressurized water nuclear reactor uses its residual heat removal system to make up water in the reactor coolant circuit from an in-containment refueling water supply during staged depressurization leading up to passive emergency cooling by gravity feed from the refueling water storage tank, and flooding of the containment building. When depressurization commences due to inadvertence or a manageable leak, the residual heat removal system is activated manually and prevents flooding of the containment when such action is not necessary. Operation of the passive cooling system is not impaired. A high pressure makeup water storage tank is coupled to the reactor coolant circuit, holding makeup coolant at the operational pressure of the reactor. The staged depressurization system vents the coolant circuit to the containment, thus reducing the supply of makeup coolant. The level of makeup coolant can be sensed to trigger opening of successive depressurization conduits. The residual heat removal pumps move water from the refueling water storage tank into the coolant circuit as the coolant circuit is depressurized, preventing reaching the final depressurization stage unless the makeup coolant level continues to drop. The residual heat removal system can also be coupled in a loop with the refueling water supply tank, for an auxiliary heat removal path.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

393

CSER 96-027: storage of cemented plutonium residue containers in 55 gallon drums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nuclear criticality safety analysis has been performed for the storage of residual plutonium cementation containers, produced at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, in 55 gallon drums. This CSER increases the limit of total plutonium stored in each 55 gallon drum from 100 to 200 grams.

Watson, W.T.

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Relationship between Hot Spot Residues and Ligand Binding Hot Spots in Protein-Protein Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, while identification of a hot spot by alanine scanning establishes the potential to generate substantial, termed "hot spots", that comprise the subset of residues that contribute the bulk of the binding free proposed as prime targets for drug binding.1,4 The established approach to the identification of such hot

Vajda, Sandor

395

Repeat Brachytherapy for Patients With Residual or Recurrent Tumors of Oral Cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To analyze data from patients receiving repeat brachytherapy (re-BT) for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor in the oral cavity. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 62 patients who had undergone definitive BT as an initial treatment of oral cancer subsequently underwent re-BT for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumors at the diagnostic radiology and oncology department (Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital). Re-BT was performed 0.9-73 months (median, 5.7) after the initial BT. Au-198 grains were used as the re-BT source in all 62 patients, and an area of 0.8-6.3 cm{sup 2} (median, 3.1) was permanently irradiated with 60-110 Gy (median, 83) according to the system of Paterson-Parker. Results: The 2-year local control and overall survival rate was 53% and 66%, respectively, and local control significantly affected overall survival. Both local control and overall survival were affected by the initial tumor characteristics and the macroscopic appearance of the residual or recurrent tumor. Grade 3 or 4 complications were seen in 5 patients. The incidence of mandibular and mucosal complications was significantly related to a biologic effective dose of {alpha}/{beta} of 3 Gy to the surface of the gingiva and mucosa, respectively. Conclusion: Re-BT using Au-198 grains for the treatment of residual or recurrent tumor after definitive BT in the oral cavity is effective and well tolerated.

Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi, E-mail: ysmrmrad@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi; Hayashi, Keiji; Nakagawa, Keiko; Toda, Kazuma [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Kaida, Atushi; Miura, Masahiko [Department of Oral Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Variance Decomposition Sensitivity Analysis of a Passive Residual Heat Removal System Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for improved reliability and safety. Sensitivity analysis can provide relevant insights on the responseVariance Decomposition Sensitivity Analysis of a Passive Residual Heat Removal System Model YU Yua Removal system (RHRs) in the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Keywords: Uncertainty

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

Boboia, S. [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca, Romania and Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Moldovan, M. [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Chemistry Research Institute, Department of Polymer Composites, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ardelean, I. [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Physics and Chemistry Department, 400114 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

Engineered Heart Tissue Enables Study of Residual Undifferentiated Embryonic Stem Cell Activity in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Engineered Heart Tissue Enables Study of Residual Undifferentiated Embryonic Stem Cell, Canada, M5S 3G9 6 Heart and Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3G9 cell survival. As an alternative, we have used an engineered heart tissue (EHT) based on neonatal rat

Zandstra, Peter W.

399

A Fuzzy Formal Logic for Interval-valued Residuated Lattices B. Van Gasse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that this truth- functional approach, along with the residu- ation principle, has some consequences that seem truth values instead of only `true' and `false'. A wide range of such logics were introduced cases it may be preferable to work with graded truth values, e.g. for propositions like `a cat

Gent, Universiteit

400

From residue matching patterns to protein folding topographies: General model and bovine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From residue matching patterns to protein folding topographies: General model and bovine pancreatic-grained model for protein-folding dynamics is introduced based on a discretized representation of torsional, pattern recognition, and general characteristics of protein folding kinetics. Topology here implies

Berry, R. Stephen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Incineration of Residue from Paint Stripping Operations Using Plastic Media Blasting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i INCINERATION OF RESIDUE FROH PAINT STRIPPING OPERATIONS USING PLASTIC MEDIA BLASTING J. E. HELT N. MALLYA Group Leader Chemist Chemical Technology Division Chemical Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National... Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Argonne, Illinois ABSTRACT A preliminary investigation has been performed on the environmental consequences of incinerating plastic-media-blasting (PHB) wastes from paint removal operations. PHB is similar to sandblasting...

Helt, J. E.; Mallya, N.

402

Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodemetallization of different origin vacuum residues: New modeling approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as sulfur or metals. Residue hydrotreatment in fixed beds, under high hydrogen pressure can achieve high,version1-13Jun2014 Author manuscript, published in "Fuel 129 (2014) 267-277" #12;2 hydrotreatment kinetic Model, Hydrodesulfurization, Hydrodemetallization, reactor modeling 1. INTRODUCTION Upgrading petroleum

Boyer, Edmond

403

PETROPHYSICS 217June 2011 Assessment of Residual Hydrocarbon Saturation with the Combined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and neutron logs. Initial estimates of residual hydrocarbon saturation and parametric relative permeability refine initial estimates of water saturation, porosity, and permeability until securing a good match and water saturation in capillary equilibrium. Application examples are described for the cases of tight

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

404

Nutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(muffle and flame burning) to combust herbaceous biomass from contrasting nutrient level sites to estimate caused by a fire is the combustion and charring of vegetation. Both C and N contained in plant biomassNutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types Benjamin A

Florida, University of

405

Evaluation of Patient Residual Deviation and Its Impact on Dose Distribution for Proton Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The residual deviations after final patient repositioning based on bony anatomy and the impact of such deviations on the proton dose distributions was investigated. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and kilovoltage (kV) 'portal verification' images from 10 patients treated with passively scattered proton radiotherapy was used to estimate the residual deviation. These changes were then applied to the location of isocenter points that, in effect, moved the isocenter relative to the apertures and compensators. A composite verification plan was obtained and compared with the original clinical treatment plan to evaluate any changes in dose distributions. The residual deviations were fitted to a Gaussian distribution with {mu} = -0.9 {+-} 0.1 mm and {sigma} = 2.55 {+-} 0.07 mm. The dose distribution showed under- and overcovered dose spots with complex dose distributions both in the target volumes and in the organs at risk. In some cases, this amounts to 63.5% above the intended clinical plan. Although patient positioning is carefully verified before treatment delivery and setup uncertainties are accounted for by using compensator smearing and aperture margins, a residual shift in a patient's position can considerably affect the dose distribution.

Arjomandy, Bijan, E-mail: arjomandy_2000@yahoo.com

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Polynomial Maps over p -Adics and Residual Properties of Mapping Tori of Group Endomorphisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Since has a 5-subgroup of index 6, has a 5-subgroup of index at most some constant M 2...homomorphisms , H has a subgroup of index at most M 2 which is residually...not in but in the p-adic completion of that group. Here we use......

Alexander Borisov; Mark Sapir

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

408

Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Nanoscience: A historical perspective R. Dez Muio and P. M. Echenique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(hydrocarbons) Carbon is added to iron to make steel etc. Methane: CH4 Carbon atom #12;Carbon bonding orbitals C hybridization #12;Carbon, from the Latin word `Carbo' = charcoal, coal Charcoal is a blackish residue consisting. fullerenes have different physical and chemical properties as well #12;Polymorphism of Carbon: Diamond

Muiño, Ricardo Díez

410

The Effect of Weld Residual Stress on Life of Used Nuclear Fuel Dry Storage Canisters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the elimination of Yucca Mountain as the long-term storage facility for spent nuclear fuel in the United States, a number of other storage options are being explored. Currently, used fuel is stored in dry-storage cask systems constructed of steel and concrete. It is likely that used fuel will continue to be stored at existing open-air storage sites for up to 100 years. This raises the possibility that the storage casks will be exposed to a salt-containing environment for the duration of their time in interim storage. Austenitic stainless steels, which are used to construct the canisters, are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride-containing environments if a continuous aqueous film can be maintained on the surface and the material is under stress. Because steel sensitization in the canister welds is typically avoided by avoiding post-weld heat treatments, high residual stresses are present in the welds. While the environment history will play a key role in establishing the chemical conditions for cracking, weld residual stresses will have a strong influence on both crack initiation and propagation. It is often assumed for modeling purposes that weld residual stresses are tensile, high and constant through the weld. However, due to the strong dependence of crack growth rate on stress, this assumption may be overly conservative. In particular, the residual stresses become negative (compressive) at certain points in the weld. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a probabilistic model with quantified uncertainties for SCC failure in the dry storage casks. In this paper, the results of a study of the residual stresses, and their postulated effects on SCC behavior, in actual canister welds are presented. Progress on the development of the model is reported.

Ronald G. Ballinger; Sara E. Ferry; Bradley P. Black; Sebastien P. Teysseyre

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 22, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2007 1563 Transmission-Constrained Residual Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IEEE Abstract--The residual demand derivative plays a central role in constructing the best response is obtained straightforwardly by taking the derivative of the residual demand function with respect to price elastic supplies/demands at some buses in the system. We verified our results in three examples: a two

Baldick, Ross

412

Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

Burke, Ian

413

Microbial community response to a release of neat ethanol onto residual hydrocarbons in a pilot-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial community response to a release of neat ethanol onto residual hydrocarbons in a pilot ethanol release (E100, 76 l) onto residual hydrocarbons in sandy soil was evaluated in a continuous-flow 8 shifts were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. High ethanol concentrations

Alvarez, Pedro J.

414

WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Mixed Residue Consent Order, September 24, 1999 Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9-09-24-01 9-09-24-01 State Colorado Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Substitute this Consent Order for the MR Consent Order; establish requirements for mixed residues management. Parties DOE ; Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC; Safe Sites of Colorado, LLC; Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC; Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Date 9/24/1999 SCOPE * Substitute this Consent Order for the MR Consent Order by modifying in its entirety the Settlement Agreement and Compliance Order on Consent, number 93-04-23-01, (the "MR Consent Order"). * Establish requirements for certain activities involving mixed residues management. * Establish enforceable commitment dates. ESTABLISHING MILESTONES * Provisions regarding enforceable commitment dates and the procedures to add

416

Removal of wool wax, nonylphenol ethoxylates and pesticide residues from wool scour effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aqueous scouring of raw wool produces a highly polluting effluent that primarily contains emulsified wool wax, together with high levels of nonionic detergents and trace levels of various agricultural pesticides. The SIROLAN CF chemical flocculation process transferred over 95% of the wool wax and detergent and greater than 98% of the pesticide residues from the wastewater stream to a spadeable sludge that was used as a starting material to produce a high quality compost. During the composting process the nonionic detergents and organophosphorus pesticide residues were degraded to below detectable levels while the pyrethroid pesticides, cypermethrin and cyhalothrin, together with the organochlorine pesticide, lindane were degraded to below 15% of their initial levels.

F.William Jones; David J Westmoreland

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Characteristics of naphthenic and paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual oil from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons segregated by liquid chromatography from a residual oil after removal of the resins and solid hydrocarbons. The studied hydrocarbons were fractionated on the basis of molecular weight (by molecular distillation) and on the basis of the content of rings (by thermal diffusion separation in a laboratory column). The results of mass-spectrometric analysis indicate that the first fraction consists mainly of isoparaffins and naphthenes with few rings. The polycyclic condensed naphthenes are concentrated in the last fraction. The content of isoparaffins drops off and the content of condensed polycyclic naphthenic structures increases from the second fraction to the next to the last. It is concluded that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual oil from mixed West Siberian crudes have a relatively narrow composition and therefore have similar physicochemical properties.

Detusheva, E.P.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Muchinskii, T.D.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Gauge fixing and residual symmetries in gauge/gravity theories with extra dimensions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study compactified pure gauge/gravitational theories with gauge-fixing terms and show that these theories possess quantum mechanical supersymmetriclike symmetries between unphysical degrees of freedom. These residual symmetries are global symmetries and generated by quantum mechanical N=2 supercharges. Also, we establish a new one-parameter family of gauge choices for higher-dimensional gravity and calculate as a check of its validity one graviton exchange amplitude in the lowest tree-level approximation. We confirm that the result is indeed {xi} independent and the cancellation of the {xi} dependence is ensured by the residual symmetries. We also give a simple interpretation of the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity, which arises in the lowest tree-level approximation, from the supersymmetric point of view.

Lim, C. S.; Sakamoto, Makoto [Department of Physics, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Nagasawa, Tomoaki [Anan National College of Technology, 265 Aoki, Minobayashi, Anan 774-0017 (Japan); Ohya, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Kazuki [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gauge-Fixing and Residual Symmetries in Gauge/Gravity Theories with Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study compactified pure gauge/gravitational theories with gauge-fixing terms and show that these theories possess quantum mechanical SUSY-like symmetries between unphysical degrees of freedom. These residual symmetries are global symmetries and generated by quantum mechanical N=2 supercharges. Also, we establish new one-parameter family of gauge choices for higher-dimensional gravity, and calculate as a check of its validity one graviton exchange amplitude in the lowest tree-level approximation. We confirm that the result is indeed $\\xi$-independent and the cancellation of the $\\xi$-dependence is ensured by the residual symmetries. We also give a simple interpretation of the vDVZ-discontinuity, which arises in the lowest tree-level approximation, from the supersymmetric point of view.

C. S. Lim; Tomoaki Nagasawa; Satoshi Ohya; Kazuki Sakamoto; Makoto Sakamoto

2008-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gauge-Fixing and Residual Symmetries in Gauge/Gravity Theories with Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study compactified pure gauge/gravitational theories with gauge-fixing terms and show that these theories possess quantum mechanical SUSY-like symmetries between unphysical degrees of freedom. These residual symmetries are global symmetries and generated by quantum mechanical N=2 supercharges. Also, we establish new one-parameter family of gauge choices for higher-dimensional gravity, and calculate as a check of its validity one graviton exchange amplitude in the lowest tree-level approximation. We confirm that the result is indeed $\\xi$-independent and the cancellation of the $\\xi$-dependence is ensured by the residual symmetries. We also give a simple interpretation of the vDVZ-discontinuity, which arises in the lowest tree-level approximation, from the supersymmetric point of view.

Lim, C S; Ohya, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Makoto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis in support of storage of residues in the pipe overpack container  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposition of the large backlog of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plans call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55 gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. The potential for damage to this container during onsite storage in unhardened structures for several hypothetical accident scenarios has been addressed using finite element calculations. This report will describe the initial conditions and assumptions for these analyses and the predicted response of the container.

Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.; Radloff, H.D.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Long-term risk stabilization of the Rocky Flats Plant residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid and solid residues continue to be a concern at Rocky Flats, primarily due to safety aspects of long-term storage and of the need for processing them into a form for ultimate disposal. Currently, Rocky Flats is processing the low-level solutions from bottles and tanks by direct cementation for storage and disposal. Plans for actinide precipitation of the high-level solutions are being finalized with an anticipated completion date of 2 to 3 yr. The solid residues present a more difficult challenge because of the numerous forms that these exist. Rocky Flats is developing several strategies to handle these materials for safe long-term storage and eventual disposal.

Melberg, T.A. [Dept. of Energy, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

CO2 Sequestration by Direct Gas?Solid Carbonation of Air Pollution Control (APC) Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Sequestration by Direct Gas?Solid Carbonation of Air Pollution Control (APC) Residues ... Furthermore, because fossil fuels are projected to be a dominant energy resource in the 21st century,1 technologies for sequestering emissions from fossil fuel combustion in a safe and definitive manner are being developed and implemented. ... According to these authors, the solution containing free calcium could then be used in a carbonation process for capturing CO2 directly from air. ...

Renato Baciocchi; Alessandra Polettini; Raffaella Pomi; Valentina Prigiobbe; Viktoria Nikulshina Von Zedwitz; Aldo Steinfeld

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Production-scale plutonium-neptunium separation and residue recovery at Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An anion exchange process to recover plutonium from plutonium - 0.5% neptunium residues has been investigated on a production scale. The plutonium was effectively recovered and separated from neptunium using Rohm and Haas Amberlite IRA-938 (20 to 50 mesh) macroreticular anion exchange resin. During this process, 58.3 kg of plutonium containing less than 100 g Np/g Pu has been recovered.

Martella, L.L.; Guyer, R.H.; Leak, W.C.; Thomas, R.L. (eds.)

1987-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cofiring Lignite with Hazelnut Shell and Cotton Residue in a Pilot-Scale Fluidized Bed Combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The absence of studies on cofiring of indigenous lignite with hazelnut shell/cotton residue blends in fluid bed combustors on one hand and the recent trend in utilization of biomass with local reserves in industry and utility boilers on the other necessitate investigation of combustion and emission characteristics of these fuel blends. ... However, the effect of recycle on gaseous emissions from combustion of Turkish lignites with high ash, volatile matter, and sulfur contents has not been investigated to date. ...

Zuhal Gogebakan; Nevin Selçuk

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Residual oil saturation, Annex VI-1. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil energy report VI-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, dealing with the US/Venezuela Cooperative exchange agreement on residual oil saturation (Annex VI), contains the results of efforts by scientists from both countries to improve the state of present technology for accurately measuring the amount of residual oil remaining in a particular reservoir of interest. To date, those efforts have resulted in an exchange of ideas through a sharing of technical literature and bibliographic listings pertinent to the subject, reciprocal visits to the laboratories and field sites where residual oil saturation measurement R and D is in progress, an exchange of ideas through workshops held in each country, and open discussions covering areas of future cooperative R and D. The text of the basic agreement , Annex VI and all amendments, are appended to the report. In addition to a chronicle of events detailing progress under Annex VI, this report also inlcudes a discussion of future work to be performed in the areas of subsidence accompanying the extraction of oil and interwell oil saturation measurement. A meeting was held in Bartlesville May 10 and 11 to formulate plans in this area.

Wesson, T.C.; VonDomselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Residue-free fabrication of high-performance graphene devices by patterned PMMA stencil mask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals and their hybrid structures have recently attracted much attention due to their potential applications. The fabrication of metallic contacts or nanostructures on 2D materials is very common and generally achieved by performing electron-beam (e-beam) lithography. However, e-beam lithography is not applicable in certain situations, e.g., cases in which the e-beam resist does not adhere to the substrates or the intrinsic properties of the 2D materials are greatly altered and degraded. Here, we present a residue-free approach for fabricating high-performance graphene devices by patterning a thin film of e-beam resist as a stencil mask. This technique can be generally applied to substrates with varying surface conditions, while causing negligible residues on graphene. The technique also preserves the design flexibility offered by e-beam lithography and therefore allows us to fabricate multi-probe metallic contacts. The graphene field-effect transistors fabricated by this method exhibit smooth surfaces, high mobility, and distinct magnetotransport properties, confirming the advantages and versatility of the presented residue-free technique for the fabrication of devices composed of 2D materials.

Shih, Fu-Yu [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shao-Yu; Wu, Tsuei-Shin; Wang, Wei-Hua, E-mail: wwang@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, Cheng-Hua; Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Ho, Po-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

The effects of machine parameters on residual stress determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of machine parameters on residual stresses in single point diamond turned silicon and germanium have been investigated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Residual stresses were sampled across ductile feed cuts in < 100 > silicon and germanium which were single point diamond turned using a variety of feed rates, rake angles and clearance angles. High spatial resolution micro-Raman spectra (1{mu}m spot) were obtained in regions of ductile cutting where no visible surface damage was present. The use of both 514-5nm and 488.0nm excitation wavelengths, by virtue of their differing characteristic penetration depths in the materials, allowed determinations of stress profiles as a function of depth into the sample. Previous discussions have demonstrated that such Raman spectra will exhibit asymmetrically broadened peaks which are characteristic of the superposition of a continuum of Raman scatterers from the various depths probed. Depth profiles of residual stress were obtained using computer deconvolution of the resulting asymmetrically broadened raman spectra.

Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

GIS mapping of rice straw residue for bioenergy purpose in a rural area of Assam, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Agricultural residues are a promising source of biomass energy. However, agricultural residues are seasonally available and loosely distributed over large geographical areas and hence require spatio-temporal assessment. Satellite image is a handy input for such assessment and high resolution image could increase the preciseness of estimation. In the present study, rice cropland is mapped using high resolution WorldView-2 satellite image in a rural area of Assam, India. The rice cropland map in combination with agricultural statistics is then analyzed in GIS in order to assess rice straw availability for potential bioenergy generation. About 54% land of study area belongs to rice cropland, which can contribute 5360 tonnes surplus rice straw per annum (equivalent to 83,296 GJ). Potential electric power capacity from the surplus rice straw in the study area is 523.50 kW. However, at individual village level the potential varies from 4.45 kW to 28.69 kW. Considering the power crisis in India, the findings of this work are expected to assist policy makers and biomass energy developers in decision making process. Particularly, this paper generated information on village level rice straw residue availability and subsequently potential electric power capacity. Such information is limited in the India expect for few states.

Moonmoon Hiloidhari; D.C. Baruah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

Hayakawa, Takehito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (Japan); Mathews, Grant [Enter for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Assessment of dry residual biomass potential for use as alternative energy source in the party of General Pueyrredón, Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present article assesses the residual biomass availability and its energy potential in the Party of General Pueyrredón, a region located southeast of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. These were considered herbaceous and vegetable residues derived from the agricultural activity developed in the region, and forest residues resulting from the pruning of urban trees and garden maintenance. The estimates were based on statistical information of the 2011–2012 harvest and a series of parameters obtained from an extensive literature review. The calculations resulted in an availability of residual biomass of 204,536 t/year, implying an energy potential of 2605 TJ/year. If this biomass is used to generate electricity, it could supply 76,000 users from Mar del Plata city, the largest consumer center in the region. If the same available biomass is used for heat generation, 25,160 users could be supplied by the available residual biomass. The authors concluded that the residual biomass energy potential is significant in the studied region, but a more detailed study must be conducted to assess the techno-economic feasibility of using the available residual biomass as alternative energy source.

Justo José Roberts; Agnelo Marotta Cassula; Pedro Osvaldo Prado; Rubens Alves Dias; José Antonio Perrella Balestieri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Flowrate effects upon adsorption in a charcoal sampling tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REFERENCES 1. Taylor, D. : NIOSH Manual of Anal tical Methods, 2nd Ed. National Institute for Occupatsona Safety and Hea th, Cincinnati (1977). 2. Bloomfield, B. D. in Air Sam lin Instruments for Evaluation of Atmos heric Contaminants, 5th Ed. pg. B-6... 28. Nader, J. S. in Air Sam lin Instruments for Evaluation of Atmos- heric Contaminants, 5th Ed. , pg. J-6. American Conference of overnmental Industrial Hygienists, Cincinnati (1978). APPENDIX A SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE NIOSH APPROVED SAMPLING TUBE...

Bolton, Fredric Newell

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Technical Session on Recycling Concrete and Other Materials for Sustainable Development at 2003 ACI Spring; microfiber reinforcement; pulp and paper mill residual solids; recycling; salt-scaling resistance. 1 Director - INTRODUCTION Pulp and paper mill wastewater treatment plant residuals (also called sludge) are the solid

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

440

International Conference on Engineering for Waste and Biomass Valorisation September 10-13, 2012 Porto, Portugal USE OF AUTO SHREDDER RESIDUES GENERATED BY POST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-13, 2012 � Porto, Portugal USE OF AUTO SHREDDER RESIDUES GENERATED BY POST SHREDDER TECHNOLOGY of plastics and residuals metals. This fraction undergoes Post-Shredder Treatments, to extract 30-50 wt characterization of fractions sampled on an industrial line of treatment of automotive residues. The results feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Control of residual stresses in tests of technological processes of producing compressor blades for gas turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes experience with inducing and controlling residual surface stresses in compressor blades made of titanium alloys. It was established that these stresses have a substantial effect on the fa...

V. A. Boguslaev

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Improving fatigue strength by producing residual stresses on surface of parts of gas-turbine engines using processing treatments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with a comparison of results of measuring residual stresses and with the study of their ... effect on the fatigue strength of parts of gas-turbine engines after finish treatments by grinding, poli...

M. G. Yakovlev

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The usability of switchgrass, rice straw, and logging residue as feedstocks for power generation in East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the economic implications of using agriculturally based feedstock for bio-energy production in East Texas. Specifically I examined the use of switchgrass, rice straw, and logging residue as a feedstock for electrical power...

Hong, Sung Wook

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Microstructure, residual stress, and mechanical properties of thin film materials for a microfabricated solid oxide fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The microstructure and residual stress of sputter-deposited films for use in microfabricated solid oxide fuel cells are presented. Much of the work focuses on the characterization of a candidate solid electrolyte: Yttria ...

Quinn, David John, Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Characterization of air emissions and residual ash from open burning of electronic wastes during simulated rudimentary recycling operations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air emissions and residual ash samples were collected and analyzed during experiments of open, uncontrolled combustion of electronic waste (e-waste), simulating practices associated with rudimentary e-waste recyc...

Brian K. Gullett; William P. Linak…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Solubilization of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Residues in Soil Using an In Vitro Physiologically Based Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum hydrocarbon residues in weathered soils may pose risks to humans through the ingestion pathway. To understand the factors controlling their gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, a newly developed experimental extraction protocol was used to model ...

Hoi-Ying N. Holman; Regine Goth-Goldstein; David Aston; Mao Yun; Jenny Kengsoontra

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Role of Sustainability Standards in the Energetic Use of Palm Oil Plantation Residues: Case Study of Cameroon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter aims to discuss the sustainability aspects of using residual wood from plantations for the production of electricity and heat. ... There are continuous debates about the potential of biomass feedstoc...

Michael Schmidt; Berthold Hansmann; Pia Dewitz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Estimation of the Residual Magnetic Field Strength Inside a Pipeline after Testing by a Magnetic Flaw Detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The residual magnetic field strength inside a pipeline after testing by a magnetic flaw detector ... demagnetizing local joint-pipe sections in carrying out repair-welding works is proposed.

R. V. Zagidulin; V. F. Muzhitskii

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Cost, energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) effectiveness of a harvesting and transporting system for residual forest biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of a system to harvest logging residues (or slashes) as a new resource for energy in Japan. A harvesting and transporting system ... the system is discussed...

Takuyuki Yoshioka; Kazuhiro Aruga; Hideo Sakai…

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448.000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate. Of the estimated solids, the hazardous wastes (e.g., electrical vehicle batteries and light tubes) were about 2% of the total volumes. The generation of solid HE residues varied uniformly with the HE production rates and ranged from about 20% of the total solids volume for the 100 HE units/yr case to about 60% for the 2000 units/yr case. The HE machining operations generated 60 to 80% of the total solid HE residues, depending on the assumed production rate, and were also the sources of the most concentrated HE residues.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly ash during coal and residual char combustion in a pressurized fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fly ash, the combustion of coal and residual char was performed in a pressurized spouted fluidized bed. After Soxhlet extraction and Kuderna-Danish (K-D) concentration, the contents of 16 PAHs recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in coal, residual char, and fly ash were analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence and diode array detection. The experimental results show that the combustion efficiency is lower and the carbon content in fly ash is higher during coal pressurized combustion, compared to the residual char pressurized combustion at the pressure of 0.3 MPa. Under the same pressure, the PAH amounts in fly ash produced from residual char combustion are lower than that in fly ash produced from coal combustion. The total PAHs in fly ash produced from coal and residual char combustion are dominated by three- and four-ring PAHs. The amounts of PAHs in fly ash produced from residual char combustion increase and then decrease with the increase of pressure in a fluidized bed. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Zinc and cadmium residues in striped bass from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zinc and cadmium concentrations in muscle, liver, and kidney were measured in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from Cherokee, Norris, and Watts Bar reservoirs in East Tennessee to determine if these metals had contributed to fish kills observed in Cherokee during the 1970's. The range of mean concentrations of zinc from collections of Cherokee striped bass (muscle 11-14, liver 98-106, kidney 88-105 mg Zn/kg dry weight) were comparable to ranges in fish from Norris and Watts Bar (muscle 12-13, liver 83-132, kidney 96-108 mg/kg dry weight). With the exception of concentrations in the kidneys of one collection, cadmium residues from Cherokee striped bass (muscle 0.02-0.09, liver 0.3-0.7, kidney 0.2-4.0 mg Cd/kg dry weight) were also similar to residues from Norris and Watts Bar fish (muscle 0.05-0.13, liver 0.3-2.1, kidney 0.3-0.5 mg Cd/kg dry weight). There were significant differences in tissue residues among seasons (summer 1979, spring 1980, summer 1980) in Cherokee Reservoir, as well as significant differences among the three reservoirs (Cherokee, Norris, Watts Bar) during the same season (spring 1980). All concentrations, however, were well below those reported for fish exposed to the maximum non-harmful concentrations of zinc and the lowest potentially harmful concentration of cadmium and moreover, were within the range typically reported for fish tissues. It is, therefore, believed that in at least the last two years, zinc and cadmium in the tissues of striped bass from Cherokee Reservoir have not been harmful to the fish.

Tisa, M.S.; Strange, R.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted by Western Research Institute (WRI). The ESO residue, have a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{lg_bullet}s at 60{degree}C (140{degree}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, ASD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, which are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a siliceous Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquettes. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquettes. The rheological analyses of the unaged petroleum-derived asphalts and their respective blends indicate that the samples satisfy the rutting requirement. However, the aging indexes for the rolling thin film oven (RTFO)-aged and RTFO/pressure aging vessel (PAV)-aged samples indicate that the blends are stiffer than the petroleum-derived asphalts. This means that when in service the blends will be more prone to pavement embrittlement and fatigue cracking than the petroleum-derived asphalts. Infrared analyses were also conducted on the three petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends before and after RTFO/PAV aging. In general, upon RTFO/PAV aging, the amounts of carbonyls and sulfoxides in the samples increase, indicating that the addition of the ESO residue does not mitigate the chemical aging (oxidation) of the petroleum-derived asphalts. This information correlates with the rheological data and the aging indexes that were calculated for the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends.

Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

455

Residual sweeping effects in the swept frame of reference in Kinematic Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been suggested that sweeping effects make Lagrangian properties in Kinematic Simulations (KS) unreliable. Here we show through a novel analysis based upon analysing neighbouring particle trajectories in a frame of reference moving with the large energy contining scales that the residual sweeping error in the turbulent pair diffusivity ($K$) in KS is $e_K\\sim dt/\\tau_s$, where $dt$ is the numerical timestep and $\\tau_s$ is the time scale of the sweeping through local eddies. Thus, provided that $dt\\ll \\tau_s$, then $e_K\\ll 1$ and the Lagrangian properties in KS are reliable.

Malik, Nadeem A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual lube stock from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lube stocks from West Siberian crudes are characterized by high contents of aromatic hydrocarbons and by high viscosity indexes of the naphthenic/paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that isoparaffins account for one-third of the total naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons. The study showed that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual lube stock from West Siberia crudes, even with a variation of molecular weight over broad limits, are relatively uniform in composition. They consist mainly of isoparaffinic and monocyclic and noncondensed naphthenic structures.

Detusheva, E.P.; Bogdanov, Sh.K.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Nekrasova, A.V.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A test for market power exertion in the credit card industry with the dual solow residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the causes, given the effect (X), equal non-zero. Y ~X ~Z Figure 3. 2: Causal inverted fork The common effects do not screen off associations between the joint causes. Directed acyclic graphs illustrate conditional independence as in n Pr(xi, xn xn... successfully. 20 Roeger's derivation, the dual residual under imperfect competition is developed from a unit cost function that presumes constant returns to scale. Equation (9) illustrates the functional form. (9) G(Wtt. Wrt)Yt C(Wtt, Wrt, Y?Et) = where...

Meurisse, Mark P

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effect of residual stress and surface roughness on the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this investigation the fatigue properties of specimens manufactured with different turning parameters were investigated in stress-controlled constant amplitude tests at ambient temperature. The change of feed rate and depth of cut lead to a change in the near surface microstructure. Hence the fatigue properties were influenced significantly due to different surface roughness and surface residual stress resulting from the unequal turning processes. The cyclic deformation behaviour of AMC225xe is characterised by pronounced initial cyclic hardening. Continuous load increase tests allow a reliable estimation of the endurance limit of AMC225xe with one single specimen on the basis of cyclic deformation, temperature and electrical resistance data.

M Smaga; D Eifler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures.

Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A. [Positron Systems, Inc., 411 S. Fifth St., Boise, Idaho 83702 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN SRS AND HANFORD 3013 INNER AND CONVENIENCE CANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a plausible corrosion mechanism for the stainless steel 3013 containers during their lifetime for plutonium material storage if sufficient electrolyte is present within the container. Contributing factors for SCC, such as fabrication and welding residual stresses, are present in the 3013 cans. Convenience and inner cans from both Hanford and SRS are made by a flow form process, which cold works the stainless steel during fabrication. Additionally, the inner cans also are sealed at the can top with a closure weld to the sealing plug. Only SRS and Hanford were tested since moisture levels were significant for SCC. As part of the 3013 corrosion plan for FY09, testing in a boiling magnesium chloride solution was performed on actual 3013 convenience and inner cans to determine if the residual stresses were sufficient for the initiation and propagation of SCC. Additional testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution was also performed on 304L stainless steel SCC coupons, i.e. stressed teardrop-shaped samples (teardrops), and an inner can welded top to provide comparative results and to assess the effect of residual stresses in a less aggressive environment. The testing performed under this task consisted of 3013 inner and convenience cans and 304L teardrops exposed to a boiling magnesium chloride solutions per ASTM G36 and a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C following the guidance of ASTM G123. Cracking occurred in all can types including the inner can bottom and welded top and the bottoms of the SRS and Hanford convenience cans when exposed to the boiling magnesium chloride solution at 155 C. Cracking occurred at different times indicative of the residual stress levels in the cans. 304L teardrops cracked in the shortest time interval and therefore provide a conservative estimate for can performance. Testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C demonstrated that cracking occurs in a less aggressive environment but at significantly longer times than in the boiling magnesium chloride. Vapor space cracking was also found to occur in the inner can welded top exposed over the boiling magnesium chloride solution and on 304L teardrops exposed over a hot calcium chloride solution.

Mickalonis, J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

An assessment of the potential for coal/residual oil coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the promising new techniques to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal is coal/petroleum coprocessing based upon the use of heavy oil, tar sand bitumen and petroleum residua as ''solvents'' for the conversion of coal. Coprocessing is the simultaneous hydrogenation of coal and heavy oil fractions in specially designed reactors with coal contents by weight ranging from as low as 1% to potentially as high as 50-60% depending upon the technology employed. The results of a study on the potential for coal/residual oil coprocessing in the United States are addressed in this paper.

Huber, D.A.; Lee, Q.; Thomas, R.L.; Frye, K.; Rudins, G.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in welds fabricated from highly anisotropic materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutron diffraction to neutron diffraction to engineering problems T.M. Holden Northern Stress Technologies Deep River, Ontario, Canada Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 13 nd June 2011 Reference material * "Introduction to the characterization of residual stress by neutron diffraction". M.T. Hutchings, P.J. Withers, T.M. Holden and T. Lorentzen, (Taylor and Francis: Boca Raton) 2005 * "Introduction to diffraction in Materials Science and Engineering", A.D. Krawitz (John Wiley and Sons ,Inc.: New York) 2001 * "Non-destructive testing-Standard Test Method for

465

,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refiner Sales Volumes" Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refres_c_nus_eppr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refres_c_nus_eppr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

466

In situ recovery from residually heated sections in a hydrocarbon containing formation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of treating a tar sands formation is described herein. The methods may include providing heat to a first section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the first section of the formation. Heat is transferred from the heaters so that at least a first section of the formation reaches a selected temperature. At least a portion of residual heat from the first section transfers from the first section to a second section of the formation. At least a portion of hydrocarbons in the second section are mobilized by providing a solvation fluid and/or a pressurizing fluid to the second section of the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

467

Contaminant Release Data Package for Residual Waste in Single-Shell Hanford Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation report be submitted to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The RCRA Facility Investigation report will provide a detailed description of the state of knowledge needed for tank farm performance assessments. This data package provides detailed technical information about contaminant release from closed single-shell tanks necessary to support the RCRA Facility Investigation report. It was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., which is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with tank closure. This data package is a compilation of contaminant release rate data for residual waste in the four Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have been tested (C-103, C-106, C-202, and C-203). The report describes the geochemical properties of the primary contaminants of interest from the perspective of long-term risk to groundwater (uranium, technetium-99, iodine-129, chromium, transuranics, and nitrate), the occurrence of these contaminants in the residual waste, release mechanisms from the solid waste to water infiltrating the tanks in the future, and the laboratory tests conducted to measure release rates.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Gasification behavior of carbon residue in bed solids of black liquor gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam gasification of carbon residue in bed solids of a low-temperature black liquor gasifier was studied using a thermogravimetric system at 3 bar. Complete gasification of the carbon residue, which remained unreactive at 600 C, was achieved in about 10 min as the temperature increased to 800 C. The rate of gasification and its temperature dependence were evaluated from the non-isothermal experiment results. Effects of particle size and adding H{sub 2} and CO to the gasification agent were also studied. The rate of steam gasification could be taken as zero order in carbon until 80% of carbon was gasified, and for the rest of the gasification process the rate appeared to be first order in carbon. The maximum rate of carbon conversion was around 0.003/s and the activation energy was estimated to be in the range of 230-300 kJ/mol. The particle size did not show significant effect on the rate of gasification. Hydrogen and carbon monoxide appeared to retard the onset of the gasification process. (author)

Preto, Fernando; Zhang, Xiaojie (Frank); Wang, Jinsheng [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

The water footprint of biofuel produced from forest wood residue via a mixed alcohol gasification process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forest residue has been proposed as a feasible candidate for cellulosic biofuels. However, the number of studies assessing its water use remains limited. This work aims to analyze the impacts of forest-based biofuel on water resources and quality by using a water footprint approach. A method established here is tailored to the production system, which includes softwood, hardwood, and short-rotation woody crops. The method is then applied to selected areas in the southeastern region of the United States to quantify the county-level water footprint of the biofuel produced via a mixed alcohol gasification process, under several logistic systems, and at various refinery scales. The results indicate that the blue water sourced from surface or groundwater is minimal, at 2.4 liters per liter of biofuel (l/l). The regional-average green water (rainfall) footprint falls between 400 and 443 l/l. The biofuel pathway appears to have a low nitrogen grey water footprint averaging 25 l/l at the regional level, indicating minimal impacts on water quality. Feedstock mix plays a key role in determining the magnitude and the spatial distribution of the water footprint in these regions. Compared with other potential feedstock, forest wood residue shows promise with its low blue and grey water footprint.

Yi-Wen Chiu; May Wu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Logistics cost analysis of rice residues for second generation bioenergy production in Ghana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study explores the techno-economic potential of rice residues as a bioenergy resource to meet Ghana’s energy demands. Major rice growing regions of Ghana have 70–90% of residues available for bioenergy production. To ensure cost-effective biomass logistics, a thorough cost analysis was made for two bioenergy routes. Logistics costs for a 5 MWe straw combustion plant were 39.01, 47.52 and 47.89 USD/t for Northern, Ashanti and Volta regions respectively. Logistics cost for a 0.25 MWe husk gasification plant (with roundtrip distance 10 km) was 2.64 USD/t in all regions. Capital cost (66–72%) contributes significantly to total logistics costs of straw, however for husk logistics, staff (40%) and operation and maintenance costs (46%) dominate. Baling is the major processing logistic cost for straw, contributing to 46–48% of total costs. Scale of straw unit does not have a large impact on logistic costs. Transport distance of husks has considerable impact on logistic costs.

Pooja Vijay Ramamurthi; Maria Cristina Fernandes; Per Sieverts Nielsen; Clemente Pedro Nunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to date, and advance four closely related topics. (1) We present a method to decouple macroscopic thermally-induced residual stresses and microscopic bulk defect related stresses. In contrast to previous reports, thermally-induced residual stresses in wafer-sized samples are generally found to be less than 5 MPa, while defect-related stresses can be several times larger. (2) We describe the unique IR birefringence signatures, including stress magnitudes and directions, of common microdefects in mc-Si solar cell materials including: {beta}-SiC and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} microdefects, twin bands, nontwin grain boundaries, and dislocation bands. In certain defects, local stresses up to 40 MPa can be present. (3) We relate observed stresses to other topics of interest in solar cell manufacturing, including transition metal precipitation, wafer mechanical strength, and minority carrier lifetime. (4) We discuss the potential of IBI as a quality-control technique in industrial solar cell manufacturing.

Ganapati, Vidya; Schoenfelder, Stephan; Castellanos, Sergio; Oener, Sebastian; Koepge, Ringo; Sampson, Aaron; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Morhenn, Humphrey; Hahn, Giso; Bagdahn, Joerg; Buonassisi1, Tonio

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

472

Using a Decision Support System to Optimize Production of Agricultural Crop Residue Biofeedstock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been developing a Decision Support System for Agriculture (DSS4Ag) which determines the economically optimum recipe of various fertilizers to apply at each site in a field to produce a crop, based on the existing soil fertility at each site, as well as historic production information and current prices of fertilizers and the forecast market price of the crop at harvest, for growing a crop such as wheat, potatoes, corn, or cotton. In support of the growing interest in agricultural crop residues as a bioenergy feedstock, we have extended the capability of the DSS4Ag to develop a variable-rate fertilizer recipe for the simultaneous economically optimum production of both grain and straw, and have been conducting field research to test this new DSS4Ag. In this paper we report the results of two years of field research testing and enhancing the DSS4Ag’s ability to economically optimize the fertilization for the simultaneous production of both grain and its straw, where the straw is an agricultural crop residue that can be used as a biofeedstock.

Reed L. Hoskinson; Ronald C. Rope; Raymond K. Fink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Sustainability assessment of industrial waste treatment processes: The case of automotive shredder residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date numerous environmental, economic and societal indicators have been applied to evaluate and compare the sustainability of products and processes. This study presents a set of ad hoc sustainability indicators suitable for assessing and comparing processes for the treatment of industrial waste streams and for allowing to address efficiently all aspects of sustainability. This set consists of the following indicators: energy intensity, material intensity, water consumption, land use, global warming, human toxicity and treatment cost. The application of these indicators to industrial waste treatment processes is discussed in depth. A distinction is made between direct contributions to sustainability, occurring at the process level itself, and indirect contributions related to the production of auxiliaries and the recovery of end products. The proposed sustainability assessment method is applied to treatment processes for automotive shredder residue (ASR), a complex and heterogeneous waste stream with hazardous characteristics. Although different strategies for recycling and valorization of ASR were developed, with some of them already commercialized, large quantities of ASR are still commonly landfilled. This study concludes that for ASR the most sustainable alternative to the present landfill practice, both in short and long term perspective, consists of recycling combined with energetic valorization of the residual fraction.

Isabel Vermeulen; Chantal Block; Jo Van Caneghem; Wim Dewulf; Subhas K. Sikdar; Carlo Vandecasteele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recycling of automobile shredder residue with a microwave pyrolysis combined with high temperature steam gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Presently, there is a growing need for handling automobile shredder residues – ASR or “car fluff”. One of the most promising methods of treatment ASR is pyrolysis. Apart of obvious benefits of pyrolysis: energy and metals recovery, there is serious concern about the residues generated from that process needing to be recycled. Unfortunately, not much work has been reported providing a solution for treatment the wastes after pyrolysis. This work proposes a new system based on a two-staged process. The ASR was primarily treated by microwave pyrolysis and later the liquid and solid products become the feedstock for the high temperature gasification process. The system development is supported within experimental results conducted in a lab-scale, batch-type reactor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH). The heating rate, mass loss, gas composition, LHV and gas yield of producer gas vs. residence time are reported for the steam temperature of 1173 K. The sample input was 10 g and the steam flow rate was 0.65 kg/h. The conversion reached 99% for liquids and 45–55% for solids, dependently from the fraction. The H2:CO mol/mol ratio varied from 1.72 solids and 1.4 for liquid, respectively. The average LHV of generated gas was 15.8 MJ/N m3 for liquids and 15 MJ/N m3 for solids fuels.

Pawel Donaj; Weihong Yang; W?odzimierz B?asiak; Christer Forsgren

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Comparative thermodynamic and experimental study of some heavy metal behaviours during automotive shredder residues incineration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical studies of the behaviour of some heavy metals were undertaken during Automotive Shredder Residues (ASR) incineration. A thermodynamic study at equilibrium was performed using a software minimizing the free Gibbs energy. The metals studied were barium, copper, lead and zinc. The studies were performed mostly at two temperatures: 1123 and 1373 K. The thermodynamic study showed that the chlorine content is the most important parameter influencing the volatility of the studied metals. It also showed that in default of chlorine in a system containing several metals, barium chloride in its condensed form is the most easily formed. Other metals remained in their metallic form or in the form of oxides. The presence of hydrogen in the system has a general limiting influence on the metal volatility because, especially at high temperatures, hydrogen chloride is more likely to be formed. In the experimental field, the behaviours of metals were studied using commercial polymers as waste models: a PVC mastic, a polyurethane mastic and a rubber powder. Copper and barium presented a non volatile behaviour during the incineration of waste matrixes as ASR, being present also in residual ash. On the other hand, lead was completely formed in the gas phase and zinc showed an equal partitioning between the two principal phases of the treatment. ©

G. Trouve; A. Kauffmann; L. Delfosse

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Simulation of tides, residual flow and energy budget in the Gulf of California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the application of a two-dimensional nonlinear hydrodynamical-numerical semi-implicit model, the principal tides M2, S2, K2, N2, K1, P1 and O1 were studied. Energy budgets of the semi-diurnal M2 and S2 were calculated separately. The linear sum of these budgets was compared with the tidal energy budget obtained when these two tidal constituents interact. Since a quadratic form for the bottom friction was used, remarkable differences were found. The results show that in the area of the Colorado River delta, the dissipation of tidal energy is very strong. Intense tidal currents were observed in the same region and over the Salsipuedes Sill. Energy budgets calculated for forcing waves of different periods, but of the same amplitude, were used to estimate the principal periods of resonance. Although the topography of the Gulf is very complex, the model reproduced observed sea-surface elevation and current patterns. To study spring tide conditions, the above seven tidal constituents were simulated. Estimates of residual currents reveal the presence of several intense cyclonic and anticyclonic gyres. Over the Salsipuedes Sill, residual currents of the M2 tide reach values of more than 15 cm s?1. Horizontal distributions of dissipation rates of tidal energy and of kinetic energy were also obtained.

Noel Carbajal; Jan O. Backhaus

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Evaluation of an eastern shale oil residue as an asphalt additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of eastern shale oil (ESO) residue as an asphalt additive to reduce oxidative age-hardening and moisture susceptibility was conducted. The ESO residue, having a viscosity of 23.9 Pa{sm_bullet}s at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F), was blended with three different petroleum-derived asphalts, AAD-1, AAK-1, and AAM-1, that are known to be very susceptible to oxidative aging. Rheological and infrared analyses of the unaged and aged asphalts and the blends were then conducted to evaluate oxidative age-hardening. In addition, the petroleum-derived asphalts and the blends were coated onto three different aggregates, Lithonia granite (RA), a low-absorption limestone (RD), and a silicious Gulf Coast gravel (RL), and compacted into briquets. Successive freeze-thaw cycling was then conducted to evaluate the moisture susceptibility of the prepared briquets. The abbreviations used above for the asphalts and the aggregates are part of the Strategic Highway Research Program nomenclature.

Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

478

The prospects of energy forestry and agro-residues in the Lithuania's domestic energy supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent restructuring of the European agricultural sector should reduce the volume of traditional agricultural production dramatically and withdraw huge areas of arable land from turnover. As a result there is a great potential in breeding short rotation forestry (SRF) and short rotation coppice (SRC) plantations in uncultivated land of good agrarian condition. Lithuania (LIT) has a great potential for expanding local biofuel market and reap the derivative effects in relation to energy and environment on faster growing biomass like SRF, SRC and straw. Energy forestry and agro-residues lessen the environmental impact connected to energy production and consumption and contribute to meeting Lithuania's international obligations for the discharge of greenhouse gasses (CO2, CH4, N2O), sustainability and biodiversity. This review contains practical information on the experience acquired by establishing SRF plantations in LIT as well as utilisation of energy forestry and agro-residues for heat and power. The paper details cultivation and harvesting of SRF, rationality of production, types and applications of industrial combustion systems. It was carefully compiled on the basis of available literature sources, national information and experiences and suggestions from local farmers. Other important issues, including support and incentive mechanisms as well as examples of successful implementation, are also discussed.

Laurencas Raslavi?ius; Vytautas Ku?inskas; Algirdas Jasinskas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Inspecting the minefield and residual explosives by fast neutron activation method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an upgrade of a robotic mobile system for antipersonnel land-mine clearance, a fast neutron probe has been considered for the detection of mines and explosive residues. Laboratory tests were made by using the 14 MeV 6 x 10{sup 7} neutrons/sec beam with the associated alpha particle detection and with a LaBr{sub 3} gamma ray detector. Simulant of the anti-personal mine was used as a target. Several measurements were made with the target buried into the soil at different depths. For each depth minimal time measurement was estimated for false negative 0.4 % and false positive equal to 10 %. Tests showed that is possible to detect buried land-mine as well as residual explosives; however, in order to reach the optimal speed of 10 cm/s for de-mining vehicle it is necessarily to use several sealed tube neutron generators and few tens of LaBr{sub 3} gamma ray detectors. (authors)

Sudac, D. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Majetic, S. [DOK-ING Ltd., Kanalski put 1, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Kollar, R. [A.C.T. D.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Nad, K.; Obhodas, J. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T. D.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residues charcoal pulp" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Applications of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RESIL4D family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question ''How clean is clean?'' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper.

Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

482

A study of residual stresses in Zircaloy-2 with rod texture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zircaloy-2 is a zirconium alloy used for components of fuel channels in nuclear reactors. The development of high grain-to-grain interactions in Zircaloy-2 polycrystals is due to the anisotropy of the thermal, elastic and plastic properties of the constituent grains. These residual stresses modify the mechanical performance of the material, as well as its response under neutron irradiation. Here the authors simulate the evolution of internal stresses in Zircaloy-2 with rod texture, when the aggregate is cooled down from the annealing temperature, and also when it is subjected to tensile and compressive deformation. They implement for that purpose an elasto-plastic self-consistent scheme that accounts for grain interactions, and compare the predictions with experimental determinations of residual strains obtained by neutron diffraction. The results are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental evidence, and represent a qualitative improvement over the predictions of the more rigid upper-bound approach. They discuss the role that slip and twinning systems play in the macroscopic response of the aggregate and in the evolution of internal stresses.

Turner, P.A.; Tome, C.N. (Inst. de Fisica Rosario (Argentina))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swenson, Hunter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pagliaro, Pierluigi [U. PALERMO; Zuccarello, Bernardo [U. PALERMO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting���¢��������s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125�������°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU���¢��������s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

485

Secondary wastes and high explosive residues generated during production of main high explosive charges for nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study identifies the sources of high-explosive (HE) residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes generated during the production of the main HE charges for nuclear weapons, and estimates their quantities and characteristics. The results can be used as a basis for design of future handling and treatment systems for solid and liquid HE residues and wastes at any proposed new HE production facilities. This paper outlines a general methodology for documenting and estimating the volumes and characteristics of the solid and liquid HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes. We prepared volume estimates by applying this method to actual past Pantex plant HE production operations. To facilitate the estimating, we separated the HE main-charge production process into ten discrete unit operations and four support operations, and identified the corresponding solid and liquid HE residues and waste quantities. Four different annual HE main-charge production rates of 100, 500, 1000, and 2000 HE units/yr were assumed to develop the volume estimates and to establish the sensitivity of the estimates to HE production rates. The total solids (HE residues and hazardous and nonhazardous wastes) estimated range from 800 to 2800 ft{sup 3}/yr and vary uniformly with the assumed HE production rate. The total liquids estimated range from 73,000 to 1,448,000 gal/yr and also vary uniformly with the assumed production rate.

Jardine, L.J.; McGee, J.T.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

On the Influence of Laser Cladding and Post-processing Strategies on Residual Stresses in Steel Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal cycles during laser cladding can alter mechanical properties of the original part significantly. In case of cyclically loaded parts residual stresses are suspected to be a property strongly determining fatigue life. Therefore, in this paper the influence of processing and post-processing strategies on resulting residual stresses are determined by neutron-diffraction. A low-alloy as well as a high-alloy steel have been considered within this study, both cladded with the Co-based superalloy Stellite 21. Processing speed and post-treatment by laser annealing and by deep rolling strategies have been tested. Residual stresses in low-alloyed steel show high sensitivity on applied treatment strategies. In the present study only deep rolling induced compressive residual stress close to the part surface. In high-alloy steel compressive stress in this area resulted directly after laser cladding, where its magnitude depends on processing speed. A compressive residual stress statewhich is suspected to be beneficial for fatigue strength could be achieved at the two representative steels.

H. Köhler; R. Rajput; P. Khazan; J. Rebelo Kornmeier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research is to design a single-well injection-withdrawal test to evaluate residual phase trapping at potential CO{sub 2} geological storage sites. Given the significant depths targeted for CO{sub 2} storage and the resulting high costs associated with drilling to those depths, it is attractive to develop a single-well test that can provide data to assess reservoir properties and reduce uncertainties in the appraisal phase of site investigation. The main challenges in a single-well test design include (1) difficulty in quantifying the amount of CO{sub 2} that has dissolved into brine or migrated away from the borehole; (2) non-uniqueness and uncertainty in the estimate of the residual gas saturation (S{sub gr}) due to correlations among various parameters; and (3) the potential biased S{sub gr} estimate due to unaccounted heterogeneity of the geological medium. To address each of these challenges, we propose (1) to use a physical-based model to simulation test sequence and inverse modeling to analyze data information content and to quantify uncertainty; (2) to jointly use multiple data types generated from different kinds of tests to constrain the Sgr estimate; and (3) to reduce the sensitivity of the designed tests to geological heterogeneity by conducting the same test sequence in both a water-saturated system and a system with residual gas saturation. To perform the design calculation, we build a synthetic model and conduct a formal analysis for sensitivity and uncertain quantification. Both parametric uncertainty and geological uncertainty are considered in the analysis. Results show (1) uncertainty in the estimation of Sgr can be reduced by jointly using multiple data types and repeated tests; and (2) geological uncertainty is essential and needs to be accounted for in the estimation of S{sub gr} and its uncertainty. The proposed methodology is applied to the design of a CO{sub 2} injection test at CO2CRC's Otway Project Site, Victoria, Australia.

Zhang, Y.; Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.; Leahy, M.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.; Dance, T.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

488

Successful application of the Top-Layer-Sintering Process for recycling of ferrous residuals contaminated with organic substances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The value of by-products and residues from steel production processes stem from their metal content and their inherent heat of combustion. However, the organic contents of sludge, scale and of other ferrous residuals make it difficult to recycle them via the conventional sinter process due to low burning rates. Insufficient burning rates will increase the dust load, could harm the ESTP and is responsible for the formation of the blue haze. The Top-Layer-Sintering Process using a second ignition hood which ignites the second layer on top of the main sinterbed has opened an economical and ecologically clean way for returning waste materials