Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

Predicting residual stresses in gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes work carried out by a major aircraft-engine builder and one of its suppliers to validate the numerical prediction of heat-treatment-induced residual stresses. For verification, the proje...

R. A. Wallis Ph.D.; I. W. Craighead B.Sc. Eng.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of the Neutron Diffraction Technique for the Determination of Near Surface Residual Stresses in Critical Gas Turbine Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near surface residual stresses contribute significantly to the life of structural engineering components. A method of producing compressive residual stresses in the surface region of components to give improve...

A. N. Ezeilo; P. S. Webster; G. A. Webster…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Residual life prediction methods for gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of fracture mechanics in predicting the life of turbine components is reviewed with emphasis on the surface crack and R ratio effects. Several examples of life methods development and verification are reported. The described methodology, which does not directly model crack-closure behavior, accurately predicts the growth of physically short surface cracks and situations where oxide- and roughness-induced closure are expected to occur.

R.H. Van Stone

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effects of the components of coal hydro-liquefaction residue on its rheological characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Four kinds of typical coal liquefaction residue samples, coming from Shenhua coal liquefaction pilot plant, were used to investigate the effects of components of residue, separation time, and temperature on its rheological characteristics. Coal liquefaction residue is a non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluid whose apparent viscosity decreases with increasing shear rate. Moreover, the residue has high viscosity at the initial softening temperature, and its viscosity drops greatly with increasing temperature. The oil content in residue has a great effect on the decline of the apparent viscosity of residue. The asphaltene can increase the apparent viscosity at lower temperatures but decrease it at higher temperatures. However, the solid only increases the apparent viscosity as it can be neither softened nor dissolved to become fluid. After simulating the separation condition, it is found that prolonging the separation time and enhancing the separation temperature will increase the apparent viscosity of residue, which is bad for preventing pipes from being blocked. So choosing the right separation time and separation temperature is necessary to actual industrial production.

Ren, Y.; Jin, S.; Xu, Y.; Wei, A.; Zhang, D.; Gao, J. [East China University of Science & Technology, Shanghai (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)  

SciTech Connect

Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures.

Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A. [Positron Systems, Inc., 411 S. Fifth St., Boise, Idaho 83702 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts  

SciTech Connect

The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swenson, Hunter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pagliaro, Pierluigi [U. PALERMO; Zuccarello, Bernardo [U. PALERMO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Test for consistence of a flyby anomaly simulation with the observed Doppler residuals for the Messenger flybys of Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2007, the observed Earth flyby anomalies have been successfully simulated using an empirical formula (H. J. Busack, 2007). This simulation has led to the prediction of anomaly values, to be expected for the Rosetta flybys of Mars in 2007, and following twice of Earth in 2007 and 2009. While the data for the Mars flyby are yet under evaluation, the predictions of the formula for the last two Earth flybys of Rosetta are fully confirmed now. This is remarkable, since an alternatively proposed formula (Anderson et al., 2007) failed to predict the correct values for the recent flybys. For the Mercury flybys of the Messenger spacecraft, this alternative formula predicts a null result. In the meantime, Doppler residuals of these flybys on 14.01.2008 and 06.10.2008 are availabel. On both flybys, significant residuals were observed, using gravity data derived by Mariner 10 on Mercury (D. E. Smith et al., 2009). According to the authors, these residuals cannot be eliminated totally by adjustment of the second degree gravity coefficients and by assumption of irregular mass concentrations of acceptable value on Mercury. In this investigation, I adapt the output of the simulation program to compare with the measured Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys without changing the formerly derived parameters for the Earth flybys. The simulation with these parameters leads to Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys compatible with the measured curves. Additionally, the expected flyby anomalies are calculated. Since the gravity field of Mercury is not explored yet with sufficient accuracy, this result cannot be falsified or confirmed until the evaluation of the coming Mercury orbits of Messenger will be finished. If the proposed empirical formula would be confirmed then again, this would be a strong indication of an underlying physical reality.

Hans-Juergen Busack

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Integrated Diagnostic and Prognostic Tools for Residual Life Estimation in Aging Nuclear Power Plant Components  

SciTech Connect

Recent events in Japan have focused renewed attention on the safe operation of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs). A central issue in safe, long-term operations of existing and planned NPPs is the early detection and monitoring of significant materials degradation. Materials aging and degradation in passive components is expected to be the key factor in determining the operational life of an NPP and may limit long-term operations in the current LWR fleet. Methods for detecting and assessing the degradation state in NPP structural materials, followed by approaches to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, are therefore necessary for safe, long-term operations. This paper explores advanced diagnostic and prognostic approaches to detecting material degradation, and then determining RUL given the current material state.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Henager, Charles H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

13

Consistency Decision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The consistency formula for set theory can be stated in terms of the free-variables theory of primitive recursive maps. Free-variable p. r. predicates are decidable by set theory, main result here, built on recursive evaluation of p. r. map codes and soundness of that evaluation in set theoretical frame: internal p. r. map code equality is evaluated into set theoretical equality. So the free-variable consistency predicate of set theory is decided by set theory, {\\omega}-consistency assumed. By G\\"odel's second incompleteness theorem on undecidability of set theory's consistency formula by set theory under assumption of this {\\omega}- consistency, classical set theory turns out to be {\\omega}-inconsistent.

Michael Pfender

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

14

residual magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetization, i.e., the magnetic polarization, that remains in a magnetized material after all attempts to remove the magnetization have been made. Note: An example of residual magnetization is the magnetiza...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Consistency, Truth and Ontology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After a brief survey of the different meanings of consistency, the study is restricted to consistency understood as non-contradiction of sets of sentences. The philosophical reasons for this requirement are discu...

Evandro Agazzi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Quantifying Residual Strains in Specimens Prepared by Additive Layer Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residual stresses and strains are prevalent in many components, especially those that are made using additive layer manufacturing. The residual strains are superposed onto any ... analysis may lead to inaccurate ...

A. N. Okioga; R. J. Greene; R. A. Tomlinson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Uniform particle-droplet partitioning of 18 organic and elemental components measured in and below  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 mm dry diameter) and droplet residual (above 9 mm ambient diameter) filter samples analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) were dominated by sea salt the population of aerosol particles may consist of external mixtures of multiple types of pure components, where

Russell, Lynn

18

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural...

19

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

20

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tell: Building a consistent,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Joseph M. Hellerstein, William R. Marczak UC Berkeley November 19, 2010 #12;Show and Tell: BuildingShow and Tell: Building a consistent, replicated shopping cart in Bloom Peter Alvaro, Neil Conway, Joseph M. Hellerstein, William R. Marczak Background The CALM Conjecture Introducing Bloom Writing

California at Irvine, University of

22

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Consistent Quantum Reasoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precise rules are developed in order to formalize the reasoning processes involved in standard non-relativistic quantum mechanics, with the help of analogies from classical physics. A classical or quantum description of a mechanical system involves a {\\it framework}, often chosen implicitly, and a {\\it statement} or assertion about the system which is either true or false within the framework with which it is associated. Quantum descriptions are no less ``objective'' than their classical counterparts, but differ from the latter in the following respects: (i) The framework employs a Hilbert space rather than a classical phase space. (ii) The rules for constructing meaningful statements require that the associated projectors commute with each other and, in the case of time-dependent quantum histories, that consistency conditions be satisfied. (iii) There are incompatible frameworks which cannot be combined, either in constructing descriptions or in making logical inferences about them, even though any one of these frameworks may be used separately for describing a particular physical system. A new type of ``generalized history'' is introduced which extends previous proposals by Omn\\`es, and Gell-Mann and Hartle, and a corresponding consistency condition which does not involve density matrices or single out a direction of time. Applications which illustrate the formalism include: measurements of spin, two-slit diffraction, and the emergence of the classical world from a fully quantum description.

Robert B. Griffiths

1995-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lightweight consistency analysis of dataflow process networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process networks are a popular modelling technique for distributed computing and signal processing applications. The ability to support various parallelism or communication patterns also makes them suitable for modelling multiprocessor architectures. ... Keywords: component-based systems, consistency analysis, dataflow process networks

Yan Jin; Robert Esser; Charles Lakos

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Application Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A complete application consists of the following documents. Use this checklist to keep track of the required documents.

26

ON CONSISTENCY OF BAYES PROCEDURES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ON CONSISTENCY OF BAYES PROCEDURES Loraine Schwartz DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA...COLUMBIA. | Journal Article ON CONSISTENCY OF BAYES PROCEDURES BY LORAINE SCHWARTZ DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA...

Loraine Schwartz

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

28

Minimal Residual Disease in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, invisible to the microscopist, are the components of an important clinical problem termed "minimal residual disease." The concept of minimal residual disease... For many years hematologists have used the microscope to identify a complete remission of leukemia after treatment with chemotherapy. In a hematologic complete remission, we know that a large portion of the leukemic cells remain out of sight. These cells, ...

Löwenberg B.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Residual Stress Evaluation of Materials Manufactured by High-Energy Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents several applications of the step by step hole drillling method for measuring residual stress distribution introduced in different components manufactured by the high energy process.

J. F. Flavenot; J. Lu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

31

Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improper or unnecessary heat-treatments extremely costly. Knowledge of the residual stress ipudient can make production of the component much more efficient and economicaL This knowledge could also be used to predict service life of components...

Pfluger, Ron Atlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Residual stress and self-assembly during deposition and etching of MEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with no residual stresses. Residual stresses are investigated as a means of self-assembling MEMS and NEMS during material deposition and etching. The assembly of two components is considered: one component is subjected to deposition or etching and is modeled...

Mani, Sathyanarayanan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR) destruction in a plasma gasification reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test results on Automobile Shredder Residue (ASR), or car fluff, demonstrated destruction efficiency and safe conversion to synthesis gas and a glass residue, in a plasma gasification system. The synthesis gas consists primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the range between 20 and 22 vol-% respectively, or 45 and 55 vol-% dry basis, when corrected for nitrogen. In dry reforming operation, carbon dioxide conversion approached 90%. The system is designed to work with oxygen in autothermal conditions, reducing thus the electric power requirement for the plasma reactor. The vitrified residue leach rate makes the product suitable for construction works.

Marco G. Tellini; Paolo Centola; James A. Batdorf; William J. Quapp

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

36

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evidence for residual elastic strain in deformed natural quartz  

SciTech Connect

Residual elastic strain in naturally deformed, quartz-containing rocks can be measured quantitatively in a petrographic thin section with high spatial resolution using Laue microdiffraction with white synchrotron x-rays. The measurements with a resolution of one micrometer allow the quantitative determination of the deviatoric strain tensor as a function of position within the crystal investigated. The observed equivalent strain values of 800-1200 microstrains represent a lower bound of the actual preserved residual strain in the rock, since the stress component perpendicular to the cut sample surface plane is released. The measured equivalent strain translates into an equivalent stress in the order of {approx} 50 MPa.

Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Tamura,Nobumichi; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Essential Substrate Residues for Action of Endopeptidases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endopeptidases, which are influenced in their specificity primarily by basic residues of arginine or lysine are treated in seven sections, according to the position of the essential residue: ...

Prof. Dr. Borivoj Keil

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A study of residual stresses in Zircaloy-2 with rod texture  

SciTech Connect

Zircaloy-2 is a zirconium alloy used for components of fuel channels in nuclear reactors. The development of high grain-to-grain interactions in Zircaloy-2 polycrystals is due to the anisotropy of the thermal, elastic and plastic properties of the constituent grains. These residual stresses modify the mechanical performance of the material, as well as its response under neutron irradiation. Here the authors simulate the evolution of internal stresses in Zircaloy-2 with rod texture, when the aggregate is cooled down from the annealing temperature, and also when it is subjected to tensile and compressive deformation. They implement for that purpose an elasto-plastic self-consistent scheme that accounts for grain interactions, and compare the predictions with experimental determinations of residual strains obtained by neutron diffraction. The results are in good quantitative agreement with the experimental evidence, and represent a qualitative improvement over the predictions of the more rigid upper-bound approach. They discuss the role that slip and twinning systems play in the macroscopic response of the aggregate and in the evolution of internal stresses.

Turner, P.A.; Tome, C.N. (Inst. de Fisica Rosario (Argentina))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Multi-component self-consistent nuclear energy system: protected plutonium production (P3)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The research activity on Protected Plutonium Production (P3) has been performed in the framework of MC-SCNES that simultaneously achieves four requirements â?? energy production, fuel production, burning of radioactive wastes and safety by the combination of fission, spallation and fusion neutron sources. The increase of a fraction of 238Pu provides an essential protective measure to plutonium against the proliferation due to its high decay heat and spontaneous fission neutrons. It is discussed that 238Pu production by the transmutation of MA in both critical and sub-critical operation modes. The demonstration of P3 mechanisms in the reactor will provide a big possibility of new reactor markets in the world.

Masaki Saito

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Residual stresses in annealed zircaloy  

SciTech Connect

Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the lattice constants of single crystal and rod-textured polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 in the temperature range 300-900 K. While the single crystal remains strain-free during heating or cooling, large residual grain-interaction strains occur in the polycrystalline sample as the result of compatibility being maintained among grains with anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients. These residual thermal strains have been determined as a function of temperature from the difference between the single and polycrystal lattice constants. Analysis of the data has been done using a polycrystalline deformation model, QUEST, which accounts for anisotropic elasticity, plasticity and thermal expansion, and for crystallographic texture of the sample. It is found that slow cooling from 900 K introduces residual stresses of the order of 100 MPa in the polycrystalline sample. The calculations demonstrate that these residual stresses can explain not only the difference in the proportional limits in tension and compression (strength differential) but also differences in the initial work hardening behaviour when Zircaloy-2 is deformed in tension or compression.

Tome, C.; Faber, J.; MacEwen, S.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Experimental program to assess the effect of residual stresses on fracture behavior  

SciTech Connect

A series of ``model material`` tests were previously undertaken on aluminium alloy tensile loaded plate specimens containing a central through-thickness crack to investigate the effect of in-plane self-balancing residual stresses on ductile tearing behavior in the context of the R6 methodology. Residual stresses were generated by an electron-beam welding method and this resulted in stress levels of the order of 1/3 yield stress in the test specimens. Provisional results of these tests were presented at the 1993 ASME PVP conference. The value of 1/3 yield is commonly considered as the level of residual stress for fracture assessments of structural components which have been stress relieved. For non stress relieved components, higher values of residual stress need to be considered. A new design of test specimen has therefore been developed. Further ductile tearing experiments have been undertaken on this new design of specimen. The results obtained from these, and the previous tests, have quantitatively demonstrated the influence of residual stress on fracture behavior in terms of both the level of residual stress and the region under consideration on the R6 failure assessment diagram. The general conservatism of the current R6 method for dealing with residual stresses has been confirmed for the type of geometry, loading and residual stress field under consideration.

Sharples, J.K.; Sanderson, D.J.; Bowdler, B.R.; Wightman, A.P. [AEA Technology, Risley (United Kingdom). Technical Services Division; Ainsworth, R.A. [Nuclear Electric plc, Berkeley (United Kingdom)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

Conner, W.V.

1994-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Residue management at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect

Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

Olencz, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using ultrasonics was approached. Residual stresses in castings are developed for various reasons. The presence of these stresses, coupled with applied stresses in service, sometimes results in the yield of material and subsequent failure of component.... Present work was focussed on development of an ultrasonic technique using critically refracted longitudinal (L g waves for evaluating residual stresses in ductile cast iron. An L probe suitable to work with ductile cast iron was designed and fabricated...

Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization  

SciTech Connect

In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Repair welding influence on offshore pipelines residual stress fields: An experimental study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Repair welds, are frequently used in steel structures either to remedy initial fabrication defects, or to rectify in-service degradations of the components. Some previous investigations indicated that repair welding is likely to pose adverse effects on the long-term integrity of the structure exposed to high pressure and temperature actions. It is believed that high residual stresses, associated with the repair process, most probably play an important role in many of subsequent failures. Repair welds might aggravate the size, magnitude and distribution of the tensile residual stresses in the weldments. These adversely affect the component structural integrity and remaining life. So far, no generally accepted guideline is available to provide reliable evaluations on the possible side effects from the repair welding in offshore oil/gas pipelines. This paper reports the result of residual stress measurement on single/double and partial/full repair welds in offshore pipelines. The semi destructive blind hole drilling and destructive sectioning methods have been employed to measure the residual stress fields in each case. In general, the results of the two measurement methods are in reasonable agreement. Residual stresses which are caused by full and partial repairs in the studied samples slightly increased the residual stress distribution when compared to the as-welded condition. Repetition of repair welding in same area influenced the residual stresses' magnitude and distribution especially in areas close to the weld centre line.

M. Zeinoddini; S. Arnavaz; A.P. Zandi; Y. Alizadeh Vaghasloo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Characterisation of rotary kiln residues from the pyrolysis of shredder residues: Issues with lead  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Stringent legislation is being to be implemented across Europe relating to heavy metal contamination into the environment. This study thus focuses on developing a method for reliably determining the lead content of automotive shredder residue (ASR). The material is first pyrolysed to remove organic fractions. Different analytical methods were then used to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in the burned char, which varies from chunks of metals in larger sized fractions to fine powders of mostly non-metals. By considering results from ICP-MS, EDXRF, WDXRF and a portable EDXRF, it was found that varying values were obtained but that consistent ‘consensus values’ could be determined. Such ‘consensus’ values of lead, copper, iron and zinc are thus reported, and show that properly depolluted \\{ELVs\\} have significantly lower lead levels than normal shredder residue (SR) feed ?8000 ppm versus 16,000 ppm. The finest fraction, <850 ?m, makes up around half of the mass of the SR and has only 2700 ppm and 5400 ppm lead concentration values for depolluted \\{ELVs\\} and normal SR, respectively, making it of interest for further work to develop uses as a feed in other industries.

Osric T. Forton; Lucas McGrady; M.M. Singh; E.R.M. Taylor; Norman R. Moles; Marie K. Harder

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

Yu. V. Arkhipov, F. B. Baimbetov, and A. E. Davletov

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

54

A Generalization of Generalized Arc Consistency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- binary classic constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs). Based on the Semiring CSP and Valued CSP such as fuzzy CSP, probabilistic CSP, max CSP, and weighted CSP. This extension is based on an idempotent satisfaction problem (CSP), local consistency can be char- acterized as deriving new constraints based on local

Mackworth, Alan K.

55

Electronic Component Obsolescence  

SciTech Connect

Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

Sohns, Carl William [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

57

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Residual Gas Mobility in Ormen Lange.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The topic of this report is "Mobility of Residual Gas in Ormen Lange" and it has been prepared as a part of the course… (more)

Undeland, Elisabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

Building and Connecting Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While equations are an essential part of model development, it quickly becomes tedious to write out all the equations for the components in a system. In this chapter, we show how to reuse constitutive equation...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rank Reduction for the Local Consistency Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the problem of how simple a solution can be for a given quantum local consistency instance. More specifically, we investigate how small the rank of the global density operator can be if the local constraints are known to be compatible. We prove that any compatible local density operators can be satisfied by a low rank global density operator. Then we study both fermionic and bosonic versions of the N-representability problem as applications. After applying the channel-state duality, we prove that any compatible local channels can be obtained through a global quantum channel with small Kraus rank.

Jianxin Chen; Zhengfeng Ji; Alexander Klyachko; David W. Kribs; Bei Zeng

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

64

Self-consistent generator coordinate method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimum continuous representation technique derived in analogy with the self-consistent harmonic approximation in quantum lattice dynamics is discussed and applied to Lipkin's model. The method is based on the variational principle and corresponds to an infinite summation of an expansion of the appropriate Hamiltonian kernel. The overlap kernel is treated exactly. The actual results indicate the removal of the drawbacks of low order perturbation theory previously employed in this connection.NUCLEAR STRUCTURE Continuous representation method applied to a solvable model.

Bernard Laskowski and Erkki Brändas

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Prediction of machining induced residual stresses in turning of titanium and nickel based alloys with experiments and finite element simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as in aircraft/industrial gas turbine engines. Particularly, IN100 nickel-based alloy manufactured via powder-mechanical load on the workpiece material is released, the residual stresses that remain in the material after stress, which is considered detrimental to the fatigue life of the component, the machined component

Ozel, Tugrul

66

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of secondary crop residues. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the first of three reports assessing the feasibility of converting secondary agricultural residues to energy in the form of either methane gas or ethyl alcohol. Secondary agricultural residues are defined in this study as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, residues from paper pulping, etc. This report summarizes the first two phases of this study, data compilation, and evaluation. Subsequent reports will analyze the technical and economic feasibility of converting these residues to energy and the implementability of this technology. The industries for which data has been compiled in this report include vegetable, fruit, seafood, meat, poultry, and dairy processing and the pulp, paper, and paperboard industry. The data collected include raw product input, final processed product output, residue types, and quantity, residue concentration, biodegradability, seasonality of production, and geographic distribution of processing facilities. In general, these industries produce a relatively solid residue ranging in total solids concentration from 10 to 50% and a dilute liquid residue with an organic content (measured as COD or BOD) ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/l. Due to the significant quantities of residues generated in each of the industries, it appears that the potential exists for generating a substantial quantity of energy. For a particular industry this quantity of energy can range from only one percent upwards to nearly thirty-five percent of the total processing energy required. The total processing energy required for the industries included in this study is approximately 2.5 quads per year. The potential energy which can be generated from these industrial residues will be 0.05 to 0.10 quads per year or approximately 2 to 4 percent of the total demand.

Ashare, E.; Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Langton, B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Predicting protein residue–residue contacts using deep networks and boosting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure prediction, protein residue-residue contacts...i.e. homologous proteins with known structure...train large boosted ensembles of DN classifiers achieving...advanced search of the Protein Data Bank filtering...contained fewer than 20% disordered residues (i.e. coordinates......

Jesse Eickholt; Jianlin Cheng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Seismic Travel-Time Residuals and Plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......United States, Canada and Greenland under the auspices of Project Vela Uniform (Long Range Seismic Measurements 1966). Arrival...1 that if we plot residuals on the focal sphere, we are at liberty to ascribe these residuals to source effects, receiver effects......

D. Davies; D. P. McKenzie

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Chemically Consistent Evolutionary Models with Dust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a tool to interpret nearby and high redshift galaxy data from optical to K-band we present our chemically consistent spectrophotometric evolutionary synthesis models. These models take into account the increasing initial metallicity of successive stellar generations using recently published metallicity dependent stellar evolutionary tracks, stellar yields and model atmosphere spectra. The influence of the metallicity is analysed. Dust absorption is included on the basis of gas content and abundance as it varies with time and galaxy type. We compare our models with IUE template spectra and are able to predict UV fluxes for different spectral types. Combined with a cosmological model we obtain evolutionary and k-corrections for various galaxy types and show the differences to models using only solar metallicity input physics as a function of redshift, wavelength band and galaxy type.

C. S. Möller; U. Fritze-v. Alvensleben; K. J. Fricke; D. Calzetti

1999-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Self Consistent Models of the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of much debate. This paper summarizes some of the essential ingredients of realistic and self-consistent models of solar wind acceleration. It also outlines the major issues in the recent debate over what physical processes dominate the mass, momentum, and energy balance in the accelerating wind. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun-heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent models that assume the energy comes from Alfven waves that are partially reflected, and then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, have been found to reproduce many of the observed features of the solar wind. This paper discusses results from these models, including detailed comparisons with measured plasma properties as a function of solar wind speed. Some suggestions are also given for future work that could answer the many remain...

Cranmer, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

A consistent interface between PIC-simulations  

SciTech Connect

Many applications for PIC-simulations are limited by cpu-time, computer- memory or unphysical noise which is caused at large numbers of timesteps by the movement of particles. Therefore the aim is to divide the calculation area into different smaller parts to reduce the calculation time of each part. This subdivision requires a consistent, physical interface, which handles not only the particle properties but also the electromagnetic fields in the interface plane. Here we present an interface, implemented in a two dimensional (rz-geometry) and a three dimensional (xyz-geometry) PIC-code. The data stored during a two dimensional PIC-simulation can be reused for either another two dimensional or a three dimensional PIC-simulation. The following conditions, which have to be fulfilled at the interface plane, are checked during the simulation: the particle-movement through the plane has to be one-directional and the electromagnetic field of present resonances has to be negligible in the interface plane. We demonstrate the functionality of the interface for different cut-planes, applied to PIC-simulations of high-power tubes.

Becker, U.; Dohlus, M.; Weiland, T. [Technische Hochshule Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, FG TEMF, Schlossgartenstr. 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Technische Hochshule Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, FG TEMF, Schlossgartenstr. 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A consistent interface between PIC-simulations  

SciTech Connect

Many applications for PIC-simulations are limited by cpu-time, computer- memory or unphysical noise which is caused at large numbers of timesteps by the movement of particles. Therefore the aim is to divide the calculation area into different smaller parts to reduce the calculation time of each part. This subdivision requires a consistent, physical interface, which handles not only the particle properties but also the electromagnetic fields in the interface plane. Here we present an interface, implemented in a two dimensional (rz-geometry) and a three dimensional (xyz-geometry) PIC-code. The data stored during a two dimensional PIC-simulation can be reused for either another two dimensional or a three dimensional PIC-simulation. The following conditions, which have to be fulfilled at the interface plane, are checked during the simulation: the particle-movement through the plane has to be one-directional and the electromagnetic field of present resonances has to be negligible in the interface plane. We demonstrate the functionality of the interface for different cut-planes, applied to PIC-simulations of high-power tubes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Becker, U. [Technische Hochshule Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, FG TEMF, Schlossgartenstr. 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Dohlus, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Weiland, T. [Technische Hochshule Darmstadt, Fachbereich 18, FG TEMF, Schlossgartenstr. 8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Mapping Residual Structure in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins at Residue Resolution Using Millisecond Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange and Residue Averaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of residual structure in intrinsically disordered proteins can provide insights into the mechanisms by which such proteins undergo coupled binding and folding. The present ... describes an approach to...

Theodore R. Keppel; David D. Weis

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pu Glass Fabrication and Product Consistency Testing  

SciTech Connect

The DOE/EM plans to conduct the Plutonium Vitrification Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An important part of this project is to reduce the attractiveness of the plutonium by fabricating a plutonium glass form and immobilizing the Pu form within the high level waste (HLW) glass prepared in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This requires that a project schedule that is consistent with EM plans for DWPF and cleanup of the SRS be developed. Critical inputs to key decisions in the vitrification project schedule are near-term data that will increase confidence that lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. A workshop was held on April 28, 2005 at Bechtel SAIC Company facility in Las Vegas, NV to define the near term data needs. Dissolution rate data and the fate of plutonium oxide and the neutron absorbers during the dissolution process were defined as key data needs. A suite of short-term tests were defined at the workshop to obtain the needed data. The objectives of these short-term tests are to obtain data that can be used to show that the dissolution rate of a LaBS glass is acceptable and to show that the extent of Pu separation from neutron absorbers, as the glass degrades and dissolves, is not likely to lead to criticality concerns. An additional data need was identified regarding the degree of macroscopic cracking that occurs during processing of the Pu glass waste form and subsequent pouring of HLW glass in the DWPF. A final need to evaluate new frit formulations that may increase the durability of the plutonium glass and/or decrease the degree to which neutron absorbers separate from the plutonium during dissolution was identified. This task plan covers testing to support a near term data need regarding glass dissolution performance. Separate task plans will be developed for testing to address the degree of macroscopic cracking and the development of alternative frit formulations. The Product Consistency Test (PCT) was identified as a means to provide some of the near term performance data. The PCT is a static test method in which known masses of crushed glass and demineralized water are reacted for a desired duration [1]. There are two reasons to perform the PCT. The first is that the results are used as a measure of acceptance in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications Document (WAPS) [2]. The second is the need for long-term static test results that can be used to verify the applicability of the degradation model. Thus, the primary focus will be on the use of the PCT Method B (PCT-B) to study the formation and stability of colloids and to study alteration phases formed on the glass surface. The standard 7-day PCT in demineralized water (PCT-A) will be included to demonstrate compliance with the waste acceptance criterion and determine the value of the k{sub E} rate parameter for comparison with the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model [3].

Marra, James

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

78

Geometrically consistent approach to stochastic DBI inflation  

SciTech Connect

Stochastic effects during inflation can be addressed by averaging the quantum inflaton field over Hubble-patch-sized domains. The averaged field then obeys a Langevin-type equation into which short-scale fluctuations enter as a noise term. We solve the Langevin equation for an inflaton field with a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) kinetic term perturbatively in the noise and use the result to determine the field value's probability density function (PDF). In this calculation, both the shape of the potential and the warp factor are arbitrary functions, and the PDF is obtained with and without volume effects due to the finite size of the averaging domain. DBI kinetic terms typically arise in string-inspired inflationary scenarios in which the scalar field is associated with some distance within the (compact) extra dimensions. The inflaton's accessible range of field values therefore is limited because of the extra dimensions' finite size. We argue that in a consistent stochastic approach the inflaton's PDF must vanish for geometrically forbidden field values. We propose to implement these extra-dimensional spatial restrictions into the PDF by installing absorbing (or reflecting) walls at the respective boundaries in field space. As a toy model, we consider a DBI inflaton between two absorbing walls and use the method of images to determine its most general PDF. The resulting PDF is studied in detail for the example of a quartic warp factor and a chaotic inflaton potential. The presence of the walls is shown to affect the inflaton trajectory for a given set of parameters.

Lorenz, Larissa; Martin, Jerome; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi [Theoretical and Mathematical Physics Group, Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology, Louvain University, 2 Chemin du Cyclotron, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095-CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98bis boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Research Center for the Early Universe, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8568 (Japan)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Residual-stress formation during the thermal hardening of components in gas-turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. An increase in the heat-transfer coefficient due to an increase in the pressure of the cooling liquid contrib...

B. A. Kravchenko; G. N. Gutman; G. N. Kostina

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Mechanisms of hydrocracking of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on research data, a technology of low-pressure residual fuel oil hydrocracking with a suspended catalyst has been developed. The process has been refined on a laboratory setup. The reaction kinetics has ...

Kh. I. Abad-zade; F. M. Velieva…

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

85

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

87

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interlaboratory comparisons of petrography of liquefaction residues from three Argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Argonne Premium coal samples, the Beulah-Zap lignite (North Dakota), the high volatile A bituminous Stockton (West Virginia), and the low volatile Pocahontas No. 3 Virginia), were ground to three initial sizes: ?20 mesh, ?100 mesh, and “micronized”. The samples were each subjected to liquefaction at 673 K for 30 min at a 2:1 tetralin: coal ratio and in an H2 atmosphere at 13.79 \\{MPa\\} (?2000 psi). Polished pellets of the uncoverted residues were circulated to three laboratories for a study designed to determine, albeit on a limited scale, the interlaboratory consistency in constituent identification and the problem areas in maceral/neo-maceral/mineral recognition. Within broad categories, the agreement for the Beulah-Zap and Pocahontas No. 3 residues is good. The high volatile A bituminous Stockton coal was the most plastic and most altered, resulting in a residue lending itself to more subjective interpretations. The biggest discrepancy between the laboratories is in the distinction of granular residue and mineral matter and in the transitions between “partially reacted macerals” and “vitroplast” and between “vitroplast” and “granular residue”. The initial size of the feed coal appears to influence the recognition of material in the residue.

James C. Hower; Ken B. Anderson; Glenda Mackay; Henrique Pinheiro; Deolinda Flores; Manuel J. Lemos de Sousa

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternating chemoradiotherapy consisting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Each assessment consisted of an anterior... . Alternate consistencies. 6. Coughswallow occasionally. 7. Supraglottic swallow. 8. Thermal stim. 5-10 times......

93

Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE DEVELOPMENT OF A SUPPLEMENTAL RESIDUAL CONTAMINATION GUIDELINE FOR THE NFSS CENTRAL DRAINAGE DITCH DECEMBER 1986 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-81OR20722 By Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge, Tennessee Bechtel Job No. 14501 I 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.1 OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used for establishing a supplemental residual contamination guideline for the NFSS vicinity property known as the Central Drainage Ditch (CDD). Supplemental guidelines may exceed authorized guidelines if the resultant dose will not exceed the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr (Ref. 1). This evaluation is based on realistic exposure pathways that were

97

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Internal consistency and the inner model Sy-David Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we obtain a new type of consistency result. Let Con(ZFC + ) stand for "ZFC + is consistent" and Icon Icon(ZFC + LC) Icon(ZFC + ). Thus a statement is internally consistent iff Icon(ZFC + ) follows from Icon(ZFC + LC) for some large cardinal axiom LC. A statement can be consistent without being internally

99

Numerical simulation of detonation structures using a thermodynamically consistent and fully conservative reactive flow model for multi-component computations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...there have been many advances in detonation modelling...apparent in figure 7 c. Recent experimental investigation...support by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research...mixtures. In 42nd AIAA Aerospace Science Meeting and Exhibit...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

102

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover :- The neutron diffraction is determined from Bragg's law. When neutron propagate through crystal sample, Coherent, Incoherent and Absorption Scattering phenomena take place Weld MaterialsPlate materials Stress

Bandara, Arosha

103

Specific Nucleoprotein Residues Affect Influenza Virus Morphology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these residues to the crystal structure of NP, we...in the production of spherical virions, as indicated...WSN-AichiM1 virus. (A) Crystal structure of NP highlighting...M1 to form straight or bent elongated ribbons and...filamentous virions to spherical ones. We anticipate...

Kristy M. Bialas; Kendra A. Bussey; Raychel L. Stone; Toru Takimoto

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residue Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residue Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residue...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive shredder residues Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residues Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automotive shredder residues...

106

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of pulp consistency and mixing intensity on ozone bleaching  

SciTech Connect

Conventional wisdom holds that ozone bleaching is feasible only at low or high pulp consistencies. However, recent research suggests that ozone bleaching at medium consistency is possible under conditions of high-intensity mixing. This article presents experimental results for softwood and hardwood pulps that were ozone-bleached over a range of consistencies (3-40%) and mixing conditions. Ozone was pressurized and delivered by a proprietary automated system. Results indicate that ozone bleaching at medium consistency can be as effective as bleaching at high consistency. Medium-consistency bleaching has the advantage of greater selectivity, resulting in higher pulp viscosity.

Hurst, M.M. (Quantum Technologies, Inc., Twinsburg, OH (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, Vol. 23, No. 3, September 2004 ( C 2004) Eddy Current Assessment of Near-Surface Residual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reason why nickel-base superalloys, which are often used in the most critical gas-turbine engine applications, including gas-turbine engines. Modern aircraft turbine engine components are designed using Assessment of Near-Surface Residual Stress in Shot-Peened Nickel-Base Superalloys Mark P. Blodgett1 and Peter

Nagy, Peter B.

109

July 4, 2012: Discovery of a particle "consistent" with Higgs...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

July 4, 2012: Discovery of a particle "consistent" with Higgs Boson July 4, 2012: Discovery of a particle "consistent" with Higgs Boson July 4, 2012: Discovery of a particle...

110

Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: {yields} Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. {yields} Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. {yields} SRCD spectroscopy shows an {alpha}-helical secondary structure. {yields} Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. {yields} Space group is P22{sub 1}2{sub 1} with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase{sub M}75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr{sub 3}370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M{sub W} 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly {alpha}-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

Rajasekaran, Mohan B [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom) [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M [Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)] [Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano [Circular Dichroism Group, Diamond Light Source, Chiltern, Oxfordshire,OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)] [Circular Dichroism Group, Diamond Light Source, Chiltern, Oxfordshire,OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Andrews, Simon C [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)] [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Watson, Kimberly A, E-mail: k.a.watson@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Internal consistency and the inner model SyDavid Friedman #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'' and Icon(ZFC + #) stand for ``there is an inner model of ZFC + #''. A typical consistency result takes result takes the form Icon(ZFC + LC) # Icon(ZFC + #). Thus a statement # is internally consistent i# Icon(ZFC + #) follows from Icon(ZFC + LC) for some large cardinal axiom LC. A statement can be consistent without being

112

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131 million tons of coal combustion residuals—including 71 million tons of fly ash, 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material—were generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic liners—would not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

116

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

117

Heat transport by residual gases in multilayer vacuum insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of an experimental investigation of residual gas heat-transfer in multilayer vacuum insulation are reported. The “thermal paradox” observed ... variation of the residual gas pressure in the insulation

R. S. Mikhal'chenko; A. G. Gerzhin; V. T. Arkhipov…

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

120

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

122

35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 1 Self-consistent energetic particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 1 Self-consistent energetic, Irvine CA 92697-4575, U.S.A. P5.056 ­ June 13.th, 2008 35.th EPS Plasma Physics Conference Hersonissos Zonca and Liu Chen #12;35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 2 Abstract

Zonca, Fulvio

123

From principal component to direct coupling analysis of coevolution in proteins: Loweigenvalue modes are needed for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 From principal component to direct coupling analysis of coevolution in proteins: Low the covariation of residues in mutliple-sequence alignments of homol- ogous proteins to extract functional by the statistical physics of disordered systems, we intro- duce the Hopfield-Potts model to naturally interpolate

Cocco, Simona

124

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

Memory consistency models for high performance distributed computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a mathematical framework for specifying the consistency guarantees of high performance distributed shared memory multiprocessors. This framework is based on computations, which specify the operations ...

Luchangco, Victor

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

127

On the economic interpretation of time consistent dynamic stochastic ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on rigorous mathematical foundations, we impel practical usage of time consistent models as we provide practitioners with an intuitive economic ...

Birgit Rudloff

128

Pitch-variable blazed grating consisting of freestanding silicon beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical analysis is presented for a pitch-variable blazed grating which consists of freestanding silicon beams. The pitch-variable blazed grating is implemented by combining...

Wang, Yongjin; Kanamori, Yoshiaki; Hane, Kazuhiro

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

130

Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture  

SciTech Connect

Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. Place Nanping City, Fujian Province, China Zip 365001 Sector Biomass Product Chinese developer of a CDM registered biomass plant. References Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd. is a company located in Nanping City, Fujian Province, China . References ↑ "[ Kaisheng Biomass Residue Power Co., Ltd.]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Kaisheng_Biomass_Residue_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=347879" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

133

Internal and External Consistency, Wintersemester 2005 1.-6.Vorlesungen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; and Icon(ZFC + #) stand for #16;there is an inner model of ZFC + ##17;. A typical consistency result takes result takes the form Icon(ZFC + LC) # Icon(ZFC + #). Thus a statement # is internally consistent relative to large cardinals i#27; Icon(ZFC + #) follows from Icon(ZFC + LC) for some large cardinal axiom

134

Allowing Atomic Objects to Coexist with Sequentially Consistent Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) sequential consistency orders all write operations, while causal consistency does not require to order the operations on all the concurrent objects be totally ordered in such a way that each read operation obtains the last value written into the corresponding object. They differ in the meaning of the word "last

Roy, Matthieu

135

A process for incorporating automotive shredder residue into thermoplastic mouldings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a process for utilising the waste that remains when all of the economically reclaimable materials have been recovered from automobiles that have reached the end of their lives. This waste material, known as automotive shredder residue (ASR), is currently disposed of in landfill sites but forthcoming environmental legislation in the European Union and elsewhere will drastically restrict the amount that can be disposed of in this way. By 2015, 80% of the ASR currently going to landfill must be recycled. The dual injection moulding process is used to mould a skin of virgin polymer over a compound containing the ASR which forms the core of a new component. Polypropylene (PP) was used as the skin material and also as the material to compound with the ASR. A 50%/50% mix by volume of PP and ASR granules was found to produce good results as the core material. Experiments were performed to vary the skin to core ratio in order to establish the effect of varying the proportion of ASR on the mechanical properties of mouldings. It was found that mouldings produced containing 25% by volume of ASR were visually excellent due to the pure PP skin. Inclusion of higher proportions of ASR by decreasing the skin:core thickness ratio was found to produce “breakthrough” of the ASR particles into the skin and test results were highly inconsistent. Using smaller proportions of ASR can be predicted to produce better mechanical properties but would have been contrary to the aim of developing a process capable of disposing of large quantities of ASR. It is concluded that recycling of ASR by using it as a core material in the dual injection moulding process is a feasible option for mouldings requiring good visual appearance but is not suited to components requiring significant strength.

S. Robson; T.C. Goodhead

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Washing treatment of automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide, the amount of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) reaches 50 million units per year. Once the ELV has been processed, it may then be shredded and sorted to recover valuable metals that are recycled in iron and steelmaking processes. The residual fraction, called automotive shredder residue (ASR), represents 25% of the ELV and is usually landfilled. In order to deal with the leachable fraction of ASR that poses a potential threat to the environment, a washing treatment before landfilling was applied. To assess the potential for full-scale application of washing treatment, tests were carried out in different conditions (L/S = 3 and 5 L/kgTS; t = 3 and 6 h). Moreover, to understand whether the grain size of waste could affect the washing efficiency, the treatment was applied to ground (<4 mm) and not-ground samples. The findings obtained revealed that, on average, washing treatment achieved removal rates of more than 60% for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN). With regard to metals and chlorides, sulphates and fluoride leachable fraction, a removal efficiency of approximately 60% was obtained, as confirmed also by EC values. The comparison between the results for ground and not-ground samples did not highlight significant differences.

Raffaello Cossu; Tiziana Lai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Production of aggregate from non-metallic automotive shredder residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the results of an experimentation on the production of granules suitable to be used as aggregates in cementitious or asphalt mixes are presented and discussed. The granules were obtained by granulating the non-metallic fraction of automotive shredder residues. In a preliminary separation step the fluff fraction containing mainly inert and non-metallic materials was sieved and analyzed for the metal content. In the following granulation step, the sieved fraction was mixed with binding materials, fly ash and a densifier agent, to produce granules of 5–30 mm of diameter and up to 1400 kg/m3 of specific weight. The granulation was carried out at room temperature in a rotating tank. Concrete samples prepared using as aggregates the produced granules showed a specific weight up to 1800 kg/m3 and a compressive strength up to about 55% of reference samples prepared using a calcareous aggregate, depending on the fluff content of the mixes, and on the nature of the binder and of the other components used.

Vito Alunno Rossetti; Luca Di Palma; Franco Medici

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Cleanroom Work Support Component Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory cleanroom operations require adequate support components. The same care in design required for the cleanroom proper must also be used in layout ... and activities that are carried out in the cleanroom

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Sold residue treatment, repackaging, and storage  

SciTech Connect

From its founding in 1952 through the cessation of production in 1989, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant (now the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site [the Site]) produced components for nuclear weapons. Some of those components were made of plutonium. As a result of the processes used to recover and purify plutonium and manufacture the components, a variety of materials became contaminated with plutonium. If the level of contamination were low, the material was considered waste. However, if the concentration of plutonium in the material exceeded the {open_quotes}economic discard limit,{close_quotes} the materials were classified as {open_quotes}residue{close_quotes} rather than{open_quotes}Waste{close_quotes} and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. While large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, accumulated at the Site in storage. Two important events regarding residues have occurred at the Site since production activities ceased. One event was the end of the Cold War in 1991, which made the return to production of nuclear weapons, with their Rocky Flats-made components, unnecessary. This event led to DOE`s decision to permanently cease production at the Site, clean up and remove radioactive and chemical contamination at the Site, and find alternative uses for the Site. This document describes methods for processing of the wastes for safe interim storage. Environmental impacts from the processing and storage are discussed.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Measurement and correlation of conditions for entrapment and mobilization of residual oil. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Six tasks are reported: capillary number relationships for rock samples, residual oil saturation near wellbore, residual oil structure, effect of gravity on residual saturation, magnitude of residual oil saturation, and effects of wettability on capillary number relationships. (DLC)

Morrow, N.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Physical Components, Coordinate Components, and the Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For generalized coordinate systems, the numerical values of vector and tensor components do not generally equal the physical values, i.e., the values one would measure with standard physical instruments. Hence, calculating physical components from coordinate components is important for comparing experiment with theory. Surprisingly, however, this calculational method is not widely known among physicists, and is rarely taught in relativity courses, though it is commonly employed in at least one other field (applied mechanics.) Different derivations of this method, ranging from elementary to advanced level, are presented. The result is then applied to clarify the oftentimes confusing issue of whether or not the speed of light in non-inertial frames is equal to c.

Robert D. Klauber

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies. The DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) program is meant to eliminate the need for Department employees and contractors to take redundant training when they move among multiple sites in the complex.

143

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Contracting companies supporting EM's cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies. The DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) program is meant to eliminate the need for Department employees and contractors to take redundant training when they move among multiple sites in the complex.

144

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing projects in a transparent manner Potential BILIWG Figures of Merit Key BILI Distributed Reforming Targets * Cost ($/kg of H2): H2A analysis - Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 5000/6250 psi (and 10,000/12,000 psi) dispensing, 500 units/yr. * nth unit vs. 500 units/yr ? * production unit only (with 300 psi outlet pressure) ? * Production unit efficiency: LHV H2 out/(LHV of feedstocks and all other energy in) GTG - WTG efficiency? - Feedstock conversion energy efficiency? * Production unit capital cost: Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 300 psi outlet pressure

145

A Preliminary Study Towards Consistent Soil Moisture from AMSR2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A preliminary study towards consistent soil moisture products from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is presented. Its predecessor, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), has provided Earth ...

Robert M. Parinussa; Thomas R.H. Holmes; Niko Wanders; Wouter A. Dorigo; Richard A.M. de Jeu

146

Shared Memory Parallel Programming with Entry Consistency for Distributed Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Midway: Shared Memory Parallel Programming with Entry Consistency for Distributed Memory to ensure a correctly functioning program. Midway is a shared memory parallel programming system which addresses the problem of excessive communication in a distributed memory multiprocessor. Midway programs

147

Consistent and efficient reconstruction of latent tree models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of learning a latent tree graphical model where samples are available only from a subset of variables. We propose two consistent and computationally efficient algorithms for learning minimal latent ...

Choi, Myung Jin

148

Consistency relations for spinning matter in gravitational theories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We explore the consistency equations that result from Euler's equations for the improved perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor for a charged spinning fluid in the Einstein-Cartan theory.

John R. Ray and Larry L. Smalley

1986-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chapter 9 - Zinc and Residue Recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Annual global production of zinc is more than 13 million tons. More than 50% of this amount is used for galvanizing while the rest is mainly split into brass production, zinc-based alloys, semi manufacturers and zinc compounds such as zinc oxide and zinc sulfate. For the zinc and steel industries, recycling of zinc-coated steel provides an important new source of raw material. Historically, the generation of zinc-rich dusts from steel recycling was a source of loss from the life-cycle (landfill); however, technologies today provide incentive for steel recyclers to minimize waste. Thus, the recycling loop is endless—both zinc and steel can be recycled again and again without losing any of their physical or chemical properties. Depending on the composition of the scrap being recycled, it can either be remelted or returned to the refining process. This chapter describes the main processes for zinc recycling from different scraps and residues.

Jürgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner; Alois Unger; Gernot Rösler; Christoph Pichler; Rene Rumpold

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Characteristics of naphthenic and paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual oil from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons segregated by liquid chromatography from a residual oil after removal of the resins and solid hydrocarbons. The studied hydrocarbons were fractionated on the basis of molecular weight (by molecular distillation) and on the basis of the content of rings (by thermal diffusion separation in a laboratory column). The results of mass-spectrometric analysis indicate that the first fraction consists mainly of isoparaffins and naphthenes with few rings. The polycyclic condensed naphthenes are concentrated in the last fraction. The content of isoparaffins drops off and the content of condensed polycyclic naphthenic structures increases from the second fraction to the next to the last. It is concluded that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual oil from mixed West Siberian crudes have a relatively narrow composition and therefore have similar physicochemical properties.

Detusheva, E.P.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Muchinskii, T.D.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Battery Components, Active Materials for  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A battery consists of one or more electrochemical cells that convert into electrically energy the chemical energy stored in two separated electrodes, the anode and the cathode. Inside a cell, the two electrodes ....

J. B. Goodenough

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

154

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

155

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

156

Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Posters Residual Analysis of Surface Spectral Radiances Between Instrument Observations and Line-by-Line Calculations S. A. Clough and P. D. Brown Atmospheric and Environmental...

157

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

162

Consistent Deformed Bosonic Algebra in Noncommutative Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In two-dimensional noncommutive space for the case of both position - position and momentum - momentum noncommuting, the consistent deformed bosonic algebra at the non-perturbation level described by the deformed annihilation and creation operators is investigated. A general relation between noncommutative parameters is fixed from the consistency of the deformed Heisenberg - Weyl algebra with the deformed bosonic algebra. A Fock space is found, in which all calculations can be similarly developed as if in commutative space and all effects of spatial noncommutativity are simply represented by parameters.

Jian-Zu Zhang

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

On thermodynamically consistent schemes for phase field equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and at the phase change front. A somewhat different approach of Charach and Zemel [2] combines bal- ance equationsOn thermodynamically consistent schemes for phase field equations C. Charach and P. C. Fife thermodynamics. The principal applications are to the solidification of a pure material and of a binary alloy

Fife, Paul

165

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

166

Self-consistent modeling of charge redistributions in Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent modeling of charge redistributions in Josephson junctions J. K. Freericks, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 #12;Josephson Proximity-Effect Junctions · A Superconductor-Normal metal, Georgetown University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 S N S I I V V Ic #12;Andreev Bound States · At an N

Freericks, Jim

167

Self-consistent modeling of SINIS and SNSNS Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent modeling of SINIS and SNSNS Josephson junctions J. K. Freericks Collaborators: Paul of Naval Research. J. K. Freericks, Georgetown University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 #12;Josephson University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 S I S I I V V Ic #12;Josephson Proximity-Effect Junctions

Freericks, Jim

168

Self-consistent methods in nuclear structure physics  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a very brief description of the Hartree Fock method in nuclear structure physics, discuss the numerical methods used to solve the self-consistent equations, and analyze the precision and convergence properties of solutions. As an application, they present results pertaining to quadrupole moments and single-particle quadrupole polarizations in superdeformed nuclei with A {approximately} 60.

Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics][Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nonlinearly consistent schemes for coupled problems in reactor analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

problems and the performance was analyzed for a 0-D and 1-D model. The results indicate that consistent approximations can be made to enhance the overall accuracy in conventional codes with such simple nonintrusive techniques. A detailed analysis of a...

Mahadevan, Vijay Subramaniam

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

A nuclear Frechet space consisting of C -functions and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A nuclear Fr´echet space consisting of C -functions and failing the bounded approximation property Dietmar Vogt Abstract An easy and transparent example is given of a nuclear Fre´echet space failing of Grothendieck whether every nuclear Fr´echet space has the bounded approximation property was open for quite

Vogt, Dietmar

171

Size-consistent Brueckner theory limited to double substitutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A size-consistent set of equations for electron correlation which are limited to double substitutions, based on Brueckner orbitals, is discussed. Called BD theory, it is shown that at fifth order of perturbation theory, BD incorporates more terms than CCSD and QCISD. The simplicity of the equations leads to an elegant gradient theory. Preliminary applications are reported.

Nicholas C. Handy; John A. Pople; Martin Head-Gordon; Krishnan Raghavachari; Gary W. Trucks

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A Programming Language Perspective on Transactional Memory Consistency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behavior, a variant of the well-known consistency condition of opacity is suf- ficient for observational-1-4503-2065-8/13/07 ...$15.00. node := new(StackNode); node.val := val; result := abort; while (result == abort) do { result yield simple code for pushing an element onto a stack represented as a singly-linked list: in this case

Gotsman, Alexey

173

Self-consistent scattering theory for the radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent scattering theory for the radiative transport equation Arnold D. Kim School by the radiative transport equation. We present a theory for the transport equation with an inhomogeneous.5850. 1. INTRODUCTION The radiative transport equation governs light propaga- tion in random media

Kim, Arnold D.

174

A Distributed Arc-Consistency Algorithm T. Nguyen, Y. Deville  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cient way of tackling constraint satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc and hardware design. Informally, a CSP is com- posed of a nite set of variables, each of which is taking values the variables can simultaneously take. Resolving a CSP consists in nding one or all complete assignments

Deville, Yves

175

A Generic ArcConsistency Algorithm and its Specializations 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

con­ straint satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc­consistency algorithms have been constraints) and d is the size of the largest domain. Being applicable to the whole class of (binary) CSP as constraint satisfaction problems (CSP). A CSP is defined by a finite set of variables taking values from

Deville, Yves

176

A Generic Arc-Consistency Algorithm and its Specializations1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc-consistency algorithms have been proposed, originating is the size of the largest domain. Being applicable to the whole class of (binary) CSP, these algorithms do satisfaction problems (CSP). A CSP is de ned by a nite set of variables taking values from nite domains

Deville, Yves

177

Charge lattices and consistency of 6D supergravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the known consistency conditions on the low-energy theory of six-dimensional N = 1 supergravity. We review some facts about the theory of two-form gauge fields and conclude that the charge lattice ? for such a ...

Seiberg, Nathan

178

View Consistency in Architectures for Cyber-Physical Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current methods for modeling, analysis, and design of cyber-physical systems lack a unifying framework due to the complexity and heterogeneity of the constituent elements and their interactions. Our approach is to define relationships between system ... Keywords: system architecture, view consistency, graph morphism, multi-domain modeling, cyber-physical systems

Ajinkya Bhave; Bruce H. Krogh; David Garlan; Bradley Schmerl

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermodynamical Consistency of Excluded Volume Hadron Gas Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new excluded volume hadron gas model by Singh et al. [1-7] is critically discussed. We demonstrate that in this model the results obtained from relations between thermodynamical quantities disagree with the corresponding results obtained by statistical ensemble averaging. Thus, the model does not satisfy the requirements of thermodynamical consistency.

M. I. Gorenstein

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Consistent selection of the number of clusters via crossvalidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......size of the validation set to increase as well. Yet, this restriction...curves for the iris (a), wine (b) and automobile (c) examples...longer appropriate to assess the quality of non-distance- based clusterings...and petal. The second is the wine example, which consists of......

Junhui Wang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS Dept. of Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON CONSISTENT FUSION OF MULTIMODAL BIOMETRICS S. Y. Kung Dept. of Electrical Engineering Princeton University, USA Man-Wai Mak Dept. of Electronic and Information Engineering The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR ABSTRACT Audio-visual (AV) biometrics offer complementary informa- tion sources

Mak, Man-Wai

182

PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) residues in transformer carcasses: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project had three objectives. The first was to assess the population of PCB-containing transformers remaining in service in the US in 1988. While this could not be done with great precision, it appears that the population of oil-filled transformers containing > 50 /mu/g PCB/g oil has decreased by some 15% since 1982 and that the population of askarel-filled transformers has decreased by some 40% in the same time period. This progress could be continued and accelerated if additional reliable and accepted routes for disposal of PCBs contained in transformers would be developed. The second and third objectives of this project have been to examine two simplified approaches to this end. The second objective was to determine if, by draining PCB-containing oil from transformers and refilling with PCB-free oil, a level of PCBs below 50 ppM (/mu/g/g oil) could be reached with assurance. It appears that reclassification of ''PCB-contaminated'' oil-filled transformers (50--500 /mu/g PCB/g oil) of all ratings by draining and refilling could be done routinely. The third objective was to determine the level of residual PCBs left on the metallic surfaces of askarel-filled transformers which, if these units were refilled with PCB-free mineral transformer oil, would have resulted in concentrations of <50 /mu/g PCB/g oil. It appears that cleaning the surfaces of the metallic components, after careful separation and disposal of the liquid and impregnated solid insulations, to a level of 400 /mu/gPCB/100 cm/sup 2/ would result in transformer carcasses of all sizes which would contain less PCBs than would be found were these transformers to have contained oil at the level of 50 /mu/gPCB/g oil. 7 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Rouse, T.O.; Raymond, C.T.; Fessler, W.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Pretreatment of automobile shredder residue (ASR) for fuel utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automobile shredder residue (ASR) was pretreated to improve its quality for fuel utilization. Composition analysis revealed that ASR components could be classified into four groups: (1) urethane and textile—light fraction and combustibles containing low levels of ash and Cl; (2) plastics and rubber—light or heavy fraction and combustibles containing high levels of Cl; (3) metals and electrical wire—heavy fraction and incombustibles, and (4) particles smaller than 5.6 mm with high ash contents. Based on these results, we successively performed sieving to remove particles smaller than 5.6 mm, float and sink separations to reject the heavy fraction and plastics and rubber containing Cl, thermal treatment under an inert atmosphere to remove Cl derived from PVC, and char washing to remove soluble chlorides. This series of pretreatments enabled the removal of 78% of the ash and 91% of the Cl from ASR. Sieving using a 5.6-mm mesh removed a considerable amount of ash. Product quality was markedly improved after the float and sink method. Specifically, the sink process using a 1.1 g cm?3 medium fluid rejected almost all rubber containing Cl and a large amount of PVC. The remaining Cl in char, after heating at 300 °C under an inert atmosphere and washing, was considered to be present as insoluble chlorides that volatilized at temperatures above 300 °C. Based on a tradeoff relationship between product quality and treatment cost, ASR may be utilized as a form of refuse plastic fuel or char.

I.H. Hwang; S. Yokono; T. Matsuto

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research Article Phytoplankton biomass and residual nitrate in the pelagic ecosystem...are linked to changes in the chlorophyll biomass. The model can be treated analytically...Mathematical bounds are found for the autotrophic biomass and the residual nitrate in terms of the...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Maximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

node consumes energy, but the receiving node does not. This assumption is not true if acknowledgementsMaximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost Qiling Xie, Chin-Tau Lea, Mordecai J-The Maximum Residual Energy Path (MREP) routing has been shown an effective routing scheme for energy

Fleischer, Rudolf

186

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fit of the two. Direct lifetime under a variety of loads spectra for wind tests of residual strength for a modified standard wind bone coupons were manufactured, tested and favorably turbine spectrum. When a single and residual strength. Over 900 tests spectrum loading and fatigue lifetimes of a typical wind have been run

188

Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd  

SciTech Connect

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: • Non-linear effects • Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections • Multi-isotope consistent assimilation • Consistency between differential and integral experiments

G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

190

Naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual lube stock from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect

The lube stocks from West Siberian crudes are characterized by high contents of aromatic hydrocarbons and by high viscosity indexes of the naphthenic/paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that isoparaffins account for one-third of the total naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons. The study showed that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual lube stock from West Siberia crudes, even with a variation of molecular weight over broad limits, are relatively uniform in composition. They consist mainly of isoparaffinic and monocyclic and noncondensed naphthenic structures.

Detusheva, E.P.; Bogdanov, Sh.K.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Nekrasova, A.V.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

192

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tructio ~ of pavements is to form a bond between adjacent aggregate particles by coating them with an adhesive ductile film of bitumen and cementing the coated particles to the adjacent surfaces. Asphalt is a natural constituent of most petroleums... which consisted of 1 in. (2. 54 cm. ) to silt sized material from the Holmes Road incinerator plant in Houston, Texas, was collected and subjected to sieve analysis, approximate composition, loss on ignition and the optimum asphalt content determined...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These...

Watson, Andrew B

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

197

Model-based software component testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Software component testing (SCT) is a proven software engineering approach to evaluating, improving and demonstrating component reliability and quality for producing trusted software… (more)

Zheng, Weiqun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

199

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

From principal component to direct coupling analysis of coevolution in proteins: Low-eigenvalue modes are needed for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 From principal component to direct coupling analysis of coevolution in proteins: Low the covariation of residues in multiple-sequence alignments of homol- ogous proteins to extract functional by the statistical physics of disordered systems, we introduce the Hopfield-Potts model to naturally interpolate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Parameter consistency in multienergetic k?p models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Standard derivations of multiband k?p models rely on Löwdin perturbation theory. Close examination of this method, however, reveals that it is unsuitable for treating systems with multiple zeroth-order energies. As a result, various perturbation sums in multienergetic k?p models are not well defined, and a consistent set of k?p parameters cannot be guaranteed. We inspect this difficulty and present an alternative derivation of the k?p theory based on the method of infinitesimal basis transformations. This approach clearly demonstrates that a consistent k?p matrix can be generated from an arbitrary number of zeroth-order wave functions regardless of their energies. In addition, we obtain a corrected expression for off-diagonal perturbation sums. The expression is applied to give the corrected form for the asymmetric B parameter in the s-p-coupled zinc-blende k?p Hamiltonian.

John P. Loehr

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Consistency conditions for orientifolds and D-manifolds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study superstrings with orientifold projections and with generalized open string boundary conditions (D branes). We find two types of consistency condition, one related to the algebra of Chan-Paton factors and the other to cancellation of divergences. One consequence is that the Dirichlet five branes of the type I theory carry a symplectic gauge group, as required by string duality. As another application we study the type I theory on a K3 Z2 orbifold, finding a family of consistent theories with various unitary and symplectic subgroups of U(16)×U(16). We argue that the K3 orbifold with spin connection embedded in gauge connection corresponds to an interacting conformal field theory in the type I theory.

Eric G. Gimon and Joseph Polchinski

1996-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Consistent metric combinations in cosmology of massive bigravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massive bigravity models are interesting alternatives to standard cosmology. In most cases however these models have been studied for a simplified scenario in which both metrics take homogeneous and isotropic forms (Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker; FLRW) with the same spatial curvatures. The interest to consider more general geometries arises in particular in view of the difficulty so far encountered in building stable cosmological solutions with homogeneous and isotropic metrics. Here we consider a number of cases in which the two metrics take more general forms, namely FLRW with different spatial curvatures, Lema\\^{i}tre, Lema\\^{i}tre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB), and Bianchi I, as well as cases where only one metric is linearly perturbed. We discuss possible consistent combinations and find that only some special cases of FLRW-Lema\\^{i}tre, LTB-LTB and FLRW-Bianchi I combinations give consistent, non-trivial solutions.

Henrik Nersisyan; Yashar Akrami; Luca Amendola

2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Consistent Bimetric Theory and its Application to Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the construction of ghost-free nonlinear massive spin-2 interactions solved a long outstanding problem in classical field theory. The consistent formulation requires a second rank-two tensor (or metric) and therefore has the form of a bimetric theory. Besides providing the solution to an old problem in field theory, ghost-free bimetric theory also has an interesting phenomenology: Its homogeneous and isotropic background solutions can reproduce the expansion history of the universe without any input of vacuum energy.

Angnis Schmidt-May

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Self-consistent Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We calculated radiation from electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify our technique. We also used our new technique to calculate emission from electrons in small simulation systems with three different Lorentz factors and ambient parallel magnetic fields. We obtained spectra which are consistent with those generated by electrons propagating in turbulent magnetic fields, that are generated at an early nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability.

Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y. [National Space Science and Technology Center, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Niemiec, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Medvedev, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, KS 66045 (United States); Zhang, B. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Hardee, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Nordlund, A ring .; Frederiksen, J. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Sol, H. [H. SolLUTH, Observatore de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules Jansen, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Pohl, M. [Institue of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25 14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Hartmann, D. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Fishman, G. J. [NASA/MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

207

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Turbulence intensity pulse propagation with self-consistent nonlinear noise  

SciTech Connect

A model of turbulence intensity spreading with self-consistent nonlinear noise is derived systematically for the simple dynamical model of resistivity gradient driven turbulence. Local effective drive, thermal conduction damping, nonlinear coupling, and spatial scattering effects are included. As a consequence of nonlinear mode coupling processes (i.e., triad mode interactions), turbulence energy can be spatially scattered, leading to turbulence propagation and spreading. However, the range of any nonlinear mode interactions of the background with a test mode is restricted to within a few mode scale widths from the test mode rational surface. The speed of a turbulent spreading front is calculated. This front speed is effectively constant on macroscopic scales. We show that the effect of self-consistent nonlinear noise on the intensity front speed is modest, as a consequence of the ordering {Delta}{sub c}consistent mode coupling noise and ad hoc external noise are discussed. The broader implications of these results for turbulence front propagation are identified and explained.

Wang, Z. H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Guercan, Oe. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Garbet, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

On the Robustness of Cool Disc Components in Bright ULXs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter, we comment on the robustness of putative cool (kT ~ 0.2 keV) accretion disc components in the X-ray spectra of the most luminous (L ~ 10^40 erg/s) ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in nearby normal galaxies. When compared to stellar-mass black holes, the low disc temperatures observed in some ULXs may imply intermediate-mass black hole primaries. Recent work has claimed that such soft excesses are unlikely to be actual disc components, based on the lack of variability in these components, and in the overall source flux. Other work has proposed that alternative phenomenological models, and complex Comptonisation models, rule-out cool disc components in ULX spectra. An inspection of the literature on Galactic stellar-mass black holes and black hole candidates demonstrates that the flux behaviours seen in specific ULXs are consistent with phenomena observed in well-known Galactic X-ray binaries. Applying Comptonisation models to simulated disc blackbody plus power-law spectra shows that at the sensitivity achieved in even the best ULX spectra, Comptonisation fits are highly model-dependent, and do not yield meaningful constraints on the accretion flow. In contrast, the need for a soft, thermal component does not appear to be model-dependent. As we have previously noted, soft thermal components in ULX spectra may not represent accretion discs, but present alternatives to this interpretation are not robust.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

210

Residual turbulence from velocity shear stabilized interchange instabilities  

SciTech Connect

The stabilizing effect of velocity shear on the macroscopic, broad bandwidth, ideal interchange instability is studied in linear and nonlinear regimes. A 2D dissipative magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code is employed to simulate the system. For a given flow shear, V Prime , linear growth rates are shown to be suppressed to below the shear-free level at both the small and large wavelengths. With increasing V Prime , the unstable band in wavenumber-space shrinks so that the peak growth results for modes that correspond to relatively high wavenumbers, on the scale of the density gradient. In the nonlinear turbulent steady state, a similar turbulent spectrum obtains, and the convection cells are roughly circular. In addition, the density fluctuation level and the degree of flattening of the initial inverted density profile are found to decrease as V Prime increases; in fact, unstable modes are almost completely stabilized and the density profile reverts to laminar when V Prime is a few times the classic interchange growth rate. Moreover, the turbulent particle flux diminishes with increasing velocity shear such that all the flux is carried by the classical diffusive flux in the asymptotic limit. The simulations are compared with measurements of magnetic fluctuations from the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, MCX, which investigated interchange modes in the presence of velocity shear. The experimental spectral data, taken in the plasma edge, are in general agreement with the numerical data obtained in higher viscosity simulations for which the level of viscosity is chosen consistent with MCX Reynolds numbers at the edge. In particular, the residual turbulence in both cases is dominated by elongated convection cells. Finally, concomitant Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the system are also examined. Complete stability to interchanges is obtained only in the parameter space wherein the generalized Rayleigh inflexion theorem is satisfied.

Hung, C. P.; Hassam, A. B. [University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

MINIMIZING WASTE AND COST IN DISPOSITION OF LEGACY RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which is directed toward development of a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues (both legacy residues and residues generated from ongoing programmatic operations). This research is focused in two directions: (1) identifying minimum negative consequence (waste, dose, cost) dispositions working within regulatory safeguards termination criteria, and (2) evaluating logistics/consequences of across-the-board residue discards such as authorized at Rocky Flats under a safeguards termination variance. The first approach emphasizes Laboratory commitments to environmental stewardship, worker safety, and fiscal responsibility. This approach has been described as the Plutonium Disposition Methodology (PDM) in deference to direction provided by DOE Albuquerque. The second approach is born of the need to expedite removal of residues from storage for programmatic and reasons and residue storage safety concerns. Any disposition path selected must preserve the legal distinction between residues as Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and discardable materials as waste in order to insure the continuing viability of Laboratory plutonium processing facilities for national security operations.

J. BALKEY; M. ROBINSON

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Method for computing self-consistent solution in a gun code  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex gun code computations can be made to converge more quickly based on a selection of one or more relaxation parameters. An eigenvalue analysis is applied to error residuals to identify two error eigenvalues that are associated with respective error residuals. Relaxation values can be selected based on these eigenvalues so that error residuals associated with each can be alternately reduced in successive iterations. In some examples, relaxation values that would be unstable if used alone can be used.

Nelson, Eric M

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes  

SciTech Connect

The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to guarantee that the system's behavior is preserved across a component replacement. If automated logical

Liskov, Barbara

215

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. ... Keywords: Reconfiguration, model checking, stateful components

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A component-based collaboration infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-through in building reusable sys- tems. The popularity of di?erent component models in industry has demonstrated the attractions and power of CBD. Further more, modern object-oriented languages 18 such as Java and .Net provide direct support on component... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 B. Shared Component Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Modeling Shared Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2. Java Embodiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Shared Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 b...

Yang, Yi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pesticide and heavy metal residues in Louisiana river otter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chromatography. Hercury levels averaged 1. 29 porn in liver (N=100) and 3. 88 ppm in hair (N=24), Liver and hair mercury residues were highly correlated (r=0. 98). Fetal whole body mercury levels averaged 0. 07 ppm (N=4). Fetal and maternal mercury levels... correlations between ani- mal weights and residue levels were observed for mercury, dieldrin, and mirex. There were no apparent relationships between residue levels of mercury and liver weight or liver:carcass weight ratio. There was no significant...

Beck, Debra Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Boussinesq equation with self-consistent sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Boussinesq equation with self-consistent sources (BESCSs) and its related linear system are derived for the first time. The Darboux transformation for the adjoint Lax pairs of the Boussinesq equation is also constructed. Starting from the solutions of the Boussinesq equation and the corresponding eigenfunctions obtained by the Darboux transformation, the method of variation of constant is applied to solve BESCS. By this method, we construct N-soliton, N-negaton, N-positon and collapse solutions for BESCSs. In addition, the interaction of two solitons is studied in detail.

Hongxia Wu; Yunbo Zeng; Tianyou Fan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Testing the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model independent method to test the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age, assuming the distance duality relation. We use type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and observational Hubble data, to reconstruct the luminosity distance D_L(z), the angle averaged distance D_V(z) and the Hubble rate H(z), using Gaussian processes regression technique. We obtain estimate of the distance duality relation in the redshift range 0.1

Nair, Remya; Jain, Deepak

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Multi-wavelength constraints on the inflationary consistency relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first attempt to use a combination of CMB, LIGO, and PPTA data to constrain both the tilt and the running of primordial tensor power spectrum through constraints on the gravitational wave energy density generated in the early universe. Combining measurements at different cosmological scales highlights how complementary data can be used to test the predictions of early universe models including the inflationary consistency relation. Current data prefers a slightly positive tilt ($n_t = 0.13^{+0.54}_{-0.75}$) and a negative running ($n_{t, {\\rm run}} assumptions regarding the UV cutoff ($k_{\\...

Meerburg, P Daniel; Hadzhiyska, Boryana; Meyers, Joel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Properties of a consistent Lorentz-violating Abelian gauge theory  

SciTech Connect

A Lorentz-violating modification of massless QED is proposed, with higher-order space derivatives for the photon field. The fermion dynamical mass generation is studied with the Schwinger-Dyson approach. Perturbative properties of the model are calculated at one-loop and discussed at higher-order loops, showing the consistency of the model. We explain that there is no contradiction with the definition of the speed of light c, although fermions see an effective light cone, with a maximum speed smaller than c.

Alexandre, J.; Vergou, A. [King's College London, Department of Physics, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Consistency of FMEA used in the validation of analytical procedures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore the consistency of the outcome of a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) in the validation of analytical procedures, an FMEA was carried out by two different teams. The two teams applied two separate \\{FMEAs\\} to a High Performance Liquid Chromatography–Diode Array Detection–Mass Spectrometry (HPLC–DAD–MS) analytical procedure used in the quality control of medicines. Each team was free to define their own ranking scales for the probability of severity (S), occurrence (O), and detection (D) of failure modes. We calculated Risk Priority Numbers (RPNs) and we identified the failure modes above the 90th percentile of RPN values as failure modes needing urgent corrective action; failure modes falling between the 75th and 90th percentile of RPN values were identified as failure modes needing necessary corrective action, respectively. Team 1 and Team 2 identified five and six failure modes needing urgent corrective action respectively, with two being commonly identified. Of the failure modes needing necessary corrective actions, about a third were commonly identified by both teams. These results show inconsistency in the outcome of the FMEA. To improve consistency, we recommend that FMEA is always carried out under the supervision of an experienced FMEA-facilitator and that the FMEA team has at least two members with competence in the analytical method to be validated. However, the \\{FMEAs\\} of both teams contained valuable information that was not identified by the other team, indicating that this inconsistency is not always a drawback.

M.T. Oldenhof; J.F. van Leeuwen; M.J. Nauta; D. de Kaste; Y.M.C.F. Odekerken-Rombouts; M.J. Vredenbregt; M. Weda; D.M. Barends

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Parton distributions based on a maximally consistent dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The choice of data that enters a global QCD analysis can have a substantial impact on the resulting parton distributions and their predictions for collider observables. One of the main reasons for this has to do with the possible presence of inconsistencies, either internal within an experiment or external between different experiments. In order to assess the robustness of the global fit, different definitions of a conservative PDF set, that is, a PDF set based on a maximally consistent dataset, have been introduced. However, these approaches are typically affected by theory biases in the selection of the dataset. In this contribution, after a brief overview of recent NNPDF developments, we propose a new, fully objective, definition of a conservative PDF set, based on the Bayesian reweighting approach. Using the new NNPDF3.0 framework, we produce various conservative sets, which turn out to be mutually in agreement within the respective PDF uncertainties, as well as with the global fit. We explore some of their implications for LHC phenomenology, finding also good consistency with the global fit result. These results provide a non-trivial validation test of the new NNPDF3.0 fitting methodology, and indicate that possible inconsistencies in the fitted dataset do not affect substantially the global fit PDFs.

Juan Rojo

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Surface Tension of Electrolyte Solutions: A Self-consistent Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the surface tension of electrolyte solutions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Employing field-theoretical methods and considering short-range interactions of anions with the surface, we expand the Helmholtz free energy to first-order in a loop expansion and calculate the excess surface tension. Our approach is self-consistent and yields an analytical prediction that reunites the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We obtain analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of concentrations for different salts using one fit parameter, reproducing the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.10.1029

Tomer Markovich; David Andelman; Rudi Podgornik

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Sustainability assessment of industrial waste treatment processes: The case of automotive shredder residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date numerous environmental, economic and societal indicators have been applied to evaluate and compare the sustainability of products and processes. This study presents a set of ad hoc sustainability indicators suitable for assessing and comparing processes for the treatment of industrial waste streams and for allowing to address efficiently all aspects of sustainability. This set consists of the following indicators: energy intensity, material intensity, water consumption, land use, global warming, human toxicity and treatment cost. The application of these indicators to industrial waste treatment processes is discussed in depth. A distinction is made between direct contributions to sustainability, occurring at the process level itself, and indirect contributions related to the production of auxiliaries and the recovery of end products. The proposed sustainability assessment method is applied to treatment processes for automotive shredder residue (ASR), a complex and heterogeneous waste stream with hazardous characteristics. Although different strategies for recycling and valorization of ASR were developed, with some of them already commercialized, large quantities of ASR are still commonly landfilled. This study concludes that for ASR the most sustainable alternative to the present landfill practice, both in short and long term perspective, consists of recycling combined with energetic valorization of the residual fraction.

Isabel Vermeulen; Chantal Block; Jo Van Caneghem; Wim Dewulf; Subhas K. Sikdar; Carlo Vandecasteele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sustainable Heat and Electricity from Sugarcane Residues Gasification in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sugarcane residues, in the form of bagasse and cane tops and leaves, represent a large renewable biomass energy resource in Brazil. Bagasse is currently used to satisfy the energy needs of the sugar and alcohol i...

Ausilio Bauen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in ... the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and m...

C. Meola; G.M. Carlomagno; M. Di Foggia; O. Natale

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Erratum to: Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two regrettable errors occurred in citing a critical funding source for the multi-location research summarized in the 2014 article entitled “Crop Residue Considerations for Sustainable Bioenergy Feedstock Supplie...

Douglas L. Karlen; Jane M. F. Johnson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

232

Tropical Residual Soils Geological Society Engineering Group Working Party Report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Clanan, M. B. 1982. Settlement of a tower on residual soil. Proceedings of Conference...i trench [ ] ~-~=___ ,~'A dolly ;' ;i i [ l Jacking undisturbed core-cutter sampler. excavation...

233

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification is a thermo-chemical process which transforms biomass into valuable synthesis gas. Integrated with a biorefinery it can address the facility’s residue handling challenges and input demands. A number of feedstock, technology, oxidizer...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Present safeguards in Great Britain against pesticide residues and hazards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A description of the direct legislative measures taken in Great Britain to protect the public from contamination of food by pesticide residues would be brief for, today, but two regulations exist, specifying t...

H. Martin

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

238

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Residual strain measurements on drill cores from Reydarfjordur, Iceland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASUREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAND A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Submitted to the Office oi' Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements I' or the degree of MAST...'ER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geophysics RESIDUAL STRAIN MEASLREMENTS ON DRILL CORES FROM REYDARFJORDUR, ICELAVD A Thesis BESIM BASLANGIC Approved as to style and content by: Earl R. Hoskins (Chair of Committee) Richard L. Carlson (Member...

Baslangic, Besim

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Consistent Gravitationally-Coupled Spin-2 Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the translational gauge structure of teleparallel gravity, the theory for a fundamental massless spin-2 field is constructed. Accordingly, instead of being represented by a symmetric second-rank tensor, the fundamental spin-2 field is assumed to be represented by a spacetime (world) vector field assuming values in the Lie algebra of the translation group. The flat-space theory naturally emerges in the Fierz formalism and is found to be equivalent to the usual metric-based theory. However, the gravitationally coupled theory, with gravitation itself described by teleparallel gravity, is shown not to present the consistency problems of the spin-2 theory constructed on the basis of general relativity.

H. I. Arcos; Tiago Gribl Lucas; J. G. Pereira

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

On Consistent Kinetic and Derivative Interactions for Gravitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new family of candidate kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field - analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the `Jordan' and `Einstein' frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

Noller, Johannes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

On Consistent Kinetic and Derivative Interactions for Gravitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new family of candidate kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field - analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the `Jordan' and `Einstein' frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

Johannes Noller

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Consistency condition for inflation from (broken) conformal symmetry  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum, i.e. the three-point correlation function of primordial density fluctuations, in slow-roll inflation. It follows from the defining property of slow-roll inflation that primordial correlation functions inherit most of their structure from weakly broken de Sitter symmetries. Using holographic techniques borrowed from the AdS/CFT correspondence, the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum can be mapped to a set of stress-tensor Ward identities in a weakly broken 2+1-dimensional Euclidean CFT. We construct the consistency condition from these Ward identities using conformal perturbation theory. This requires a second order Ward identity and the use of the evolution equation. Our result also illustrates a subtle difference between conformal perturbation theory and the slow-roll expansion.

Schalm, Koenraad; Aalst, Ted van der [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands); Shiu, Gary, E-mail: kschalm@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: shiu@physics.wisc.edu, E-mail: vdaalst@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Consistent description of kinetic equation with triangle anomaly  

SciTech Connect

We provide a consistent description of the kinetic equation with a triangle anomaly which is compatible with the entropy principle of the second law of thermodynamics and the charge/energy-momentum conservation equations. In general an anomalous source term is necessary to ensure that the equations for the charge and energy-momentum conservation are satisfied and that the correction terms of distribution functions are compatible to these equations. The constraining equations from the entropy principle are derived for the anomaly-induced leading order corrections to the particle distribution functions. The correction terms can be determined for the minimum number of unknown coefficients in one charge and two charge cases by solving the constraining equations.

Pu Shi; Gao Jianhua; Wang Qun [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Leonard Susskind

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Susskind, Leonard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P±H phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

250

Predicting problems caused by component upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new, automatic technique to assess whether replacing a component of a software system by a purportedly compatible component may change the behavior of the system. The technique operates before ...

McCamant, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

252

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization  

SciTech Connect

We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

Souvatzis, Petros, E-mail: petros.souvatsiz@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Niklasson, Anders M. N., E-mail: amn@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. If automated logical comparison indicates that the new component does not make all the guarantees that the old

Liskov, Barbara

256

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

260

Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (?43%), suboptimal gating setup (?37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (?13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

SciTech Connect

Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

264

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures  

SciTech Connect

A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Combined cycle power plants: A comparison between two different dynamic models to evaluate transient behaviour and residual life  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The deregulated energy market and the increasing quota of electrical capacity covered by non-predictable renewable sources require strongly irregular and discontinuous operation of thermoelectric plants to satisfy users demand and compensate the variability of renewable sources. As a consequence, due to thermo-mechanical fatigue, creep and corrosion, a lifetime reduction of the most critical components occurs. The availability of a procedure able to predict the residual life of plant devices is necessary to assist the management decisions about power plants’ operation and maintenance scheduling. The first step of this procedure is the capability of simulating the plant behaviour versus time by evaluating the trends of the main thermodynamic parameters that describe the plant operation during different transient periods. In this context, the main contribution of the present paper is to propose a complete procedure able to simulate the plant dynamic behaviour and estimate the residual life reduction of some components. Indeed, two different models, developed by two different research groups, of the same single pressure heat recovery steam generator unit are presented and utilized to characterize the dynamic behaviour of the above mentioned power plant. The main thermodynamic variables during different transient operation conditions are predicted and good correspondence between the two methods is obtained. It can be also noted that, when the geometry and size of the devices are considered, the thermal inertia related to heat exchangers tubes, pipes and other physical masses causes a delay in the system response. Moreover, a residual life estimation of the most stressed component is presented.

Alberto Benato; Anna Stoppato; Stefano Bracco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica  

SciTech Connect

Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

EERE Postdoctoral Research Award Application Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A complete application consists of the following documents. Use this checklist PDF to keep track of the required documents.

268

Residual Fuel Oil Prices, Average - Sales to End Users  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Product/Sales Type: Residual Fuel, Average - Sales to End Users Residual Fuel, Average - Sales for Resale Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% - Sales for Resale Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales to End Users Sulfur Greater Than 1% - Sales for Resale Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product/Sales Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1983-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1983-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1983-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1983-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1983-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1983-2013

269

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) characterization for a valuable management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Car fluff is the waste produced after end-of-life-vehicles (ELVs) shredding and metal recovery. It is made of plastics, rubber, glass, textiles and residual metals and it accounts for almost one-third of a vehicle mass. Due to the approaching of Directive 2000/53/EC recycling targets, 85% recycling rate and 95% recovery rate in 2015, the implementation of automotive shredder residue (ASR) sorting and recycling technologies appears strategic. The present work deals with the characterization of the shredder residue coming from an industrial plant, representative of the Italian situation, as for annual fluxes and technologies involved. The aim of this study is to characterize ASR in order to study and develop a cost effective and environmentally sustainable recycling system. Results show that almost half of the residue is made of fines and the remaining part is mainly composed of polymers. Fine fraction is the most contaminated by mineral oils and heavy metals. This fraction produces also up to 40% ashes and its LHV is lower than the plastic-rich one. Foam rubber represents around half of the polymers share in car fluff. Moreover, some chemical–physical parameters exceed the limits of some parameters fixed by law to be considered refuse derived fuel (RDF). As a consequence, ASR needs to be pre-treated in order to follow the energy recovery route.

Luciano Morselli; Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues: a lumped kinetic characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A lumped kinetic model for the pyrolysis of industrial wastes of unknown chemical composition is developed. The model is applied to the pyrolysis of automotive shredder residues (ASRs), studied by means of thermogravimetric and calorimetric analyses, in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

Oreste Patierno; Paola Cipriani; Fausto Pochetti; Massimiliano Giona

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitric acid leaching processes were evaluated for removal of heavy metals from samples of residual sludge from an industrial and municipal wastewater plant. The study showed that an acid:water ratio of 1:1 and a nitric acid concentration of 2 mol 1?1 gave efficient removal of 86.7%, 100% and 100% of copper, nickel and arsenic.

Jose Abrego

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

274

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

276

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barrier Coating (TBC) 12 PM024 TBCs applied on engine exhaust components reduce heat loss so improve efficiency; they also replace the use of expensive high-temperature...

277

Component and System Qualification Workshop Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop, held at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, on November 4, 2010.

278

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

279

ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN SRS AND HANFORD 3013 INNER AND CONVENIENCE CANS  

SciTech Connect

Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a plausible corrosion mechanism for the stainless steel 3013 containers during their lifetime for plutonium material storage if sufficient electrolyte is present within the container. Contributing factors for SCC, such as fabrication and welding residual stresses, are present in the 3013 cans. Convenience and inner cans from both Hanford and SRS are made by a flow form process, which cold works the stainless steel during fabrication. Additionally, the inner cans also are sealed at the can top with a closure weld to the sealing plug. Only SRS and Hanford were tested since moisture levels were significant for SCC. As part of the 3013 corrosion plan for FY09, testing in a boiling magnesium chloride solution was performed on actual 3013 convenience and inner cans to determine if the residual stresses were sufficient for the initiation and propagation of SCC. Additional testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution was also performed on 304L stainless steel SCC coupons, i.e. stressed teardrop-shaped samples (teardrops), and an inner can welded top to provide comparative results and to assess the effect of residual stresses in a less aggressive environment. The testing performed under this task consisted of 3013 inner and convenience cans and 304L teardrops exposed to a boiling magnesium chloride solutions per ASTM G36 and a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C following the guidance of ASTM G123. Cracking occurred in all can types including the inner can bottom and welded top and the bottoms of the SRS and Hanford convenience cans when exposed to the boiling magnesium chloride solution at 155 C. Cracking occurred at different times indicative of the residual stress levels in the cans. 304L teardrops cracked in the shortest time interval and therefore provide a conservative estimate for can performance. Testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C demonstrated that cracking occurs in a less aggressive environment but at significantly longer times than in the boiling magnesium chloride. Vapor space cracking was also found to occur in the inner can welded top exposed over the boiling magnesium chloride solution and on 304L teardrops exposed over a hot calcium chloride solution.

Mickalonis, J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Interfaces between highly incompatible polymers of different stiffness: Monte Carlo simulations and self-consistent field calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate interfacial properties between two highly incompatible polymers of different stiffness. The extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the binary polymer melt yield detailed interfacial profiles and the interfacial tension via an analysis of capillary fluctuations. We extract an effective Flory-Huggins parameter from the simulations, which is used in self-consistent field calculations. These take due account of the chain architecture via a partial enumeration of the single chain partition function, using chain conformations obtained by Monte Carlo simulations of the pure phases. The agreement between the simulations and self-consistent field calculations is almost quantitative, however we find deviations from the predictions of the Gaussian chain model for high incompatibilities or large stiffness. The interfacial width at very high incompatibilities is smaller than the prediction of the Gaussian chain model, and decreases upon increasing the statistical segment length of the semi-flexible component.

Marcus Mueller; Andreas Werner

1997-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Self-Assembled Multi-Component Catenanes: The Effect of Multivalency and Cooperativity on Structure and Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Self-Assembled Multi-Component Catenanes: The Effect of Multivalency and Cooperativity on Structure and Stability ... Using dynamic combinatorial chemistry, mixtures of dipeptide monomers were combined to probe how the structural elements of a family of self-assembled [2]-catenanes affect their equilibrium stability versus competing non-catenated structures. ... The nanostructure is constructed through the self-assembly of the ?-helical building block excised from E. coli galactoside acetyltransferase (PDB code 1krr, chain A; residues 131-165). ...

Mee-Kyung Chung; Stephen J. Lee; Marcey L. Waters; Michel R. Gagné

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup145N, by analogy with Nup98, carries RNA between the nucleus and the NPC. Nup145 belongs to a highly conserved family of homologs found throughout eukarya. Curiously, the Phe-Ser autoproteolytic site is not always conserved, resulting in the absence of autoproteolysis for some of these closely related proteins. Our structural understanding of NPC function has benefited recently from X-ray crystal structures of segments of individual proteins. As a part of ongoing efforts at the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (www.nysgxrc.org) to determine crystal structures of distinct components of the yeast NPC, we report herein structures of Nup145N residues 443-605 [Nup145N(443-605)] from the larger autoproteolytic segment. The monomeric architecture of Nup145N(443-605) is similar to that of the autoproteolytic domain of human Nup98-N and the homologous domain of Nup116. In contrast, Nup145N(443-605) and Nup98-N show different modes of association in the crystalline state. Results of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in solution are consistent with the head-to-tail dimer of Nup145N(443-605), observed in two different crystal forms.

Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K. (SLAC); (Rockefeller); (UCSF); (Lilly)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Self-Consistent Fokker-Planck Treatment Of Particle Distributions in Astrophysical Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy, multi-component plasmas in which pair creation and annihilation, lepton-lepton scattering, lepton-proton scattering, and Comptonization all contribute to establishing the particle and photon distributions, are present in a broad range of compact astrophysical objects. Earlier work has included much of the microphysics needed to account for electron-photon and electron-proton interactions, but little has been done to handle the redistribution of the particles as a result of their Coulomb interaction with themselves in an arbitrary case. Our goal here is to use a Fokker-Planck approach in order to develop a fully self-consistent theory for the interaction of arbitrarily distributed particles and radiation to arrive at an accurate representation of the high-energy plasma in these sources. We conduct several tests representative of two dominant segments of parameter space and discuss physical implications of the non-Maxwellian distribution function. Approximate analytical forms for the electron distribution in the case of strongly non-Maxwellian plasmas are given.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

Separation and Fixation of Toxic Components in Salt Brines Using a Water-Based Process  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to implement new water quality standards, increase water reuse and reclamation, and minimize the cost of waste storage motivate the development of new processes for stabilizing wastewater residuals that minimize waste volume, water content and the long-term environmental risk from related by-products. This work explores the use of an aqueous-based emulsion process to create an epoxy/rubber matrix for separating and encapsulating waste components from salt laden, arsenic contaminated, amorphous iron hydrate sludges. Such sludges are generated from conventional water purification precipitation/adsorption processes, used to convert aqueous brine streams to semi-solid waste streams, such as ion exchange/membrane separation, and from other precipitative heavy metal removal operations. In this study, epoxy and polystyrene butadiene (PSB) rubber emulsions are mixed together and then combined with a surrogate sludge. The surrogate sludge consists of amorphous iron hydrate with 1 part arsenic fixed to the surface of the hydrate per 10 parts iron mixed with sodium nitrate and chloride salts and water. The resulting emulsion is cured and dried at 80 °C to remove water. Microstructure characterization by electron microscopy confirms that the epoxy/PSB matrix surrounds and encapsulates the arsenic laden amorphous iron hydrate phase while allowing the salt to migrate to internal and external surfaces of the sample. Salt extraction studies indicate that the porous nature of the resulting matrix promotes the separation and removal of as much as 90% of the original salt content in only one hour. Long term leaching studies based on the use of the infinite slab diffusion model reveal no evidence of iron migration or, by inference, arsenic migration, and demonstrate that the diffusion coefficients of the unextracted salt yield leachability indices within regulations for non-hazardous landfill disposal. Because salt is the most mobile species, it is inferred that arsenic leaches from the host material at an even slower rate, making the waste forms amenable to unregulated land disposal options. These results indicate that the environmentally-benign, water-based emulsion processing of epoxy/PSB polymeric hosts show great promise as a separation and fixation technology for treating brine streams from wastewater treatment facilities.

Franks, C.; Quach, A.; Birnie III, D.; Ela, W.; Saez, A.E.; Zelinski, B.; Smith, H.; Smith, G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

289

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. We present a procedure to conduct reconfiguration in systems of concurrent, stateful components that interferes as little as possible with unchanged subsystems. Reconfiguration is described by a plan for adding, deleting and reconnecting components. A plan is executed by a sequence of simple, local steps, which are suitable for implementation in a programming language. We prove that plan execution is indistinguishable from atomic reconfiguration and use this fact for state-space reduction for verifying properties by model checking.

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings  

SciTech Connect

Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

292

Advanced Life Assessment Methods for Gas Turbine Engine Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In combustion systems for aircraft applications, liners represent an interesting challenge from the engineering point of view regarding the state of stress, including high temperatures (up to 1500 °C) varying over time, high thermal gradients, creep related phenomena, mechanical fatigue and vibrations. As a matter of fact, under the imposed thermo-mechanical loading conditions, some sections of the liner can creep; the consequent residual stresses at low temperatures can cause plastic deformations. For these reasons, during engine operations, the material behaviour can be hardly non-linear and the simulation results to be time expensive. Aim of this paper is to select and implement some advanced material life assessment methods to gas turbine engine components such as combustor liners. Uniaxial damage models for Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF), based on Coffin-Manson, Neu-Sehitoglu and Chaboche works, have been implemented in Matlab®. In particular, experimental LCF and TMF results for full size specimens are compared to calibrate these models and to assess TMF life of specimens. Results obtained in different testing conditions have been used for validation. In particular, each model needs specific parameter calibrations to characterize the investigated materials; these parameters and their relation with temperature variation have been experimentally obtained by testing standard specimens.

Vincenzo Cuffaro; Francesca Curà; Raffaella Sesana

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

Design of resonant frequencies for piezoelectric actuator with integrated components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piezoelectric actuators are used in a wide range of electrical devices including piezoelectric speakers buzzers haptics and ultrasonic transducers. For piezoelectric actuator systems used in mobile devices the most important issue is improving the electromechanical conversion efficiency. The power consumed by the actuators must be minimized due to the small size of the batteries used. The frequency response around the mechanical resonance must be carefully designed to enable low power driving. The resonant frequencies of piezoelectric actuators that consist of integrated components such as the metal cones in ultrasonic speakers are determined by the energy dispersion of the total system. Therefore factors such as the size and physical properties of each component must be designed to optimize the resonant frequencies for practical applications. The total energy of the piezoelectric system is described by Lagrange-Maxwell equations. Even though it is not easy to solve the differential equations written in a Lagrangian coordinate system by using exact calculations useful information for designing systems can be derived from approximate calculations. In this paper we will introduce design guidelines that can be used to optimize the resonant frequencies of piezoelectric actuators with integrated components based on analysis using the Lagrangian coordinate system.

Jun Kuroda; Yasuharu Onishi; Motoyoshi Komoda; Yoshio Yamasaki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Use of ethers as high-octane components of gasolines  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on a study of the possible utilization of methyl tert-amyl ether (MTAE) as an automotive gasoline component, both by itself and in combination with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The naphtha used in these studies consisted of 80% reformer naphtha produced under severe conditions and 20% straight-run IBP-62/sup 0/C cut. The physicochemical properties of the MTAE, the MTBE, and the naphtha base stock are given. It is determined that MTAE, which has a slightly poorer knock resistance than MTBE, is fully equal to MTBE in all other respects and can be used as an automotive gasoline component; that a gasoline blend prepared from 89% naphtha base stock, 5.5% MTAE, and 5.5% MTBE meets all of the requirements of the standard GOST 2084-77 for Grade AI-93 gasoline; and that the use of MTAE offers a means for expanding the resources of high-octane components, lowering the toxicity of the gasolines and the exhaust gas (in comparison with organometallic antiknock agents), and bringing non-petroleum raw materials into the fuel production picture.

Gureev, A.A.; Baranova, G.N.; Korotkov, I.V.; Levinson, G.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

FIRST DRAFT OF OUTLINE: RPSEA 1 RESIDUAL OIL ZONE RESEARCH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas RPSEA PROJECT NUMBER.FINAL Commercial Exploitation and the Origin of Residual Oil Zones: Developing a Case History in the Permian Basin of New Mexico and West Texas Contract 81.089 08123-19-RPSEA June 28, 2012 Dr. Robert Trentham Director, Center for Energy and Economic Diversification The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Odessa, Texas 79762 L. Steven Melzer Melzer Consulting Midland, Texas 79701 David Vance Arcadis, U. S. Midland, Texas 79701 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Dr Robert Trentham as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA

297

The Particle Adventure | What holds it together? | Residual EM force  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EM force EM force Residual EM force Atoms usually have the same numbers of protons and electrons. They are electrically neutral, therefore, because the positive protons cancel out the negative electrons. Since they are neutral, what causes them to stick together to form stable molecules? The answer is a bit strange: we've discovered that the charged parts of one atom can interact with the charged parts of another atom. This allows different atoms to bind together, an effect called the residual electromagnetic force. So the electromagnetic force is what allows atoms to bond and form molecules, allowing the world to stay together and create the matter you interact with all of the time. Amazing, isn't it? All the structures of the world exist simply because protons and electrons have opposite charges!

298

In situ ultrahigh vacuum residual gas analyzer 'calibration'  

SciTech Connect

Knowing the residual gas spectrum is essential for many applications and research in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Residual gas analyzers (RGAs) are used for both qualitative and quantitative gas analyses, where the quadrupole mass analyzers are now the most popular. It was found that RGAs supplied by different manufacturers are not necessarily well calibrated for quantitative gas analysis. A procedure applied for in situ RGA 'calibration' against a calibrated UHV total pressure gauge is described in this article. It was found that special attention should be paid to H{sub 2} calibration, as RGAs are usually much more sensitive to H{sub 2} than ionization gauges. The calibration coefficients are quite reproducible in Faraday cup mode, however, using the secondary electron multiplier requires frequent checks of the calibration coefficients. The coefficients obtained for the RGA allow the use of the RGA as an accurate device for gas spectrum analysis.

Malyshev, O. B.; Middleman, K. J. [ASTeC, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for her help in typing and proofreading the text, and especially for her undying moral support during our stay in College Station. ACKNOWLED6NENTS The author is grateful to Drs. John B. Herbich and Wayne A. Dunlap for their advice and guidance... Size Analysis for Glass Beads . . . . . . . . 24 Waterproof Housing for Pressure Transducers 27 10 Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Experiment 3 Experiment 4 Experiment 5 Experiment 6 32 33 34 35 36 37 12 13 Effect of Residual Pore...

DeVries, Jack Walter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals and Host-Galaxy Properties  

SciTech Connect

Kim et al. (2013) [K13] introduced a new methodology for determining peak- brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spec- trophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ? 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at ? 1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement the Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.045 ? 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch param- eters: Steps at> 2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light- curve width and color around peak (similar to the?m15 and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20 to 30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

Nearby Supernova Factory; Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Bongard, S.; Buton, C.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Childress, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Feindt, U.; Fleury, M.; Gangler, E.; Greskovic, P.; Guy, J.; Kowalski, M.; Lombardo, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P.; Pain, R.; Pecontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Rigault, M.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Scalzo, R.; Smadja, G.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Weaver, B. A.

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

303

Diesel engine lubrication with poor quality residual fuel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of marine residual fuel is declining. This is being caused by a gradual trend towards production of heavier crudes and increased residuum conversion processes in refineries to meet light product demand while holding down crude runs. Additionally, more stringent inland fuel sulfur regulations have caused the higher sulfur residues to be used for marine residual fuel blending. Engine manufacturers are making major efforts in design so that their engines can burn these fuels at high efficiency with minimum adverse effects. The oil industry is developing improved lubricants to reduce as much as possible the increased wear and deposit formation caused by these poor quality fuels. To guide the development of improved lubricants, knowledge is required about the impact of the main fuel characteristics on lubrication. This paper summarizes work conducted to assess the impact of fuel sulfur, Conradson carbon and asphaltenes on wear and deposit formation in engines representative of full scale crosshead diesel engines and medium speed trunk piston engines. Results obtained with improved lubricants in these engines are reviewed.

Van der Horst, G.W.; Hold, G.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Crop Residue Removal for Bioenergy Reduces Soil Carbon Pools: How Can We Offset Carbon Losses?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue removal for bioenergy can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) ... been, however, widely discussed. This paper reviews potential practices that can be used to offset the SOC lost with residue removal. Literature

Humberto Blanco-Canqui

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Systematic Investigation for Reducing Shredder Residue for Complex Automotive Seat Subassemblies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue is a byproduct of the automotive recycling infrastructure and represents 15% of the ... in order to remove a large portion of automotive shredder residue before the shredding process i...

Siobhan Barakat; Jill Urbanic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

310

Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Microbiology May 15, 2008 ARTICLE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY Bioenergy Production via Microbial Conversion of Residual Oil to Natural...alkanes by anaerobic microorganisms. Nature 401: 266-269. Bioenergy production via microbial conversion of residual oil to natural...

Lisa M. Gieg; Kathleen E. Duncan; Joseph M. Suflita

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Techniques for identifying long-range residue correlations in the fifth binding module of LDLR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of correlations between residues in distal regions of a protein structure may provide insights into the mechanism of protein folding. Such long-range correlations may exist between distant residues that are ...

Lin, Jennifer W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

313

Mechanistic Examination of C?–C? Bond Cleavages of Tryptophan Residues during Dissociations of Molecular Peptide Radical Cations  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we used collision-induced dissociation (CID) to examine the gas-phase fragmentations of [GnW]•+ (n = 2-4) and [GXW]•+ (X = C, S, L, F, Y, Q) species. The C?–C? bond cleavage of a C-terminal decarboxylated tryptophan residue ([M - CO2]•+) can generate [M - CO2 - 116]+, [M - CO2 - 117]•+, and [1H-indole]•+ (m/z 117) species as possible product ions. Competition between the formation of [M - CO2 - 116]+ and [1H-indole]•+ systems implies the existence of a proton-bound dimer formed between the indole ring and peptide backbone. Formation of such a proton-bound dimer is facile via a protonation of the tryptophan ?-carbon atom as suggested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations also suggested the initially formed ion 2--the decarboxylated species that is active against C?–C? bond cleavage -can efficiently isomerize to form a more-stable -radical isomer (ion 9) as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. The C?–C? bond cleavage of a tryptophan residue also can occur directly from peptide radical cations containing a basic residue. CID of [WGnR]•+ (n = 1-3) radical cations consistently resulted in predominant formation of [M-116]+ product ions. It appears that the basic arginine residue tightly sequesters the proton and allows the charge-remote C?–C? bond cleavage to prevail over the charge-directed one. DFT calculations predicted the barrier for the former is 6.2 kcal mol -1 lower than that of the latter. Furthermore, the pathway involving a salt-bridge intermediate also was accessible during such a bond cleavage event.

Song, Tao; Ma, Ching-Yung; Chu, Ivan K.; Siu, Chi-Kit; Laskin, Julia

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

315

Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm08kia.pdf More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite...

316

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges Claudia Loebbecke University of Cologne Kevin Crowston Syracuse University School of Information Studies Abstract Knowledge Portals (KPs) are highly integrative Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) that promise to synthesize widely

Crowston, Kevin

317

Artificial Vision A vital component of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Vision A vital component of transhumanism #12;Machinehead · Merger of human and machine. · Transhumanism ­ Our design is flawed. · Blind spot · Blinking #12;Beyond the blind spot · Eventually plug

La Rosa, Andres H.

318

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fault Diagnosis System for a Multilevel Inverter Using a Principal Component Neural Network Surin Khomfoi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fault Diagnosis System for a Multilevel Inverter Using a Principal Component Neural Network Surin system in a multilevel-inverter using a compact neural network is proposed in this paper. It is difficult to diagnose a multilevel-inverter drive (MLID) system using a mathematical model because MLID systems consist

Tolbert, Leon M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

326

An analysis of multiple component mooring lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE COMPONENT MOORING LINES A Thesis by THOMAS ROBERT NALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major...'595 ABSTRACT An Analysis Of Multiple Component Mooring Lines (December 1977) Thomas Robert Walters, B. E. , Vanderbilt University Co-Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ts ung- Chow Su Co- Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard Domi nguez...

Walters, Thomas Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Self-consistent nonlinear kinetic simulations of the anomalous Doppler instability of suprathermal electrons in plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Suprathermal tails in the distributions of electron velocities parallel to the magnetic field are found in many areas of plasma physics, from magnetic confinement fusion to solar system plasmas. Parallel electron kinetic energy can be transferred into plasma waves and perpendicular gyration energy of particles through the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI), provided that energetic electrons with parallel velocities v{sub ||}?(?+?{sub ce})/k{sub ||} are present; here ?{sub ce} denotes electron cyclotron frequency, ? the wave angular frequency, and k{sub ||} the component of wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present the first fully self-consistent relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the ADI, spanning the linear and nonlinear regimes of the ADI. We test the robustness of the analytical theory in the linear regime and follow the ADI through to the steady state. By directly evaluating the parallel and perpendicular dynamical contributions to j·E in the simulations, we follow the energy transfer between the excited waves and the bulk and tail electron populations for the first time. We find that the ratio ?{sub ce}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}) of energy transfer between parallel and perpendicular, obtained from linear analysis, does not apply when damping is fully included, when we find it to be ?{sub pe}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}); here ?{sub pe} denotes the electron plasma frequency. We also find that the ADI can arise beyond the previously expected range of plasma parameters, in particular when ?{sub ce}>?{sub pe}. The simulations also exhibit a spectral feature which may correspond to the observations of suprathermal narrowband emission at ?{sub pe} detected from low density tokamak plasmas.

Lai, W. N. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Design and development of a special purpose SAFT system for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear reactor vessels and piping components  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design details of a special purpose system for real-time nondestructive evaluation of reactor vessels and piping components. The system consists of several components and the report presents the results of the research aimed at the design of each component and recommendations based on the results. One major component of the NDE system, namely the real-time SAFT processor, was designed with sufficient details to enable the fabrications of a prototype by GARD Inc. under a subcontract from The University of Michigan and the report includes their results and conclusions.

Ganapathy, S.; Schmult, B.; Wu, W.S.; Dennehy, T.G.; Moayeri, N.; Kelly, P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest  

SciTech Connect

The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Producing bulk residual stresses in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inhomogeneous plastic strain has been used to produce a pattern of bulk compressive stresses that counteract macrodefect formation and growth in machine components, which increases the working life. Studies ha...

V. A. Boguslaev; A. P. Lopatenko; N. B. Makarenko; N. I. Obodan

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Residual Strain Distribution in Bent Composite Boiler Tubes  

SciTech Connect

Kraft recovery boilers are typically constructed of carbon steel boiler tubes clad with a corrosion resistant layer, and these composite tubes are bent and welded together to form air port panels which enable the combustion air to enter the boiler. In this paper, the through-thickness residual strain in the carbon steel layer of non-heat-treated and heat-treated composite bent tubes were measured by neutron diffraction techniques and modeled by finite element modeling. The results can be used to optimize material selection and manufacturing processes to prevent stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking in the boiler tubes.

Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Tang, Fei [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sorption Characteristics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Aluminum Smelter Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. ... Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35?50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11?16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. ... To determine the BC levels, the Gelinas modification (15) of the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO) method by Gustafsson (16) was applied. ...

Gijs D. Breedveld; Émilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Heavy residue properties in intermediate energy nuclear collisions with gold  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the target fragment production cross sections and angular distributions for the interaction of 32, 44 and 93 MeV/nucleon argon, 35 and 43 MeV/nucleon krypton with gold. The fragment isobaric yield distributions, moving frame angular distributions and velocities have been deduced from these data. This fission cross section decreases with increasing projectile energy and the heavy residue cross section increases. The ratio v{sub {parallel}}/v{sub cn} increases approximately linearly with mass removed from the target. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Aleklett, K.; Sihver, L. (Uppsala Univ., Nykoeping (Sweden). Studsvik Neutron Research Lab.); Loveland, W. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA)); Liljenzin, J.O. (Chalmers Univ. of Tech., Goeteborg (Sweden)); Seaborg, G.T. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA). Nuclear Science Div.)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Subsidiary Regge Trajectories with Singular Residues. Nucleon-Nucleon Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the existence of secondary Regge trajectories with intercepts ?(0) which differ by integers from that of the leading trajectory at t=0, and residues which are singular at that point, is a very general phenomenon which should occur both in the scattering of particles with spin, and in the scattering of particles of unequal mass. Rules are given for determining if such trajectories exist, and for determining their properties. The case of nucleon-nucleon scattering is discussed as an example.

Loyal Durand; III

1967-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

DSM-PM2: A Portable Implementation Platform for Multithreaded DSM Consistency Protocols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSM-PM2 is a platform for designing, implementing and experimenting with multithreaded DSM consistency protocols. It provides a generic toolbox ... alternative protocols for a given consistency model. DSM-PM2 is ...

Gabriel Antoniu; Luc Bougé

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Simulation of Prompt Emission from GRBs with a Photospheric Component and its Detectability By GLAST  

SciTech Connect

The prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) still requires a physical explanation. Studies of time-resolved GRB spectra, observed in the keV-MeV range, show that a hybrid model consisting of two components, a photospheric and a non-thermal component, in many cases fits bright, single-pulsed bursts as well as, and in some instances even better than, the Band function. With an energy coverage from 8 keV up to 300 GeV, GLAST will give us an unprecedented opportunity to further investigate the nature of the prompt emission. In particular, it will give us the possibility to determine whether a photospheric component is the determining feature of the spectrum or not. Here we present a short study of the ability of GLAST to detect such a photospheric component in the sub-MeV range for typical bursts, using simulation tools developed within the GLAST science collaboration.

Battelino, Milan; Ryde, Felix; /Stockholm Observ.; Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa; Longo, Francesco; /U. Trieste /INFN, Trieste

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spheromak tilt stabilization with an energetic particle component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tilt and shift stability of a spheromak plasma in the presence of a large orbit ion?ring component is determined by evaluating the magnetic interaction of the plasma with the ion ring and the external coils. Neither the ion?ring toroidal current nor the ring inverse aspect ratio is required to be small. The influence of conducting walls is considered to be negligible as is appropriate for compression experiments. The plasma tilt and shift stability has been evaluated for a comprehensive set of numerically generated self?consistent hybrid spheromak/ion?ring equilibria. Stable equilibria are found over a considerable range of the parameters. The tilt stabilization of the plasma typically requires that more than about 25% of the total toroidal current be carried by the ion ring.

C. Mehanian; R. V. E. Lovelace

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

340

Component external leakage and rupture frequency estimates  

SciTech Connect

In order to perform detailed internal flooding risk analyses of nuclear power plants, external leakage and rupture frequencies are needed for various types of components - piping, valves, pumps, flanges, and others. However, there appears to be no up-to-date, comprehensive source for such frequency estimates. This report attempts to fill that void. Based on a comprehensive search of Licensee Event Reports (LERs) contained in Nuclear Power Experience (NPE), and estimates of component populations and exposure times, component external leakage and rupture frequencies were generated. The remainder of this report covers the specifies of the NPE search for external leakage and rupture events, analysis of the data, a comparison with frequency estimates from other sources, and a discussion of the results.

Eide, S.A.; Khericha, S.T.; Calley, M.B.; Johnson, D.A.; Marteeny, M.L.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications  

SciTech Connect

This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235{+-}267 ng/m{sup 3}) and children's bedrooms (179{+-}246 ng/m{sup 3}) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03{+-}0.04 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1{+-}100.1 ng/cm{sup 2}) compared to mean loadings (<0.09 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings on the fur clippings were at least 14 times higher on days 1, 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.8{+-}0.4 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. For transferable residues from dog fur, the mean loadings of diazinon on the technician's cotton glove samples were the lowest before application (0.04{+-}0.08 ng/cm{sup 2}) and the highest on day 1 post-application (10.4{+-}23.9 ng/cm{sup 2}) of diazinon to turf. Urinary IMPy concentrations for the participants ranged from <0.3 to 5.5 ng/mL before application and <0.3-12.5 ng/mL after application of diazinon. The mean urinary IMPy concentrations for children or adults were not statistically different (p>0.05) at pre-application compared to post-application of diazinon to turf. The results showed that the participants and their pet dogs were likely exposed to low levels of diazinon residues from several sources (i.e., air, dust, and soil), through several pathways and routes, after lawn applications at these residences. Lastly, the pet dog appears to be an important pathway for the transfer and translocation of diazinon residues inside the homes and likely exposed occupants through personal contacts (i.e., petting)

Morgan, Marsha K. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: morgan.marsha@epa.gov; Stout, Daniel M.; Jones, Paul A. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Barr, Dana B. [National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Published in Software -Practice and Experience Vol. 20, No. 6., Wiley Supporting flexible consistency management via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and contrasted to existing consistency management approaches. #12;Page 2 2. COMMON CONSISTENCY MANAGEMENT consistency management via discrete change description propagation JOHN C. GRUNDY Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand JOHN G. HOSKING AND WARWICK B

Grundy, John

343

Internal consistency and the inner model hypothesis (Budapest lecture, August 2005)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for ``ZFC + # is consistent'' and Icon(ZFC + #) stand for ``there is an inner model of ZFC + #''. A typical. An internal consistency result takes the form Icon(ZFC + LC) # Icon(ZFC + #). Thus a statement # is internally consistent relative to large cardinals i# Icon(ZFC + #) follows from Icon(ZFC + LC) for some large cardinal

344

Internal consistency and the inner model hypothesis (Budapest lecture, August 2005)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for "ZFC + is consistent" and Icon(ZFC + ) stand for "there is an inner model of ZFC + ". A typical. An internal consistency result takes the form Icon(ZFC + LC) Icon(ZFC + ). Thus a statement is internally consistent relative to large cardinals iff Icon(ZFC + ) follows from Icon(ZFC + LC) for some large cardinal

345

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News CONTACT US card file image ASIC Custom Solutions email: ASIC Custom Solutions Biological Microsensor Technologies Biosensors and Nanomaterials email: Biosensors and Nanomaterials Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Chemical sensors and integrated sensor-based microsystems email: Chemical Microsensors and Sensor Microsystems Custom Components COTS, Capacitors, Magnetics, Cables and Interconnects email: Custom Components Failure Analysis Root Cause and Failure Analysis email: Failure Analysis Integrated Photonics Photonic Crystals, Nano Photonics, Micro Optics

346

Five-quark components in baryons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence has been accumulating for the existence of significant intrinsic non-perturbative five-quark components in various baryons. The inclusion of the five-quark components gives a natural explanation of the excess of $\\bar d$ over $\\bar u$, significant quark orbital angular momentum in the proton, the problematic mass and decay pattern of the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon nonet, etc.. A breathing mode of $qqq\\leftrightarrow qqqq\\bar q$ is suggested for the lowest $1/2^-$ baryon octet. Evidence of a predicted member of the new scheme, $\\Sigma^*(1/2^-)$ around 1380 MeV, is introduced.

B. S. Zou

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

347

Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability  

SciTech Connect

Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Method For Eclipsing Component Identification In Large Photometric Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an automated method for assigning the most likely physical parameters to the components of an eclipsing binary (EB), using only its photometric light curve and combined color. In traditional methods (e.g. WD and EBOP) one attempts to optimize a multi-parameter model over many iterations, so as to minimize the chi-squared value. We suggest an alternative method, where one selects pairs of coeval stars from a set of theoretical stellar models, and compares their simulated light curves and combined colors with the observations. This approach greatly reduces the EB parameter-space over which one needs to search, and allows one to determine the components' masses, radii and absolute magnitudes, without spectroscopic data. We have implemented this method in an automated program using published theoretical isochrones and limb-darkening coefficients. Since it is easy to automate, this method lends itself to systematic analyses of datasets consisting of photometric time series of large numbers of stars, such as those produced by OGLE, MACHO, TrES, HAT, and many others surveys.

Jonathan Devor; David Charbonneau

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

350

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Utilization of palm solid residue as a source of renewable and sustainable energy in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Today, global energy consumers are addicted to fossil fuels such as natural gas, oil and coal. Although it has been anticipated that fossil fuels will be depleted soon, these fuels are still dominant as the primary source of energy in the world. Recently, many efforts have been done to substitute renewable alternative fuels to reduce dependency on fossil fuels. Biomass as one of the earliest energy sources appears to be the most promising renewable energy source due to its numerous resources and its environmentally sound characteristics. Since Malaysia is agriculture based tropical country, many crops such as palm, paddy rice and sugarcane are cultivated in this region. Malaysian palm oil industry generate huge amounts of palm solid residue (PSR) biomass such as empty fruit bunches (EFB), palm fiber, shell, trunks and fronds as byproducts which are capable to be taken into account in the energy mix of the country. In this paper, an overview of the PSR generation from Malaysian palm oil industries and its social and economic effects has been given. Indeed, performance of the direct combustion of PSR in terms of PSR composition, properties, heating value, emissions and its effects on the equipment or the components of the boilers have been reviewed. It has been found that the very high moisture content of PSR of palm industry makes their collection and transportation expensive, therefore energy conversion process could be inefficient and utilization of these materials inside the palm oil mills seems more beneficial.

Seyed Ehsan Hosseini; Mazlan Abdul Wahid

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Advanced thermal treatment of auto shredder residue and refuse derived fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The disposal of End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) results in a highly heterogeneous polymeric waste stream of Automobile shredder residue (ASR). Within Europe, strict legislation, such as the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive and the Landfill Directive, has imposed targets for reducing this waste stream and diverting the material away from landfill. One pathway open to recyclers is to thermally process these wastes, but the presence of chlorine and metallic species can present challenges to traditional incineration technologies. This paper discusses the use of Gasplasma®, an advanced thermal treatment technology, comprising fluidised bed oxy-steam gasification followed by plasma treatment, for ASR, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and blends of ASR and RDF wastes. The work demonstrates the ability to process these highly heterogeneous materials achieving high energy conversion (87–94%) and virtually complete carbon conversion, producing a calorific synthetic gas (syngas) capable of being used for power generation or as a chemical feedstock. The actual conversion efficiency achieved is dependent on feed chemistry and properties. The study also shows that ash components of the feed material can be transformed into an environmentally stable vitrified product.

Richard Taylor; Ruby Ray; Chris Chapman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Size distribution of metals in particulate matter formed during combustion of residual fuel oil  

SciTech Connect

Between July 1992 and January 1993 three full-scale test programs were performed by Carnot for the Electric Power Research Institute and the Fuel Oil Users` Support (FOUS) Group, as part of a program for development and testing of various stack emissions models. One of the components of the program was determination of the concentrations of individual elements as a function of the size of particles suspended in flue gas. The size distributions of species are important because several aspects of system performance depend upon particulate matter size and composition: (1) the rate of ash deposition in the convection section, and activity of deposits for high temperature corrosion and SO{sub 3} formation, (2) the efficiency of precipitators for collection of individual elements, and (3) scattering of visible light and contribution of particles to stack plume opacity. Size distributions of major ash constituents were measured at the entrance and exit of the dust collectors during each of the field tests. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first reports of such measurements in residual oil-fired utility boilers. The focus, in the present paper, is on the composition of the particles entering the dust collectors.

Walsh, P. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rovesti, W.C. [Electric Power Research Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Freeman, R.F. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Oswego, NY (United States); Olen, K.R.; Washington, K.T.; Patrick, S.T.; Campbell, G.L.; Harper, D.S. [Florida Power & Light Co., West Palm Beach, FL (United States); Teetz, R.D.; Bennett, T.E. [Long Island Lighting Co., Glenwood Landing, NY (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Rocky Flats Plant Waste Stream and Residue Identification and Characterization Program (WSRIC): Progress and achievements  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Stream and Residue Identification and Characterization (WSRIC) Program, as described in the WSRIC Program Description delineates the process knowledge used to identify and characterize currently-generated waste from approximately 5404 waste streams originating from 576 processes in 288 buildings at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Annual updates to the WSRIC documents are required by the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement between the US Department of Energy, the Colorado Department of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. Accurate determination and characterization of waste is a crucial component in RFP`s waste management strategy to assure compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) storage and treatment requirements, as well as disposal acceptance criteria. The WSRIC Program was rebaselined in September 1992, and serves as the linchpin for documenting process knowledge in RFP`s RCRA operating record. Enhancements to the WSRIC include strengthening the waste characterization rationale, expanding WSRIC training for waste generators, and incorporating analytical information into the WSRIC building books. These enhancements will improve credibility with the regulators and increase waste generators` understanding of the basis for credible waste characterizations.

Ideker, V.L. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Doyle, G.M. [USDOE Rocky Flats Office, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of SWAT streamflow components for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passes: forward, backward, forward, with a decreasing baseflow rate at each pass [Arnold et al. (1995 from physically based equations) A reliable simulation of streamflow components is an important step any reference to the underlying physical processes #12;Application of two separation techniques

356

Software reuse strategies and component markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black-box reuse with component markets could be the silver bullet solution that makes software reuse a reality, and advances software development to a robust industrial process---but only if market makers address the growing pains plaguing this immature ...

T. Ravichandran; Marcus A. Rothenberger

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

SCADA architecture with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Architecture for SCADA with mobile remote components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the advent of new technologies, the demand of connecting IT systems to the Internet is increasing. This is also the case for Control systems specifically SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) systems. Traditional SCADA systems are connected ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, mobility, remote components

Rosslin John Robles; Tai-Hoon Kim

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Non-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Depending on the purpose of risk attribution, it may or may not be acceptable to get negative riskNon-Negative Risk Components Jeremy Staum j-staum@northwestern.edu Department of Industrial the risk of a portfolio or system to its compo- nents, when it is required to produce non-negative risk

Staum, Jeremy

360

Beamline standard component designs for the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) has initiated a design standardization and modularization activity for the APS synchrotron radiation beamline components. These standard components are included in components library, sub-components library and experimental station library. This paper briefly describes these standard components using both technical specifications and side view drawings.

Shu, D.; Barraza, J.; Brite, C.; Chang, J.; Sanchez, T.; Tcheskidov, V.; Kuzay, T.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 June 29, 2011 Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement (HSS CRAD 45-12, Rev....

364

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

365

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Results with a bench scale downdraft biomass gasifier for agricultural and forestry residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A small scale fixed bed downdraft gasifier system to be fed with agricultural and forestry residues has been designed and constructed. The downdraft gasifier has four consecutive reaction zones from the top to the bottom, namely drying, pyrolysis, oxidation and reduction zones. Both the biomass fuel and the gases move in the same direction. A throat has been incorporated into the design to achieve gasification with lower tar production. The experimental system consists of the downdraft gasifier and the gas cleaning unit made up by a cyclone, a scrubber and a filter box. A pilot burner is utilized for initial ignition of the biomass fuel. The product gases are combusted in the flare built up as part of the gasification system. The gasification medium is air. The air to fuel ratio is adjusted to produce a gas with acceptably high heating value and low pollutants. Within this frame, different types of biomass, namely wood chips, barks, olive pomace and hazelnut shells are to be processed. The developed downdraft gasifier appears to handle the investigated biomass sources in a technically and environmentally feasible manner. This paper summarizes selected design related issues along with the results obtained with wood chips and hazelnut shells.

Hayati Olgun; Sibel Ozdogan; Guzide Yinesor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Leaching behavior and possible resource recovery from air pollution control residues of fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

Ash residues are generated at several points during combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW), i.e., in cyclones, electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Such residues are of a complex physical and chemical nature and are often enriched in soluble salts and heavy metals such as Pb, Cd and Zn. Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of MSW is a relatively new technique and very little information is available about the leaching behavior of its residues. In this study, the total elemental composition, mineralogy and leaching behavior of cyclone and bag-house filter ashes from a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler fired with municipal solid waste have been investigated. In addition, the possibilities of recovery heavy metals from these ashes were studied. The long-term leaching behavior of the ash constituents was evaluated using a two-step batch leaching test known as the CEN-test, whereas short and medium term leaching behavior was evaluated using a Column test. The extraction of elements from cyclone and filter ashes with various acidic solutions was also investigated. The leaching behavior of acid washed ashes was evaluated using the CEN test. The cyclone ash was mainly composed of aluminosilicate minerals, whereas the filter ash consisted of chlorides and hydroxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The concentration of heavy metals such as Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb was higher in the filter ash than in the cyclone ash. The leached amounts of sulfates and Pb from the cyclone ash decreased with leaching test contact time, indicating the formation of secondary mineral phases. Large amounts of chlorides, sulfates, Ca, Cu and Pb were leached from the filter ash. Acid extraction removed large amounts ({gt}50%) of Zn, Pb and Cu from the filter ash and approximately 56% of the total amount of Zn present in the cyclone ash. An efficient removal of heavy metal species from these types of ashes can probably be achieved by application of a recycling or multi-step process.

Abbas, Z.; Andersson, B.A.; Steenari, B.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation of CO Separation of CO 2 From Multi-Component Gas Streams Opportunity Research is active on the patent-pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Process for the Separation of Gases Using Supersonic Expansion and Oblique Shock Wave Compression." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The separation of a gaseous mixture into constituent gases has proven to be useful for a variety of industrial and commercial applications. Currently CO 2 can be separated from multi- component gas streams using compression and refrigeration techniques in order to condense the CO 2 out of a vapor phase so that it can be mechanically separated from the stream.

372

Coatings for hot section gas turbine components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Components in the hot section of gas turbines are protected from the environment by oxidation-resistant coatings while thermal barrier coatings are applied to reduce the metal operating temperature of blades and vanes. The integrity of these protective coatings is an issue of major concern in current gas turbine designs. Premature cracking of the protective layer in oxidation-resistant coatings and of the interface in thermal barrier coating systems has become one of the life limiting factors of coated components in gas turbines. Following a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of coated material systems with respect to coating types and their status of application, the fracture mechanisms and mechanics of coated systems are presented and discussed.

J. Bressers; S. Peteves; M. Steen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Lightweight Valve Train Components Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

376

Durability of ACERT Engine Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Washington D.C. pmp11lin.pdf More Documents & Publications Durability of ACERT Engine Components Durability of ACERT Engine Components Materials for Advanced Engine Valve Train...

377

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Miracle Wind Power Components Manufacture Co Ltd Place: Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector:...

378

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes multicomponent.pdf More...

379

AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Component Cost Model AVTA Vehicle Component Cost Model 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010...

380

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

382

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

383

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

384

Table 11.4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Electricity: Components of Onsite Generation, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Onsite-Generation Components; Unit:...

385

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Hydrogen System Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other hydrogen system components. Reliable components are needed to ensure the success of hydrogen fueling stations and support the commercial deployment of fuel cell electric...

386

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components As recommended by the 2004 National Research Council report, the program continues to increase its support...

387

A Scheduling Algorithm for Consistent Monitoring Results with Solar Powered High-Performance Wireless Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Scheduling Algorithm for Consistent Monitoring Results with Solar Powered High but critical task for solar powered wireless high power embedded systems. Our algorithm relies on an energy

Simunic, Tajana

388

Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

1.2 - Chondrites and Their Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chondrites are extraordinary mixtures of materials with diverse origins that formed around other stars, in the solar nebula, and in their parent asteroids. Most chondrites were so severely altered by aqueous fluids, thermal metamorphism, and impacts that the original characteristics of their components have been largely erased. But a few pristine chondrites have preserved an exquisite mineralogical, chemical, isotopic, and chronological record of the first few million years of solar system history. The properties of diverse types of carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites focusing on the most pristine samples are reviewed to establish the chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical properties and origins of their components and to elucidate the asteroidal processes that modified them. Refractory inclusions – amoeboid olivine aggregates and Ca–Al-rich inclusions – were the first solids to form in the solar nebula near to the protosun. Chondrules and associated metallic Fe–Ni grains were still forming several million years later when the earliest planetesimals, which melted due to heat from 26Al decay, were colliding. In the least-altered chondrites, matrix material, which coats chondrules and other components, is largely composed of micrometer-sized silicates and amorphous materials, which formed at high temperatures, plus small amounts (up to 200 ppm) of presolar oxides and silicates.

E.R.D. Scott; A.N. Krot

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

392

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

393

Recycling waste polymers from automotive shredder residue (ASR); application in iron making.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An investigation was performed on characterisation of automotive shredder residue which resulted in application of its polymeric fraction as a substitute for coke, as reducing… (more)

Fahandej Sadi, Seyed Habib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Methods of analysis modified size exchange chromatography method for analysis of heavy oil residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified size exchange chromatography method is used to obtain molecular weight distributions, average molecular weight, and other characteristics of heavy oil residues: coal asphalt, petroleum asphalt, vacu...

Changming Zhang; Adnan Alhajji…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

An Experimental Investigation into Additive Manufacturing-Induced Residual Stresses in 316L Stainless Steel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology provides unique opportunities for...i.e., neutron diffraction). Good agreement between the two measurement techniques is observed. Furthermore, a reduction in residual stres...

Amanda S. Wu; Donald W. Brown; Mukul Kumar…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SAFEGUARDED DUAL WEIGHTED RESIDUAL METHOD RICARDO H. NOCHETTO, ANDREAS VEESER, AND MARCO VERANI safeguarded by additional asymptotically higher order a posteriori terms. In particular, the enhanced

Nochetto, Ricardo H.

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

400

The preparation of a cabbage candidate reference material to be certified for residues of agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new cabbage candidate reference material has been prepared for the determination of residues of agrochemicals. The cabbage was grown with deliberate application...

Rolf Zeisler; Vladimir Strachnov…

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - africa quantifying residual Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: africa quantifying residual Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Satellite observations of the...

402

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

403

SELF-CONSISTENT MODEL OF THE INTERSTELLAR PICKUP PROTONS, ALFVENIC TURBULENCE, AND CORE SOLAR WIND IN THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect

A self-consistent model of the interstellar pickup protons, the slab component of the Alfvenic turbulence, and core solar wind (SW) protons is presented for r {>=} 1 along with the initial results of and comparison with the Voyager 2 (V2) observations. Two kinetic equations are used for the pickup proton distribution and Alfvenic power spectral density, and a third equation governs SW temperature including source due to the Alfven wave energy dissipation. A fraction of the pickup proton free energy, f{sub D} , which is actually released in the waveform during isotropization, is taken from the quasi-linear consideration without preexisting turbulence, whereas we use observations to specify the strength of the large-scale driving, C{sub sh}, for turbulence. The main conclusions of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) For C{sub sh} Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5 and f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1, the model slab component agrees well with the V2 observations of the total transverse magnetic fluctuations starting from {approx}8 AU. This indicates that the slab component at low-latitudes makes up a majority of the transverse magnetic fluctuations beyond 8-10 AU. (2) The model core SW temperature agrees well with the V2 observations for r {approx}> 20 AU if f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1. (3) A combined effect of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin attenuation, large-scale driving, and pickup proton generated waves results in the energy sink in the region r {approx}< 10 AU, while wave energy is pumped in the turbulence beyond 10 AU. Without energy pumping, the nonlinear energy cascade is suppressed for r {approx}< 10 AU, supplying only a small energy fraction into the k-region of dissipation by the core SW protons. A similar situation takes place for the two-dimensional turbulence. (4) The energy source due to the resonant Alfven wave damping by the core SW protons is small at heliocentric distances r {approx}< 10 AU for both the slab and the two-dimensional turbulent components. As a result, adiabatic cooling mostly controls the model SW temperature in this region, and the model temperature disagrees with the V2 observations in the region r {approx}< 20 AU.

Gamayunov, Konstantin V.; Zhang Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob, E-mail: kgamayunov@fit.edu [Department of Physics and Center for Space Physics and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

Livingston, R.R.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

405

LOTEC: A Simple DSM Consistency Protocol for Nested Object Transactions Peter Graham and Yahong Sui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOTEC: A Simple DSM Consistency Protocol for Nested Object Transactions Peter Graham and Yahong Sui Memory (DSM) consistency protocol for an unconventional but important application domain - object applications typically targetted by DSM system designers. While, after 10 years of performance enhancement

Graham, Peter

406

DSM-PM2: A portable implementation platform for multithreaded DSM consistency protocols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DSM-PM2: A portable implementation platform for multithreaded DSM consistency protocols Gabriel Antoniu and Luc Bougé Abstract DSM-PM2 is a platform for designing, implementing and experimenting multithreaded DSM consistency proto- cols. It provides a generic toolbox which facilitates protocol design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION Adam Bowen for light fields: a global method based on the idea of photo-consistency and a local method which employs. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the two methods as compared to other photo

Rajpoot, Nasir

408

AI Communications 17 (2004) 213221 213 An efficient consistency algorithm for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) by modeling it as a meta- CSP, which is a finite CSP with a unique global constraint. The size of this global consistency algorithm for filtering the meta-CSP. This algorithm significantly reduces the domains of the variables of the meta-CSP without guaranteeing arc-consistency. We use AC as a preprocessing step to solving

Farritor, Shane

409

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Stefan on a consistent modelling methodology (CMM) of complex real processes in wastewater treatment by utilizing both as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant and the simulation

Bürger, Raimund

410

Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutetic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

414

Comparison of component frameworks for real-time embedded systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of components significantly helps in development of real-time embedded systems. There have been a number of component frameworks developed for this purpose, and some of them have already became well established in this area. Even though these ... Keywords: Component frameworks, Component-based development, Real-time and embedded systems

Tomáš Pop, Petr Hn?tynka, Petr Hošek, Michal Malohlava, Tomáš Bureš

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

416

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

417

Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Installation of Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installation of Alternative Fuel Components in Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

419

Defining food literacy and its components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Food literacy has emerged as a term to describe the everyday practicalities associated with healthy eating. The term is increasingly used in policy, practice, research and by the public; however, there is no shared understanding of its meaning. The purpose of this research was to develop a definition of food literacy which was informed by the identification of its components. This was considered from two perspectives: that of food experts which aimed to reflect the intention of existing policy and investment, and that of individuals, who could be considered experts in the everyday practicalities of food provisioning and consumption. Given that food literacy is likely to be highly contextual, this second study focused on disadvantaged young people living in an urban area who were responsible for feeding themselves. The Expert Study used a Delphi methodology (round one n = 43). The Young People’s Study used semi-structured, life-course interviews (n = 37). Constructivist Grounded Theory was used to analyse results. This included constant comparison of data within and between studies. From this, eleven components of food literacy were identified which fell into the domains of: planning and management; selection; preparation; and eating. These were used to develop a definition for the term “food literacy”.

Helen Anna Vidgen; Danielle Gallegos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Anodizing of High Electrically Stressed Components  

SciTech Connect

Anodizing creates an aluminum oxide coating that penetrates into the surface as well as builds above the surface of aluminum creating a very hard ceramic-type coating with good dielectric properties. Over time and use, the electrical carrying components (or spools in this case) experience electrical breakdown, yielding undesirable x-ray dosages or failure. The spool is located in the high vacuum region of a rod pinch diode section of an x-ray producing machine. Machine operators have recorded decreases in x-ray dosages over numerous shots using the reusable spool component, and re-anodizing the interior surface of the spool does not provide the expected improvement. A machine operation subject matter expert coated the anodized surface with diffusion pump oil to eliminate electrical breakdown as a temporary fix. It is known that an anodized surface is very porous, and it is because of this porosity that the surface may trap air that becomes a catalyst for electrical breakdown. In this paper we present a solution of mitigating electrical breakdown by oiling. We will also present results of surface anodizing improvements achieved by surface finish preparation and surface sealing. We conclude that oiling the anodized surface and using anodized hot dip sealing processes will have similar results.

Flores, P. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Hogge, K. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Naffziger, C. [NSTec; Codova, S. R. [SNL; Ormond, E. U. [SNL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Continued development of the residue baler. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The baling concept discussed in this report has evolved from work started in 1975. The objective of this activity was to develop a method for transporting entire above ground portions of both pine and hardwood stems to a mill or centralized processing point in a form that was compatible with truck, trailer, rail and barge hauls and with sufficient bulk density to optimize load sizes on the various carriers while expending a minimum amount of capital and energy in the woods operations. The year's work resulted in the baling concept and a prototype baler being tested under a wide variety of field conditions material types and operating scenarios. The work in the Pacific Northwest demonstrated that baling offers a means of preparing forest residues for transport which results in a near maximum solid wood content in a load. The reworking of the hydraulic circuits significantly reduced the cycle time on the prototype without increasing the power requirements. The installation of the wire feed assembly moved the development of an automatic banding and tying system one step closer. Both sets of field trials also pointed out that a true field demonstration of the commercial ability of the baline concept will have to await the construction of a second generation prototype producing a larger bale and designed to accept several different infeed types. 7 figures, 3 tables.

Stuart, W.B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15 wt.% NiO/Al2O3 catalysts at 760–900 K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have Ni–O and Ni–Ni bonds with bond distances of 2.03 ± 0.05 and 2.46 ± 0.05 Å, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220 kg h?1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760–900 K and 46.2 atm with the reactor volume 0.27 m3 to obtain approximately 3.42 × 105 kcal h?1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100 kW electric powers.

Kuen-Song Lin; Sujan Chowdhury; Ze-Ping Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Analysis of lead content in automotive shredder residue (ASR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automotive shredder residue (ASR) is a very heterogeneous waste, which could have a very high metal content on finest fractions ?  < 6 mm produced by the shredding of end of live vehicles. The approval of Directive 2000/53/EC and its transposition to the European Union member states requires an analytical technique for in-situ checking of the content of some metals in ASR wastes. The objective of this study is the evaluation of total Pb content in the different fractions using a rapid measurement method to easily accomplish the current legislation. An experimental Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer with tri-axial geometry was used to analyse the ASR in order to test the feasibility of this analytical technique. Likewise, a correction of the intensities by the incoherent scattering (Compton) radiation was made to compensate the matrix effects. The results show that values in the smaller fractions are bigger (11,600 mg kg?1 in the fraction <125 ?m) than in the coarser fractions (4600 mg kg?1 in the fraction between 2 and 6 mm) and that such type of instrumentation enables a fast measurement with a limit of detection of 1.1 mg kg?1 for 1000 s measurement).

Oscar Gonzalez-Fernandez; Sofia Pessanha; Ignacio Queralt; Maria Luisa Carvalho

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Valorization of automotive shredder residue in building materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every year in EU nations, it is estimated that 3 million tonnes of automotive shredder residue (ASR) are generated. Half of the ASR is composed of rubber, textiles and plastics, which can be either transformed into alternative fuel or recycled. The second half, which is landfilled, is incombustible and has not yet been valorized. This waste contains 30% organic matter, as well as inorganic compounds such as quartz, calcite, magnetite, hematite, and anhydrite. It is also very rich in zinc (1–3.5%) and lead (0.7–3.3%). These elements are powerful retarders of ordinary Portland cement. For this reason, two ways of processing of this waste have been investigated: (1) transformation into aggregates after a thermal treatment followed by a chemical treatment or (2) directly into concrete with the use of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. This second way is especially very interesting for engineers and scientists. As established by leaching tests, zinc and lead are integrated and fixed in the structure of ettringite, the main hydration product of calcium sulfoaluminate cement. Therefore, it is possible to produce concrete for some applications including road construction from this currently landfilled “waste” (i.e., the ASR is shown to be useful recyclable material that can be converted into an environmentally friendly “green” concrete).

J. Péra; J. Ambroise; M. Chabannet

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Directive 2000/53/EC sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a “waste-to-chemicals” perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Alessandro Santini; Fabrizio Passarini; Ivano Vassura; David Serrano; Javier Dufour; Luciano Morselli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

427

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

428

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive ComponentEmissionsEmissionsEmissions Todd Hubing Mi h li P f f V hi l El t iMichelin Professor of Vehicular Electronics Clemson University

Stuart, Steven J.

431

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

432

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says Vast Energy Resource in Residual Oil Zones, FE Study Says July 20, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Billions of barrels of oil that could increase domestic supply, help reduce imports, and increase U.S. energy security may be potentially recoverable from residual oil zones, according to initial findings from a study supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The recently completed study, conducted by researchers at the University of Texas-Permian Basin (UTPB), is one of several FE-supported research projects providing insight that will help tap this valuable-but-overlooked resource. Residual oil zones, called ROZs, are areas of immobile oil found below the oil-water contact of a reservoir. ROZs are similar to reservoirs in the

433

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

434

Model for Gasification of Residual Fuels from Petroleum Refineries Using the Equation Oriented (EO) Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attractive way to use residual fuels from petroleum refineries (vacuum residue and petcoke) is their gasification to produce syngas, which contains mainly H2, CO and small quantities of CH4, CO2, as well as nitrogen and sulfur compounds. ... Vacuum residue and petroleum coke (petcoke) are, respectively, heavy liquid and solid byproducts from crude oil refining, they are often used as fuel in boilers for power production, natural gas has been more commonly used in the past few years in power generation; reducing the market for both vacuum residue and petcoke. ... Regarding petroleum refinery residuals Uson et al.(1) developed a model for cogasification of coal, petcoke and biomass, based on reaction kinetics. ...

Jorge E. Marin-Sanchez; Miguel A. Rodriguez-Toral

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

435

EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the 0: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado EA-1120: Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to stabilize, if necessary, and/or repackage the residues for safe interim storage at the Site while awaiting the completion and opening of a suitable repository to which they would be shipped for disposal from the U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 1, 1996 EA-1120: Finding of No Significant Impact Solid Residues Treatment, Repackaging and Storage at the Rocky Flats

436

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Near-infrared photodetector consisting of J-aggregating cyanine dye and metal oxide thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a near-infrared photodetector that consists of a thin film of the J-aggregating cyanine dye, U3, and transparent metal-oxide charge transport layers. The high absorption coefficient of the U3 film, combined ...

Osedach, Timothy P.

438

Effect of twinning on texture evolution of depleted uranium using a viscoplastic self-consistent model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Texture evolution of depleted uranium is investigated using a viscoplastic self-consistent model. Depleted uranium, which has the same structure as alpha-uranium, is difficult to model… (more)

Ho, John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Knowledge acquisition, consistency checking and concurrency control for Gene Ontology (GO)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......University Press 2003 Original Paper Knowledge acquisition, consistency checking and...for communicating biological data and knowledge. The Gene Ontology (GO; http...paper, we assess the applicability of a Knowledge Base Management System (KBMS), Protege-2000......

Iwei Yeh; Peter D. Karp; Natalya F. Noy; Russ B. Altman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy experiments?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, United States b Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States c Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Received

Fayer, Michael D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUID sensors demonstrate the effectiveness of this data consistency constraint and sparsity prior-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction MRI has become an indispensible resource in clinical medicine because

442

Data Consistency for Self-acting Load Balancing of Parallel File System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the increasing scale of I/O servers, nice load balancing algorithm among I/O servers is ... problem, we have proposed a self-acting load balancing strategy. In this paper, data consistency between I/O server...

Li Guoying; Dong Bin; Li Xiuqiao; Wu Qimeng…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations ... of electron energy balance takes into account ...

V. E. Moiseenko; Yu. S. Stadnik; A. I. Lysoivan; V. B. Korovin

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

MODIS Consistent Vegetation Parameter Specifications and Their Impacts on Regional Climate Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A consistent set of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation parameters, including leaf and stem area index (LAI and SAI, respectively), land-cover category (LCC), fractional vegetation cover (FVC), and albedo ...

Min Xu; Xin-Zhong Liang; Arthur Samel; Wei Gao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Statistical Separability and the Consistency between Quantum Theory, Relativity and the Causality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the non-locality together with the statistical character makes the world statistically separable. The super-luminal signal transmission is impossible. The quantum theory is therefore consistent with the relativity and the causality.

Qi-Ren Zhang

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Precision and consistency of contour interpolation Jacqueline M. Fulvio a,*, Manish Singh b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precision and consistency of contour interpolation Jacqueline M. Fulvio a,*, Manish Singh b-mail address: jmf384@nyu.edu (J.M. Fulvio). www.elsevier.com/locate/visres Available online at www

Singh, Manish

447

Building America Webinar: Standardized Retrofit Packages — What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This webinar will focus on specific Building America projects that have examined methods to consistently meet high levels of energy performance in existing homes, with a focus on retrofit packages that can be replicated across many homes.

448

Stability and Internal Consistency of the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire: A Study of Finnish Adolescents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reliability of the Offer Self-Image Questionnaire (OSIQ) was assessed with two measures—internal consistency and stability—in Finnish children aged 13. The OSIQ was administered to 268 normal 13-...

Eila Laukkanen; Pirjo Halonen; Heimo Viinamäki

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Quasiparticle lifetimes in magnesium clusters modeled by self-consistent GW? calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quasiparticle (QP) lifetimes in magnesium clusters are calculated using many-body Green's-function theory. We analyze the effect of the self-consistency of the one-particle Green's function G on the calculations and ...

He, Yi

450

Managing the use of style guides in an organisational setting: practical lessons in ensuring UI consistency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......designs consistent with the general characteristics of an environment. Such guides are...seminars, distribution using the Corporate Intranet, and establishing discussion bulletin...17] R. Bernard, The Corporate Intranet, Wiley, New York, 1996. [18] A......

Nichole Simpson

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effective Mass Matrix for Light Neutrinos Consistent with Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an effective mass matrix for light neutrinos which is consistent with the mixing pattern indicated by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. Two scenarios for the mass eigenvalues are discussed and the connection with double beta decay is noted.

S. P. Rosen; Waikwok Kwong

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Globally convergent trust-region methods for self-consistent field electronic structure calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally convergent trust-region methods for self-consistent field electronic structure calculations Juliano B. Franciscoa) Department of Applied Mathematics, IMECC-UNICAMP, State University calculations, the reliability of the algorithms used becomes increasingly important. Trust-region strategies

Martínez, José Mario

453

Validation of and enhancements to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents efforts to validate two elements related to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation procedure: (1) the speed reduction estimation ability of the model, and (2) assumptions about acceleration...

Collins, Kent Michael

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Relating geometric design consistency and accident experience on two-lane rural highways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and accident experience on two-lane rural highways. Safety, operational, and driver behavioral studies were reviewed and compared to the concepts of the Messer procedure and other design consistency studies. This was done to critically evaluate the Messer... and one-half years of data. A variable called the effective workload value EWL derived from the Messer procedure was established as the measure of consistency used for analysis. The effective workload value and accident experience were used as input...

Glascock, Stephen Wade

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microsystems Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News MICROSYSTEMS SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & COMPONENTS Clear Latest MSTC News Ed Cole appointed Fellow by ASM International Researching new detectors for chemical, biological threats MESA fab streaming video MESAFab streaming video Get Adobe Flash player The concept of integrating more than one transistor on a single chip has had a profound and lasting impact on our society. From the first use in the Minuteman missile to the proliferation of consumer products today, microelectronic circuits have dramatically improved performance, functionality, and reliability, while reducing cost

458

Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Modeling the Phillips curve with unobserved components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are imposed on the underlying level (core in?ation), since #25;t = (1#0; #11;L)#0;1#22;t + (1#0; #11;L)#0;1"t; t = 1; :::; T 5 1960 1980 2000 ­0.05 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 INFLATION Level 1960 1980 2000 ­0.01 0.00 0.01 INFLATION­Seasonal 1960 1980 2000 ­0.05 0... .8 9.0 9.2 log_GDP Level 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 ­0.025 0.000 0.025 0.050 0.0 75 INFLATION Level+Cycle 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 ­0.02 ­0.01 0.00 0.01 0.02 0.0 3 log_GDP­Cycle Figure 5: Smoothed components from a bivariate model for GDP and in?a- tion A...

Harvey, Andrew C

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

462

Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components  

SciTech Connect

Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

463

2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone of Monochamus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone and identified as 2-(undecyloxy)-ethanol. In analyses by GC coupled to electroantennography the only consistent, Sweden, and China. 2-(Undecyl- oxy)-ethanol was attractive to both male and female M. sutor beetles

Hanks, Lawrence M.

464

Artificial Neural Network Investigation of the Structural Group Contribution Method for Predicting Pure Components Auto Ignition Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Artificial Neural Network Investigation of the Structural Group Contribution Method for Predicting Pure Components Auto Ignition Temperature ... Artificial neural networks were used to investigate several structural group contribution (SGC) methods available in the literature. ... The hidden layer is a single layer with six neurons, and the output layer consists of one neuron representing the predicted AIT property. ...

Tareq A. Albahri; Reena S. George

2003-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Ultra-high speed residue processor for SAFT inspection system image enhancement. Final report, October 1983-March 1984  

SciTech Connect

The Phase-I feasibility study of residue number system (RNS) image processing for SAFT inspection has successfully determined that an advanced inspection system may be built using a correlation-reconstruction SAFT algorithm, implemented with RNS techniques and off-the-shelf electronic components. Images are reconstructed in a number theoretic transform domain with simple pointwise multiplication of the A-scan data volume by a custom point spread function (PSF), all in a highly parallel computational architecture. These methods also allow image enhancement to be easily performed for improved flaw visualization, and with negligible speed reduction. It has been determined that high resolution three dimensional flaw images may be generated and that a commercially viable product could result through development of a prototype real-time RNS processor. The hardware is expected to be made up of 100 nsec bit slice microprocessor components and large RAM storage units. Such a processor would provide the NDE community with a valuable new tool, that could generate significant improvements in real-time flaw visualization of critical components encountered in nuclear power plant inspection. Special inspection conditions, such as multiple reflections and crack tip detection in the presence of corner reflecting effects, may be overcome by modifying the functional form of the PSF. It is also possible that semi-automatic flaw classification could be included in the process without significantly adding to the computational burden. Based on the performance estimates of the Phase-I effort, this new image processing system has the potential to acquire and focus the equivalent of 145 A-scans per second, which translates into more than 1000 in./sup 3//min inspection rate for typical pressure vessel specimens.

Polky, J.N.; Miller, D.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

468

Technical Program Maintaining Consistent Conditions over a Wide Range of Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Material Deposition Rates in Beam-Based Additive Manufacturing: Jack Beuth1; Shane Esola1; Raymond Walker2 consideration for additive manufacturing and repair applications in the aerospace industry. To be successful Effect of Process Parameters on Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Additively Manufactured Components in Ti-6Al-4

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

469

Maintaining consistency between system architecture and dynamic system models with SysML4Modelica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays many technical products include mechatronic systems that incorporate components from multiple disciplines --- mechanical, electronic, controls and software. In model-based design of mechatronic systems different kinds of models are used to model ... Keywords: SysML, mechatronic systems, model-based design, modelica

Axel Reichwein; Christiaan J. J. Paredis; Arquimedes Canedo; Petra Witschel; Philipp Emanuel Stelzig; Anjelika Votintseva; Rainer Wasgint

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

471

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.  

SciTech Connect

Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Determination of an acceptable assimilable organic carbon (AOC) level for biological stability in water distribution systems with minimized chlorine residual  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in minimizing the chlorine residual in Japan because of increasing complaints about a chlorinous odor in drinking water. However, minimizing the chlorine residual causes the microbi...

Yumiko Ohkouchi; Bich Thuy Ly; Suguru Ishikawa…

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Fractionation and transport of nutrients among coal ash residues and in soil covered with fly ash-amended organic compost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate different types of ash residues and discharge small particles and vapors to the atmosphere. The ash residues which account for the major part ... the byproducts are collected and ...

M. P. Menon; K. S. Sajwan; G. S. Ghuman; J. James…

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Microstructure and residual stress evaluation of ductile cast iron using the critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave propagation technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residual stress and microstructure evaluation of ductile cast iron using a nondestructive method (Critically Refracted Longitudinal Ultrasonic Wave Technique) was approached. Residual stresses, both good and bad graphite nodules, and different...

Bennett, Robert Jeffrey

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

476

Experimental and theoretical study on the characteristics of vacuum residue gasification in an entrained-flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

About 200,000 bpd (barrel/day) vacuum residue oil is produced from oil refineries in Korea. These are supplied to use asphalt, high sulfur fuel oil, and upgrading residue hydro-desulfurization units. High sulfur ...

Young-Chan Choi; Jae-Goo Lee; Sang-Jun Yoon…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The Third Law of Thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice: "Stillwater" or ?SH2Of,T=0 = 0  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Third Law of Thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice: "Stillwater" or ?SH2Of,T=0 = 0 ... This paper will explore the connection between the third law of thermodynamics and the residual entropy of ice. ... Thermodynamics ...

Maureen M. Julian; Frank H. Stillinger; Roger R. Festa

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

A Model-Driven Engineering Framework for Component Models Interoperability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A multitude of component models exist today, characterized by slightly different conceptual architectural elements, focusing on a specific operational domain, covering different phases of component life-cycle, or supporting analysis of different quality ...

Ivica Crnkovi?; Ivano Malavolta; Henry Muccini

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Feeding of Small Components Using the Surface Tension of Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feeding of components smaller than 1mm2 is a high challenge in an automated manufacturing line. The surface forces affecting these micro components are getting more important and cause problems when handled. ...

Matthias Burgard; Nabih Othman; Uwe Mai…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

483

Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

Stickney, R.G.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

484

,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsd_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

485

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas ... Thus, the terminology of heavy oil or heavy residue can be also used to indicate all such heavy petroleum oils. ... Notwithstanding, for the RCG process it is ideal to develop the catalyst that has moderate cracking activity for heavy residues or heavy oils but meanwhile good activity for catalyzing the deposited coke gasification so that the gasification can be at reasonably low temperatures to maintain the catalytic activity for cracking heavy fractions. ...

Yuming Zhang; Deping Yu; Wangliang Li; Yin Wang; Shiqiu Gao; Guangwen Xu

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

486

Potential of crop residue in India as a source of energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here is given an estimate of crop residue production and different recycling options as a source of renewable energy. India produces 388 Tg crop residues but only 182 Tg equivalent to 2818 PJ is usable. Recycling as manure can replace 15% of 595 PJ national fertiliser energy. Recycling in digester can produce 20.32 billion m³ biogas. It can be converted into 182 Tg of biocoal generating 156â??258.3 billion unit (kWh) electricity. It can lead to 16 billion dm³ ethanol productions. Having less environmental consequences, different recycling options can make the crop residue an environmentally sound sustainable energy system.

Apurba Sarkar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

,"U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" Residual Fuel Oil by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use",8,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1984" ,"Release Date:","11/15/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","10/31/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_821rsda_dcu_nus_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

488

Three path interference using nuclear magnetic resonance: a test of the consistency of Born's rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Born rule is at the foundation of quantum mechanics and transforms our classical way of understanding probabilities by predicting that interference occurs between pairs of independent paths of a single object. One consequence of the Born rule is that three way (or three paths) quantum interference does not exist. In order to test the consistency of the Born rule, we examine detection probabilities in three path intereference using an ensemble of spin-1/2 quantum registers in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (LSNMR). As a measure of the consistency, we evaluate the ratio of three way interference to two way interference. Our experiment bounded the ratio to the order of $10^{-3} \\pm 10^{-3}$, and hence it is consistent with Born's rule.

Daniel K. Park; Osama Moussa; Raymond Laflamme

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

490

Impact of Biodiesel on Fuel System Component Durability  

SciTech Connect

A study of the effects of biodiesel blends on fuel system components and the physical characteristics of elastomer materials.

Terry, B.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Improving the Design Reliability of Petroleum Pipeline Components on Repair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments are considered that may appreciably improve the design reliability in the repair of petroleum pipeline components.

I. N. Karelin

492

DOSE RATES FROM NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEUTRON ACTIVATION OF FUSION REACTOR C01WONENTS LawrenceNeutron Activation of Fusion Reactor Components Lawrence

Ruby, Lawrence

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Rancho Seco-Planning for Large Components  

SciTech Connect

The Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station ceased operation in June of 1989 and entered an extended period of Safestor to allow funds to accumulate for dismantlement. Incremental dismantlement was begun in 1997 of steam systems and based on the successful work to date, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) board of directors approved full decommissioning in July 1999. A schedule has been developed for completion of decommissioning by 2008, allowing decommissioning funds to accumulate until they are needed. Systems removal began in the Auxiliary Building in October of 1999 and in the Reactor Building in January of 2000. Systems dismantlement continues in the Reactor Building and the Auxiliary Building and should be completed by mid 2003. The Spent Fuel is currently being moved to dry storage in an onsite ISFSI, with completion scheduled for late 2002. The personnel resources on site are currently assigned to support both the dry fuel project and the dismantlement of the facility. Once fuel movement is complete more resources will be provided for dismantlement. Characterization of major components other than the vessel is complete and planning for their removal is in progress with various cut-up and/or shipping options being evaluated. Planning for the vessel and internals removal is being performed. The relatively slow pace of the work allows careful evaluation of cost-effective options as they become available in the industry.

Gardiner, D. E.; Newey, J. M; Snyder, M. W.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

494

Two component-three dimensional catalysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" 1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand, 1998;" " Level: Nation