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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS FOR MULTI-PASS WELDS IN PRESSURE VESSEL AND PIPING COMPONENTS distributions in common pressure vessel and piping components is generated by using the multi-pass finite-walled pipes with various radius to thickness ratios. Both single- and double-V weld joints are investigated

Michaleris, Panagiotis

5

Nondestructive Induced Residual Stress Assessment in Superalloy Turbine Engine Components Using Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Induced Positron Analysis (IPA) has demonstrated the ability to nondestructively quantify shot peening/surface treatments and relaxation effects in single crystal superalloys, steels, titanium and aluminum with a single measurement as part of a National Science Foundation SBIR program and in projects with commercial companies. IPA measurement of surface treatment effects provides a demonstrated ability to quantitatively measure initial treatment effectiveness along with the effect of operationally induced changes over the life of the treated component. Use of IPA to nondestructively quantify surface and subsurface residual stresses in turbine engine materials and components will lead to improvements in current engineering designs and maintenance procedures.

Rideout, C. A.; Ritchie, S. J.; Denison, A. [Positron Systems, Inc., 411 S. Fifth St., Boise, Idaho 83702 (United States)

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Measuring multiple residual-stress components using the contour method and multiple cuts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conventional contour method determines one component of stress over the cross section of a part. The part is cut into two, the contour of the exposed surface is measured, and Bueckner's superposition principle is analytically applied to calculate stresses. In this paper, the contour method is extended to the measurement of multiple stress components by making multiple cuts with subsequent applications of superposition. The theory and limitations are described. The theory is experimentally tested on a 316L stainless steel disk with residual stresses induced by plastically indenting the central portion of the disk. The stress results are validated against independent measurements using neutron diffraction. The theory has implications beyond just multiple cuts. The contour method measurements and calculations for the first cut reveal how the residual stresses have changed throughout the part. Subsequent measurements of partially relaxed stresses by other techniques, such as laboratory x-rays, hole drilling, or neutron or synchrotron diffraction, can be superimposed back to the original state of the body.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swenson, Hunter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pagliaro, Pierluigi [U. PALERMO; Zuccarello, Bernardo [U. PALERMO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Test for consistence of a flyby anomaly simulation with the observed Doppler residuals for the Messenger flybys of Mercury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2007, the observed Earth flyby anomalies have been successfully simulated using an empirical formula (H. J. Busack, 2007). This simulation has led to the prediction of anomaly values, to be expected for the Rosetta flybys of Mars in 2007, and following twice of Earth in 2007 and 2009. While the data for the Mars flyby are yet under evaluation, the predictions of the formula for the last two Earth flybys of Rosetta are fully confirmed now. This is remarkable, since an alternatively proposed formula (Anderson et al., 2007) failed to predict the correct values for the recent flybys. For the Mercury flybys of the Messenger spacecraft, this alternative formula predicts a null result. In the meantime, Doppler residuals of these flybys on 14.01.2008 and 06.10.2008 are availabel. On both flybys, significant residuals were observed, using gravity data derived by Mariner 10 on Mercury (D. E. Smith et al., 2009). According to the authors, these residuals cannot be eliminated totally by adjustment of the second degree gravity coefficients and by assumption of irregular mass concentrations of acceptable value on Mercury. In this investigation, I adapt the output of the simulation program to compare with the measured Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys without changing the formerly derived parameters for the Earth flybys. The simulation with these parameters leads to Doppler residuals of the Mercury flybys compatible with the measured curves. Additionally, the expected flyby anomalies are calculated. Since the gravity field of Mercury is not explored yet with sufficient accuracy, this result cannot be falsified or confirmed until the evaluation of the coming Mercury orbits of Messenger will be finished. If the proposed empirical formula would be confirmed then again, this would be a strong indication of an underlying physical reality.

Hans-Juergen Busack

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

8

Integrated Diagnostic and Prognostic Tools for Residual Life Estimation in Aging Nuclear Power Plant Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent events in Japan have focused renewed attention on the safe operation of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs). A central issue in safe, long-term operations of existing and planned NPPs is the early detection and monitoring of significant materials degradation. Materials aging and degradation in passive components is expected to be the key factor in determining the operational life of an NPP and may limit long-term operations in the current LWR fleet. Methods for detecting and assessing the degradation state in NPP structural materials, followed by approaches to estimate the remaining useful life (RUL) of the component, are therefore necessary for safe, long-term operations. This paper explores advanced diagnostic and prognostic approaches to detecting material degradation, and then determining RUL given the current material state.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Henager, Charles H.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fusion Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss when and how the Verlinde dimensions of a rational conformal field theory can be expressed as correlation functions in a topological LG theory. It is seen that a necessary condition is that the RCFT fusion rules must exhibit an extra symmetry. We consider two particular perturbations of the Grassmannian superpotentials. The topological LG residues in one perturbation, introduced by Gepner, are shown to be a twisted version of the $SU(N)_k$ Verlinde dimensions. The residues in the other perturbation are the twisted Verlinde dimensions of another RCFT; these topological LG correlation functions are conjectured to be the correlation functions of the corresponding Grassmannian topological sigma model with a coupling in the action to instanton number.

Kenneth Intriligator

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Uniform particle-droplet partitioning of 18 organic and elemental components measured in and below  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 mm dry diameter) and droplet residual (above 9 mm ambient diameter) filter samples analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) were dominated by sea salt the population of aerosol particles may consist of external mixtures of multiple types of pure components, where

Russell, Lynn

12

Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual...

13

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Tell: Building a consistent,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Joseph M. Hellerstein, William R. Marczak UC Berkeley November 19, 2010 #12;Show and Tell: BuildingShow and Tell: Building a consistent, replicated shopping cart in Bloom Peter Alvaro, Neil Conway, Joseph M. Hellerstein, William R. Marczak Background The CALM Conjecture Introducing Bloom Writing

California at Irvine, University of

15

BY HOW MUCH CAN RESIDUAL MINIMIZATION ACCELERATE THE CONVERGENCE OF ORTHOGONAL RESIDUAL METHODS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Examples of such pairs are the conjugate gradient (CG) and the conjugate residual (CR) methods, the full-minimal residual (QMR) methods. Also the pairs consisting of the (bi)conjugate gradient squared (CGS, iterative method, Krylov space method, conjugate gradient method, biconjugate gradient method, CG, CGNE

Gutknecht, Martin H.

16

Procedure for Computing Residual Stresses from Neutron Diffraction Data and its Application to Multi-Pass Dissimilar Weld  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool for non-destructive measurement of internal residual stresses of welded structures. The conventional approach for determination of residual stresses requires the knowledge of stress-free lattice spacing a priori. For multiple-pass dissimilar metal welds common to nuclear reactor pipeline systems, the stress-free lattice parameter is a complex function of position due to the chemistry inhomogeneity in the weld region and can be challenging to determine experimentally. This paper presents a new approach to calculate the residual stress field in dissimilar welds without the use of stress-free lattice parameter. The theoretical basis takes advantage of the fact that the normal component of welding residual stresses is typically small for thin plate or pipe welds. The applicability of the new approach is examined and justified in a multi-pass dissimilar metal weld consisting of a stainless steel plate and a nickel alloy filler metal. The level of uncertainties associated with this new approach is assessed. Neutron diffraction experiment is carried out to measure the lattice spacing at various locations in the dissimilar weld. A comb-shaped specimen, electro-discharge machined from a companion weld, is used to determine the stress-free lattice spacing. The calculated results from the new approach are consistent with those from the conventional approach. The new approach is found to be a practical method for determining the two in-plane residual stress components in thin plate or pipe dissimilar metal welds.

Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Crooker, Paul [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspartic acid residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scott1 and Barry LStoddard 2* Summary: -links are each consistent with a parallel coiled coil structure, residues 1-36 of the aspartate receptor were... residues 23-180 of the...

18

Residual stress determination in an overlay dissimilar welded pipe by neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses were determined through the thickness of a dissimilar weld overlay pipe using neutron diffraction. The specimen has a complex joining structure consisting of a ferritic steel (SA508), austenitic steel (F316L), Ni-based consumable (Alloy 182), and overlay of Ni-base superalloy (Alloy 52M). It simulates pressurized nozzle components, which have been a critical issue under the severe crack condition of nuclear power reactors. Two neutron diffractometers with different spatial resolutions have been utilized on the identical specimen for comparison. The macroscopic 'stress-free' lattice spacing (d{sub o}) was also obtained from both using a 2-mm width comb-like coupon. The results show significant changes in residual stresses from tension (300-400 MPa) to compression (-600 MPa) through the thickness of the dissimilar weld overlay pipe specimen.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Em, Vyacheslav [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; Lee, Ho-Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute; Park, Kwang Soo [Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

improper or unnecessary heat-treatments extremely costly. Knowledge of the residual stress ipudient can make production of the component much more efficient and economicaL This knowledge could also be used to predict service life of components...

Pfluger, Ron Atlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

23

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing...

24

Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .............................................................................. 7 Table 2. Components Used in Simulation. ...................................................................... 20 Table 3. Composition of Biomass Feedstock to Biorefinery. ......................................... 43 Table 4. Operating... for optimizing gasification plant design from an economic perspective. Specifically, the problem addressed in this work is stated as follows: Given are: ? A set of biomass feedstocks {i|i = 1,2,?,I } which includes fresh as well as residue biomass ? A set...

Georgeson, Adam

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

Justification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas inside the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volume, the influx and accumulation of residual gas ions reduces the number of working ions in a trap for internal elements, technology of processing and equipment should be adequate. The components of the gasJustification of RHIC EBIS vacuum system. A. Pikin 1. Requirements to the pressure of residual gas

26

Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

Jain, Pranav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

AIAA-2001-0025 SPECTRUM FATIGUE LIFETIME AND RESIDUAL STRENGTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a typical fiberglass laminate configuration turbine blade fiberglass material has been undertaken under at various fractions of the lifetime turbine blade materials.. are consistent with the residual strength of fiberglass spectrum have been studied. Data have been obtained for materials produce results that may

28

Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rice residue and related factors on NH3 volatilization from an acid Beaumont clay (pH 5.4) and an alkaline Lake Charles clay (pH 7.4). The treatments in the greenhouse and lab consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface...

Barghassa, Peyam

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets and Ice Crystals Collected On Board Research Chemical Characterization of Individual Particles and Residuals of Cloud Droplets...

30

Characterization of flue gas residues from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid residues recovered from treatment of flue gas resulting from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) are of particular concern because of ever-increasing worldwide production rates and their concentrations of potentially hazardous transition elements and heavy metals. Three main residue types have been studied in this study: electrostatic precipitator ashes, wet filter cakes, and semidry scrubber residues. Using a large number of residues from two French MSW combustion (MSWC) facilities, the aim of this work is to determine their chemistry and mineralogy in order to shed light on their potential toxicity. The authors find that pollutant concentrations are dependent not only on the composition of MSW but also on the size of particles and flue gas treatment process. Using a procedure based on leaching, grain-size, density, and magnetic separations, the authors present a detailed description of the mineralogy of MSWC solid residues. These residues consist of a very heterogeneous assemblage of glasses, metals, and other crystals in which polluting elements are distributed. The results of this characterization will therefore help to contribute to the development of adequate waste management strategies.

Forestier, L.L. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [ENSG, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Libourel, G. [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [CRPG-CNRS, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); [Univ. H. Poincare, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pulp and paper mill fibrous residuals in excavatable flowable fill Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, & R.N. Kraus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber reclaim is composed of wood cellulose fibers and moisture mills Fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects. The basic components of the wastewater-treatment residuals

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

32

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich, UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich,a.finkelstein}@cs.ucl.ac.uk Abstract Software engineers building a complex

Finkelstein, Anthony

34

Hydroconversion of heavy oils. [Residue of tar sand bitumen distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for hydroconversion of feedstocks consisting essentially of at least one heavy hydrocarbon oil selected from the group consisting of residue of petroleum oil distillation and the residue of tar sand bitumen distillation to enhance the recovery of 350/sup 0/-650/sup 0/F boiling product fraction. The method comprises treating such feed stock with hydrogen at superatmospheric pressure and in the presence of finely divided active hydrogenation catalyst in consecutive reaction stages. An initial reaction stage is carried out at a temperature in the range of 780/sup 0/-825/sup 0/F, and a subsequent reaction stage is directly carried out after the initial reaction stage at a higher temperature in the range of 800/sup 0/F-860/sup 0/F, the temperature of the subsequent reaction stage being at least 20/sup 0/F higher than that of the initial reaction stage.

Garg, D.

1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Critical pulse power components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Consistent nonlinear dynamics: identifying model inadequacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical modelling often aims for the simplest model consistent with the data. A new technique is presented which quantifies the consistency of the model dynamics as a function of location in state space. As is well-known, traditional statistics of nonlinear models like root-mean-square (RMS) forecast error can prove misleading. Testing consistency is shown to overcome some of the deficiencies of RMS error, both within the perfect model scenario and when applied to data from several physical systems using previously published models. In particular, testing for consistent nonlinear dynamics provides insight towards (i) identifying when a delay reconstruction fails to be an embedding, (ii) allowing state dependent model selection and (iii) optimising local neighbourhood size. It also provides a more relevant (state dependent) threshold for identifying false nearest neighbours.

Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Experimental determination of residual stress by neutron diffraction in a boiling water reactor core shroud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual strains in a 51 mm (2-inch) thick 304L stainless steel plate have been measured by neutron diffraction and interpreted in terms of residual stress. The plate, measuring (300 mm) in area, was removed from a 6m (20-ft.) diameter unirradiated boiling water reactor core shroud, and included a multiple-pass horizontal weld which joined two of the cylindrical shells which comprise the core shroud. Residual stress mapping was undertaken in the heat affected zone, concentrating on the outside half of the plate thickness. Variations in residual stresses with location appeared consistent with trends expected from finite element calculations, considering that a large fraction of the residual hoop stress was released upon removal of the plate from the core shroud cylinder.

Payzant, A.; Spooner, S.; Zhu, Xiaojing; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of residual stress on the thin-film elastic moduli calculated from surface acoustic wave spectroscopy experimentsB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of residual stress on the thin-film elastic moduli calculated from surface acoustic wave 23 February 2005 Available online 26 April 2005 Abstract We describe a method to examine how residual equibiaxial stress. The five test samples consisted of TiN films deposited on single-crystal Si substrate

42

Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E. [Department of Physics, Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Generalization of Generalized Arc Consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- binary classic constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs). Based on the Semiring CSP and Valued CSP such as fuzzy CSP, probabilistic CSP, max CSP, and weighted CSP. This extension is based on an idempotent satisfaction problem (CSP), local consistency can be char- acterized as deriving new constraints based on local

Mackworth, Alan K.

44

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Consistence beats causality in recommender systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The explosive growth of information challenges people's capability in finding out items fitting to their own interests. Recommender systems provide an efficient solution by automatically push possibly relevant items to users according to their past preferences. Recommendation algorithms usually embody the causality from what having been collected to what should be recommended. In this article, we argue that in many cases, a user's interests are stable, and thus the previous and future preferences are highly consistent. The temporal order of collections then does not necessarily imply a causality relationship. We further propose a consistence-based algorithm that outperforms the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in disparate real data sets, including \\textit{Netflix}, \\textit{MovieLens}, \\textit{Amazon} and \\textit{Rate Your Music}.

Zhu, Xuzhen; Hu, Zheng; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Tao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transverse Component Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 232-237. Raw Data Radial Component Analysis of Treasure Island earthquake data using seismic by Treasure Island Geotechnical Array near San Francisco, California on 06/26/94. It was a magnitude 4

51

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

52

Rank Reduction for the Local Consistency Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the problem of how simple a solution can be for a given quantum local consistency instance. More specifically, we investigate how small the rank of the global density operator can be if the local constraints are known to be compatible. We prove that any compatible local density operators can be satisfied by a low rank global density operator. Then we study both fermionic and bosonic versions of the N-representability problem as applications. After applying the channel-state duality, we prove that any compatible local channels can be obtained through a global quantum channel with small Kraus rank.

Jianxin Chen; Zhengfeng Ji; Alexander Klyachko; David W. Kribs; Bei Zeng

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

53

Self-consistent resonance in a plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As an application of the solution of the equations of electromagnetic self-consistency in a plasma, found in a previous paper, the study of controlled thermo-nuclear fusion is undertaken. This study utilizes the resonance which can be developed in the plasma, as indicated by the above solution, and is based to an analysis of the underlying forced oscillation under friction. As a consequence, we find that, in this way, controlled thermonuclear fusion seems now to be feasible in principle. The treatment is rather elementary, and it may serve as a guide for more detailed calculations.

Evangelos Chaliasos

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

Evaluation of filter media for clarification of partially dissolved residues containing plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A common process in the chemical industry employs the leaching of a desirable component from an insoluble substrate, followed by filtration to produce a clarified solution of the desirable component and a discardable residue. The work described here involved evaluating sintered metal filter media for separating dissolved plutonium from undissolved residues generated at various locations owned by the Department of Energy throughout the United States. The work was performed during a six-week assignment at the Savannah River Laboratory as part of a high school science enrichment program conducted in the summer of 1989. The leach step used included dissolving the plutonium-containing solids in a solution of nitric-hydrofluoric acid. To simulate the partial solubility of the actual plutonium-containing residues, a non-radioactive power plant flyash was used. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Foley, E.S.

1989-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

55

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotics for GARCH Squared Residual Correlations Istv'an Berkes \\Lambda A. R'enyi Institute a GARCH(p; q) model. Denoting by â?? r n (k); k â?? 1; these autocorrelations computed from a realization words and phrases: GARCH(p; q) sequence, quasi--maximum likelihood esti­ mator, squared residuals

Kokoszka, Piotr

56

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Pittsburgh Residual Funds on FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Sponsored Projects I by the sponsor. Funds cannot be unilaterally retained by the University. Failure to return residual funds related funds on sponsored grants and contracts on the financial accounting records of the University

Sibille, Etienne

57

Data Conversion in Residue Number System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for direct conversion when interaction with the real analog world is required. We first develop two efficient schemes for direct analog-to-residue conversion. Another efficient scheme for direct residue analogique réel est nécessaire. Nous dévelopons deux systèmes efficaces pour la conversion directe du domaine

Zilic, Zeljko

58

Combustion of textile residues in a packed bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Textile is one of the main components in the municipal waste which is to be diverted from landfill for material and energy recovery. As an initial investigation for energy recovery from textile residues, the combustion of cotton fabrics with a minor fraction of polyester was investigated in a packed bed combustor for air flow rates ranging from 117 to 1638 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.027-0.371 m/s). Tests were also carried out in order to evaluate the co-combustion of textile residues with two segregated waste materials: waste wood and cardboard. Textile residues showed different combustion characteristics when compared to typical waste materials at low air flow rates below 819 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.186 m/s). The ignition front propagated fast along the air channels randomly formed between packed textile particles while leaving a large amount of unignited material above. This resulted in irregular behaviour of the temperature profile, ignition rate and the percentage of weight loss in the ignition propagation stage. A slow smouldering burn-out stage followed the ignition propagation stage. At air flow rates of 1200-1600 kg/m{sup 2} h (0.272-0.363 m/s), the bed had a maximum burning rate of about 240 kg/m{sup 2} h consuming most of the combustibles in the ignition propagation stage. More uniform combustion with an increased burning rate was achieved when textile residues were co-burned with cardboard that had a similar bulk density. (author)

Ryu, Changkook; Phan, Anh N.; Sharifi, Vida N.; Swithenbank, Jim [Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC), Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

60

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

Gray, J.H.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

62

Residue temperatures in intermediate energy nucleus-nucleus collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model, we have investigated the reaction dynamics leading to the thermal freeezout for [sup 40]Ar+[sup 124]Sn collisions. Several criteria are assessed for defining the proper thermal freezout time which separates preequilibrium processes from equilbrium processes. One of these criteria, the time dependence of the thermal excitation energy, provides consistent results for defining the thermal freezeout. The other two criteria, the emission rate of nucleons and the quadrupole moment of the momentum distributions, do not consistently provide accurate freezeout times due to the existence of long time scale collective vibrations. The predicted values for the excitation energies and temperatures, obtained assuming Fermi gas level densities, are quite sensitive to the equation of state and the impact parameter. Surprisingly, both the thermal excitation energies and the residue temperatures, in the limit of a large ensemble of parallel collisions, show little sensitivity to the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross section.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Cyclotron Institute, Texas A M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

SAR impulse response with residual chirps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Solid state lighting component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Solid state lighting component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a Densified Large Square Bale Format ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues In a...

69

Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Sustainable System for Residual Hazards Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous, radioactive and other toxic substances have routinely been generated and subsequently disposed of in the shallow subsurface throughout the world. Many of today’s waste management techniques do not eliminate the problem, but rather only concentrate or contain the hazardous contaminants. Residual hazards result from the presence of hazardous and/or contaminated material that remains on-site following active operations or the completion of remedial actions. Residual hazards pose continued risk to humans and the environment and represent a significant and chronic problem that require continuous longterm management (i.e. >1000 years). To protect human health and safeguard the natural environment, a sustainable system is required for the proper management of residual hazards. A sustainable system for the management of residual hazards will require the integration of engineered, institutional and land-use controls to isolate residual contaminants and thus minimize the associated hazards. Engineered controls are physical modifications to the natural setting and ecosystem, including the site, facility, and/or the residual materials themselves, in order to reduce or eliminate the potential for exposure to contaminants of concern (COCs). Institutional controls are processes, instruments, and mechanisms designed to influence human behavior and activity. System failure can involve hazardous material escaping from the confinement because of system degradation (i.e., chronic or acute degradation) or by externalintrusion of the biosphere into the contaminated material because of the loss of institutional control. An ongoing analysis of contemporary and historic sites suggests that the significance of the loss of institutional controls is a critical pathway because decisions made during the operations/remedial action phase, as well as decisions made throughout the residual hazards management period, are key to the longterm success of the prescribed system. In fact, given that society has become more reliant on and confident of engineered controls, there may be a growing tendency to be even less concerned with institutional controls.

Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell system and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cogeneration systems known as Combined Heat and Power (CHP) consist of an internal combustion engine (gas or steam turbine) and with a generator. Together with these main components, there are also various heat engine, a generator and an absorption chiller. The main advantages of these systems in different aspects

Liso, Vincenzo

72

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternating chemoradiotherapy consisting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Each assessment consisted of an anterior... . Alternate consistencies. 6. Coughswallow occasionally. 7. Supraglottic swallow. 8. Thermal stim. 5-10 times......

75

archaeological record consistent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: Sequential Consistency for Heterogeneous-Race-Free DEREK R. HOWER, BRADFORD M. BECKMANN, BENEDICT R: Sequential Consistency for Data-Race-Free (SC for...

76

Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

Miller, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashland Petroleum Company is a production-poor refining and marketing company. A company must have refining flexibility to compete in today's crude and marketing situation. Ashland has adopted a dual approach to achieving the required refining flexibility: development and construction of the RCC process, and development of techniques to practice residual oil conversion in Ashland FCC units. This paper discusses the operating techniques Ashland has used to allow residual oil conversion to be practiced in their present day FCC's and shows some of the yields which have been achieved.

Barger, D.F.; Miller, C.B.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Residual dust charges in discharge afterglow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An on-ground measurement of dust-particle residual charges in the afterglow of a dusty plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance the gravitational force. It was found that positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral dust particles coexisted for more than 1 min after the discharge was switched off. The mean residual charge for 200-nm-radius particles was measured. The dust particle mean charge is about -5e at a pressure of 1.2 mbar and about -3e at a pressure of 0.4 mbar.

Coueedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Boufendi, L.; Samarian, A. A. [GREMI - Groupe de Recherches sur l'Energetique des Milieux Ionises, CNRS/Universite d'Orleans, 14 rue d'Issoudun, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Automatic Methods for Predicting Functionally Important Residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pazos and Alfonso Valencia* Protein Design Group National Center for Biotechnology, Cantoblanco Madrid of protein families into subfamilies in the search for those positions that could have some functional families, testing the statistical meaning of the Tree-determinant residues predicted by three different

Pazos, Florencio

82

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

84

Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements within the SRQRPA with self-consistent short range correlations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0v} of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0v{beta}{beta}-decay) are systematically evaluated using the self-consistent renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (SRQRPA). The residual interaction and the two-nucleon short-range correlations are derived from the charge-dependent Bonn (CD-Bonn) potential. The importance of further progress in the calculation of the 0v{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is stressed.

Benes, Petr [IEAP, Czech Technical University (Czech Republic); Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

RAMA Surveillance Capsule and Component Activation Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the calculated-to-measured ratios associated with the application of the RAMA Fluence Methodology software to light water reactor surveillance capsule and reactor component activation evaluations. Comparisons to measurements are performed for pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor surveillance capsule activity specimens from seventeen operating light water reactors. Comparisons to measurements are also performed for samples removed from the core shroud, top guide, and jet pump brace pads from two reactors. In conclusion: The flexible geometry modeling capabilities provided by RAMA, combined with the detailed representation of operating reactor history and anisotropic scattering detail, produces accurate predictions of the fast neutron fluence and neutron activation for BWR and PWR surveillance capsule geometries. This allows best estimate RPV fluence to be determined without the need for multiplicative bias corrections. The three-dimensional modeling capability in RAMA provides an accurate estimate of the fast neutron fluence for regions far removed from the core mid-plane elevation. The comparisons to activation measurements for various core components indicate that the RAMA predictions are reasonable, and notably conservative (i.e., C/M ratios are consistently greater than unity). It should be noted that in the current evaluations, the top and bottom fuel regions are represented by six inch height nodes. As a result, the leakage-induced decrease in power near the upper and lower edges of the core are not well represented in the current models. More precise predictions of fluence for components that lie above and below the core boundaries could be obtained if the upper and lower fuel nodes were subdivided into multiple axial regions with assigned powers that reflect the neutron leakage at the top and bottom of the core. This use of additional axial sub-meshing at the top and bottom of the core is analogous to the use of pin-wise meshing in peripheral bundles to accurately represent radial leakage effects. The representation of thermal neutron fluence and activations are found to be reasonably accurate and consistently conservative, as demonstrated by comparison to the reactor component thermal neutron reaction activation measurements. Further improvement in the comparisons to measurements could be achieved by exploring the impact of enhanced sub-meshing of the geometry near the components of interest. The mesh densities utilized in the current evaluation are consistent with the mesh requirements for high energy neutron transport. The substantially shorter transport lengths for thermal neutrons relative to high energy neutrons suggests that localized regions of finer meshing are needed in the vicinity of those reactor components requiring thermal neutron fluence evaluations. (authors)

Watkins, Kenneth E.; Jones, Eric N. [TransWare Enterprises Inc., 1565 Mediterranean Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178 (United States); Carter, Robert G. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W. T. Harris Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Building Component Library: An Online Repository to Facilitate Building Energy Model Creation; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the Building Component Library (BCL), the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) online repository of building components that can be directly used to create energy models. This comprehensive, searchable library consists of components and measures as well as the metadata which describes them. The library is also designed to allow contributors to easily add new components, providing a continuously growing, standardized list of components for users to draw upon.

Fleming, K.; Long, N.; Swindler, A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors are solely responsible for the content of this technical presentation. The technical presentation does not necessarily reflect the official position of the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE), and its printing and distribution does not constitute an endorsement of views which may be expressed. Technical presentations are not subject to the formal peer review process by ASAE editorial committees; therefore, they are not to be presented as refereed publications. Citation of this work should state that it is from an ASAE meeting paper. EXAMPLE: Author's Last Name, Initials. 2004. Title of Presentation. ASAE Paper No. 04xxxx. St. Joseph, Mich.: ASAE. For information about securing permission to reprint or reproduce a technical presentation, please contact ASAE at hq@asae.org or 269-429-0300 (2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, MI 49085-9659 USA). Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research highlights: {yields} Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. {yields} Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. {yields} SRCD spectroscopy shows an {alpha}-helical secondary structure. {yields} Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. {yields} Space group is P22{sub 1}2{sub 1} with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase{sub M}75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr{sub 3}370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M{sub W} 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly {alpha}-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

Rajasekaran, Mohan B [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom) [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M [Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)] [Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano [Circular Dichroism Group, Diamond Light Source, Chiltern, Oxfordshire,OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)] [Circular Dichroism Group, Diamond Light Source, Chiltern, Oxfordshire,OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Andrews, Simon C [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)] [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Watson, Kimberly A, E-mail: k.a.watson@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Generalized contexts and consistent histories in quantum mechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze a restriction of the theory of consistent histories by imposing that a valid description of a physical system must include quantum histories which satisfy the consistency conditions for all states. We prove that these conditions are equivalent to imposing the compatibility conditions of our formalism of generalized contexts. Moreover, we show that the theory of consistent histories with the consistency conditions for all states and the formalism of generalized context are equally useful representing expressions which involve properties at different times.

Losada, Marcelo [Instituto de Física Rosario, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Laura, Roberto, E-mail: rlaura@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingeniería y Agrimensura, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Instituto de Física Rosario, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

ORCHIS: CONSISTENCY-DRIVEN DATA QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN SENSING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensing Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.3 Related Energy Efficiency Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.4 Related Data Consistency Models

Shi, Weisong

91

Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Software Agent Architecture for Consistency Management in Distributed Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software Agent Architecture for Consistency Management in Distributed Documents Anthony Finkelstein an account of an architecture for management of consistency relations between distributed documents. We of use of this system in a domain of software engineering documents. Keywords Consistency management, XML

Finkelstein, Anthony

93

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media. A Practical Model for Mobile, Residual, and Entrapped NAPL in Water-Wet Porous Media....

94

In-situ method for treating residual sodium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on radioactive soil contamination from the Chernobyl fallout. Introduction The problem of analysing environmentalNEURAL NETWORK RESIDUAL STOCHASTIC COSIMULATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DATA ANALYSIS V. Demyanov, M original method of stochastic simulation of environmental data -- Neural Network Residual Sequential

97

In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

Kamisli, Fatih

99

Ceramic Component Development Process Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of ceramic components and coatings is critical to the demonstration of advanced fossil energy systems. Ceramic components and coating will play critical role in hot-gas filtration, high- temperature heat exchangers, thermal barrier coatings, and the hot- section of turbines. Continuous-fiber composites (CFCC) are expected to play an increasing role in these applications. This program encompassed five technical areas related to ceramic component development for fossil energy systems.

Boss, D.; Sambasivan, S.; Kuehmann, C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Basic Industrial Research Lab.; Faber, K. [Northwestern University, MEAS Materials Science & Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residues on fruit, forage crops, and animals. The effects of temperature, relative humid? ity, light, wind, and simulated rain on the residual toxicities of many of the chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides used for the control of cotton insects were... humidity. Sunlight was found to be an important factor in reducing the residual effectiveness of dieldrin. Wind and simulated rain reduced the period of residual effectiveness of many of the compounds tested. These investigators have shown...

Hightower, Billie Gene

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

102

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Accomplishments (continued) * Determine the mechanical properties of airfoils from TiAl turbo wheel. * Provide "real" component database for verification of design and life...

103

HEU Holdup Measurements in the 321-M Draw Bench, Straightener, and Fluoroscope Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue on the draw bench, straightener, and the fluoroscope components of the 321-M facility.

Dewberry, R.A.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

RESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposition technique yields residual stress of around 100 MPa and Young's modulus of around 300 GPa. Keywords's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and residual stress of the deposited thin films. In this paper, we propose a newRESIDUAL STRESS AND YOUNG'S MODULUS MEASUREMENT OF CAPACITIVE MICROMACHINED ULTRASONIC TRANSDUCER

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

105

SUPERLAYER RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECT ON THE INDENTATION ADHESION MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a function of film thickness and residual stress. These films were sputter deposited onto thermally oxidized deposition parameters were controlled to produce either a compressive residual stress of 1 GPa or a tensile in a study of compressive and tensile residual stresses created during sputter deposition of tungsten

Volinsky, Alex A.

106

Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Welding residual stresses in ferritic power plant steels J. A. Francis*1 , H. K. D. H require therefore, an accounting of residual stresses, which often are introduced during welding. To do in the estimation of welding residual stresses in austenitic stainless steels. The progress has been less convincing

Cambridge, University of

107

35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 1 Self-consistent energetic particle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 1 Self-consistent energetic, Irvine CA 92697-4575, U.S.A. P5.056 ­ June 13.th, 2008 35.th EPS Plasma Physics Conference Hersonissos Zonca and Liu Chen #12;35th EPS PPC Self-consistent energetic particle nonlinear dynamics ... 2 Abstract

Zonca, Fulvio

108

Standards for Power Electronic Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Power Electronic Components and Systems EPE 14 ECCE Europe Dr Peter R. Wilson #12;Session Outline · "Standards for Power Electronic Components and Systems" ­ Peter Wilson, IEEE PELS Electronics ­ where next? · Wide Band Gap Devices ­ SiC, GaN etc... · Transformers (ETTT) · Power Modules

109

Heat treating of manufactured components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Consistent Data Assimilation of Actinide Isotopes: 235U and 239Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments were analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Inmost cases the results have shown quite large worse results with respect to the corresponding existing evaluations available for ENDF/B-VII. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results were used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. Only the GODIVA and JEZEBEL experimental results were used, in order to exploit information relative to the isotope of interest that are, in this particular case: {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that with reasonable modifications (mostly within the initial standard deviation) it is possible to eliminate the original large discrepancies on the K{sub eff} of the two critical configurations. However, some residual discrepancy remains for a few fission spectral indices that are, most likely, to be attributed to the detector cross sections.

G. Palmiottti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . -slide #1 The SQ-universality and residual properties of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #1 The SQ-universality Main Results Ashot Minasyan SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality and residual properties. . . - slide #2 SQ-universality A group G is called SQ-universal if any countable group

Minasyan, Ashot

112

Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

On the economic interpretation of time consistent dynamic stochastic ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on rigorous mathematical foundations, we impel practical usage of time consistent models as we provide practitioners with an intuitive economic ...

Birgit Rudloff

115

California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

116

High Heat Flux Components Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

Whitley, J.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Combination process for upgrading residual oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for upgrading high boiling residual portions of crude oils comprising metal contaminants, porphyrins, asphaltenes and high molecular weight multi-ring hydrocarbon material. It comprises: charging a high boiling residual portion of crude oil admixed with diluent in contact with suspended upflowing substantially inert fluidizable solids particulate material at an elevated thermal visbreaking temperature in a riser contact zone for a time sufficient to recover therefrom a vaporous hydrocarbon product higher boiling than gasoline partially decarbonized and demetallized to a lower contaminating metals level, quenching the vaporous product of thermal visbreaking below its dew point after separation from solids, charging quenched thermally modified high boiling hydrocarbon product with a crystalline zeolite cracking catalyst under cracking conditions for a hydrocarbon residence time in a riser cracking zone; recovering a hydrocarbon conversion product; separating a combined C{sub 4} minus wet gas product stream of the visbreaking and zeolite catalyst cracking operating to recover a C{sub 3}-C{sub 4} rich fraction separately from a C{sub 2} minus dry gas product fraction, and regenerating the crystalline zeolite contcontaining catalyst.

Busch, L.E.; Walters, P.W.; Zandona, O.

1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. The use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - is reviewed as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. The environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass are covered. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Dale, L; Opilla, R; Surles, T

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Alcohol production from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of carbohydrate sources can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Section 1 is a review of technologies available for the production of ethanol from whole corn. Particular emphasis is placed on the environmental aspects of the process, including land utilization and possible air and water pollutants. Suggestions are made for technological changes intended to improve the economics of the process as well as to reduce some of the pollution from by-product disposal. Ethanol may be derived from renewable cellulosic substances by either enzymatic or acid hydrolysis of cellulose to sugar, followed by conventional fermentation and distillation. Section 2 is a review of the use of two agricultural residues - corn stover (field stalks remaining after harvest) and straw from wheat crops - as a cellulosic feedstock. Two processes have been evaluated with regard to environmental impact - a two-stage acid process developed by G.T. Tsao of Purdue University and an enzymatic process based on the laboratory findings of C.R. Wilke of the University of California, Berkeley. Section 3 deals with the environmental residuals expected from the manufacture of methyl and ethyl alcohols from woody biomass. The methanol is produced in a gasification process, whereas ethanol is produced by hydrolysis and fermentation processes similar to those used to derive ethanol from cellulosic materials.

Opilla, R.; Dale, L.; Surles, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Market-Consistent Valuation of Long-Term Insurance Contracts -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market-Consistent Valuation of Long-Term Insurance Contracts - Valuation Framework-Consistent Valuation of Long-Term Insurance Contracts Valuation Framework and Application to German Private Health with respect to prot sharing rules and premium adjustment mechanisms. In contrast to the valuation of life

Pfeifer, Holger

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Consistent Query Answers in Inconsistent Databases Marcelo Arenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is proved as well. 1 Introduction Integrity constraints capture an important normative aspect of every of consistent answer in a relational database that may violate given integrity constraints. This notion are consistent with the integrity constraints and which are not. In this pa­ per, we provide a logical

Bertossi, Leopoldo

122

Allowing Atomic Objects to Coexist with Sequentially Consistent Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) sequential consistency orders all write operations, while causal consistency does not require to order the operations on all the concurrent objects be totally ordered in such a way that each read operation obtains the last value written into the corresponding object. They differ in the meaning of the word "last

Roy, Matthieu

123

Consistent inventory control Elvira Marie B. Aske,, and Sigurd Skogestad,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent inventory control Elvira Marie B. Aske,, and Sigurd Skogestad, Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract Inventory or material of this paper is to propose the more general local- consistency rule for evaluating inventory control systems

Skogestad, Sigurd

124

Combustion turbine deposition observations from residual and simulated residual oil studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burning residual oil in utility combustion turbines and the consequent deposition on blades and vanes may adversely affect reliability and operation. Corrosion and deposition data for combustion turbine materials have been obtained through dynamic testing in pressurized passages. The deposition produced by the 1900/sup 0/F (1038/sup 0/C) combustion gases from a simulated and a real residual oil on cooled Udimet 500 surfaces is described. Higher deposition rates for the doped fuel than for the real residual oil raised questions of whether true simulation with this approach can be achieved. Particles 4-8..mu.. m in diameter predominated in the gas stream, with some fraction in the 0.1-12 ..mu.. m range. Deposition rates seemed to be influenced by thermophoretic delivery of small molten particles, tentatively identified as magnesium pyro and metavanadates and free vanadium pentoxide, which may act to bond the larger solid particles arriving by inertial impaction to turbine surfaces. Estimated maintenance intervals for current utility turbines operating with washed and treated residual oil agreed well with field experience.

Whitlow, G.A.; Cohn, A.; Lee, S.Y.; Mulik, P.R.; Sherlock, T.P.; Wenglarz, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Tensile creep database of commercial TiAl alloys was generated for probabilistic turbo rotor component design and life prediction Daido HIP TiAl Howmet TiAl 16 Managed by...

126

A Document Model Management Framework based on Core Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Document Model Management Framework based on Core Components Michael Strommer, Christian Pichler for a consistent framework for the management of electronic business documents, together with tool support rises. Tools, that foster the management of document models in a way to overcome interoperability issues

127

Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

Process converts incineration slag into stabilized residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1973 and 1974, EMC-Services designed and built a physico-chemical treatment plant in Hombourg, in France's Alsatian region. The plant is still in operation. Since then, EMC-Services has developed substantial experience in environmental projects, becoming one of the top companies internationally with experience and practice in designing, building and operating hazardous waste treatment plants. EMC-Services operates in France in Salaise, Strasbourg, Mitry-Mory, and Saint-Vulbas, where eight incinerators treat solid, liquid, highly halogenated and nonhazardous industrial waste. The incinerators, built or updated by EMC-Services, have a total capacity of about 200,000 tons per year. In the new process, incineration of special industrial wastes produces non-volatilized solid residue or slag, which is sent for disposal, in compliance with regulations, to special disposal plants. Future European regulations will incorporate landfilling criteria requiring such slag to be stabilized.

Thauront, J.; Deneux-Mustin, S. (EMC-Services, Paris (France)); Durecu, S. (EMC-Services, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France)); Fraysse, G. (EMC-Services, Saint-Vulbas (France)); Berthelin, J. (Centre de Pedologie Biologique, Vandoeuvre-Les Nancy (France))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Consistent and efficient reconstruction of latent tree models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the problem of learning a latent tree graphical model where samples are available only from a subset of variables. We propose two consistent and computationally efficient algorithms for learning minimal latent ...

Choi, Myung Jin

132

Using XML to Build Consistency Rules for Distributed Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using XML to Build Consistency Rules for Distributed Specifications Andrea Zisman Wolfgang Emmerich)20 76794413 a.zisman@soi.city.ac.uk {w.emmerich | a.finkelstein}@cs.ucl.ac.uk ABSTRACT The work presented

Finkelstein, Anthony

133

Flexible Consistency Checking Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich, Anthony Finkelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible Consistency Checking Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich, Anthony Finkelstein Department of Computer Science University College London Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich

Finkelstein, Anthony

134

Consistent blind protein structure generation from NMR chemical shift data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent blind protein structure generation from NMR chemical shift data Yang Shen*, Oliver Lange been successfully applied in a blind manner to nine protein targets with molecular masses up to 15.4 k

Baker, David

135

On Consistent Mapping in Distributed Environments using Mobile Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community, and is the stepping stone towards making a robot completely autonomous. A hybrid solution to the SLAM problem is proposed based on "first localize then map" principle. It is provably consistent and has great potential for real time application...

Saha, Roshmik

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Data Structures for Generalised Arc Consistency for Extensional Constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extensional representation remains the most effective way to model a facet of a problem it is essential and structured problems. 2 Background The finite-domain constraint satisfaction problem (CSP) consists of

St Andrews, University of

137

The EIS process consists of several steps, each with  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EIS process consists of several steps, each with opportunities for you to get involved. BPA follows these six steps for EISs on projects, plans and policies. 1. Notice of Intent...

138

Characteristics of naphthenic and paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual oil from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons segregated by liquid chromatography from a residual oil after removal of the resins and solid hydrocarbons. The studied hydrocarbons were fractionated on the basis of molecular weight (by molecular distillation) and on the basis of the content of rings (by thermal diffusion separation in a laboratory column). The results of mass-spectrometric analysis indicate that the first fraction consists mainly of isoparaffins and naphthenes with few rings. The polycyclic condensed naphthenes are concentrated in the last fraction. The content of isoparaffins drops off and the content of condensed polycyclic naphthenic structures increases from the second fraction to the next to the last. It is concluded that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual oil from mixed West Siberian crudes have a relatively narrow composition and therefore have similar physicochemical properties.

Detusheva, E.P.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Muchinskii, T.D.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

Markiv, B. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine)] [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine); Tokarchuk, M. [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine) [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 1 Svientsitskii St., 79011 Lviv (Ukraine); National University “Lviv Polytechnic,” 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv (Ukraine)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

active site residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

active site residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in human transferrin and Tyr Oksana Lockridge 2008-01-01 140 RESEARCH ARTICLE Benefits of organic residues and chemical fertilizer Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: RESEARCH...

142

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996...

143

Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices," source for backcast estimates prior to January 1983. 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices 36 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997...

144

Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

145

Disappearance of fusionlike residues and the nuclear equation of state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for massive residues from {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 40}Ar+{sup 27}Al collisions were calculated with an improved Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation. The calculated residue cross sections decrease with incident energy, an effect which does not appear related to the residue excitation energy. Larger residue cross sections result from calculations with larger in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections or with equations of state which are less attractive at subnuclear density. This dual sensitivity may be eliminated by measurements of observables associated with the coincident light particles.

Xu, H.M.; Lynch, W.G.; Danielewicz, P.; Bertsch, G.F. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA) Department of Physics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA))

1990-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

acetamido trideoxyhexose residue: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

147

autophosphorylated residues required: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

though no flow is present. The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The...

148

abradable coating residual: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

149

Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Each process may be a primitive process indicating a single action; or it may be a composite process consisting of a number of de nitions and simpler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 Processes Each process may be a primitive process indicating a single action; or it may be a composite process consisting of a number of de#12;nitions and simpler component processes bound together by process constructors, indicating a combination of the actions of its component processes. The structure

Jones, Geraint

151

Transducer for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Large Component Removal/Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

Wheeler, D. M.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

156

Radionuclide Leaching from Residual Solids Remaining after Acid Dissolution of Composite K East Canister Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were performed to examine mixed nitric/hydrofluoric acid leach treatments for decontaminating dissolver residual solids (KECDVSR24H-2) produced during a 20- to 24-hr dissolution of a composite K East (KE) Basin canister sludge in 95 C 6 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}). The scope of this testing has been described in Section 4.5 of ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basin Sludge Treatment Process'' (Flament 1998). Radionuclides sorbed or associated with the residual solids generated in the K Basin sludge treatment process can restrict disposal of this solid to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The starting dissolver residual solid for this testing, KECDVSR24H-2, contains radionuclides at concentrations which exceed the ERDF Waste Acceptance Criteria for TRU by about a factor of 70, for {sup 239}Pu by a factor of 200, and for {sup 241}Am by a factor of 50. The solids also exceed the ERDF criterion for {sup 137}Cs by a factor of 2 and uranium by a factor of 5. Therefore, the radionuclides of greatest interest in this leaching study are first {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am (both components of TRU) and then uranium and {sup 137}Cs.

Delegard, C.H.; Rinehart, D.E.; Soderquist, C.Z.; Fadeff, S.K.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited $0^+$ state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass.

Michael Duerr; Manfred Lindner; Kai Zuber

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Consistent interaction vertices in arbitrary topological BF theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we extend the previous results from [12] to the computation of all consistent self-interactions for topological BF theories with maximal field spectra in D =5,6,7,8 and present some partial results on possible generalizations on a space-time of arbitrary dimension D. For convenience, the deformation of the solution to the master equation in the context of the BRST-antifield formalism is used as a general method of constructing consistent interacting gauge field theories together with most of the standard hypotheses on quantum field theories on Minkowski space-times.

Bizdadea, C.; Cioroianu, E. M.; Saliu, S. O.; Sararu, S. C.; Stanciu-Oprean, L. [Department of Physics, University of Craiova, 13 Al. I. Cuza Street, Craiova 200585 (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited 0{sup +} state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass .

Duerr, Michael; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technical University Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Self-consistent quasiparticle model for quark-gluon plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we present a self-consistent quasi-particle model for quark-gluon plasma and apply it to explain the non-ideal behaviour seen in lattice simulations. The basic idea, borrowed from electrodynamic plasma, is that the gluons acquire mass as it propagates through plasma due to collective effects and is approximately equal to the plasma frequency. The statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of such a system is studied by treating it as an ideal gas of massive gluons. Since mass or plasma frequency depends on density, which itself is a thermodynamic quantity, the whole problem need to be solved self-consistently.

Vishnu M. Bannur

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid Protein Structure Detection and Assignment using Residual Dipolar Couplings Michael A substructures by exploiting the orientational constraint of residual dipolar coupling (RDC). PEPMORPH reverses: We have tested PEPMORPH on a variety of real proteins deposited in the Protein Data Base (PDB), using

162

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Symmetrized Weight Enumerators for Lifted Quadratic Residue Codes I. M. Duursma Dept for the computation of structural parameters for ring-linear codes. This article therefore presents a method to eÃ?ciently compute weight enumerators of linear codes over primary integer residue rings. For the lifted QR-codes

Duursma, Iwan M.

163

Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

Michaleris, Panagiotis

164

Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission- works, where energy efficiency is a critical design consideration. We assume that multiple relay nodes

Leung, Kin K.

166

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because composites and adhesive joints are made from different phases with different thermal expansion coefficients, they inevitably develop residual thermal stresses. When designing composites or adhesive joints, it is important

Nairn, John A.

167

PCB (polychlorinated biphenyl) residues in transformer carcasses: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had three objectives. The first was to assess the population of PCB-containing transformers remaining in service in the US in 1988. While this could not be done with great precision, it appears that the population of oil-filled transformers containing > 50 /mu/g PCB/g oil has decreased by some 15% since 1982 and that the population of askarel-filled transformers has decreased by some 40% in the same time period. This progress could be continued and accelerated if additional reliable and accepted routes for disposal of PCBs contained in transformers would be developed. The second and third objectives of this project have been to examine two simplified approaches to this end. The second objective was to determine if, by draining PCB-containing oil from transformers and refilling with PCB-free oil, a level of PCBs below 50 ppM (/mu/g/g oil) could be reached with assurance. It appears that reclassification of ''PCB-contaminated'' oil-filled transformers (50--500 /mu/g PCB/g oil) of all ratings by draining and refilling could be done routinely. The third objective was to determine the level of residual PCBs left on the metallic surfaces of askarel-filled transformers which, if these units were refilled with PCB-free mineral transformer oil, would have resulted in concentrations of <50 /mu/g PCB/g oil. It appears that cleaning the surfaces of the metallic components, after careful separation and disposal of the liquid and impregnated solid insulations, to a level of 400 /mu/gPCB/100 cm/sup 2/ would result in transformer carcasses of all sizes which would contain less PCBs than would be found were these transformers to have contained oil at the level of 50 /mu/gPCB/g oil. 7 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Rouse, T.O.; Raymond, C.T.; Fessler, W.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation.

Khomenko, E., E-mail: khomenko@iac.es; Collados, M.; Vitas, N. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Díaz, A. [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Programming Language Perspective on Transactional Memory Consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behavior, a variant of the well-known consistency condition of opacity is suf- ficient for observational-1-4503-2065-8/13/07 ...$15.00. node := new(StackNode); node.val := val; result := abort; while (result == abort) do { result yield simple code for pushing an element onto a stack represented as a singly-linked list: in this case

Gotsman, Alexey

171

Self-consistent scattering theory for the radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent scattering theory for the radiative transport equation Arnold D. Kim School by the radiative transport equation. We present a theory for the transport equation with an inhomogeneous.5850. 1. INTRODUCTION The radiative transport equation governs light propaga- tion in random media

Kim, Arnold D.

172

Self-consistent methods in nuclear structure physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a very brief description of the Hartree Fock method in nuclear structure physics, discuss the numerical methods used to solve the self-consistent equations, and analyze the precision and convergence properties of solutions. As an application, they present results pertaining to quadrupole moments and single-particle quadrupole polarizations in superdeformed nuclei with A {approximately} 60.

Dobaczewski, J. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Theoretical Physics][Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Joint Inst. for Heavy Ion Research]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A nuclear Frechet space consisting of C -functions and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nuclear Fr´echet space consisting of C -functions and failing the bounded approximation property Dietmar Vogt Abstract An easy and transparent example is given of a nuclear Fre´echet space failing of Grothendieck whether every nuclear Fr´echet space has the bounded approximation property was open for quite

Vogt, Dietmar

174

Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective Collaboration and Consistency Management in Business Process Modeling Co-Chairs: Moises they are lost. Business Process Modeling (BPM) is a promising approach to enable agility in business process of experts. Business analysts gather requirements and create high-level process models. Solution architects

Czarnecki, Krzysztof

175

Charge lattices and consistency of 6D supergravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We extend the known consistency conditions on the low-energy theory of six-dimensional N = 1 supergravity. We review some facts about the theory of two-form gauge fields and conclude that the charge lattice ? for such a ...

Seiberg, Nathan

176

Summary of residential environmental issues and program consistency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Act authorizes the Bonneville Power Administration to acquire all necessary energy resources to serve Northwest utilities choosing to acquire power from the agency and to give conservation the highest priority in responding to the demand for electricity. To meet this mandate, the agency has established residential conservation programs for weatherizing existing homes, building new energy-efficient homes, and promoting energy-efficient appliances. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared this report to compare and contrast the environmental requirements and issues involving Bonneville's residential conservation programs. The key environmental concern confronting each of the programs with measures aimed at reducing air leakage rates in houses (both new and existing) is indoor air quality (IAQ). This report reviews the similarity and consistency of the programs' approach to IAQ, their impacts, program features, mitigation techniques, and new information about IAQ and other potential environmental issues confronting the programs. The information is intended for use in comparing and contrasting how environmental features mesh with other program features, checking consistency across programs and determining whether it makes sense for programs to be consistent, determining consistency between programs, and providing information to aid program planning in light of potential environmental issues and new information. 31 refs.

Baechler, M C

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

178

Thermodynamical Consistency of Excluded Volume Hadron Gas Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The new excluded volume hadron gas model by Singh et al. [1-7] is critically discussed. We demonstrate that in this model the results obtained from relations between thermodynamical quantities disagree with the corresponding results obtained by statistical ensemble averaging. Thus, the model does not satisfy the requirements of thermodynamical consistency.

M. I. Gorenstein

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

179

Self-consistent modeling of charge redistributions in Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent modeling of charge redistributions in Josephson junctions J. K. Freericks, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 #12;Josephson Proximity-Effect Junctions · A Superconductor-Normal metal, Georgetown University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 S N S I I V V Ic #12;Andreev Bound States · At an N

Freericks, Jim

180

Self-consistent modeling of SINIS and SNSNS Josephson junctions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent modeling of SINIS and SNSNS Josephson junctions J. K. Freericks Collaborators: Paul of Naval Research. J. K. Freericks, Georgetown University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 #12;Josephson University, Josephson Junction talk, 2000 S I S I I V V Ic #12;Josephson Proximity-Effect Junctions

Freericks, Jim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nonlinearly consistent schemes for coupled problems in reactor analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems and the performance was analyzed for a 0-D and 1-D model. The results indicate that consistent approximations can be made to enhance the overall accuracy in conventional codes with such simple nonintrusive techniques. A detailed analysis of a...

Mahadevan, Vijay Subramaniam

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Self-consistent quasi-particle model for relativistic plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relativistic plasma with radiation at thermodynamic equilibrium is ageneral system of interest in astrophysics and high energy physics. We develop a new self-consistent quasi-particle model for such a system to take account of collective behaviour of plasma andthermodynamic properties are derived. It is applied to electrodynamic plasma and quark gluon plasma and compared with existing results.

Vishnu M. Bannur

2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of residual lube stock from West Siberian crudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lube stocks from West Siberian crudes are characterized by high contents of aromatic hydrocarbons and by high viscosity indexes of the naphthenic/paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that isoparaffins account for one-third of the total naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons. The study showed that the naphthenic/paraffinic hydrocarbons of the residual lube stock from West Siberia crudes, even with a variation of molecular weight over broad limits, are relatively uniform in composition. They consist mainly of isoparaffinic and monocyclic and noncondensed naphthenic structures.

Detusheva, E.P.; Bogdanov, Sh.K.; Khramtsova, L.P.; Nekrasova, A.V.; Shkol'nikov, V.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

185

SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada Department of Computer Science versions, component revision numbers and change indications are derived as a well- founded version called "component revisions" and the basic fine-grained "type revisions", can subsequently be used

186

Incinerator residue in bituminous base construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for use of the material in a bituminous base. Preliminary investigation on the optimum mix design included Hveem stability, Marshall stability and Durability tests, A test section consisting of the experimental hot-mixed pavement, littercrete, and a... for flexural fatigue tests, Hveem and Marshall stabilities, thermal expansion, direct tension, splitting tensile and Schmidt tests. Four in. (10. 2 cm. ) diameter cores were taken after compaction (before traffic) and after six months in service. Samples...

Haynes, Joseph Anthony

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: • Non-linear effects • Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections • Multi-isotope consistent assimilation • Consistency between differential and integral experiments

G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

190

An evaluation on the environmental consequences of residual CFCs from obsolete household refrigerators in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) contained in household refrigerators consist mainly of CFC-11 and CFC-12, which will be eventually released into the environment. Consequentially, environmental releases of these refrigerants will lead to ozone depletion and contribute significantly to the greenhouse effect, if waste refrigerators are not disposed of properly. In the present paper, the potential release of residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China is examined, and their contributions to ozone depletion and greenhouse effect are compared with those of other recognized ozone-depleting substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs). The results imply that annual potential amounts of released residual CFC-11 and CFC-12 will reach their maximums at 4600 and 2300 tons, respectively in 2011, and then decrease gradually to zero until 2020. Meanwhile, the amounts of their most widely used substitutes HCFC-141b and HFC-134a will keep increasing. Subsequently, the contribution ratio of these CFCs and their substitutes to ozone depletion will remain at 25% through 2011, and reach its peak value of 34% by 2018. The contribution to greenhouse effect will reach its peak value of 0.57% by 2010. Moreover, the contribution ratio of these CFCs to the total global release of CFCs will steadily increase, reaching its peak of 15% by 2018. Thus, this period from 2010 to 2018 is a crucial time during which residual CFCs and their substitutes from obsolete household refrigerators in China will contribute significantly to ozone depletion.

Zhao Xiangyang; Duan Huabo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

On the grade consistent theories of micromorphic elastic solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the investigation of specific nonlocal phenomena the second-order displacement gradient has been added to the independent constitutive variables used in the classical theories of elastic solids. In this paper we outline the hystorical development of the subject and present a nonlinear grade consistent theory of micromorphic elastic solids in which the independent constitutive variables are the deformation gradient, the second-order displacement gradient, microdeformation tensor, and microdeformation gradient. Then, we present the linearized theory and establish a uniqueness result with no definiteness assumption on the elastic coefficients. The theory is used to obtain the basic eqations of a grade consistent theory of microstretch elastic bodies. The field equations for an isotropic and homogeneous elastic body are presented. A counterpart of the Cauchy-Kowalevski-Somigliana solution of the classical elastodynamics is established.

Iesan, D. [Department of Mathematics, 'Al.I. Cuza' University, and 'O. Mayer' Institute of Mathematics, Romanian Academy, 700506 Iasi (Romania)

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Formalization of the data flow diagram rules for consistency check  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In system development life cycle (SDLC), a system model can be developed using Data Flow Diagram (DFD). DFD is graphical diagrams for specifying, constructing and visualizing the model of a system. DFD is used in defining the requirements in a graphical view. In this paper, we focus on DFD and its rules for drawing and defining the diagrams. We then formalize these rules and develop the tool based on the formalized rules. The formalized rules for consistency check between the diagrams are used in developing the tool. This is to ensure the syntax for drawing the diagrams is correct and strictly followed. The tool automates the process of manual consistency check between data flow diagrams.

Ibrahim, Rosziati; 10.5121/ijsea.2010.1406

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Consistent metric combinations in cosmology of massive bigravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massive bigravity models are interesting alternatives to standard cosmology. In most cases however these models have been studied for a simplified scenario in which both metrics take homogeneous and isotropic forms (Friedmann-Lema\\^{i}tre-Robertson-Walker; FLRW) with the same spatial curvatures. The interest to consider more general geometries arises in particular in view of the difficulty so far encountered in building stable cosmological solutions with homogeneous and isotropic metrics. Here we consider a number of cases in which the two metrics take more general forms, namely FLRW with different spatial curvatures, Lema\\^{i}tre, Lema\\^{i}tre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB), and Bianchi I, as well as cases where only one metric is linearly perturbed. We discuss possible consistent combinations and find that only some special cases of FLRW-Lema\\^{i}tre, LTB-LTB and FLRW-Bianchi I combinations give consistent, non-trivial solutions.

Henrik Nersisyan; Yashar Akrami; Luca Amendola

2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Consistent Bimetric Theory and its Application to Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, the construction of ghost-free nonlinear massive spin-2 interactions solved a long outstanding problem in classical field theory. The consistent formulation requires a second rank-two tensor (or metric) and therefore has the form of a bimetric theory. Besides providing the solution to an old problem in field theory, ghost-free bimetric theory also has an interesting phenomenology: Its homogeneous and isotropic background solutions can reproduce the expansion history of the universe without any input of vacuum energy.

Angnis Schmidt-May

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Cosmological Modification to Energy from Mach-Hamilton Consistency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If Mach's Principle explains the Newtonian inertial reaction to acceleration then the role of the 'fixed stars' should also be manifest through Hamilton's formulation of mechanics. This consistency may be achieved if the expression for relativistic energy contains a cosmological coefficient that is (currently) equal to one. The presence of the required cosmological term exactly identifies the rest energy of a body as its gravitational potential energy due to the mass of the Universe.

Scott Funkhouser

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent full wave simulations of lower hybrid waves John C. Wright P. T. Bonoli - MIT E .J for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions L.A. Berry, D.B. Batchelor, E.F. Jaeger, E. D`Azevedo D. Green C. Milanesio #12;3 Outline · Introduction to Lower Hybrid waves · Modeling LH waves ­ Ray tracing ­ Full Wave

Wright, John C.

197

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DDT RESIDUES IN SEAWATER AND PARTICULATE MATTER IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM JAMES L. COX in the California current system were analyzed for DDT residues. DDT residue concentrations in whole seawater are discussed in relation to mechanisms of land-sea DDT residue transfer. DDT residue concentrations

198

The Importance of Identifying Different Components of a Mixture Distribution in the Prediction of Field Returns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a given date. The power transformer population consists of a mixture of two different designs, an oldThe Importance of Identifying Different Components of a Mixture Distribution in the Prediction, it is important to identify components of the mixture and do statistical inference based on the stratified data

199

Title: Crack Diagnostics via Fourier Transform: Real and Imaginary Components vs. Power Spectral Density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: Crack Diagnostics via Fourier Transform: Real and Imaginary Components vs. Power Spectral simultaneously the real and imaginary components of the Fourier transforms as diagnostics features approach consists of using new features based on the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform

Giurgiutiu, Victor

200

Turbulence intensity pulse propagation with self-consistent nonlinear noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model of turbulence intensity spreading with self-consistent nonlinear noise is derived systematically for the simple dynamical model of resistivity gradient driven turbulence. Local effective drive, thermal conduction damping, nonlinear coupling, and spatial scattering effects are included. As a consequence of nonlinear mode coupling processes (i.e., triad mode interactions), turbulence energy can be spatially scattered, leading to turbulence propagation and spreading. However, the range of any nonlinear mode interactions of the background with a test mode is restricted to within a few mode scale widths from the test mode rational surface. The speed of a turbulent spreading front is calculated. This front speed is effectively constant on macroscopic scales. We show that the effect of self-consistent nonlinear noise on the intensity front speed is modest, as a consequence of the ordering {Delta}{sub c}consistent mode coupling noise and ad hoc external noise are discussed. The broader implications of these results for turbulence front propagation are identified and explained.

Wang, Z. H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Department of Physics and Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Guercan, Oe. D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique-CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Garbet, X. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method for computing self-consistent solution in a gun code  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Complex gun code computations can be made to converge more quickly based on a selection of one or more relaxation parameters. An eigenvalue analysis is applied to error residuals to identify two error eigenvalues that are associated with respective error residuals. Relaxation values can be selected based on these eigenvalues so that error residuals associated with each can be alternately reduced in successive iterations. In some examples, relaxation values that would be unstable if used alone can be used.

Nelson, Eric M

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

204

Testing the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a model independent method to test the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age, assuming the distance duality relation. We use type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and observational Hubble data, to reconstruct the luminosity distance D_L(z), the angle averaged distance D_V(z) and the Hubble rate H(z), using Gaussian processes regression technique. We obtain estimate of the distance duality relation in the redshift range 0.1

Nair, Remya; Jain, Deepak

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Multi-wavelength constraints on the inflationary consistency relation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first attempt to use a combination of CMB, LIGO, and PPTA data to constrain both the tilt and the running of primordial tensor power spectrum through constraints on the gravitational wave energy density generated in the early universe. Combining measurements at different cosmological scales highlights how complementary data can be used to test the predictions of early universe models including the inflationary consistency relation. Current data prefers a slightly positive tilt ($n_t = 0.13^{+0.54}_{-0.75}$) and a negative running ($n_{t, {\\rm run}} assumptions regarding the UV cutoff ($k_{\\...

Meerburg, P Daniel; Hadzhiyska, Boryana; Meyers, Joel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Infrared self-consistent solutions of bispinor QED3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum electrodynamics in three dimensions in the bispinor formulation is considered. It is shown that the Dyson-Schwinger equations for fermion and boson propagators may be self-consistently solved in the infrared domain if on uses the Salam's vertex function. The parameters defining the behavior of the propagators are found numerically for different values of coupling constant and gauge parameter. For weak coupling the approximated analytical solutions are obtained. The renormalized gauge boson propagator (transverse part) is shown in the infrared domain to be practically gauge independent.

Tomasz Radozycki

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Discrete KP equation with self-consistent sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation with sources obtained recently by the "source generalization" method can be incorporated into the squared eigenfunction symmetry extension procedure. Moreover, using the known correspondence between Darboux-type transformations and additional independent variables, we demonstrate that the equation with sources can be derived from Hirota's discrete KP equations but in a space of higher dimension. In this way we uncover the origin of the source terms as coming from multidimensional consistency of the Hirota system itself.

Adam Doliwa; Runliang Lin

2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Multi-writer consistency conditions for shared memory objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system composed of n application processes, p0;:::;pn¡1, and some number of shared objects. In this thesis, we focus on read/write registers. Such a register, x, supports two operations, read and write, which can be executed by the processes. Each... and responses, we denote by ji the subsequence of containing all the invocations and responses performed by process pi. Deflnition 2 A sequence of invocations and responses is a schedule if, for each i, 0 • i < n, the following hold: † ji consists...

Shao, Cheng

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Multi-writer consistency conditions for shared memory objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system composed of n application processes, p0;:::;pn?1, and some number of shared objects. In this thesis, we focus on read/write registers. Such a register, x, supports two operations, read and write, which can be executed by the processes. Each... and responses, we denote by ji the subsequence of containing all the invocations and responses performed by process pi. Deflnition 2 A sequence of invocations and responses is a schedule if, for each i, 0 ? i < n, the following hold: ? ji consists...

Shao, Cheng

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Self-consistent input-output formulation of quantum feedback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple method of analyzing quantum feedback circuits is presented. The classical analysis of feedback circuits can be generalized to apply to quantum systems by mapping the field operators of various outputs to other inputs via the standard input-output formalism. Unfortunately, this has led to unphysical results such as the violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for in-loop fields. This paper shows that this general approach can be redeemed by ensuring a self-consistently Hermitian Hamiltonian. The calculations are based on a noncommutative calculus of operator derivatives. A full description of several examples of quantum linear and nonlinear feedback for optical systems is presented.

Yanagisawa, M. [Department of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Hope, J. J. [Department of Quantum Science, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D.

213

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables required under a fixed-price award, after costs in fulfilling the requirements of the award have been

Weston, Ken

214

Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 #12;#12;Minimizing High Spatial Frequency Residual in Active Space Telescope Mirrors Thomas Gray, David W. Miller June 2008 SSL # 4-08 This work is based on the unaltered text

215

An urban infill : a residual site in Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

Kobel, Marika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Residual dust charges in an afterglow plasma , M. Mikikian  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma was performed in a rf discharge. An upward thermophoretic force was used to balance]. For the study concerning residual charges, the top electrode was cooled. An upward thermophoretic force

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

218

RELATIVE RESIDUAL BOUNDS FOR INDEFINITE SINGULAR HERMITIAN MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual bounds, indefinite Hermitian matrix, eigen- values, perturbation theory, relative perturbations. These theorems are proper generalization of results on a semi-definite Hermitian matrix SIAM Journal on Matrix

Truhar, Ninoslav

219

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S. (Energy Systems)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Parton distributions based on a maximally consistent dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of data that enters a global QCD analysis can have a substantial impact on the resulting parton distributions and their predictions for collider observables. One of the main reasons for this has to do with the possible presence of inconsistencies, either internal within an experiment or external between different experiments. In order to assess the robustness of the global fit, different definitions of a conservative PDF set, that is, a PDF set based on a maximally consistent dataset, have been introduced. However, these approaches are typically affected by theory biases in the selection of the dataset. In this contribution, after a brief overview of recent NNPDF developments, we propose a new, fully objective, definition of a conservative PDF set, based on the Bayesian reweighting approach. Using the new NNPDF3.0 framework, we produce various conservative sets, which turn out to be mutually in agreement within the respective PDF uncertainties, as well as with the global fit. We explore some of their implications for LHC phenomenology, finding also good consistency with the global fit result. These results provide a non-trivial validation test of the new NNPDF3.0 fitting methodology, and indicate that possible inconsistencies in the fitted dataset do not affect substantially the global fit PDFs.

Juan Rojo

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Self-consistent Green's functions with three-body forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present thesis aims at studying the properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter from a Green's functions point of view, including two-body and three-body chiral forces. An extended self-consistent Green's function formalism is defined to consistently incorporate three-body forces in the many-body calculations. The effect of three-nucleon interactions is included via the construction of a dressed two-body density dependent force. This is obtained performing an average of the leading order three-body terms in the chiral effective field theory expansion. The dressed force corresponds to the use of an in-medium propagator in the average which takes into account the correlations characterizing the system at each stage of the many-body calculation. The total energy of the system is obtained by means of a modified Galitskii-Migdal-Koltun sumrule to correctly account for the effect of three-body forces. Microscopic as well as macroscopic properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter are analyzed in detailed.

Arianna Carbone

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Surface Tension of Electrolyte Solutions: A Self-consistent Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the surface tension of electrolyte solutions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Employing field-theoretical methods and considering short-range interactions of anions with the surface, we expand the Helmholtz free energy to first-order in a loop expansion and calculate the excess surface tension. Our approach is self-consistent and yields an analytical prediction that reunites the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We obtain analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of concentrations for different salts using one fit parameter, reproducing the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.10.1029

Tomer Markovich; David Andelman; Rudi Podgornik

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

225

Consistency analysis of Kaluza-Klein geometric sigma models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geometric sigma models are purely geometric theories of scalar fields coupled to gravity. Geometrically, these scalars represent the very coordinates of space-time, and, as such, can be gauged away. A particular theory is built over a given metric field configuration which becomes the vacuum of the theory. Kaluza-Klein theories of the kind have been shown to be free of the classical cosmological constant problem, and to give massless gauge fields after dimensional reduction. In this paper, the consistency of dimensional reduction, as well as the stability of the internal excitations, are analyzed. Choosing the internal space in the form of a group manifold, one meets no inconsistencies in the dimensional reduction procedure. As an example, the SO(n) groups are analyzed, with the result that the mass matrix of the internal excitations necessarily possesses negative modes. In the case of coset spaces, the consistency of dimensional reduction rules out all but the stable mode, although the full vacuum stability remains an open problem.

M. Vasilic

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

226

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Opportunities and Challenges for Nondestructive Residual Stress Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a long time, nondestructive residual stress assessment has been one of the greatest opportunities as well as one of the greatest challenges for the NDE community, and probably it will remain so in the foreseeable future. The most critical issue associated with nondestructive residual stress assessment seems to be that of selectivity. Numerous NDE methods have been found to be sufficiently sensitive to the presence of residual stress, but unfortunately also rather sensitive to other spurious variations that usually accompany residual stresses, such as anisotropic texture, microstructural inhomogeneity, plastic deformation, etc., which could interfere with, or even overshadow, the elastic strain caused by the sought residual stress. The only sufficiently selective NDE method that is more or less immune from these spurious effects is X-ray diffraction measurement, which however does not have the required penetration depth in most applications unless high-energy neutron radiation is used. It is timely for the community to sit back and ask where we are in this important area. This paper presents an overview of the various indirect techniques that have been used to measure residual stress in the past. It is shown that traditional techniques have a number of limitations, which have spurred several recent research programs. Some of the new techniques that are presently being examined in the NDE community are reviewed and the current status of these research efforts is assessed.

Nagy, P. B. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221-0070 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

228

Heavy Water Components Test Reactor Decommissioning - Major Component Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility (Figure 1) was built in 1961, operated from 1962 to 1964, and is located in the northwest quadrant of the Savannah River Site (SRS) approximately three miles from the site boundary. The HWCTR facility is on high, well-drained ground, about 30 meters above the water table. The HWCTR was a pressurized heavy water test reactor used to develop candidate fuel designs for heavy water power reactors. It was not a defense-related facility like the materials production reactors at SRS. The reactor was moderated with heavy water and was rated at 50 megawatts thermal power. In December of 1964, operations were terminated and the facility was placed in a standby condition as a result of the decision by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission to redirect research and development work on heavy water power reactors to reactors cooled with organic materials. For about one year, site personnel maintained the facility in a standby status, and then retired the reactor in place. In 1965, fuel assemblies were removed, systems that contained heavy water were drained, fluid piping systems were drained, deenergized and disconnected and the spent fuel basin was drained and dried. The doors of the reactor facility were shut and it wasn't until 10 years later that decommissioning plans were considered and ultimately postponed due to budget constraints. In the early 1990s, DOE began planning to decommission HWCTR again. Yet, in the face of new budget constraints, DOE deferred dismantlement and placed HWCTR in an extended surveillance and maintenance mode. The doors of the reactor facility were welded shut to protect workers and discourage intruders. The $1.6 billion allocation from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to SRS for site clean up at SRS has opened the doors to the HWCTR again - this time for final decommissioning. During the lifetime of HWCTR, 36 different fuel assemblies were tested in the facility. Ten of these experienced cladding failures as operational capabilities of the different designs were being established. In addition, numerous spills of heavy water occurred within the facility. Currently, radiation and radioactive contamination levels are low within HWCTR with most of the radioactivity contained within the reactor vessel. There are no known insults to the environment, however with the increasing deterioration of the facility, the possibility exists that contamination could spread outside the facility if it is not decommissioned. An interior panoramic view of the ground floor elevation taken in August 2009 is shown in Figure 2. The foreground shows the transfer coffin followed by the reactor vessel and control rod drive platform in the center. Behind the reactor vessel is the fuel pool. Above the ground level are the polar crane and the emergency deluge tank at the top of the dome. Note the considerable rust and degradation of the components and the interior of the containment building. Alternative studies have concluded that the most environmentally safe, cost effective option for final decommissioning is to remove the reactor vessel, steam generators, and all equipment above grade including the dome. Characterization studies along with transport models have concluded that the remaining below grade equipment that is left in place including the transfer coffin will not contribute any significant contamination to the environment in the future. The below grade space will be grouted in place. A concrete cover will be placed over the remaining footprint and the groundwater will be monitored for an indefinite period to ensure compliance with environmental regulations. The schedule for completion of decommissioning is late FY2011. This paper describes the concepts planned in order to remove the major components including the dome, the reactor vessel (RV), the two steam generators (SG), and relocating the transfer coffin (TC).

Austin, W.; Brinkley, D.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

ADAPTION OF NONSTANDARD PIPING COMPONENTS INTO PRESENT DAY SEISMIC CODES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With spiraling energy demand and flat energy supply, there is a need to extend the life of older nuclear reactors. This sometimes requires that existing systems be evaluated to present day seismic codes. Older reactors built in the 1960s and early 1970s often used fabricated piping components that were code compliant during their initial construction time period, but are outside the standard parameters of present-day piping codes. There are several approaches available to the analyst in evaluating these non-standard components to modern codes. The simplest approach is to use the flexibility factors and stress indices for similar standard components with the assumption that the non-standard component’s flexibility factors and stress indices will be very similar. This approach can require significant engineering judgment. A more rational approach available in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which is the subject of this paper, involves calculation of flexibility factors using finite element analysis of the non-standard component. Such analysis allows modeling of geometric and material nonlinearities. Flexibility factors based on these analyses are sensitive to the load magnitudes used in their calculation, load magnitudes that need to be consistent with those produced by the linear system analyses where the flexibility factors are applied. This can lead to iteration, since the magnitude of the loads produced by the linear system analysis depend on the magnitude of the flexibility factors. After the loading applied to the nonstandard component finite element model has been matched to loads produced by the associated linear system model, the component finite element model can then be used to evaluate the performance of the component under the loads with the nonlinear analysis provisions of the Code, should the load levels lead to calculated stresses in excess of Allowable stresses. This paper details the application of component-level finite element modeling to account for geometric and material nonlinear component behavior in a linear elastic piping system model. Note that this technique can be applied to the analysis of B31 piping systems.

D. T. Clark; M. J. Russell; R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess residue contributions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Incinerators in England and Summary: . To assess the risks to health from ash and air pollution control residues, the Agency assessed the risks... Solid Residues from...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceptable residual magnetic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residual limb. A small Neodymium-Iron-Boron magnet... of a small permanent magnet into the distal residual ... Source: Peshkin, Michael A.- Department of Mechanical...

232

A Simplified Self-Consistent Probabilities Framework to Characterize Percolation Phenomena on Interdependent Networks : An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interdependent networks are ubiquitous in our society, ranging from infrastructure to economics, and the study of their cascading behaviors using percolation theory has attracted much attention in the recent years. To analyze the percolation phenomena of these systems, different mathematical frameworks have been proposed including generating functions, eigenvalues among some others. These different frameworks approach the phase transition behaviors from different angles, and have been very successful in shaping the different quantities of interest including critical threshold, size of the giant component, order of phase transition and the dynamics of cascading. These methods also vary in their mathematical complexity in dealing with interdependent networks that have additional complexity in terms of the correlation among different layers of networks or links. In this work, we review a particular approach of simple self-consistent probability equations, and illustrate that it can greatly simplify the mathemati...

Feng, Ling; Hu, Yanqing

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Consistency condition for inflation from (broken) conformal symmetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum, i.e. the three-point correlation function of primordial density fluctuations, in slow-roll inflation. It follows from the defining property of slow-roll inflation that primordial correlation functions inherit most of their structure from weakly broken de Sitter symmetries. Using holographic techniques borrowed from the AdS/CFT correspondence, the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum can be mapped to a set of stress-tensor Ward identities in a weakly broken 2+1-dimensional Euclidean CFT. We construct the consistency condition from these Ward identities using conformal perturbation theory. This requires a second order Ward identity and the use of the evolution equation. Our result also illustrates a subtle difference between conformal perturbation theory and the slow-roll expansion.

Schalm, Koenraad; Aalst, Ted van der [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands); Shiu, Gary, E-mail: kschalm@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: shiu@physics.wisc.edu, E-mail: vdaalst@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Environment--Induced Decoherence, Classicality and Consistency of Quantum Histories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove that for an open system, in the Markovian regime, it is always possible to construct an infinite number of non trivial sets of histories that exactly satisfy the probability sum rules. In spite of being perfectly consistent, these sets manifest a very non--classical behavior: they are quite unstable under the addition of an extra instant to the list of times defining the history. To eliminate this feature --whose implications for the interpretation of the formalism we discuss-- and to achieve the stability that characterizes the quasiclassical domain, it is necessary to separate the instants which define the history by time intervals significantly larger than the typical decoherence time. In this case environment induced superselection is very effective and the quasiclassical domain is characterized by histories constructed with ``pointer projectors''.

Juan Pablo Paz; Wojciech Hubert Zurek

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Susskind, Leonard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Leonard Susskind

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Consistent Gravitationally-Coupled Spin-2 Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspired by the translational gauge structure of teleparallel gravity, the theory for a fundamental massless spin-2 field is constructed. Accordingly, instead of being represented by a symmetric second-rank tensor, the fundamental spin-2 field is assumed to be represented by a spacetime (world) vector field assuming values in the Lie algebra of the translation group. The flat-space theory naturally emerges in the Fierz formalism and is found to be equivalent to the usual metric-based theory. However, the gravitationally coupled theory, with gravitation itself described by teleparallel gravity, is shown not to present the consistency problems of the spin-2 theory constructed on the basis of general relativity.

H. I. Arcos; Tiago Gribl Lucas; J. G. Pereira

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

238

Hanford tank residual waste – contaminant source terms and release models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual waste is expected to be left in 177 underground storage tanks after closure at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State (USA). In the long term, the residual wastes represent a potential source of contamination to the subsurface environment. Residual materials that cannot be completely removed during the tank closure process are being studied to identify and characterize the solid phases and estimate the release of contaminants from these solids to water that might enter the closed tanks in the future. As of the end of 2009, residual waste from five tanks has been evaluated. Residual wastes from adjacent tanks C-202 and C-203 have high U concentrations of 24 and 59 wt%, respectively, while residual wastes from nearby tanks C-103 and C-106 have low U concentrations of 0.4 and 0.03 wt%, respectively. Aluminum concentrations are high (8.2 to 29.1 wt%) in some tanks (C-103, C-106, and S-112) and relatively low (<1.5 wt%) in other tanks (C-202 and C-203). Gibbsite is a common mineral in tanks with high Al concentrations, while non-crystalline U-Na-C-O-P±H phases are common in the U-rich residual wastes from tanks C-202 and C-203. Iron oxides/hydroxides have been identified in all residual waste samples studied to date. Contaminant release from the residual wastes was studied by conducting batch leach tests using distilled deionized water, a Ca(OH)2-saturated solution, or a CaCO3-saturated water. Uranium release concentrations are highly dependent on waste and leachant compositions with dissolved U concentrations one or two orders of magnitude higher in the tests with high U residual wastes, and also higher when leached with the CaCO3-saturated solution than with the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution. Technetium leachability is not as strongly dependent on the concentration of Tc in the waste, and it appears to be slightly more leachable by the Ca(OH)2-saturated solution than by the CaCO3-saturated solution. In general, Tc is much less leachable (<10 wt% of the available mass in the waste) than previously predicted. This may be due to the coprecipitation of trace concentrations of Tc in relatively insoluble phases such as Fe oxide/hydroxide solids.

Deutsch, William J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrogenation of individual components isolated from Athabasca bitumen vacuum resid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to produce synthetic fuels from heavy oils and vacuum resids depends on a number of factors, among them being geological origin, thermal history and type of upgrading process. In general, the properties of resids are sufficiently different that for each a unique set of processing conditions can be found to optimize its conversion to distillate. Ideally, one would like to predict a resid's upgradability and the optimum processing conditions from a few simple analytical lab tests. Unfortunately, properties of vacuum resids determined by conventional analytical methods correlate only loosely with upgradability. The pitch conversion and distillate yield most commonly used to monitor processes provide little insight into the upgrading chemistry. The same can be said for global parameters such as sulfur and nitrogen conversions. At present there is no recourse but to process each feedstock on a suitable large scale. This is expensive and time consuming. The objective of the present study is to establish a good model of upgrading chemistry that explains which components in a feedstock cause problems, which are most reactive, which interact with catalysts, and which convert to distillate or residue. Such knowledge should lead to analytical methods sensitive to the chemical changes occurring during upgrading. This paper reports the modified chromatographic separation procedures and some initial results for the hydroprocessing of Athabasca bitumen vacuum resid (ABVB) and its maltene and asphaltene components using a newly designed bubbling microautoclave.

Dawson, W.H. (CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)); Chornet, E.; Tiwari, P.; Heitz, M. (Sherbrooke Univ., Quebec (Canada))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Efficient speaker verification using Gaussian mixture model component clustering.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In speaker verification (SV) systems that employ a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to make decisions on a supervector derived from Gaussian mixture model (GMM) component mean vectors, a significant portion of the computational load is involved in the calculation of the a posteriori probability of the feature vectors of the speaker under test with respect to the individual component densities of the universal background model (UBM). Further, the calculation of the sufficient statistics for the weight, mean, and covariance parameters derived from these same feature vectors also contribute a substantial amount of processing load to the SV system. In this paper, we propose a method that utilizes clusters of GMM-UBM mixture component densities in order to reduce the computational load required. In the adaptation step we score the feature vectors against the clusters and calculate the a posteriori probabilities and update the statistics exclusively for mixture components belonging to appropriate clusters. Each cluster is a grouping of multivariate normal distributions and is modeled by a single multivariate distribution. As such, the set of multivariate normal distributions representing the different clusters also form a GMM. This GMM is referred to as a hash GMM which can be considered to a lower resolution representation of the GMM-UBM. The mapping that associates the components of the hash GMM with components of the original GMM-UBM is referred to as a shortlist. This research investigates various methods of clustering the components of the GMM-UBM and forming hash GMMs. Of five different methods that are presented one method, Gaussian mixture reduction as proposed by Runnall's, easily outperformed the other methods. This method of Gaussian reduction iteratively reduces the size of a GMM by successively merging pairs of component densities. Pairs are selected for merger by using a Kullback-Leibler based metric. Using Runnal's method of reduction, we were able to achieve a factor of 2.77 reduction in a posteriori probability calculations with no loss in accuracy when the original UBM consisted of 256 component densities. When clustering was implemented with a 1024 component UBM, we achieved a computation reduction of 5 with no loss in accuracy and a reduction by a factor of 10 with less than 2.4% relative loss in accuracy.

De Leon, Phillip L. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); McClanahan, Richard D.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

242

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Battery components employing a silicate binder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hazard consistent structural demands and in-structure design response spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current analysis methodology for the Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities is specified in ASCE Standard 4. This methodology is based on the use of deterministic procedures with the intention that enough conservatism is included in the specified procedures to achieve an 80% probability of non-exceedance in the computed response of a Structure, System. or Component for given a mean seismic design input. Recently developed standards are aimed at achieving performance-based, risk consistent seismic designs that meet specified target performance goals. These design approaches rely upon accurately characterizing the probability (hazard) level of system demands due to seismic loads consistent with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses. This paper examines the adequacy of the deterministic SSI procedures described in ASCE 4-98 to achieve an 80th percentile of Non-Exceedance Probability (NEP) in structural demand, given a mean seismic input motion. The study demonstrates that the deterministic procedures provide computed in-structure response spectra that are near or greater than the target 80th percentile NEP for site profiles other than those resulting in high levels of radiation damping. The deterministic procedures do not appear to be as robust in predicting peak accelerations, which correlate to structural demands within the structure.

Houston, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Carl J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Outsourcing the Design of Structural Building Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

component design work stateside. vi 1 Introduction The outsourcing of structural building component design has recently become available to component manufacturers in the United States. These manufacturers of metal plate connected (MPC) wood roof... of the effectiveness of outsourcing as a means of fulfilling the design requirements of MPC wood trusses. Although 1 this report does not evaluate other structural building components (i.e., i- joists, engineered wood beams and wall panels), the analysis provided...

Swearingin, Adam V.

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

Souvatzis, Petros, E-mail: petros.souvatsiz@fysik.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Materials Theory, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Niklasson, Anders M. N., E-mail: amn@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

IMPROVING CONSISTENCY OF PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS IN THE DOE COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low-level waste (LLW) performance assessment (PA) process has been traditionally focused on disposal facilities at a few United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites and commercial disposal facilities. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the scope of the use of PA-like modeling approaches, involving multiple activities, facilities, contractors and regulators. The scope now includes, for example: (1) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) assessments, (2) CERCLA disposal cells, (3) Waste Determinations and High-Level Waste (HLW) Closure activities, (4) Potential on-site disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste, and (5) In-situ decommissioning (including potential use of existing facilities for disposal). The dramatic increase in the variety of activities requiring more detailed modeling has resulted in a similar increase in the potential for inconsistency in approaches both at a site and complexwide scale. This paper includes a summary of USDOE Environmental Management (EM) sponsored initiatives and activities for improved consistency. New initiatives entitled the Performance Assessment Community of Practice and Performance Assessment Assistance Team are also introduced.

Seitz, R; Elmer Wilhite, E

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Towards consistent Electroweak Precision Data constraints in the SMEFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the impact of many previously neglected effects of higher dimensional operators when fitting to Electroweak Precision data (EWPD) in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). We calculate the general case of $2 \\rightarrow 2$ fermion scattering in the SMEFT to order $\\mathcal{O}(\\bar{v}_T^2/\\Lambda^2)$ valid on and off the $Z$ pole, in the massless fermion limit. We demonstrate that previously neglected corrections scale as $\\Gamma_Z M_Z/\\bar{v}_T^2$ in the partial widths extracted from measured cross sections at LEPI, compared to the leading effect of dimension six operators in anomalous $Z$ couplings. Further, constraints on leading effects of anomalous $Z$ couplings are also modified by neglected perturbative corrections and dimension eight operators. We perform a minimal EWPD fit to illustrate the size of the error these corrections induce, when bounding leading effects. These considerations relax bounds compared to a naive leading order analysis, and show that constraints that rise above the percent level are subject to substantial theoretical uncertanties. We also argue that renormalization group running global constraints expressed through $\\chi^2$ functions to a common scale, and then minimizing and performing a global fit of all data allows more consistent constraints to be obtained in the SMEFT.

Laure Berthier; Michael Trott

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Brent F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Shihai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Principal Components Analysis for Binary Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Formulations of Principal Components Analysis . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 Generalization of Sparse Principal Components Analysis to Binary Variables... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3 Review of Estimation Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Overview of Dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 II SPARSE PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ANALYSIS FOR BI- NARY DATA...

Lee, Seokho

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nutritive characteristics of forage chemical components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cattle are fed as a herd such a relation could have an important influence on the intake of roughage The rate of disappearance of digesta from the reticulo-rumen has been suggested as a factor affecting voluntary intake (Balch and Campling, 1962... the undigested. residues pass through the alimentary tract. Because of the importance of the amount of digesta 23 in the reticulo-rumen in the regulation of the voluntary intake of roughage, the time of retention of food residues in this part of the tract...

Buentello, Jose Luis

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Consistent neutron kinetics data generation for nodal transient calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current three-dimensional transient codes for thermal reactors are mostly based on two-group diffusion-theory nodal models. In the two-group approach no explicit distinction is made between prompt fission neutrons and delayed neutrons. Consequently, effective delayed neutron fractions have traditionally been used in an attempt to compensate for this shortcoming. A fundamentally better approach would be to solve the nodal kinetics equations in a sufficient number of energy groups to explicitly capture neutron emission spectrum effects. However, this would require the availability of a multi-group nodal transient code as well as a lattice code to generate the appropriate multi-group nodal data for the simulator. One such simulator is the PARCS nodal transient code, which is widely used and recognized as representative of the current state-of-the-art. Unfortunately, a proper nodal data preparation path between PARCS and a lattice code is not available. Even though several industrial lattice codes could be considered as candidates, most of them are tailored to producing two-group nodal data and would require modifications to produce multi-group prompt and delayed neutron emission spectra. In this paper, the particular modifications required to match the TransLAT lattice code and the PARCS nodal transient code for BWR transient applications are reported. Some modifications to PARCS were also required to make two-group and multi-group applications fully consistent. Numerical results are presented both to verify the proper functioning of these modifications and to illuminate the impact of various nodal kinetics data approximations in a selected transient calculation. In particular, the significance of blending rodded and un-rodded kinetics data in partially rodded nodes is demonstrated. It is also confirmed that the use of delayed neutron importance factors in two-group calculations notably reduces the differences between two-group and multi-group kinetics calculations. (authors)

Akdeniz, B. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mueller, E.; Panayotov, D. [Westinghouse Electric Sweden, SE - 721 63 Vaesteraas (Sweden); Ivanov, K. N. [Penn State Univ., Nuclear Engineering Program, Univ. Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Accuracy and Consistency of Respiratory Gating in Abdominal Cancer Patients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate respiratory gating accuracy and intrafractional consistency for abdominal cancer patients treated with respiratory gated treatment on a regular linear accelerator system. Methods and Materials: Twelve abdominal patients implanted with fiducials were treated with amplitude-based respiratory-gated radiation therapy. On the basis of daily orthogonal fluoroscopy, the operator readjusted the couch position and gating window such that the fiducial was within a setup margin (fiducial-planning target volume [f-PTV]) when RPM indicated “beam-ON.” Fifty-five pre- and post-treatment fluoroscopic movie pairs with synchronized respiratory gating signal were recorded. Fiducial motion traces were extracted from the fluoroscopic movies using a template matching algorithm and correlated with f-PTV by registering the digitally reconstructed radiographs with the fluoroscopic movies. Treatment was determined to be “accurate” if 50% of the fiducial area stayed within f-PTV while beam-ON. For movie pairs that lost gating accuracy, a MATLAB program was used to assess whether the gating window was optimized, the external-internal correlation (EIC) changed, or the patient moved between movies. A series of safety margins from 0.5 mm to 3 mm was added to f-PTV for reassessing gating accuracy. Results: A decrease in gating accuracy was observed in 44% of movie pairs from daily fluoroscopic movies of 12 abdominal patients. Three main causes for inaccurate gating were identified as change of global EIC over time (?43%), suboptimal gating setup (?37%), and imperfect EIC within movie (?13%). Conclusions: Inconsistent respiratory gating accuracy may occur within 1 treatment session even with a daily adjusted gating window. To improve or maintain gating accuracy during treatment, we suggest using at least a 2.5-mm safety margin to account for gating and setup uncertainties.

Ge, Jiajia; Santanam, Lakshmi; Yang, Deshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: pparikh@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

DDT residues in human milk samples from Delhi, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The widespread use of DDT in India has resulted in increased levels of the insecticide in the ecosystem and, therefore, the potential possible health hazards has been voiced. DDT-residues excreted in milk have been reported from different parts of the world; however, very few reports did appear from India. In fact, there is no report on DDT-content in human milk from Delhi area where higher levels of DDT and BHC in human adipose tissues and blood have already been reported. Higher bioaccumulation of DDT might reflect the higher excretion of residues in milk. The authors have, therefore, attempted a systematic study to monitor DDT-residues in human milk samples collected from various hospitals of Delhi (India).

Zaidi, S.S.A.; Bhatnagar, V.K.; Banerjee, B.D.; Balakrishnan, G.; Shah, M.P.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Residual stress and damage-induced critical fracture on CO2 laser treated fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized damage repair and polishing of silica-based optics using mid- and far-IR CO{sub 2} lasers has been shown to be an effective method for increasing optical damage threshold in the UV. However, it is known that CO{sub 2} laser heating of silicate surfaces can lead to a level of residual stress capable of causing critical fracture either during or after laser treatment. Sufficient control of the surface temperature as a function of time and position is therefore required to limit this residual stress to an acceptable level to avoid critical fracture. In this work they present the results of 351 nm, 3 ns Gaussian damage growth experiments within regions of varying residual stress caused by prior CO{sub 2} laser exposures. Thermally stressed regions were non-destructively characterized using polarimetry and confocal Raman microscopy to measure the stress induced birefringence and fictive temperature respectively. For 1 {approx} 40s square pulse CO{sub 2} laser exposures created over 0.5-1.25 kW/cm{sup 2} with a 1-3 mm 1/e{sup 2} diameter beam (T{sub max} {approx} 1500-3000 K), the critical damage site size leading to fracture increases weakly with peak temperature, but shows a stronger dependence on cooling rate, as predicted by finite element hydrodynamics simulations. Confocal micro-Raman was used to probe structural changes to the glass over different thermal histories and indicated a maximum fictive temperature of 1900K for T{sub max} {ge} 2000 K. The effect of cooling rate on fictive temperature caused by CO{sub 2} laser heating are consistent with finite element calculations based on a Tool-Narayanaswamy relaxation model.

Matthews, M; Stolken, J; Vignes, R; Norton, M

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

He, Yun; Ding, Chris

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

263

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Ocean Engineering WAVE INDUCED RESIDUAL PORE-WATER PRESSURES IN SANDBEDS A Thesis by Jack W. Deyries Approved as to style and content by: J. B. Her bich (Chairman of Committee) Y. K. Lou (Member) W. A. Dunlap (Member) R. O. Reid (Member...-Water Pressure . . . . . 43 Development of Residual Pore-Mater Pressure 46 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Wave Height Recording Pore-Water Pressure Recording Permeability of Sand Permeability of Glass Beads Wave Form (least steep) Wave Form (middle steepness...

DeVries, Jack Walter

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic aluminum clad uranium–10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U–10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U–10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U–10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly -250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and -140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the aluminum cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the aluminum cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U–10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size.

D. W. Brown; M. A. Okuniewski; J. D. Almer; L. Balogh; B. Clausen; J. S. Okasinski; B. H. Rabin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to detect travel-times with a precision of 0. l nanoseconds and an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanoseconds. A residual stress reference standard developed for previous research was used as the sample to measure travel-times. The sample was designed...

Kypa, Jagan Mohan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPERTIES OF RESIDUALS FOR SPATIAL POINT PROCESSES A. BADDELEY, University of Western Australia J. MØLLER, University of Aalborg A.G. PAKES, University of Western Australia Abstract For any point process & Statistics M019, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands WA 6009, Australia Postal

Baddeley, Adrian

268

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

Dai, Yang

269

Trigeneration in a northern Chinese village using crop residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gasification of crop residues can provide modern energy carriers to rural areas at potentially at- tractive in rural areas of developing countries by the introduction of mod- ern, clean energy carriers (e.g., fluid the prospects for providing such energy carriers to a rural village in Jilin province, China: clean gas

270

Two Component Model of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the possibility that the dark energy is made up of two or more independent components, each having a different equation of state. We fit the model with supernova and gamma-ray burst (GRB) data from resent observations, and use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique to estimate the allowed parameter regions. We also use various model selection criteria to compare the two component model with the LCDM, one component dark energy model with static or variable w(XCDM), and with other multi-component models. We find that the two component models can give reasonably good fit to the current data. For some data sets, and depending somewhat on the model selection criteria, the two component model can give better fit to the data than XCDM with static w and XCDM with variable w parameterized by w = w_0 + w_az/(1+z).

Yan Gong; Xuelei Chen

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

ASSESSMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN SRS AND HANFORD 3013 INNER AND CONVENIENCE CANS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is a plausible corrosion mechanism for the stainless steel 3013 containers during their lifetime for plutonium material storage if sufficient electrolyte is present within the container. Contributing factors for SCC, such as fabrication and welding residual stresses, are present in the 3013 cans. Convenience and inner cans from both Hanford and SRS are made by a flow form process, which cold works the stainless steel during fabrication. Additionally, the inner cans also are sealed at the can top with a closure weld to the sealing plug. Only SRS and Hanford were tested since moisture levels were significant for SCC. As part of the 3013 corrosion plan for FY09, testing in a boiling magnesium chloride solution was performed on actual 3013 convenience and inner cans to determine if the residual stresses were sufficient for the initiation and propagation of SCC. Additional testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution was also performed on 304L stainless steel SCC coupons, i.e. stressed teardrop-shaped samples (teardrops), and an inner can welded top to provide comparative results and to assess the effect of residual stresses in a less aggressive environment. The testing performed under this task consisted of 3013 inner and convenience cans and 304L teardrops exposed to a boiling magnesium chloride solutions per ASTM G36 and a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C following the guidance of ASTM G123. Cracking occurred in all can types including the inner can bottom and welded top and the bottoms of the SRS and Hanford convenience cans when exposed to the boiling magnesium chloride solution at 155 C. Cracking occurred at different times indicative of the residual stress levels in the cans. 304L teardrops cracked in the shortest time interval and therefore provide a conservative estimate for can performance. Testing in a 40% calcium chloride solution at 100 C demonstrated that cracking occurs in a less aggressive environment but at significantly longer times than in the boiling magnesium chloride. Vapor space cracking was also found to occur in the inner can welded top exposed over the boiling magnesium chloride solution and on 304L teardrops exposed over a hot calcium chloride solution.

Mickalonis, J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Key residues for the oligomerization of A{beta}42 protein in Alzheimer's disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} oligomers are neurotoxins and likely the causing agents for Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein form globular oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein oligomers contain SDS-resistant tetramers and hexamers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cysteine substitutions at residues 31, 32, 34, 39-41 disrupt A{beta}42 oligomerization. -- Abstract: Deposition of amyloid fibrils consisting of amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) protein as senile plaques in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. However, a growing body of evidence shows that soluble A{beta} oligomers correlate better with dementia than fibrils, suggesting that A{beta} oligomers may be the primary toxic species. The structure and oligomerization mechanism of these A{beta} oligomers are crucial for developing effective therapeutics. Here we investigated the oligomerization of A{beta}42 in the context of a fusion protein containing GroES and ubiquitin fused to the N-terminus of A{beta} sequence. The presence of fusion protein partners, in combination with a denaturing buffer containing 8 M urea at pH 10, is unfavorable for A{beta}42 aggregation, thus allowing only the most stable structures to be observed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed globular oligomers, which bound weakly to thioflavin T and Congo red. SDS-PAGE shows that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed SDS-resistant hexamers and tetramers. In contrast, A{beta}40 fusion protein remained as monomers on SDS gel, suggesting that the oligomerization of A{beta}42 fusion protein is not due to the fusion protein partners. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis at 22 residue positions further revealed that single cysteine substitutions of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues (I31, I32, L34, V39, V40, and I41) led to disruption of hexamer and tetramer formation, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions between these residues are most critical for A{beta}42 oligomerization.

Ngo, Sam [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Guo, Zhefeng, E-mail: zhefeng@ucla.edu [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

275

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

276

Interfaces between highly incompatible polymers of different stiffness: Monte Carlo simulations and self-consistent field calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate interfacial properties between two highly incompatible polymers of different stiffness. The extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the binary polymer melt yield detailed interfacial profiles and the interfacial tension via an analysis of capillary fluctuations. We extract an effective Flory-Huggins parameter from the simulations, which is used in self-consistent field calculations. These take due account of the chain architecture via a partial enumeration of the single chain partition function, using chain conformations obtained by Monte Carlo simulations of the pure phases. The agreement between the simulations and self-consistent field calculations is almost quantitative, however we find deviations from the predictions of the Gaussian chain model for high incompatibilities or large stiffness. The interfacial width at very high incompatibilities is smaller than the prediction of the Gaussian chain model, and decreases upon increasing the statistical segment length of the semi-flexible component.

Marcus Mueller; Andreas Werner

1997-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN · Low-Platinum and Platinum-Free Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction at PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes · Low-Platinum-Loading Catalysts for Fuel Cells · Scale-Up of Carbon/Carbon Composite Bipolar Plates #12;Stack Component Projects

280

Self-Consistent Fokker-Planck Treatment Of Particle Distributions in Astrophysical Plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy, multi-component plasmas in which pair creation and annihilation, lepton-lepton scattering, lepton-proton scattering, and Comptonization all contribute to establishing the particle and photon distributions, are present in a broad range of compact astrophysical objects. Earlier work has included much of the microphysics needed to account for electron-photon and electron-proton interactions, but little has been done to handle the redistribution of the particles as a result of their Coulomb interaction with themselves in an arbitrary case. Our goal here is to use a Fokker-Planck approach in order to develop a fully self-consistent theory for the interaction of arbitrarily distributed particles and radiation to arrive at an accurate representation of the high-energy plasma in these sources. We conduct several tests representative of two dominant segments of parameter space and discuss physical implications of the non-Maxwellian distribution function. Approximate analytical forms for the electron distribution in the case of strongly non-Maxwellian plasmas are given.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

About consistence between pi N Delta spin-3/2 gauge couplings and electromagnetic gauge invariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the consistence between the recently proposed "spin 3/2 gauge" interaction for the Delta resonance with nucleons and pions, and the fundamental electromagnetic gauge invariance in any radiative amplitude. Chiral symmetric pion-derivative pi N Delta couplings can be substituted through a linear transformation to get Delta-derivative ones, which have the property of decoupling the 1/2 field components of the Delta propagator. Nevertheless, the electromagnetic gauge invariance introduced through minimal substitution in all derivatives, can only be fulfilled at a given order n without destroying the spin 3/2 one by dropping n+1 order terms within an effective field theory (EFT) framework with a defined power counting. In addition, we show that the Ward identity for the gamma Delta gamma vertex cannot be fulfilled with a trimmed 3/2 propagator, which should be necessary in order to keep the spin 3/2 gauge symmetry in the radiative case for the gamma Delta gamma amplitude. Finally, it is shown that radiative corrections of the spin 3/2 gauge strong vertexes at one loop, reintroduce the conventional interaction.

D. Badagnani; C. Barbero; A. Mariano

2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the processability of bitumen from tar sand is dependent on its chemical composition, the details of this relationship are poorly understood. In this study, residue fractions from Athabasca bitumen (topped at different temperatures) and hydrocracker and coker residues were analyzed in detail. Separated class fractions were subjected to elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. These data were combined mathematically to obtain a structural profile of each oil. This analysis defines the structural changes in asphaltene precipitates due to distillation and processing, as well as the quantitative changes in the overall structural composition of the oil. Hydrocarbon structures such as paraffinic chains and naphthenes show definite trends with distillation and processing.

Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O. (Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Residual stresses in dielectrics caused by metallization lines and pads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses in dielectrics and semiconductors induced by metal lines, pads and vias can have detrimental effects on the performance of devices and electronic packages. Analytical and numerical calculations of these stresses have been performed for two purposes. (1) To illustrate how these stresses relate to the residual stress in the metallization and its geometry; (2) to calibrate a piezo-spectroscopic method for measuring these stresses with high spatial resolution. The results of the calculations have been presented using non-dimensional parameters that both facilitate scaling and provide connections to the stresses in the metal, with or without yielding. Preliminary experimental results obtained for Au/Ge eutectic pads illustrate the potential of the method and the role of the stress analysis.

He, M.Y.; Lipkin, J.; Clarke, D.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.] [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.; Evans, A.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences] [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Div. of Applied Sciences; Tenhover, M. [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)] [Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. This harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as a replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modelling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullins, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macknelly, David [INST-OFF/AWE; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Resolute Marine Energy, Inc (TRL 1 2 3 Component) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(TRL 1 2 3 Component) Resolute Marine Energy, Inc (TRL 1 2 3 Component) Resolute Marine Energy, Inc (TRL 1 2 3 Component) 28devwaveactptoelectricgenrmeachertok1.ppt...

287

The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Residual Stress Evaluation within a Crimped Splice Connector Assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In power transmission, connectors play an important role in the efficiency and reliability of the system. Due to the increase of power demand and lack of new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than the original design criteria. However, this had led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors, which has been manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection of transmission lines operating at elevated temperatures. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increase in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reduction in the connector clamping strength, which ultimately results in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector has become the weakest link in the electric power transmission infrastructure. The compressive residual stresses induced by the crimping process within the splice provide the clamping forces to secure the conductor and therefore, the determination of the state of residual stresses in splice connectors is a necessary requirement to provide an accurate estimate of their service lifetime. This paper presents a protocol of utilizing finite-element analysis and neutron scattering experiments for evaluating the residual stress fields within a crimped single-stage splice connector assembly.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Hubbard, Camden R [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL; Graziano, Joe [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Chan, John [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Component-Based Application for GAMESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GAMESS, a quantum chetnistry program for electronic structure calculations, has been freely shared by high-performance application scientists for over twenty years. It provides a rich set of functionalities and can be run on a variety of parallel platforms through a distributed data interface. While a chemistry computation is sophisticated and hard to develop, the resource sharing among different chemistry packages will accelerate the development of new computations and encourage the cooperation of scientists from universities and laboratories. Common Component Architecture (CCA) offers an enviromnent that allows scientific packages to dynamically interact with each other through components, which enable dynamic coupling of GAMESS with other chetnistry packages, such as MPQC and NWChem. Conceptually, a cotnputation can be constructed with "plug-and-play" components from scientific packages and require more than componentizing functions/subroutines of interest, especially for large-scale scientific packages with a long development history. In this research, we present our efforts to construct cotnponents for GAMESS that conform to the CCA specification. The goal is to enable the fine-grained interoperability between three quantum chemistry programs, GAMESS, MPQC and NWChem, via components. We focus on one of the three packages, GAMESS; delineate the structure of GAMESS computations, followed by our approaches to its component development. Then we use GAMESS as the driver to interoperate integral components from the other tw"o packages, arid show the solutions for interoperability problems along with preliminary results. To justify the versatility of the design, the Tuning and Analysis Utility (TAU) components have been coupled with GAMESS and its components, so that the performance of GAMESS and its components may be analyzed for a wide range of systetn parameters.

Fang Peng

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

THE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kind integral equations, conjugate gradient type methods, Galerkin method, regularization schemesTHE METHOD OF CONJUGATE RESIDUALS FOR SOLVING THE GALERKIN EQUATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH SYMMETRIC, the method of conjugate residuals is consid- ered. An a posteriori stopping rule is introduced

Plato, Robert

292

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

Hall, Sharon J.

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues involved Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts, however... acid residues with small side-chains (Gly, Ala, Ser, Cys) allow tight helix packing by mediating strong... ) amino acid residues. We propose the use of the...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-pollution-control residues leaching...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

leaching Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air-pollution-control residues leaching Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solid Residues from...

295

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road www.forestry.gov.uk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, for disposal of coppice, to reduce specific weeds and to aid land use conversion. BURNING RESIDUES: TYPES

298

A Scalable Cloud-based Queueing Service with Improved Consistency Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to access the service, an HTTP REST component provides a RESTful interface of the native queue API via HTTP available and partition tolerant persis- tence. The queue operations component implements a queue API using Cassan- dra API. The queue operations component stores all states in Cassandra; there- fore, multiple

Kim, Minkyong

299

Thermochemical nanolithography components, systems, and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved nanolithography components, systems, and methods are described herein. The systems and methods generally employ a resistively heated atomic force microscope tip to thermally induce a chemical change in a surface. In addition, certain polymeric compositions are also disclosed.

Riedo, Elisa; Marder, Seth R.; de Heer, Walt A.; Szoskiewicz, Robert J.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Jones, Simon C.; Okada, Takashi; Wang, Debin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Henderson, Clifford L.; Hua, Yueming

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Symplectic Nonlinear Component Lucas C. Parra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symplectic Nonlinear Component Analysis Lucas C. Parra Siemens Corporate Research 755 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540 lucas@scr.siemens.com Abstract Statistically independent features can feed-forward, information conserving, nonlinear map - the explicit symplectic transformations. It also

Parra, Lucas C.

302

Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project (AMD 304)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

block, bore and journal strategies 2.2 Fasteners, gaskets, sealing 2.3 Coolant and corrosion 2.4 FEA design, integration and analysis 2.5 Component casting and casting analysis...

303

Stationary turbine component with laminated skin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Residual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be eliminated during deposition. Introduction In this study, the decay of the residual stressesResidual Stress Relaxation and Microstructure in ZnO Thin Films Istem Ozena and Mehmet Ali Gulgunb. a istem@sabanciuniv.edu b m-gulgun@sabanciuniv.edu Keywords: ZnO, thin films, residual stress

Yanikoglu, Berrin

307

NONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

harmonics. I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION The thin-film deposition process can create large residualNONLINEAR SAW PROPAGATION IN THIN-FILM SYSTEMS WITH RESIDUAL STRESS* R. E. Kumon National Institute is the residual stress. The effective elas- tic constants and density are given by Ceff ijkl = Cijkl(1 - eres

308

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microstructure, residual stress, and fracture of sputtered TiN films Liqiang Zhang a , Huisheng Keywords: TiN films Residual stress Hardness Fracture toughness Morphology, structure, residual stress, hardness, and fracture toughness of magnetron sputtered titanium nitride (TiN) thin films, deposited at 300

Volinsky, Alex A.

309

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energyUsing mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio

Victoria, University of

310

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Protein Interaction Sites From Sequence Profile and Residue Neighbor List Huan Protein­protein interaction sites are predicted from a neural network with sequence profiles correctly predicted residues account for 65% of the 11,805 residues making up the 129 interfaces. The main

Weston, Ken

311

Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electrochemical components employing polysiloxane-derived binders  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A processed polysiloxane resin binder for use in electrochemical components and the method for fabricating components with the binder. The binder comprises processed polysiloxane resin that is partially oxidized and retains some of its methyl groups following partial oxidation. The binder is suitable for use in electrodes of various types, separators in electrochemical devices, primary lithium batteries, electrolytic capacitors, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells and sensors.

Delnick, Frank M.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Fault Diagnosis System for a Multilevel Inverter Using a Principal Component Neural Network Surin Khomfoi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fault Diagnosis System for a Multilevel Inverter Using a Principal Component Neural Network Surin system in a multilevel-inverter using a compact neural network is proposed in this paper. It is difficult to diagnose a multilevel-inverter drive (MLID) system using a mathematical model because MLID systems consist

Tolbert, Leon M.

319

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Residual stresses in bakelite models induced by quenching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the bellows was extended to six inobes. Lifter proper focusing and using a Kodachrome type 4 film, separate piotures were made at openings f8, fll, f16, and f22 in order to provide for a suitable spread of exposure. Sodium vapor was used as the source... for determining the residual stresses or the elastic redistribution of stresses that occurs after the prototype has undergone some plastio deformation or heat treatment. The creep characteristics of bakelite, BT-61-893, become appreciable with temperatures...

Jarvi, Ray Victor

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Spectral Components Analysis of Diffuse Emission Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a novel method to separate the components of a diffuse emission process based on an association with the energy spectra. Most of the existing methods use some information about the spatial distribution of components, e.g., closeness to an external template, independence of components etc., in order to separate them. In this paper we propose a method where one puts conditions on the spectra only. The advantages of our method are: 1) it is internal: the maps of the components are constructed as combinations of data in different energy bins, 2) the components may be correlated among each other, 3) the method is semi-blind: in many cases, it is sufficient to assume a functional form of the spectra and determine the parameters from a maximization of a likelihood function. As an example, we derive the CMB map and the foreground maps for seven yeas of WMAP data. In an Appendix, we present a generalization of the method, where one can also add a number of external templates.

Malyshev, Dmitry; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235{+-}267 ng/m{sup 3}) and children's bedrooms (179{+-}246 ng/m{sup 3}) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03{+-}0.04 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1{+-}100.1 ng/cm{sup 2}) compared to mean loadings (<0.09 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings on the fur clippings were at least 14 times higher on days 1, 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.8{+-}0.4 ng/cm{sup 2}) at pre-application. For transferable residues from dog fur, the mean loadings of diazinon on the technician's cotton glove samples were the lowest before application (0.04{+-}0.08 ng/cm{sup 2}) and the highest on day 1 post-application (10.4{+-}23.9 ng/cm{sup 2}) of diazinon to turf. Urinary IMPy concentrations for the participants ranged from <0.3 to 5.5 ng/mL before application and <0.3-12.5 ng/mL after application of diazinon. The mean urinary IMPy concentrations for children or adults were not statistically different (p>0.05) at pre-application compared to post-application of diazinon to turf. The results showed that the participants and their pet dogs were likely exposed to low levels of diazinon residues from several sources (i.e., air, dust, and soil), through several pathways and routes, after lawn applications at these residences. Lastly, the pet dog appears to be an important pathway for the transfer and translocation of diazinon residues inside the homes and likely exposed occupants through personal contacts (i.e., petting)

Morgan, Marsha K. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)], E-mail: morgan.marsha@epa.gov; Stout, Daniel M.; Jones, Paul A. [USEPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Barr, Dana B. [National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

GRB980923; a Burst with the MeV-spectral Component of GRB941017  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed joint analysis of BATSE-LAD and EGRET-TASC data yielded to the discovery of an anomalous MeV-component in the spectra of GRB941017. The detailed description and time evolution, as well as the lack of other GRBs with the MeV-component have made difficult the description of such MeV-component. Previous analyses by Kaneko and Gonzalez, showed that the spectrum of GRB980923 beyond 10 MeV is not consistent with a smooth continuation of the spectra at keV-energies along the whole burst. We have deeply analyzed GRB980923 and found the presence of a MeV-component with similar spectral features to the one found in GRB941017. In this work we compare GRB941017 and GRB980923.

Gonzalez, M. M.; Sacahui, J. R. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D. F., Mexico, 04510 (Mexico); Dingus, B. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, N. M. 87545 (United States)

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation of Prompt Emission from GRBs with a Photospheric Component and its Detectability By GLAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) still requires a physical explanation. Studies of time-resolved GRB spectra, observed in the keV-MeV range, show that a hybrid model consisting of two components, a photospheric and a non-thermal component, in many cases fits bright, single-pulsed bursts as well as, and in some instances even better than, the Band function. With an energy coverage from 8 keV up to 300 GeV, GLAST will give us an unprecedented opportunity to further investigate the nature of the prompt emission. In particular, it will give us the possibility to determine whether a photospheric component is the determining feature of the spectrum or not. Here we present a short study of the ability of GLAST to detect such a photospheric component in the sub-MeV range for typical bursts, using simulation tools developed within the GLAST science collaboration.

Battelino, Milan; Ryde, Felix; /Stockholm Observ.; Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa; Longo, Francesco; /U. Trieste /INFN, Trieste

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Quarry residuals RI/FS scoping document. [Weldon Spring quarry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to serve as a planning tool for the implementation of the Quarry Residual Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process and to provide direct input to revising and updating the 1988 Work Plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study-Environmental Impact Statement for the Weldon Spring Site (RI/FS-EIS) (Peterson et al. 1988) for this effort. The scoping process is intended to outline the tasks necessary to develop and implement activities in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act-National Environmental Policy Act (CERCLA-NEPA) process from detailed planning through the appropriate decision document. In addition to scoping the entire process, this document will serve as the primary tool for planning and accomplishing all activities to be developed in the Quarry Residual RI/FS Work Plan. Subsequent tasks are difficult to plan at this time. 10 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

Hall, David R.; Hall Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

Size distribution of metals in particulate matter formed during combustion of residual fuel oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between July 1992 and January 1993 three full-scale test programs were performed by Carnot for the Electric Power Research Institute and the Fuel Oil Users` Support (FOUS) Group, as part of a program for development and testing of various stack emissions models. One of the components of the program was determination of the concentrations of individual elements as a function of the size of particles suspended in flue gas. The size distributions of species are important because several aspects of system performance depend upon particulate matter size and composition: (1) the rate of ash deposition in the convection section, and activity of deposits for high temperature corrosion and SO{sub 3} formation, (2) the efficiency of precipitators for collection of individual elements, and (3) scattering of visible light and contribution of particles to stack plume opacity. Size distributions of major ash constituents were measured at the entrance and exit of the dust collectors during each of the field tests. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first reports of such measurements in residual oil-fired utility boilers. The focus, in the present paper, is on the composition of the particles entering the dust collectors.

Walsh, P. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rovesti, W.C. [Electric Power Research Institute, Washington, DC (United States); Freeman, R.F. [Niagara Mohawk Power Corp., Oswego, NY (United States); Olen, K.R.; Washington, K.T.; Patrick, S.T.; Campbell, G.L.; Harper, D.S. [Florida Power & Light Co., West Palm Beach, FL (United States); Teetz, R.D.; Bennett, T.E. [Long Island Lighting Co., Glenwood Landing, NY (United States)] [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Method For Eclipsing Component Identification In Large Photometric Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe an automated method for assigning the most likely physical parameters to the components of an eclipsing binary (EB), using only its photometric light curve and combined color. In traditional methods (e.g. WD and EBOP) one attempts to optimize a multi-parameter model over many iterations, so as to minimize the chi-squared value. We suggest an alternative method, where one selects pairs of coeval stars from a set of theoretical stellar models, and compares their simulated light curves and combined colors with the observations. This approach greatly reduces the EB parameter-space over which one needs to search, and allows one to determine the components' masses, radii and absolute magnitudes, without spectroscopic data. We have implemented this method in an automated program using published theoretical isochrones and limb-darkening coefficients. Since it is easy to automate, this method lends itself to systematic analyses of datasets consisting of photometric time series of large numbers of stars, such as those produced by OGLE, MACHO, TrES, HAT, and many others surveys.

Jonathan Devor; David Charbonneau

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Reliability Analysis of Microelectronic Components and Materials Increasing numbers of the degradation processes relevant to soldered joints is crucial for more reliable life-cycle predictions. Joining methods are critical for the reliable use of electronic packages. In particular, since the advent

Berlin,Technische Universität

340

James P. Mosquera Director, Reactor Plant Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the application of nuclear reactor power to capital ships of the U.S. Navy, and other assigned projects. Mr for steam generator technology (within the Nuclear Components Division); and power plant systems engineer working for the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (a.k.a. Naval Reactors). This program is a joint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ensemble Learning for Independent Component Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . James W. Miskin Selwyn College Cambridge December 20th, 2000 i #12; Abstract This thesis is concerned with the problem of Blind Source Separation. Speci#12;cally we consider the Independent Component Analysis (ICA the sources given only a set of observations. In chapter 1, the blind source separation problem is introduced

MacKay, David J.C.

342

Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bottleneck, the NLPCA is able to extract periodic or wave modes. The Lorenz (1963) 3-component chaotic system nonlinear empirical modelling methods originating from the field of artificial intelligence, raises the hope that the linear restriction in our analysis of environmental datasets may finally be lifted (Hsieh and Tang, 1998

Hsieh, William

343

Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bottleneck, the NLPCA is able to extract periodic or wave modes. The Lorenz (1963) 3­component chaotic system, a class of powerful nonlinear empirical modelling methods originating from the field of artificial be lifted (Hsieh and Tang, 1998). Various NN methods have been developed for performing PCA (Oja, 1982

Hsieh, William

344

Facilitating performance predictions using software components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reussner 1. Introduction Composing software systems of independent building blocks is the central vision based on the properties of its components. In civil and electrical engineering, the early assessment, performance is often mainly considered at the end of the development cycle when the complete system can

Becker, Steffen

345

A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Correlated Component Analysis for diffuse component separation with error estimation on simulated Planck polarization data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a data analysis pipeline for CMB polarization experiments, running from multi-frequency maps to the power spectra. We focus mainly on component separation and, for the first time, we work out the covariance matrix accounting for errors associated to the separation itself. This allows us to propagate such errors and evaluate their contributions to the uncertainties on the final products.The pipeline is optimized for intermediate and small scales, but could be easily extended to lower multipoles. We exploit realistic simulations of the sky, tailored for the Planck mission. The component separation is achieved by exploiting the Correlated Component Analysis in the harmonic domain, that we demonstrate to be superior to the real-space application (Bonaldi et al. 2006). We present two techniques to estimate the uncertainties on the spectral parameters of the separated components. The component separation errors are then propagated by means of Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the corresponding contributi...

Ricciardi, S; Natoli, P; Polenta, G; Baccigalupi, C; Salerno, E; Kayabol, K; Bedini, L; De Zotti, G; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2010.16819.x

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Technical Program Maintaining Consistent Conditions over a Wide Range of Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Process Parameters on Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Additively Manufactured Components in Ti-6Al-4 in the Rapid-Layer Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Components by Electron Beam Melting: Sara Gaytan1; Lawrence Murr1 of Texas Rapid prototype (RP) manufacturing using Ti-6Al-4V powder and electron beam melting (EBM) has

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

348

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup ?12} Pa{sup ?1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Hayward, Maurice [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

350

Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

Younkin, T. R., E-mail: tyounkin@gatech.edu [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering – Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C. [Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of the residue from microset on various metal surfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast-curing impression materials are sometimes used to cast negative-mold replications of physical defects on material surfaces. The negative-mold impressions can then be used for further measurements to record the nature of the defect. These impression materials have been designed to cure quickly, and with very low adhesion, so that they can be easily removed from the surface leaving little residual contamination. Unfortunately, some contaminant is retained by the substrate material. This investigation seeks to identify the composition and quantity of the remaining material upon removal of Microset Synthetic Rubber Replicating Compound from several material surfaces. Coe-Flex was used as a relative comparison to Microset. On fifteen different substrate materials the Microset leaves no visible trace of contaminant, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows evidence of a thin silicone-based contaminant film of approximately 2 nm thickness.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Webb, Erin [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component Measurements for Determining VehicleDetermining Vehicle--Level RadiatedLevel Radiated Automotive Component Measurements forAutomotive Component automotiveWe need to characterize automotive components the way we characterize circuitcomponents the way we

Stuart, Steven J.

356

Methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity, which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate, which may include microchannels or other features.

Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

System for inspecting large size structural components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for inspecting large scale structural components such as concrete walls or the like. The system includes a mobile gamma radiation source and a mobile gamma radiation detector. The source and detector are constructed and arranged for simultaneous movement along parallel paths in alignment with one another on opposite sides of a structural component being inspected. A control system provides signals which coordinate the movements of the source and detector and receives and records the radiation level data developed by the detector as a function of source and detector positions. The radiation level data is then analyzed to identify areas containing defects corresponding to unexpected variations in the radiation levels detected.

Birks, Albert S. (Columbus, OH); Skorpik, James R. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

M.A. Alvin

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

C.S. Cearlock

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sandia National Laboratories: understanding hydrogen components  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-activeNationalhydrogen components Energy Department Awards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Emission Control Systems and Components for Retrofit and First...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems and Components for Retrofit and First-Fit Applications Emission Control Systems and Components for Retrofit and First-Fit Applications 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions...

362

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Components Responsible for the Health Effects of Inhaled Engine Emissions Presentation given at the 2007...

363

Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

364

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes multicomponent.pdf More...

365

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components Fuel Cell Subsystems and Components As recommended by the 2004 National Research Council report, the program continues to increase its support...

366

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

367

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

368

Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP Applications Balance of Plant Needs and Integration of Stack Components for Stationary Power and CHP...

369

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

370

HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HVAC Component Data Modeling Using Industry Foundationof a major extension of the HVAC part of the IFC data model.generic approach for handling HVAC components. This includes

Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

372

Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimate of the scatter component in SPECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical expressions that describe the dependence of slopes and amplitudes of the scatter distribution functions (SDF) on source depth and media density are used to estimate a scatter component in SPECT projection data. Since the ratio of detected scattered to total photons (S/T), SDF amplitude and slope depend strongly on line source length (SL) used to obtain SDFs, we compared estimated scattered components using SDFs, obtained for lengths of 2-21 cm. At 10 cm source depth, S/T changes from 0.19 to 0.36 when SL changes from 2 to 21 cm. Scatter amplitude`s dependence on source depth (d) in water was described by 6.38e{sup -0.186d} for a 2 cm and 16.15e{sup -0.129d} for a 21 cm SL. Slope was described by 0.292d{sup -0.601} for a cm SL and by 0.396d{sup -0.82} for a 21 cm SL. The estimated scatter components are compared with simulated SPECT projection data obtained with Monte Carlo modeling of six hot spheres placed in a cylindrical water filled phantom. The comparison of estimated with simulated total counts/projection shows very good agreement when approaching SDF for a point source (the % difference varied from 2 to 13% for 2 cm SL). Significant overestimate is seen when source length increases.

Ivanovic, M.; Weber, D.A. [Univ. of California, Sacramento, CA (United States); Loncaric, S. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use in the United States Summary: , livestock commodities, agricultural residues, and bioenergy crops. Drawing on ORNL and APAC county... , developed and maintained at the...

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile shredder residue Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile shredder residue Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASHVILLE INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE TESTS...

376

Neutron scattering residual stress measurements on gray cast iron brake discs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction was used to investigate the effects of a heat treatment designed to remove internal residual stresses in brake discs. It is believed that residual stresses may change the rate of deformation of the discs during severe braking conditions when the disc temperature is increased significantly. Neutron diffraction was used to map out residual strain distributions in a production disc before and after a stress-relieving heat treatment. Results from these neutron diffraction experiments show that some residual strains were reduced by as much as 400 microstrain by stress relieving. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Spooner, S.; Payzant, E.A.; Hubbard, C.R. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

378

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

379

Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

380

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 245 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - acs residual ischemic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acs residual ischemic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Brain Research 961 (2003) 2231 www.elsevier.comlocatebrainres Summary: further...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues required Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 13 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

383

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues determine Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Columbia University Collection: Engineering ; Biology and Medicine 14 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

384

alters less-conserved residues: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The macroscopic stress evolution is connected to a length scale of residual liquefaction displayed by microscopic mean-squared displacements. The theory describes this...

385

Energy Efficient Memory Speculation With Memory Latency Tolerance Supporting Sequential Consistency Without A Coherence Protocol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1–17, Sept. 2006. [35] Derek Hower. Acoherent shared memory.memory consistency models. Derek Hower [35] pro- posed the

Munday, David Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Scheduling Algorithm for Consistent Monitoring Results with Solar Powered High-Performance Wireless Embedded Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Scheduling Algorithm for Consistent Monitoring Results with Solar Powered High but critical task for solar powered wireless high power embedded systems. Our algorithm relies on an energy

Simunic, Tajana

387

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Freque...

Maino, D; Baccigalupi, C; Perrotta, F; Banday, A J; Bedini, L; Burigana, C; Zotti, G D; Górski, K M; Salerno, E

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When precipitation is accounted for, residual stress in both forgings are similar.

Robinson, J.S., E-mail: jeremy.robinson@ul.ie [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Tanner, D.A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland); Truman, C.E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol (United Kingdom); Paradowska, A.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Wimpory, R.C. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy, Hahn Meitner Platz 1, Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A consistent modelling methodology for secondary settling tanks in wastewater treatment Stefan on a consistent modelling methodology (CMM) of complex real processes in wastewater treatment by utilizing both as a case since this is one of the most complex processes in a wastewater treatment plant and the simulation

Bürger, Raimund

393

A generalized self consistent model for effective elastic moduli of human dentine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent Model for cell model of fiber-reinforced composites is extended to the case of hollow cylinder model and the corresponding cell model is chosen to consist of a circular hollow cylinder filled from other models such as nano-indentation method. Ã? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords

Qin, Qinghua

394

Consistent parametric estimation of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistent parametric estimation of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process. Frederic under which parametric estimates of the intensity of a spatial-temporal point process are consistent. Although the actual point process being estimated may not be Poisson, an estimate involving maximizing

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

395

Characterization of slow rusting components in maize (Zea mays) inbreds and single crosses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gompertz model The logistic model Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIII INHERITANCE OF SLOW RUSTING IN MAIZE Introduction Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIV IDENTIFICATION OF THE COMPONENTS OF SLOW RUSTING... (30) working with oats, found out that the Gompertz transformation was more consistent at detecting degrees of slow rusting than the logistic model. Vanderplank (61) stressed the concept of disease increase as a function of time. This theory implies...

Ngoko

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method of making low work function component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for fabricating a component is disclosed. The method includes: providing a member having an effective work function of an initial value, disposing a sacrificial layer on a surface of the member, disposing a first agent within the member to obtain a predetermined concentration of the agent at said surface of the member, annealing the member, and removing the sacrificial layer to expose said surface of the member, wherein said surface has a post-process effective work function that is different from the initial value.

Robinson, Vance (Niskayuna, NY); Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Delmar, NY)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Coplanar strip analysis and component development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

converge toward the same value, ABCI does so much more rapidly. 34 Characteristic Impedance vs. Side Wall Distance 90 18 80 0 70 a n 60 L m 50 ~ With ABC1 40 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 a (= b) (mm) Figure 14. Convergence Analysis of CPS...COPLANAR STRIP ANALYSIS AND COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT A Thesis by KEITH ANDREW TILLEY Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Kai...

Tilley, Keith Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Turbine engine component with cooling passages  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

400

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials and Components Compatibilitiy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS ExhibitIowaLosSandia Participated in AMII toand Components

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

St Andrews, University of

402

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Balance of Plant & Stack Component Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cogeneration opportunity Standard Manufacturing Process ­ Low capex Standard Components ­ Standard HVAC

403

FROGi: Fractal components deployment over OSGi Mikael Desertot1 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FROGi: Fractal components deployment over OSGi Mikael Desertot1 3 , Humberto Cervantes2 and Didier, a proposal to support continuous de- ployment activities inside Fractal, a hierarchical component model of Fractal components. With FROGi, it is possible to automate the assembly of a Fractal component application

Donsez, Didier

404

Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials.

Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutetic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Structural group analysis of residues from Athabasca bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-distillable fractions of hydrocarbons such as bitumen are a challenge for analysis because of their molecular complexity and high heteroatom content. One method for characterizing their composition is by analysis for a relatively small number of structures expected to predominate in the mixture, i.e. for the significant structural groups. Because NMR spectroscopy can give quantitative data on the distribution of hydrogen and carbon types, it is an ideal method for group-based analysis. This study uses a structural group formalism which combines data from several analytical methods into a single profile. Residue fractions derived from Athabasca bitumen were investigated to determine the different chemical structures which could have an impact on subsequent processing. Structural analysis is the identification of key structures from analytical data that characterize a complex mixture. Higher accuracy data, from elemental, /sup 1/H-NMR, IR and titration analyses, are used to construct balance equations which must be satisfied. The spectral envelope of /sup 13/C-NMR is more difficult to resolve quantatitively, and hence /sup 13/C-NMR data are used as constraints to compute the concentrations of structural groups. The mathematical notation and methods have been presented previously. The structural analysis transforms the spectrometric data into a more useable form; the maximum number of groups that can be calculated is limited to the number of useful analytical measurements.

Gray, M.R.; Choi, J.H.K.; Egiebor, N.O.; Kirchen, R.P.; Sanford, E.C.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Processing Effects for Integrated PZT: Residual Stress, Thickness, and Dielectric Properties Ryan J (PZT) films integrated onto Pt/Ti/SiO2//Si substrates are reported. Sol­gel synthesis and deposition orientation (nominally (111) fiber tex- tured), and measured residual stress. The Stoney method, using laser

Sottos, Nancy R.

409

UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UPTAKE, ASSIMILATION, AND LOSS OF DDT RESIDUES BY Euphausia pacifica, A EUPHAUSIID SHRIMP ABSTRACT acquire sufficient DDT residue from its food to account for amounts found in its tissues. Assimilation effii- ciencies for DDT in ingested food are similar to published figures for assimilation of carbon

410

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Speciation of Sb in airborne particulate matter, vehicle brake linings, and brake pad wear residues: XAS XANES EXAFS Antimony Particulate matter Brake linings a b s t r a c t Insights into the speciation of Sb in samples of brake linings, brake pad wear residues, road dust, and atmospheric particulate

Short, Daniel

411

Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Gage and ferrite meters have been developed to measure the amount of residual ferrite in duplex stainless steel) ) Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys. Electron beam welds, laser beam welds and rapidly solidified stainless steel alloys have small physical

Eagar, Thomas W.

412

Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of catalytic residues in proteins using machine-learning techniques Natalia V. Petrova) and prediction of protein function using various properties of proteins and amino acids (2). Prediction of the functional residues is a challenging and interesting task. The results of such prediction could

413

Prediction of Interface Residues in ProteinProtein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method: Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Interface Residues in Protein­Protein Complexes by a Consensus Neural Network Method important information for predicting struc- tures of new protein complexes. This motivated us to develop the PPISP method for predicting inter- face residues in protein­protein complexes. In PPISP, sequence

Weston, Ken

414

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residual Magnetic Flux Leakage: A Possible Tool for Studying Pipeline Defects Vijay Babbar1 weaker flux signals. KEY WORDS: Magnetic flux leakage; residual magnetization; pipeline defects; pipeline pipelines, which may develop defects such as corrosion pits as they age in service.(1) Under the ef- fect

Clapham, Lynann

416

MALATHION RESIDUES IN GREEK HONEY Andreas T. THRASYVOULOU Michael D. IFANTIDIS Nikos L. PAPPAS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1982 were analyzed for malathion residues. Residues were extracted with acetonitrile/water solution, parti the north, the south, and some Greek islands as well. Reagents Acetonitrile - Nanograde (Mallinckrodt, Inc. Fifty ml of a 10/90 wa- ter/acetonitrile solution was added and the funnel shaken vigorously until

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

Pharmacokinetic and residue studies of quinolone compounds and olaquindox in poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pharmacokinetic and residue studies of quinolone compounds and olaquindox in poultry A Anadón MR of these quinolones and fluoroquinolones for which clinical experience or experimental informa- tion exists in poultry residues in poultry. This paper presents information about the pharmacokinetic profile of olaquindox

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

Anodizing of High Electrically Stressed Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anodizing creates an aluminum oxide coating that penetrates into the surface as well as builds above the surface of aluminum creating a very hard ceramic-type coating with good dielectric properties. Over time and use, the electrical carrying components (or spools in this case) experience electrical breakdown, yielding undesirable x-ray dosages or failure. The spool is located in the high vacuum region of a rod pinch diode section of an x-ray producing machine. Machine operators have recorded decreases in x-ray dosages over numerous shots using the reusable spool component, and re-anodizing the interior surface of the spool does not provide the expected improvement. A machine operation subject matter expert coated the anodized surface with diffusion pump oil to eliminate electrical breakdown as a temporary fix. It is known that an anodized surface is very porous, and it is because of this porosity that the surface may trap air that becomes a catalyst for electrical breakdown. In this paper we present a solution of mitigating electrical breakdown by oiling. We will also present results of surface anodizing improvements achieved by surface finish preparation and surface sealing. We conclude that oiling the anodized surface and using anodized hot dip sealing processes will have similar results.

Flores, P. [NSTec; Henderson, D. J. [NSTec; Good, D. E. [NSTec; Hogge, K. [NSTec; Mitton, C. V. [NSTec; Molina, I. [NSTec; Naffziger, C. [NSTec; Codova, S. R. [SNL; Ormond, E. U. [SNL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Communication adapter for use with a drilling component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A communication adapter is disclosed that provides for removable attachment to a drilling component when the drilling component is not actively drilling and for communication with an integrated transmission system in the drilling component. The communication adapter comprises a data transmission coupler that facilitates communication between the drilling component and the adapter, a mechanical coupler that facilitates removable attachment of the adapter to the drilling component, and a data interface.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Hall; Jr.; H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Bradford, Kline (Orem, UT); Rawle, Michael (Springville, UT)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

420

Application of neutron diffraction to measure residual strains in high temperature composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental neutron diffraction technique was used to measure residual thermal strains developed in high temperature composites during postfabrication cooling. Silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide (over the temperature range 20--950{degree}C) and tungsten and saphikon fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide composites (at room temperature) were investigated. As a result of thermal expansion mismatch, compressive residual strains and stresses were generated in the silicon carbide fibers during cooldown. The axial residual strains were tensile in the matrix and were lower in nickel aluminide matrix as compared to those in titanium aluminide matrix. The average transverse residual strains in the matrix were compressive. Liquid-nitrogen dipping and thermal-cycling tend to reduce the fabrication-induced residual strains in silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. However, matrix cracking can occur as a result of these processes. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Saigal, A. (Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Kupperman, D.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermal barrier coatings for turbine components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine component, such as a turbine blade having a metal substrate (22) is coated with a metal MCrAlY alloy layer (24) and then a thermal barrier layer (20) selected from LaAlO.sub.3, NdAlO.sub.3, La.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7, Dy.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12, HO.sub.3 Al.sub.3 O.sub.12, ErAlO.sub.3, GdAlO.sub.3, Yb.sub.2 Ti.sub.2 O.sub.7, LaYbO.sub.3, Gd.sub.2 Hf.sub.2 O.sub.7 or Y.sub.3 Al.sub.5 O.sub.12.

Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Bethesda, MD); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Component failure data handbook. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Rapid Spontaneous Assembly of Single Component Liposomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can single component bilayer forming surfactants spontaneously assemble to form unilamellar vesicles of a definite size ? Although possible by Helfrich's theory, this has not been observed without external forcing. We show two variants of a method where this is possible without any input of external energy, with the time of synthesis reduced to as less as 15 minutes. It is shown that the average diameter of the liposomes formed is intrinsic and depends only on the temperature and the lipid type, eliminating kinetic effects normally observed. This thus can be a candidate mechanism for vesicle size selection in pre-biotic conditions. The method may also be suitable to study time-resolved studies of micelle to vesicle transition.

P. Sunthar; Sopan M. Phapal

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

Santini, Alessandro [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Passarini, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.passarini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Vassura, Ivano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Instituto IMDEA Energy, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Morselli, Luciano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy experiments?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are water simulation models consistent with steady-state and ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy, United States b Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, United States c Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, United States Received

Fayer, Michael D.

430

Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SQUID sensors demonstrate the effectiveness of this data consistency constraint and sparsity prior-mail: fhlin@ntu.edu.tw Introduction MRI has become an indispensible resource in clinical medicine because

431

Analysis of Dual Consistency for Discontinuous Galerkin Discretizations of Source Terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of dual consistency on discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of solution and solution gradient dependent source terms are examined. Two common discretizations are analyzed: the standard weighting technique for ...

Darmofal, David L.

432

Precision and consistency of contour interpolation Jacqueline M. Fulvio a,*, Manish Singh b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Precision and consistency of contour interpolation Jacqueline M. Fulvio a,*, Manish Singh b-mail address: jmf384@nyu.edu (J.M. Fulvio). www.elsevier.com/locate/visres Available online at www

Singh, Manish

433

Consistency Management with Repair Actions Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich and Anthony Finkelstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Consistency Management with Repair Actions Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich and Anthony Finkelstein Department of Computer Science University College London Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich

van der Hoek, André

434

Validation of and enhancements to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis documents efforts to validate two elements related to an operating-speed-based geometric design consistency evaluation procedure: (1) the speed reduction estimation ability of the model, and (2) assumptions about acceleration...

Collins, Kent Michael

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Building America Webinar: Standardized Retrofit Packages — What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance?  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar will focus on specific Building America projects that have examined methods to consistently meet high levels of energy performance in existing homes, with a focus on retrofit packages that can be replicated across many homes.

436

Learning Globally Consistent Maps by Relaxation Tom Duckett Stephen Marsland & Jonathan Shapiro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Learning Globally Consistent Maps by Relaxation #3; Tom Duckett Stephen Marsland & Jonathan Shapiro-70182  Orebro Manchester M13 9PL Sweden England Tom.Duckett@aass.oru.se fmarslans

Duckett, Tom

437

Quasiparticle lifetimes in magnesium clusters modeled by self-consistent GW? calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasiparticle (QP) lifetimes in magnesium clusters are calculated using many-body Green's-function theory. We analyze the effect of the self-consistency of the one-particle Green's function G on the calculations and ...

He, Yi

438

Effective Mass Matrix for Light Neutrinos Consistent with Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an effective mass matrix for light neutrinos which is consistent with the mixing pattern indicated by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. Two scenarios for the mass eigenvalues are discussed and the connection with double beta decay is noted.

S. P. Rosen; Waikwok Kwong

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Near-infrared photodetector consisting of J-aggregating cyanine dye and metal oxide thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate a near-infrared photodetector that consists of a thin film of the J-aggregating cyanine dye, U3, and transparent metal-oxide charge transport layers. The high absorption coefficient of the U3 film, combined ...

Osedach, Timothy P.

440

Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project's objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we've teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p[sup +] and n[sup +] GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We've learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we've demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Relating geometric design consistency and accident experience on two-lane rural highways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATING GEOMETRIC DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE ON TWO-LANE RURAL HIGHWAYS A Thesis by STEPHEN WADE GLASCOCK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering RELATING GEOMETRIC DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE ON TWO-LANE RURAL HIGHWAYS A Thesis by STEPHEN WADE GLASCOCK Approved as to style and content by: aymond A...

Glascock, Stephen Wade

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone of Monochamus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone and identified as 2-(undecyloxy)-ethanol. In analyses by GC coupled to electroantennography the only consistent, Sweden, and China. 2-(Undecyl- oxy)-ethanol was attractive to both male and female M. sutor beetles

Hanks, Lawrence M.

445

Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G. [and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal for Bioenergy: A Spatially Comprehensive National Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study provides a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainable agricultural residue removal potential across the United States. Earlier assessments determining the quantity of agricultural residue that could be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at the regional and national scale faced a number of computational limitations. These limitations included the number of environmental factors, the number of land management scenarios, and the spatial fidelity and spatial extent of the assessment. This study utilizes integrated multi-factor environmental process modeling and high fidelity land use datasets to perform a spatially comprehensive assessment of sustainably removable agricultural residues across the conterminous United States. Soil type represents the base spatial unit for this study and is modeled using a national soil survey database at the 10 – 100 m scale. Current crop rotation practices are identified by processing land cover data available from the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service Cropland Data Layer database. Land management and residue removal scenarios are identified for each unique crop rotation and crop management zone. Estimates of county averages and state totals of sustainably available agricultural residues are provided. The results of the assessment show that in 2011 over 150 million metric tons of agricultural residues could have been sustainably removed across the United States. Projecting crop yields and land management practices to 2030, the assessment determines that over 207 million metric tons of agricultural residues will be able to be sustainably removed for bioenergy production at that time.

D. Muth, Jr.; K. M. Bryden; R. G. Nelson

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Injection, flow, and mixing of CO2 in porous media with residual gas.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic structures associated with depleted natural gas reservoirs are desirable targets for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as evidenced by numerous pilot and industrial-scale GCS projects in these environments world-wide. One feature of these GCS targets that may affect injection is the presence of residual CH{sub 4}. It is well known that CH{sub 4} drastically alters supercritical CO{sub 2} density and viscosity. Furthermore, residual gas of any kind affects the relative permeability of the liquid and gas phases, with relative permeability of the gas phase strongly dependent on the time-history of imbibition or drainage, i.e., dependent on hysteretic relative permeability. In this study, the effects of residual CH{sub 4} on supercritical CO{sub 2} injection were investigated by numerical simulation in an idealized one-dimensional system under three scenarios: (1) with no residual gas; (2) with residual supercritical CO{sub 2}; and (3) with residual CH{sub 4}. We further compare results of simulations that use non-hysteretic and hysteretic relative permeability functions. The primary effect of residual gas is to decrease injectivity by decreasing liquid-phase relative permeability. Secondary effects arise from injected gas effectively incorporating residual gas and thereby extending the mobile gas plume relative to cases with no residual gas. Third-order effects arise from gas mixing and associated compositional effects on density that effectively create a larger plume per unit mass. Non-hysteretic models of relative permeability can be used to approximate some parts of the behavior of the system, but fully hysteretic formulations are needed to accurately model the entire system.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Doughty, C.A.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

451

Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

All-sky astrophysical component separation with Fast Independent Component Analysis (FastICA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new, fast, algorithm for the separation of astrophysical components superposed in maps of the sky, based on the fast Independent Component Analysis technique (FastICA). It allows to recover both the spatial pattern and the frequency scalings of the emissions from statistically independent astrophysical processes, present along the line-of-sight, from multi-frequency observations. We apply FastICA to simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and instrumental noise at the mean nominal levels for the Planck satellite, containing the most important known diffuse signals: the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), Galactic synchrotron, dust and free-free emissions. A method for calibrating the reconstructed maps of each component at each frequency has been devised. The spatial pattern of all the components have been recovered on all scales probed by the instrument. In particular, the CMB angular power spectra is recovered at the percent level up to $\\ell_{max}\\simeq 2000$. Frequency scalings and normalization have been recovered with better than percent precision for all the components at frequencies and in sky regions where their signal-to-noise ratio exceeds 1.5; the error increases at ten percent level for signal-to-noise ratios about 1. Runs have been performed on a Pentium III 600 MHz computer; FastICA typically took a time of the order of 10 minutes for all-sky simulations with 3.5 arcminutes pixel size. We conclude that FastICA is an extremly promising technique for analyzing the maps that will be obtained by the forthcoming high resolution CMB experiments.

D. Maino; A. Farusi; C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; A. J. Banday; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; K. M. Gorski; E. Salerno

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burress, R.V. [SEHO (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

D.C. Mecham

2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (?5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ?3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

Feddock, Jonathan, E-mail: jmfedd0@uky.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Arnold, Susanne M. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States) [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Shelton, Brent J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary [Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Chen, Li [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); Rinehart, John [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States); McGarry, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice, Strategy Supervisor #12;2 #12;Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number

de Weck, Olivier L.

458

ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, multivariate data analysis, multimodality data, scientific visualization, seg- mentation, volume rendering 1ISpace: Interactive Volume Data Classification Techniques Using Independent Component Analysis, which uses Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and a multi- dimensional histogram of the volume data

Ma, Kwan-Liu

459

Using Temporal Logic for Dynamic Reconfigurations of Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Temporal Logic for Dynamic Reconfigurations of Components Julien Dormoy1 , Olga Kouchnarenko1, published in "FACS 2010, 7th Int. Ws. on Formal Aspects of Component Software, Portugal (2010)" #12;More

Boyer, Edmond

460

Using Temporal Logic for Dynamic Reconfigurations of Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Temporal Logic for Dynamic Reconfigurations of Components Julien Dormoy1 , Olga Kouchnarenko1, published in "7th International Workshop on Formal Aspects of Component Software - FACS'2010 (2010)" #12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

462

AMD 601 High Integrity -Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 - High Integrity Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) edm2@chrysler.com February 28, 2008 AMD 601 High Integrity - Magnesium Automotive Components (HI-MAC) USAMP 2008 DOE...

463

Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

Stickney, R.G.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Two component-three dimensional catalysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Nondestructive characterization of structural ceramic components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced structural ceramic components under development for heat-engine applications include both monolithic and continuous fiber composites (CFC). Nondestructive characterization (NDC) methods being developed differ for each material system. For monolithic materials, characterization during processing steps is important. For many CFC, only post process characterization is possible. Many different NDC systems have been designed and built A 3D x-ray micro computed tomographic (3DXCT) imaging system has been shown to be able to map density variations to better than 3% in pressure slip cast Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} monolithic materials. In addition, 3DXCT coupled to image processing has been shown to be able to map through-thickness fiber orientations in 2D lay-ups of 0{degrees}/45{degrees}, 0{degrees}/75{degrees}, 0{degrees}/90{degrees}, in SiC/SiC CVI CFC. Fourier optics based laser scatter systems have been shown to be able to detect surface and subsurface defects (as well as microstructural variations) in monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bearing balls. Infrared methods using photothermal excitation have been shown to be able to detect and measure thermal diffusivity differences on SiC/SiC 2D laminated CFC which have been subjected to different thermal treatments including thermal shock and oxidizing environments. These NDC methods and their applications help provide information to allow reliable usage of ceramics in advanced heat engine applications.

Ellingson, W.A.; Steckenrider, J.S.; Sivers, E.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ling, J.R. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, SH (China). Shanghai Inst. of Ceramics

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Components of the Milky Way and GAIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The GAIA mission will produce an extraordinary database from which we should be able to deduce not only the Galaxy's current structure, but also much of its history, and thus cast a powerful light on the way in which galaxies in general are made up of components, and of how these formed. The database can be fully exploited only by fitting to it a sophisticated model of the entire Galaxy. Steady-state models are of fundamental importance even though the Galaxy cannot be in a steady state. A very elaborate model of the Galaxy will be required to reproduce the great wealth of detail that GAIA will reveal. A systematic approach to model-building will be required if such a model is to be successfully constructed, however. The natural strategy is to proceed through a series of models of ever increasing elaborateness, and to be guided in the specification of the next model by mismatches between the data and the current model. An approach to the dynamics of systems with steady gravitational potentials that we call the `torus programme' promises to provide an appropriate framework within which to carry out the proposed modelling programme. The basic principles of this approach have been worked out in some detail and are summarized here. Some extensions will be required before the GAIA database can be successfully confronted. Other modelling techniques that might be employed are briefly examined.

James Binney

2001-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

3D residual stress field in arteries: novel inverse method based on optical full-field measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-stretch and residual stresses arise in arteries largely due to the deposition of stable, highly elastic, elastin during1 3D residual stress field in arteries: novel inverse method based on optical full over time. This gives rise to residual stresses contributing to the homeostatic state of stress in vivo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

468

Close electric field signatures of dart leader//return stroke sequences in rocket-triggered lightning showing residual fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 30 m deposited by the leader but presumably left unneutralized by the return stroke. This residual-triggered lightning showing residual fields V. A. Rakov and V. Kodali Department of Electrical and Computer and 30 m from the negative lightning channel are used to examine the so-called residual electric field

Florida, University of

469

Multi component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Multi-component Nanoparticle Based Lubricant Additive to Improve Efficiency and Durability in Engines ITP Nanomanufacturing:...

470

Impact of Biodiesel on Fuel System Component Durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the effects of biodiesel blends on fuel system components and the physical characteristics of elastomer materials.

Terry, B.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Standardization of Components, Products and Processes with Data Mining Bruno AGARD Département de databases. This paper discusses applications of data mining in standardization of components, products, and processes. Standardization of components is accomplished using association rules derived from customers

Kusiak, Andrew

472

PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to PCB Radiation Mechanisms: Using Component-Level Measurements to Determine System-Level Radiated EmissionsDetermine System-Level Radiated Radiation Directly from PCB StructuresRadiation Directly from PCB Structures Signal or component voltage

Stuart, Steven J.

473

Three path interference using nuclear magnetic resonance: a test of the consistency of Born's rule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Born rule is at the foundation of quantum mechanics and transforms our classical way of understanding probabilities by predicting that interference occurs between pairs of independent paths of a single object. One consequence of the Born rule is that three way (or three paths) quantum interference does not exist. In order to test the consistency of the Born rule, we examine detection probabilities in three path intereference using an ensemble of spin-1/2 quantum registers in liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (LSNMR). As a measure of the consistency, we evaluate the ratio of three way interference to two way interference. Our experiment bounded the ratio to the order of $10^{-3} \\pm 10^{-3}$, and hence it is consistent with Born's rule.

Daniel K. Park; Osama Moussa; Raymond Laflamme

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

474

Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Experimental study of the residual stress-induced self-assembly of MEMS structures during deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility of using residual stresses favorably as a means of self-assembling MEMS during material deposition is experimentally investigated. Two atomic force microscope cantilevers are placed in contact at their free ends. Material...

Kim, Sang-Hyun

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Residual Stress of Bimetallic Joints and Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about residual stress...

477

Hanford Tank 241-S-112 Residual Waste Composition and Leach Test Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of laboratory characterization and testing of two samples (designated 20406 and 20407) of residual waste collected from tank S-112 after final waste retrieval. These studies were completed to characterize the residual waste and assess the leachability of contami¬nants from the solids. This is the first report from this PNNL project to describe the composition and leach test data for residual waste from a salt cake tank. All previous PNNL reports (Cantrell et al. 2008; Deutsch et al. 2006, 2007a, 2007b, 2007c) describing contaminant release models, and characterization and testing results for residual waste in single-shell tanks were based on samples from sludge tanks.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

478

Residual stresses and retained austenite distribution and evolution in SAE 52100 steel under rolling contact loading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses are introduced and modified during manufacturing and also by normal use. In this paper the changes in magnitude and distribution of residual stresses, attending the strain induced transformation of retained austenite are examined. Tests were conducted on SAE 52100 bearing steel with different amounts of retained austenite in a 5-ball-rod rolling contact fatigue machine. The tests were accelerated by applying well-controlled micro- indentations on the wear track and using rough balls. The magnitude and distribution of residual stresses and retained austenite were measured using x-ray diffraction techniques. The contribution of the residual stresses and amount of retained austenite to the rolling contact fatigue life is analyzed.

Dommarco, R.C. [Univ. Nac Mar del Plata (Argentina); Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hahn, G.T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp binding residues Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp binding residues Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Asymmetric deceleration of ClpB or Hsp104...

480

Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Smith, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12-10 #12;#12;Minimizing Actuator-Induced Residual Error in Active Space Telescope Primary Mirrors Matthew W. Smith, David W. Miller September 2010 SSL #12

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residue component consists" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Managing Residual Forage for Rangeland Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing is a tool for managing economic and climatic risk. Overgrazing increases a producer's risk should drought occur or market prices decline. This publication explains the importance of leaving enough forage residue to protect against...

Hanselka, C. Wayne; White, Larry D.; Holechek, Jerry L.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

45.5 49.2 W W 44.5 45.4 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

483

Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year No. 1 Distillate No. 2...

484

Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

55.1 47.1 W W 55.1 46.2 See footnotes at end of table. 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

485

US Apple Association Having an Impact Insecticide Residues in Apple Juice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weeks ago we would have said two weeks early, right now we're saying maybe a week early. The cool syrup, soybeans, and milk for residues of a number of different pesticides. While I hate to bore you

Ginzel, Matthew

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid residues responsible Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Collection: Fossil Fuels 4 Protein folding with stochastic L-systems Gemma Danks1 Summary: 70 amino acid residues to 1000s...

487

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Characterization of residual stress relaxation in welded steel plate using TAP-NDE and wavelets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis presents the characterization of residual stress relaxation in a welded ASTM 1018 steel plate by using the Thermo-Acousto-Photonic Nondestructive Evaluation (TAP-NDE) technique and… (more)

Jhun, Choon-Sik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2005. The Role of Dissolved Aluminum in Silica Chemistry forDraft Public Health Goal for Aluminum in Drinking Water .1994. Control of Residual Aluminum in Filtered Water . AWWA,

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Recovery of the Shear Modulus and Residual Stress of Hyperelastic Soft Tissues by Inverse Spectral Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequencies of the vessel wall material. As the IVUS is interrogating inside the artery, it produces small amplitude, high frequency time harmonic vibrations superimposed on the quasistatic deformation of the blood pressure pre-stressed and residually...

Gou, Kun 1981-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

491

A New Analytical Method to Quantify Residual Fluid Cleanup in Hydraulic Fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydraulic fracturing fluid has always been a major issue, and is believed to drastically undermine the performance of hydraulically fractured wells. Several attempts have been made to quantify the damage associated with residual fluid, with varying level...

Zarrin, Tahira

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

492

Topological BF models with maximal field spectra: Consistent self-interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking into account the recent developments in alternative descriptions of gravity via topological BF models, all consistent self-interactions of such theories with maximal field spectra in D=4,5,6 are analyzed in order to facilitate further generalizations to an arbitrary D. For convenience, the deformation of the solution to the master equation in the context of the BRST-antifield formalism is used as a general method of constructing consistent interacting gauge field theories. Also, commonly used hypotheses on quantum field theories on Minkowski space-times are employed.

Bizdadea, C.; Cioroianu, E. M.; Saliu, S. O.; Sararu, S. C.; Stanciu-Oprean, L. [Department of Physics, University of Craiova, 200585 Craiova (Romania)

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

493

Temperature Fluctuation and an Expected Limit of Hubble Parameter in the Self-Consistent Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The temperature gradient of microwave background radiation (CMBR) is calculated in the Self Consistent Model. An expected values for Hubble parameter have been presented in two different cases. In the first case the temperature is treated as a function of time only, while in the other one the temperature depends on relaxation of isotropy condi