National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for residue component consists

  1. Method for using global optimization to the estimation of surface-consistent residual statics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reister, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Barhen, Jacob (Oak Ridge, TN); Oblow, Edward M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    An efficient method for generating residual statics corrections to compensate for surface-consistent static time shifts in stacked seismic traces. The method includes a step of framing the residual static corrections as a global optimization problem in a parameter space. The method also includes decoupling the global optimization problem involving all seismic traces into several one-dimensional problems. The method further utilizes a Stochastic Pijavskij Tunneling search to eliminate regions in the parameter space where a global minimum is unlikely to exist so that the global minimum may be quickly discovered. The method finds the residual statics corrections by maximizing the total stack power. The stack power is a measure of seismic energy transferred from energy sources to receivers.

  2. A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

    2014-05-01

    A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

  3. Bonding exterior grade structural panels with copolymer resins of biomass residue components, phenol, and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.M. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Components of various forest and agricultural residue biomass-including the polyphenolic compounds-were converted into aqueous solution and/or suspension by extraction and digestion. Some biomass components reacted vigorously under alkaline catalysis with formaldehyde and initially showed a high degree of exothermic reaction; however, other components did not react as vigorously under these conditions, indicating that different biomass materials require different methods to obtain optimum reactivity for the copolymerization with phenol. Our primary goal is to develop adhesives capable of producing acceptable bond quality, as determined by the wood products industries` standards, under a reasonable range of gluing conditions. Copolymer resins of phenol, formaldehyde, and biomass components were synthesized and evaluated for gluability of bonding exterior grade structural replaced with chemicals derived from peanut hulls, pecan shell flour, pecan pith, southern pine bark, and pine needle required shorter press times. These resins also tolerated a broader range of gluing conditions. In summary, it appears that the technology of the fast curing copolymer resins of biomass components as adhesives for wood products has been developed and is ready to be transferred to industrial practice.

  4. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  5. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  6. SRC residual fuel oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.; Foster, E.P.

    1985-10-15

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  7. Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Vehicle Components: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Residual Stresses for Structural Analysis and Fatigue Life Prediction in...

  8. The examination of residual plots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Chih-Ling; Cai, Zongwu; Wu, Xizhi

    1998-01-01

    , then equations (14) and (18) indicate that the plot of eˆ(i) (or eˆi) versus yˆi might not reveal a nonlinear pattern even though the true mean function includes the nonlinear component, g(Z). Cook’s Example 7.1 (1994) illustrates this point. In practice...), Examples 7.1 and 7.2) has shown that this type of plot may provide misleading information when fitted values are used, we therefore suggest using the linear residual plot (residuals versus explanatory variables case) for the detection of nonlinearity...

  9. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

  10. Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue in East Texas, 2008 by Curtis L. VanderSchaaf, Forest Resource Analyst October 2009 #12;N Introduction The abundance of woody biomass from East Texas forests. This report represents the most current data on the availability of woody biomass in the form of logging

  11. Properties of soil pore space regulate pathways of plant residue decomposition and community structure of associated bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Negassa, Wakene C.; Guber, Andrey K.; Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Marsh, Terence L.; Hildebrandt, Britton; Rivers, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    Physical protection of soil carbon (C) is one of the important components of C storage. However, its exact mechanisms are still not sufficiently lucid. The goal of this study was to explore the influence of soil structure, that is, soil pore spatial arrangements, with and without presence of plant residue on (i) decomposition of added plant residue, (ii) CO? emission from soil, and (iii) structure of soil bacterial communities. The study consisted of several soil incubation experiments with samples of contrasting pore characteristics with/without plant residue, accompanied by X-ray micro-tomographic analyses of soil pores and by microbial community analysis ofmore »amplified 16S–18S rRNA genes via pyrosequencing. We observed that in the samples with substantial presence of air-filled well-connected large (>30 µm) pores, 75–80% of the added plant residue was decomposed, cumulative CO? emission constituted 1,200 µm C g?¹ soil, and movement of C from decomposing plant residue into adjacent soil was insignificant. In the samples with greater abundance of water-filled small pores, 60% of the added plant residue was decomposed, cumulative CO? emission constituted 2,000 µm C g?¹ soil, and the movement of residue C into adjacent soil was substantial. In the absence of plant residue the influence of pore characteristics on CO? emission, that is on decomposition of the native soil organic C, was negligible. The microbial communities on the plant residue in the samples with large pores had more microbial groups known to be cellulose decomposers, that is, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes, while a number of oligotrophic Acidobacteria groups were more abundant on the plant residue from the samples with small pores. This study provides the first experimental evidence that characteristics of soil pores and their air/water flow status determine the phylogenetic composition of the local microbial community and directions and magnitudes of soil C decomposition processes.« less

  12. Residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate thin film tunable dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten, L. M., E-mail: lmg309@psu.edu; Trolier-McKinstry, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Lam, P.; Harris, D.; Maria, J.-P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Loss reduction is critical to develop Ba{sub 1?x}Sr{sub x}TiO{sub 3} thin film tunable microwave dielectric components and dielectric energy storage devices. The presence of ferroelectricity, and hence the domain wall contributions to dielectric loss, will degrade the tunable performance in the microwave region. In this work, residual ferroelectricity—a persistent ferroelectric response above the global phase transition temperature—was characterized in tunable dielectrics using Rayleigh analysis. Chemical solution deposited Ba{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}TiO{sub 3} films, with relative tunabilities of 86% over 250?kV/cm at 100?kHz, demonstrated residual ferroelectricity 65?°C above the ostensible paraelectric transition temperature. Frequency dispersion observed in the dielectric temperature response was consistent with the presence of nanopolar regions as one source of residual ferroelectricity. The application of AC electric field for the Rayleigh analysis of these samples led to a doubling of the dielectric loss for fields over 10?kV/cm at room temperature.

  13. Duality, Residues, Fundamental class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-05-22

    May 22, 2011 ... Duality, Residues, Fundamental class. Joseph Lipman. Purdue University. Department of Mathematics lipman@math.purdue.edu. May 22 ...

  14. Biomass from Logging Residue and Mill Residue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a renewable energy resource or for chemical extraction. This report represents the most current data harvesting or are cut off the central stem of the tree due to a merchantability standard. Limbs refer for energy production or chemical extraction. Table 1 shows the logging residue available in East Texas

  15. Vitrification of NAC process residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Vitrification tests have been performed with simulated waste compositions formulated to represent the residue which would be obtained from the treatment of low-level, nitrate wastes from Hanford and Oak Ridge by the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process. The tests were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of vitrifying NAC residue and to quantify the impact of the NAC process on the volume of vitrified waste. The residue from NAC treatment of low-level nitrate wastes consists primarily of oxides of aluminum and sodium. High alumina glasses were formulated to maximize the waste loading of the NAC product. Transparent glasses with up to 35 wt% alumina, and even higher contents in opaque glasses, were obtained at melting temperatures of 1,200 C to 1,400 C. A modified TCLP leach test showed the high alumina glasses to have good chemical durability, leaching significantly less than either the ARM-1 or the DWPF-EA high-level waste reference glasses. A significant increase in the final waste volume would be a major result of the NAC process on LLW vitrification. For Hanford wastes, NAC-treatment of nitrate wastes followed by vitrification of the residue will increase the final volume of vitrified waste by 50% to 90%; for Melton Valley waste from Oak Ridge, the increase in final glass volume will be 260% to 280%. The increase in volume is relative to direct vitrification of the waste in a 20 wt% Na{sub 2}O glass formulation. The increase in waste volume directly affects not only disposal costs, but also operating and/or capital costs. Larger plant size, longer operating time, and additional energy and additive costs are direct results of increases in waste volume. Such increases may be balanced by beneficial impacts on the vitrification process; however, those effects are outside the scope of this report.

  16. Vitrification of NAC process residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.A.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    Vitrification tests have been performed with simulated waste compositions formulated to represent the residue which would be obtained from the treatment of low-level, nitrate wastes from Hanford and Oak Ridge by the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process. The tests were designed to demonstrate the feasibility of vitrifying NAC residue and to quantify the impact of the NAC process on the volume of vitrified waste. The residue from NAC treatment of low-level nitrate wastes consists primarily of oxides of aluminum and sodium. High alumina glasses were formulated to maximize the waste loading of the NAC product. Transparent glasses with up to 35 wt% alumina, and even higher contents in opaque glasses, were obtained at melting temperatures of 1200{degrees}C to 1400{degrees}C. A modified TCLP leach test showed the high alumina glasses to have good chemical durability, leaching significantly less than either the ARM-1 or the DWPF-EA high-level waste reference glasses. A significant increase in the final waste volume would be a major result of the NAC process on LLW vitrification. For Hanford wastes, NAC-treatment of nitrate wastes followed by vitrification of the residue will increase the final volume of vitrified waste by 50% to 90%; for Melton Valley waste from Oak Ridge, the increase in final glass volume will be 260% to 280%. The increase in volume is relative to direct vitrification of the waste in a 20 wt% Na{sub 2}O glass formulation. The increase in waste volume directly affects not only disposal costs, but also operating and/or capital costs. Larger plant size, longer operating time, and additional energy and additive costs are direct results of increases in waste volume. Such increases may be balanced by beneficial impacts on the vitrification process; however, those effects are outside the scope of this report.

  17. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit.

  18. Hanford Tank Waste Residuals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - 27...

  19. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G. [and others

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  20. 1 Computer Architecture hardware components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Computer Architecture hardware components programming environments 2 Getting Started January 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) Computer Architecture L-2 14 January 2015 1 / 23 #12;Computer Architecture Hardware & Software A computer system consists of 1 Hardware: physical components

  1. Residual stress and self-assembly during deposition and etching of MEMS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Sathyanarayanan

    2002-01-01

    with no residual stresses. Residual stresses are investigated as a means of self-assembling MEMS and NEMS during material deposition and etching. The assembly of two components is considered: one component is subjected to deposition or etching and is modeled...

  2. Estimating Residual Solids Volume In Underground Storage Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Jason L.; Worthy, S. Jason; Martin, Bruce A.; Tihey, John R.

    2014-01-08

    The Savannah River Site liquid waste system consists of multiple facilities to safely receive and store legacy radioactive waste, treat, and permanently dispose waste. The large underground storage tanks and associated equipment, known as the 'tank farms', include a complex interconnected transfer system which includes underground transfer pipelines and ancillary equipment to direct the flow of waste. The waste in the tanks is present in three forms: supernatant, sludge, and salt. The supernatant is a multi-component aqueous mixture, while sludge is a gel-like substance which consists of insoluble solids and entrapped supernatant. The waste from these tanks is retrieved and treated as sludge or salt. The high level (radioactive) fraction of the waste is vitrified into a glass waste form, while the low-level waste is immobilized in a cementitious grout waste form called saltstone. Once the waste is retrieved and processed, the tanks are closed via removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations and severing/sealing external penetrations. The comprehensive liquid waste disposition system, currently managed by Savannah River Remediation, consists of 1) safe storage and retrieval of the waste as it is prepared for permanent disposition; (2) definition of the waste processing techniques utilized to separate the high-level waste fraction/low-level waste fraction; (3) disposition of LLW in saltstone; (4) disposition of the HLW in glass; and (5) closure state of the facilities, including tanks. This paper focuses on determining the effectiveness of waste removal campaigns through monitoring the volume of residual solids in the waste tanks. Volume estimates of the residual solids are performed by creating a map of the residual solids on the waste tank bottom using video and still digital images. The map is then used to calculate the volume of solids remaining in the waste tank. The ability to accurately determine a volume is a function of the quantity and quality of the waste tank images. Currently, mapping is performed remotely with closed circuit video cameras and still photograph cameras due to the hazardous environment. There are two methods that can be used to create a solids volume map. These methods are: liquid transfer mapping / post transfer mapping and final residual solids mapping. The task is performed during a transfer because the liquid level (which is a known value determined by a level measurement device) is used as a landmark to indicate solids accumulation heights. The post transfer method is primarily utilized after the majority of waste has been removed. This method relies on video and still digital images of the waste tank after the liquid transfer is complete to obtain the relative height of solids across a waste tank in relation to known and usable landmarks within the waste tank (cooling coils, column base plates, etc.). In order to accurately monitor solids over time across various cleaning campaigns, and provide a technical basis to support final waste tank closure, a consistent methodology for volume determination has been developed and implemented at SRS.

  3. Linear Consistency Testing Yonatan Aumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    of Blum, Luby and Rubinfeld [?] to check the linear-consistency of three functions f1, f2, f3 mapping and check if f1(x) + f2(y) = f3(x + y). We analyze this test for two cases: (1) G and H are arbitrary the consistency of multiple functions. Given a triple of functions f1, f2, f3 : G H, we say that they are "linear

  4. Consistent Mesh Parameterizations Princeton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    that their parameterizations are consistent if they all use the same base domain, such as a low polygon-count head model¨oder Bell Labs + + + + + + + = Figure 1: When given a set of head models an obvious shape to compute of the tech- niques carry over to higher genus. Consider for example a set of head scans; we say

  5. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  6. Consistent 4-form fluxes for maximal supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godazgar, Hadi; Krueger, Olaf; Nicolai, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    We derive new ansaetze for the 4-form field strength of D=11 supergravity corresponding to uplifts of four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. In particular, the ansaetze directly yield the components of the 4-form field strength in terms of the scalars and vectors of the four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity---in this way they provide an explicit uplift of all four-dimensional consistent truncations of D=11 supergravity. The new ansaetze provide a substantially simpler method for uplifting d=4 flows compared to the previously available method using the 3-form and 6-form potential ansaetze. The ansatz for the Freund-Rubin term allows us to conjecture a `master formula' for the latter in terms of the scalar potential of d=4 gauged supergravity and its first derivative. We also resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the antisymmetry of the flux obtained from uplift ansaetze.

  7. Consistent 4-form fluxes for maximal supergravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadi Godazgar; Mahdi Godazgar; Olaf Krueger; Hermann Nicolai

    2015-07-28

    We derive new ansaetze for the 4-form field strength of D=11 supergravity corresponding to uplifts of four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity. In particular, the ansaetze directly yield the components of the 4-form field strength in terms of the scalars and vectors of the four-dimensional maximal gauged supergravity---in this way they provide an explicit uplift of all four-dimensional consistent truncations of D=11 supergravity. The new ansaetze provide a substantially simpler method for uplifting d=4 flows compared to the previously available method using the 3-form and 6-form potential ansaetze. The ansatz for the Freund-Rubin term allows us to conjecture a `master formula' for the latter in terms of the scalar potential of d=4 gauged supergravity and its first derivative. We also resolve a long-standing puzzle concerning the antisymmetry of the flux obtained from uplift ansaetze.

  8. Materials recovery from shredder residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, B. J.; Pomykala, J., Jr.

    2000-07-24

    Each year, about five (5) million ton of shredder residues are landfilled in the US. Similar quantities are landfilled in Europe and the Pacific Rim. Landfilling of these residues results in a cost to the existing recycling industry and also represents a loss of material resources that are otherwise recyclable. In this paper, the authors outline the resources recoverable from typical shredder residues and describe technology that they have developed to recover these resources.

  9. Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

  10. Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pal, Debnath

    Estimates of the Loss of Main-Chain Conformational Entropy of Different Residues on Protein Folding of the main-chain (torsion angles, and ) conformational entropy by taking its side-chain into account. The analysis shows that the main-chain component of the total conformational entropy loss for a residue

  11. Root cause analysis of solder flux residue incidence in the manufacture of electronic power modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Pranav

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates the root causes of the incidence of solder flux residue underneath electronic components in the manufacture of power modules. The existing deionized water-based centrifugal cleaning process was ...

  12. Qualitative reasoning about consistency in geographic information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckham, Matt

    Qualitative reasoning about consistency in geographic information Matt Duckham a,, Jenny Lingham b reasoning system for describing consistency between different geographic data sets. Consistency is closely related to issues of uncertainty and interoperability in geographic information, and the paper assesses

  13. Non-trivial checks of novel consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin; Wang, Junpu E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-06-01

    Single-field perturbations satisfy an infinite number of consistency relations constraining the squeezed limit of correlation functions at each order in the soft momentum. These can be understood as Ward identities for an infinite set of residual global symmetries, or equivalently as Slavnov-Taylor identities for spatial diffeomorphisms. In this paper, we perform a number of novel, non-trivial checks of the identities in the context of single field inflationary models with arbitrary sound speed. We focus for concreteness on identities involving 3-point functions with a soft external mode, and consider all possible scalar and tensor combinations for the hard-momentum modes. In all these cases, we check the consistency relations up to and including cubic order in the soft momentum. For this purpose, we compute for the first time the 3-point functions involving 2 scalars and 1 tensor, as well as 2 tensors and 1 scalar, for arbitrary sound speed.

  14. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  15. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  16. Technology for treatment of salt residue stored at NPPs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobelev, A.P.; Savkin, A.E.; Sinjakin, O.G.; Kachalova, E.A.; Sorokoletova, A.N.; Nechaev, V.R. [SUE Moscow SIA Radon (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    At Moscow SIA 'Radon', three (3) options for NPP salt residue treatment were developed and tested. Option 1 consists of dissolving the salt residue and subsequent treatment by ozonization, separation of the deposits formed from ozonization and selective cleaning by ferrocyanide sorbents. Option 2 consists of fusion of the salt residue, addition of glass-forming additives and melting of borosilicate glass in a melter such as a 'cold crucible'. Option 3 consists of dissolving the salt residue, oxidation of the solution obtained, removal of radionuclides by collectors and the separate handling of formed deposits and the solution. The deposits containing more than 99 % of the activity are directed to vitrification and the solution is directed either to a concentrates dryer or to cementation. The vitrified waste product is placed in repository for solid radioactive waste storage and the solidified product from the solution goes to an industrial waste disposal site or a repository specially developed at NPP sites for 'exempt waste' products by IAEA classification. (authors)

  17. Nanodiamond Analysis Methods Compared for Consistency. J. B. Lewis1,2 , D. Isheim4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floss, Christine

    Nanodiamond Analysis Methods Compared for Consistency. J. B. Lewis1,2 , D. Isheim4 , C. Floss1 introduced herein and used to analyze nine new detonation nanodiamond standards (DND) and three meteoritic nanodiamond residue sam- ples from the Allende DM separate (ADM). Experimental: A full description of specimen

  18. Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a flow path having solid components flowing therethrough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bauer, William F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Elias, Gracy (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-05-06

    A method and apparatus is provided for monitoring a flow path having plurality of different solid components flowing therethrough. For example, in the harvesting of a plant material, many factors surrounding the threshing, separating or cleaning of the plant material and may lead to the inadvertent inclusion of the component being selectively harvested with residual plant materials being discharged or otherwise processed. In accordance with the present invention the detection of the selectively harvested component within residual materials may include the monitoring of a flow path of such residual materials by, for example, directing an excitation signal toward of flow path of material and then detecting a signal initiated by the presence of the selectively harvested component responsive to the excitation signal. The detected signal may be used to determine the presence or absence of a selected plant component within the flow path of residual materials.

  19. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  20. Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, Vol. 23, No. 3, September 2004 ( C 2004) Eddy Current Assessment of Near-Surface Residual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation, Vol. 23, No. 3, September 2004 ( C 2004) Eddy Current in eddy current conductivity at increasing inspection frequencies, which can be exploited components, lend themselves easily for eddy current residual stress assessment lies in their favorable

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

  2. Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, W.V.

    1994-06-17

    A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

  3. Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam??l?, Fatih

    2010-01-01

    Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

  4. Residue management at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olencz, J.

    1995-12-31

    Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

  5. Consistent nonlinear dynamics: identifying model inadequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

    2004-03-09

    Empirical modelling often aims for the simplest model consistent with the data. A new technique is presented which quantifies the consistency of the model dynamics as a function of location in state space. As is well-known, traditional statistics of nonlinear models like root-mean-square (RMS) forecast error can prove misleading. Testing consistency is shown to overcome some of the deficiencies of RMS error, both within the perfect model scenario and when applied to data from several physical systems using previously published models. In particular, testing for consistent nonlinear dynamics provides insight towards (i) identifying when a delay reconstruction fails to be an embedding, (ii) allowing state dependent model selection and (iii) optimising local neighbourhood size. It also provides a more relevant (state dependent) threshold for identifying false nearest neighbours.

  6. On the initial state and consistency relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhiani, Lasha; Khoury, Justin E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study the effect of the initial state on the consistency conditions for adiabatic perturbations. In order to be consistent with the constraints of General Relativity, the initial state must be diffeomorphism invariant. As a result, we show that initial wavefunctional/density matrix has to satisfy a Slavnov-Taylor identity similar to that of the action. We then investigate the precise ways in which modified initial states can lead to violations of the consistency relations. We find two independent sources of violations: i) the state can include initial non-Gaussianities; ii) even if the initial state is Gaussian, such as a Bogoliubov state, the modified 2-point function can modify the q-vector ? 0 analyticity properties of the vertex functional and result in violations of the consistency relations.

  7. On the Consistency of Multiclass Classification Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tewari, Ambuj

    On the Consistency of Multiclass Classification Methods Ambuj Tewari1 and Peter L. Bartlett2 1 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005 #12;144 A. Tewari and P.L. Bartlett guarantee that if the -risk of f

  8. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  9. Viscosity stabilization of SRC residual oil. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-05-01

    The use of SRC residual oils for No. 6 Fuel Oil substitutes has been proposed. The oils exhibit viscosity characteristics at elevated temperatures that allow this substitution with only minor modifications to the existing fuel oil infrastructure. However, loss of low-boiling materials causes an increase in the viscosity of the residual oils that is greater than expected from concentration changes. A process has been developed that minimizes the loss of volatiles and thus maintains the viscosity of these materials. The use of an additive (water, phenol, or an SRC light oil cut rich in low-boiling phenols in amounts up to 2.0 wt %) accomplishes this and hence stabilizes the pumping and atomizing characteristics for an extended period. During the course of the work, the components of the volatiles lost were identified and the viscosity change due to this loss was quantified. 3 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  10. Onsager's symmetry relation and the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a magnetized plasma with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Yang, E-mail: yangzustc@gmail.com; Wang, Shaojie [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2014-09-15

    The physics of the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a rotating plasma with electrostatic turbulence is explicitly identified by using the transport formulation of the gyrokinetic turbulence. It is clarified that the residual stress consists of four terms, among which are the cross terms due to the pressure gradient and the temperature gradient and the terms related to the turbulent acceleration impulse and the turbulent heating rate. The last two terms are identified for the first time, and are shown to cause analogous residual term in the heat flux. Meanwhile, the transport matrix reveals diffusion in the phase space. The transport matrix is demonstrated to satisfy the Onsager's symmetry relation.

  11. Quantifying the consistency of scientific databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Šubelj, Lovro; Boshkoska, Biljana Mileva; Kastrin, Andrej; Levnaji?, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Science is a social process with far-reaching impact on our modern society. In the recent years, for the first time we are able to scientifically study the science itself. This is enabled by massive amounts of data on scientific publications that is increasingly becoming available. The data is contained in several databases such as Web of Science or PubMed, maintained by various public and private entities. Unfortunately, these databases are not always consistent, which considerably hinders this study. Relying on the powerful framework of complex networks, we conduct a systematic analysis of the consistency among six major scientific databases. We found that identifying a single "best" database is far from easy. Nevertheless, our results indicate appreciable differences in mutual consistency of different databases, which we interpret as recipes for future bibliometric studies.

  12. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  13. Instantaneous symmetrical components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salehfar, Hossein

    1984-01-01

    in faulted power systems, and to the study of the transient behavior of synchronous machines. iV Ky Family ACKNOWLEDGENENTS The author wishes Co express his sincere gracitude to his thesis advisor, Dr. A. K. Ayoub. Dr. Ayoub's guidance, encouragement... Three-Phase Systems XII. POWER SYSTEM TRANSIENT RESPONSE USING INSTANTANEOUS SYMMETRICAL COMPONENTS Nature of Short-Circuit currents Physical Interpretation of the Short- Circuit Phenomenon Use of Instantaneous Symmetrical Components Method I Lum...

  14. Style Consistent Classification of Isogenous Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, George

    a basis for more accurate classification of a group (field) of digitized characters from the same sourceStyle Consistent Classification of Isogenous Patterns Prateek Sarkar, Member, IEEE Computer Society they share the same, albeit unknown, style. Style constrained classifiers achieve higher classification

  15. Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consistency of Posterior Distributions for Neural Networks Herbert Lee \\Lambda May 21, 1998 Abstract In this paper we show that the posterior distribution for feedforward neural networks is asymp neural networks for nonparametric regression in a Bayesian framework. Keywords: Bayesian statistics

  16. Web Services Need Consistency Giacomo Piccinelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    Web Services Need Consistency Giacomo Piccinelli Hewlett-Packard Laboratories Stoke Gifford Park.finkelstein|c.nentwich}@cs.ucl.ac.uk Abstract Web Services provide a powerful access channel to business capabilities. Inside the company can be streamlined and business opportunities extended. A major issue with the current Web Service

  17. A Generalization of Generalized Arc Consistency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackworth, Alan K.

    - binary classic constraint satisfaction problems (CSPs). Based on the Semiring CSP and Valued CSP such as fuzzy CSP, probabilistic CSP, max CSP, and weighted CSP. This extension is based on an idempotent satisfaction problem (CSP), local consistency can be char- acterized as deriving new constraints based on local

  18. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  19. Foundations of consistent couple stress theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali R. Hadjesfandiari; Gary F. Dargush

    2015-07-29

    In this paper, we examine the recently developed skew-symmetric couple stress theory and demonstrate its inner consistency, natural simplicity and fundamental connection to classical mechanics. This hopefully will help the scientific community to overcome any ambiguity and skepticism about this theory, especially the validity of the skew-symmetric character of the couple-stress tensor. We demonstrate that in a consistent continuum mechanics, the response of infinitesimal elements of matter at each point decomposes naturally into a rigid body portion, plus the relative translation and rotation of these elements at adjacent points of the continuum. This relative translation and rotation captures the deformation in terms of stretches and curvatures, respectively. As a result, the continuous displacement field and its corresponding rotation field are the primary variables, which remarkably is in complete alignment with rigid body mechanics, thus providing a unifying basis. For further clarification, we also examine the deviatoric symmetric couple stress theory that, in turn, provides more insight on the fundamental aspects of consistent continuum mechanics.

  20. Particulate residue separators for harvesting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, John R.

    2010-06-29

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include a plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams which are formed by the harvesting device and which travel, at least in part, along the plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly which is located in partially occluding relation relative to the plenum, and which substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  1. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  2. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  3. Gyrokinetic simulation of momentum transport with residual stress from diamagnetic level velocity shears

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-04-15

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the equilibrium fluid toroidal velocity (and the velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)], we demonstrated with GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] gyrokinetic simulations that TAM pinching from (ion pressure gradient supported or diamagnetic level) equilibrium ExB velocity shear could provide some of the residual stress needed to support spontaneous toroidal rotation against normal diffusive loss. Here we show that diamagnetic level shear in the intrinsic drift wave velocities (or ''profile shear'' in the ion and electron density and temperature gradients) provides a comparable residual stress. The individual signed contributions of these small (rho-star level) ExB and profile velocity shear rates to the turbulence level and (rho-star squared) ion energy transport stabilization are additive if the rates are of the same sign. However because of the additive stabilization effect, the contributions to the small (rho-star cubed) residual stress is not always simply additive. If the rates differ in sign, the residual stress from one can buck out that from the other (and in some cases reduce the stabilization.) The residual stress from these diamagnetic velocity shear rates is quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion energy (power) flow (M/P) in a global GYRO core simulation of a ''null'' toroidal rotation DIII-D [Mahdavi and Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] discharge by matching M/P profiles within experimental uncertainty. Comparison of global GYRO (ion and electron energy as well as particle) transport flow balance simulations of TAM transport flow in a high-rotation DIII-D L-mode quantifies and isolates the ExB shear and parallel velocity (Coriolis force) pinching components from the larger ''diffusive'' parallel velocity shear driven component and the much smaller profile shear residual stress component.

  4. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  5. Friction welded battery component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.K.; Zagrodnik, J.P.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a battery component for use in a flow battery containing fluid electrolyte. It comprises: first and second bond ribs disposed on opposite sides of and defining a channel and respective primary flash traps disposed adjacent the bond ribs opposite the channel.

  6. Self-consistent resonance in a plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evangelos Chaliasos

    2005-10-14

    As an application of the solution of the equations of electromagnetic self-consistency in a plasma, found in a previous paper, the study of controlled thermo-nuclear fusion is undertaken. This study utilizes the resonance which can be developed in the plasma, as indicated by the above solution, and is based to an analysis of the underlying forced oscillation under friction. As a consequence, we find that, in this way, controlled thermonuclear fusion seems now to be feasible in principle. The treatment is rather elementary, and it may serve as a guide for more detailed calculations.

  7. Conductivity Profile Determination by Eddy Current for Shot Peened Superalloy Surfaces Toward Residual Stress Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Y.; Lo, C. C. H.; Frishman, A. M.; Lee, C.; Nakagawa, N. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    This paper describes an eddy current model-based method for inverting near-surface conductivity deviation profiles of surface treated materials from swept-high frequency eddy current (SHFEC) data. This work forms part of our current research directed towards the development of an electromagnetic nondestructive technique for assessing residual stress of shot-peened superalloy components. The inversion procedure is based on the use of a parameterized function to describe the near-surface conductivity as a function of depth for a shot-peened surface, and the laterally uniform multi-layer theory of Cheng, Dodd and Deeds to calculate the resulting coil impedance deviations. The convergence of the inversion procedure has been tested against synthesized eddy current data. As a demonstration, the conductivity deviation profiles of a series of Inconel 718 specimens, shot peened at various Almen intensities, have been obtained by inversion. Several consistency tests were conducted to examine the reliability of the inverted conductivity profiles. The results show that conductivity deviation profiles can be reliably determined from SHFEC data within the accuracy of the current measurement system.

  8. The consistency test on the cosmic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Yan; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Chen, Xuelei

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new and robust method to test the consistency of the cosmic evolution given by a cosmological model. It is realized by comparing the combined quantity r_d^CMB/D_V^SN, which is derived from the comoving sound horizon r_d from cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements and the effective distance D_V derived from low-redshift Type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) data, with direct and independent r_d/D_V obtained by baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at median redshifts. We apply this test method for the LCDM and wCDM models, and investigate the consistency of the derived value of r_d/D_V from Planck 2015 and the SN Ia data sets of Union2.1 and JLA (z<1.5), and the r_d/D_V directly given by BAO data from six-degree-field galaxy survey (6dFGS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 Main Galaxy Survey (SDSS-DR7 MGS), DR11 of SDSS-III, WiggleZ and Ly-alpha forecast surveys from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Data (BOSS) DR-11 over 0.1

  9. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Trott

    2015-01-17

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables to consistently constrain the Standard Model EFT is only expected to grow with future LHC data, as more complex processes are studied.

  10. Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

    1960-01-01

    -ITHION. The residual toxicity of para- rliioti to the tumid spider mite was not affected by ~i1nul;ttetl rain when the spray was applied at a dosage c.cluiv;~lcnt to 0.3 pound of toxicant per acre. Kill5 or the cotton aphid on spray residues of 1),11;1thion were...

  11. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  12. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin; Perlack, Robert D; Blackwelder, D. Brad; Muth, David J.; Hess, J. Richard

    2008-08-01

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  13. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables...

  14. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  15. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  16. Injection molded component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  17. Identifying Strongly Connected Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plimpton, Steve

    platforms usually consist of distributed parallel #3; This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy in these grids as well as an implementation and experimental results on shared and distributed memory machines. 1 enormous computational resources, if they are to be executed in practi- cal time. Such large computational

  18. Catalyst deactivation in residue hydrocracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oballa, M.C.; Wong, C.; Krzywicki, A. [Novacor Research and Technology Corp., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The existence of a computer-controlled bench scale hydrocracking units at the authors site has made cheaper the non-stop running of experiments for long periods of time. It was, therefore possible to show, at minimal costs, when three hydrocracking catalysts in service reach their maximum lifetime. Different parameters which are helpful for catalyst life and activity predictions were calculated, e.g., relative catalyst age and the effectiveness factor. Experimental results compared well with model, giving them the minimum and maximum catalyst lifetime, as well as the deactivation profile with regard to sulfur and metals removal. Reaction rate constants for demetallization and desulfurization were also determined. Six commercial catalysts were evaluated at short term runs and the three most active were used for long term runs. Out of three catalysts tested for deactivation at long term runs, it was possible to choose one whose useful life was higher than the others. All runs were carried out in a Robinson-Mahoney continuous flow stirred tank reactor, using 50/50 volumetric mixture of Cold Lake/Lloydminster atmospheric residue and NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst.

  19. Basis Token Consistency A Practical Mechanism for Strong Web Cache Consistency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    call \\Basis Token Consistency" or BTC; when im- plemented at the server, this mechanism allows any between the BTC algorithm and the use of the Time-To-Live (TTL) heuristic. #3; This research was supported

  20. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  1. 3D Residual Stress Field in Arteries: Novel Inverse Method Based on Optical Full-field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badel, Pierre; Avril, Stéphane; 10.1111/str.12008

    2013-01-01

    Arterial tissue consists of multiple structurally important constituents that have individual material properties and associated stress-free configurations that evolve over time. This gives rise to residual stresses contributing to the homoeostatic state of stress in vivo as well as adaptations to perturbed loads, disease or injury. The existence of residual stresses in an intact but load-free excised arterial segment suggests compressive and tensile stresses, respectively, in the inner and outer walls. Accordingly, an artery ring springs open into a sector after a radial cut. The measurement of the opening angle is commonly used to deduce the residual stresses, which are the stresses required to close back the ring. The opening angle method provides an average estimate of circumferential residual stresses but it gives no information on local distributions through the thickness and along the axial direction. To address this lack, a new method is proposed in this article to derive maps of residual stresses usi...

  2. Long-range correlations in finite nuclei: comparison of two self-consistent treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Dewulf; D. Van Neck; L. Van Daele; M. Waroquier

    1997-01-29

    Long-range correlations, which are partially responsible for the observed fragmentation and depletion of low-lying single-particle strength, are studied in the Green's function formalism. The self-energy is expanded up to second order in the residual interaction. We compare two methods of implementing self-consistency in the solution of the Dyson equation beyond Hartree-Fock, for the case of the 16O nucleus. It is found that the energy-bin method and the BAGEL method lead to globally equivalent results. In both methods the final single-particle strength functions are characterized by exponential tails at energies far from the Fermi level.

  3. Consistent treatment of hydrophobicity in protein lattice models accounts for cold denaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dijk, Erik; Knowles, Tuomas; Frenkel, Daan; Abeln, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavourable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  4. Consistent treatment of hydrophobicity in protein lattice models accounts for cold denaturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik van Dijk; Patrick Varilly; Tuomas Knowles; Daan Frenkel; Sanne Abeln

    2015-11-25

    The hydrophobic effect stabilizes the native structure of proteins by minimizing the unfavourable interactions between hydrophobic residues and water through the formation of a hydrophobic core. Here we include the entropic and enthalpic contributions of the hydrophobic effect explicitly in an implicit solvent model. This allows us to capture two important effects: a length-scale dependence and a temperature dependence for the solvation of a hydrophobic particle. This consistent treatment of the hydrophobic effect explains cold denaturation and heat capacity measurements of solvated proteins.

  5. Arabian crude-oil residues evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.F.; Bukhari, A.; Hasan, M.; Saleem, M.

    1985-08-12

    This article evaluates detailed physical and chemical characteristics for four important Saudi Arabian resids. Petroleum residues are composed of a mixture of large and complex hydrocarbon molecules along with one or more heteroatoms such as sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen, vanadium, and nickel. The amount of residue and its physical and chemical composition depend on the source of the crude oil and methods of processing. Residues from four Saudi Arabian crude oils produced by the Arabian American Oil Co. (Aramco) were evaluated. The crude oils are 38.5 degrees API Arabian Extra Light, 33.8 degrees API Arabian Light, 30.4 degrees Api Arabian Medium, and 28.03 degrees API Arabian Heavy. Results are presented and residue preparation, and physical and chemical characteristics are analyzed.

  6. Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

  7. Harvesting Residuals-Economic Energy Link 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, E. T.; Curtis, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    A description of systems used in integrated harvesting of quality and unmerchantable trees is outlined for three areas in New Brunswick, Canada. The silvicultural benefits and the use of residues as an alternative to ...

  8. FINAL REPORT LGP Discrimination and Residual Risk Analysis on Standardized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    FINAL REPORT LGP Discrimination and Residual Risk Analysis on Standardized Test Sites ­ Camp Sibert............................................................................................................... 10 2.1.6 Residual Risk Analysis

  9. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  10. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

  11. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

  12. Immobilization of Rocky Flats graphite fines residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.; Marra, J.C.; Peeler, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt% graphite, 15 wt% calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and 12 wt% plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Approximately 950 kg of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO{sub 2} concentration in the residue averages 12 wt%, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF{sub 2} dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF{sub 2} and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.

  13. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  14. Alternative cooling resource for removing the residual heat of reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, D. S.; Jung, C. Y.; Choi, K. Y. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 260 Naa-ri Yangnam-myeon Gyeongju-si, Gyeonasangbuk-do, 780-815 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The Recirculated Cooling Water (RCW) system of a Candu reactor is a closed cooling system which delivers demineralized water to coolers and components in the Service Building, the Reactor Building, and the Turbine Building and the recirculated cooling water is designed to be cooled by the Raw Service Water (RSW). During the period of scheduled outage, the RCW system provides cooling water to the heat exchangers of the Shutdown Cooling System (SDCS) in order to remove the residual heat of the reactor, so the RCW heat exchangers have to operate at all times. This makes it very hard to replace the inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers because the replacement work requires the isolation of the RCW. A task force was formed to prepare a plan to substitute the recirculated water with the chilled water system in order to cool the SDCS heat exchangers. A verification test conducted in 2007 proved that alternative cooling was possible for the removal of the residual heat of the reactor and in 2008 the replacement of inlet and outlet valves of the RCW heat exchangers for both Wolsong unit 3 and 4 were successfully completed. (authors)

  15. THE PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TEST HOW AND WHY IT WAS DEVELOPED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-12-15

    The Product Consistency Test (PCT), American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard C1285, is currently used world wide for testing glass and glass-ceramic waste forms for high level waste (HLW), low level waste (LLW), and hazardous wastes. Development of the PCT was initiated in 1986 because HLW glass waste forms required extensive characterization before actual production began and required continued characterization during production ({ge}25 years). Non-radioactive startup was in 1994 and radioactive startup was in 1996. The PCT underwent extensive development from 1986-1994 and became an ASTM consensus standard in 1994. During the extensive laboratory testing and inter- and intra-laboratory round robins using non-radioactive and radioactive glasses, the PCT was shown to be very reproducible, to yield reliable results rapidly, to distinguish between glasses of different durability and homogeneity, and to easily be performed in shielded cell facilities with radioactive samples. In 1997, the scope was broadened to include hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste glasses. In 2002, the scope was broadened to include glass-ceramic waste forms which are currently being recommended for second generation nuclear wastes yet to be generated in the nuclear renaissance. Since the PCT has proven useful for glass-ceramics with up to 75% ceramic component and has been used to evaluate Pu ceramic waste forms, the use of this test for other ceramic/mineral waste forms such as geopolymers, hydroceramics, and fluidized bed steam reformer mineralized product is under investigation.

  16. Residual-energy-applications program: support and integration report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The proposed government-owned EAST Facility at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina, would provide capabilities for development and confidence testing of industrial heat pumps, high temperature bottoming cycles, low temperature Rankine cycle power generation systems, and absorption chillers. This work is one component of the Residual Energy Applications Program (REAP). Other documents provide initial considerations concerning the heat pump and power generation systems to be tested at EAST, policy, objectives and guidelines for operation of the facility, a preliminary conceptual design, and environmental data. This report describes support and integration activities that were performed during the contract year. The various elements that impact on the EAST Facility are discussed and an assessment of the EAST Facility mission is given. The report concludes with proposed milestones, schedules, and costs for design, construction, and operation of the facility.

  17. A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient viscous flow with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A consistent...

  18. Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear data evaluations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards consistent nuclear models and comprehensive nuclear...

  19. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. . Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  20. Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S.; Rivera, M.A.

    1993-03-01

    Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

  1. Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements within the SRQRPA with self-consistent short range correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benes, Petr [IEAP, Czech Technical University (Czech Republic); Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-09

    The nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0v} of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0v{beta}{beta}-decay) are systematically evaluated using the self-consistent renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (SRQRPA). The residual interaction and the two-nucleon short-range correlations are derived from the charge-dependent Bonn (CD-Bonn) potential. The importance of further progress in the calculation of the 0v{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is stressed.

  2. Abstract--This work consists of two main components: (a) a longitudinal ethnographic study in Kyrgyzstan that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    study in Kyrgyzstan that demonstrates the importance of transportation resources in the developing world. Transportation is a very important shared resource; enabling efficient and effective use of such resources aids at their location. The paper discusses the system and early testing, as well as the development implications

  3. Addressing the Manufacturing Issues Associated with the use of Ceramic Materials for Diesel Engine Components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSpadden, SB

    2001-09-12

    This CRADA supports the objective of selecting appropriate ceramic materials for manufacturing several diesel engine components and addressing critical manufacturing issues associated with these components. Materials that were evaluated included several varieties of silicon nitride and stabilized zirconia. The critical manufacturing issues that were addressed included evaluation of the effect of grain size and the effect of the grinding process on mechanical properties, mechanical performance, reliability, and expected service life. The CRADA comprised four tasks: (1) Machining of Zirconia and Silicon Nitride Materials; (2) Mechanical Properties Characterization and Performance Testing; (3) Tribological Studies; and (4) Residual Stress Studies. Using instrumented equipment at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) Machining and Inspection Research User Center (MIRUC), zirconia and silicon nitride materials were ground into simulated component geometries. These components were subsequently evaluated for mechanical properties, wear, and residual stress characteristics in tasks two, three, and four.

  4. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prime, Michael B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  5. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore »both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  6. Identification of Factors Causing Heterogeneous Within-Herd Variance Components Using a Structural Model for Variances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yandell, Brian S.

    be computationally feasible on a na- tional basis. For this study, a structural log-linear model for sire models for genetic evaluation of dairy cattle assume that genetic and residual components of variance and conformation traits, which can reduce accuracy of selection and cause biases in the proportions of breeding

  7. Multi-component assembly casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  8. Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandara, Arosha

    Residual Stresses in Weldments by Neutron Diffraction Shanmukha Rao M, Jon James, Shirley Northover :- The neutron diffraction is determined from Bragg's law. When neutron propagate through crystal sample, Coherent, Incoherent and Absorption Scattering phenomena take place Weld MaterialsPlate materials Stress

  9. The Significance of Disordered Residues in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poonen, Bjorn

    RFs are significant in causing drug resistance in bacteria. 2. Protein interactions with a. common b. MoRF c. NonThe Significance of Disordered Residues in: 1) Bacterial Drug Resistance and 2) SNP Interactions #12;Outline 1. Introduction 2. Bacteria Methods 3. Bacteria Results 4. Disease Association Methods 5

  10. Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

    2014-03-01

    Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanford’s tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

  11. Data Conversion in Residue Number System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilic, Zeljko

    ;2 Abstract This thesis tackles the problem of data conversion in the Residue Number System (RNS). The RNS has the use of RNS at the applications. In this thesis, we aim at developing efficient schemes for the conversion from the conventional representation to the RNS representation and vice versa. The conventional

  12. Residual Gas Analysis for Long-Pulse, Advanced Tokamak Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepper, C Christopher; Hillis, Donald Lee; Bucalossi, J.; Douai, D.; OddonCEA, IRFM, P.; VartanianCEA-Cadarach, S.; Colas, L.; Manenc, L.; Pegourie, B.

    2010-01-01

    A shielded residual gas analyzer RGA system on Tore Supra can function during plasma operation and is set up to monitor the composition of the neutral gas in one of the pumping ducts of the toroidal pumped limited. This diagnostic RGA has been used in long-pulse up to 6 min discharges for continuous monitoring of up to 15 masses simultaneously. Comparison of the RGA-measured evolution of the H2 /D2 isotopic ratio in the exhaust gas to that measured by an energetic neutral particle analyzer in the plasma core provides a way to monitor the evolution of particle balance. RGA monitoring of corrective H2 injection to maintain proper minority heating is providing a database for improved ion cyclotron resonance heating, potentially with RGA-base feedback control. In very long pulses 4 min absence of significant changes in the RGA-monitored, hydrocarbon particle pressures is an indication of proper operation of the actively cooled, carbon-based plasma facing components. Also H2 could increase due to thermodesorption of overheated plasma facing components. 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T. S.

    1998-11-06

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

  14. Heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  15. Generalized contexts and consistent histories in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losada, Marcelo; Laura, Roberto

    2014-05-15

    We analyze a restriction of the theory of consistent histories by imposing that a valid description of a physical system must include quantum histories which satisfy the consistency conditions for all states. We prove that these conditions are equivalent to imposing the compatibility conditions of our formalism of generalized contexts. Moreover, we show that the theory of consistent histories with the consistency conditions for all states and the formalism of generalized context are equally useful representing expressions which involve properties at different times.

  16. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

  17. Testing regression models with residuals as data by Xia Hua.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In polynomial regression ... . In this thesis, I developed a residual based test, the turning point test for residuals, which tests the hypothesis that the kth order polynomial regression holds with ... while the ...

  18. Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kypa, Jagan Mohan

    1999-01-01

    Critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) waves have been investigated with a computerized data acquisition and analysis technique to evaluate residual stresses present in a residual stress reference standard. This measurement ...

  19. In-situ method for treating residual sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Steven R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Henslee, S. Paul (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-07-19

    A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

  20. FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    FIXED PRICE RESIDUAL FUNDS POLICY Policy dated March 29, 1999 After completion of all deliverables in this process. May 1, 1999 Amendment to Policy · The first $75,000 of the residual balance will be transferred

  1. 1-D Transforms for the Motion Compensation Residual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamisli, Fatih

    Transforms used in image coding are also commonly used to compress prediction residuals in video coding. Prediction residuals have different spatial characteristics from images, and it is useful to develop transforms that ...

  2. In-Situ Method for Treating Residual Sodium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherman, Steven R.; Henslee, S. Paul

    2005-07-19

    A unique process for deactivating residual sodium in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) systems which uses humidified (but not saturated) carbon dioxide at ambient temperature and pressure to convert residual sodium into solid sodium bicarbonate.

  3. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  4. Thin layer chromatography residue applicator sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Kelly, Fredrick R. (Modesto, CA); Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-24

    A thin layer chromatograph residue applicator sampler. The residue applicator sampler provides for rapid analysis of samples containing high explosives, chemical warfare, and other analyses of interest under field conditions. This satisfied the need for a field-deployable, small, hand-held, all-in-one device for efficient sampling, sample dissolution, and sample application to an analytical technique. The residue applicator sampler includes a sampling sponge that is resistant to most chemicals and is fastened via a plastic handle in a hermetically sealed tube containing a known amount of solvent. Upon use, the wetted sponge is removed from the sealed tube and used as a swiping device across an environmental sample. The sponge is then replaced in the hermetically sealed tube where the sample remains contained and dissolved in the solvent. A small pipette tip is removably contained in the hermetically sealed tube. The sponge is removed and placed into the pipette tip where a squeezing-out of the dissolved sample from the sponge into the pipette tip results in a droplet captured in a vial for later instrumental analysis, or applied directly to a thin layer chromatography plate for immediate analysis.

  5. Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Topic 3 Correlation and Regression Linear Regression I 1 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals Outline Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations Residuals 2 / 15 #12;Principle of Least Squares Regression Equations

  6. RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    RESIDUAL STRESS EFFECTS IN FRACTURE OF COMPOSITES AND ADHESIVES JOHN A. NAIRN ABSTRACT Because by including residual stresses in fracture mechanics models of failure. This chapter gives general results examples of including residual stresses in fracture mechanics interpretation of experimental results

  7. Automating component reuse and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

    2004-09-01

    framework for automating specification-based component retrieval and adaptation that has been successfully applied to synthesis of software for embedded and digital signal processing systems. Using specifications to abstractly represent implementations...

  8. Runtime Assignment of Reconfigurable Hardware Components for Image Processing Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meleis, Waleed

    Runtime Assignment of Reconfigurable Hardware Components for Image Processing Pipelines Heather balance the benefits and costs of using FPGAs. Image processing applications of- ten consist of a pipeline implementations of image processing algorithms for a given problem. The pipeline assignment problem chooses from

  9. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  10. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of...

  11. Environmental assessment, finding of no significant impact, and response to comments. Sold residue treatment, repackaging, and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    From its founding in 1952 through the cessation of production in 1989, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant (now the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site [the Site]) produced components for nuclear weapons. Some of those components were made of plutonium. As a result of the processes used to recover and purify plutonium and manufacture the components, a variety of materials became contaminated with plutonium. If the level of contamination were low, the material was considered waste. However, if the concentration of plutonium in the material exceeded the {open_quotes}economic discard limit,{close_quotes} the materials were classified as {open_quotes}residue{close_quotes} rather than{open_quotes}Waste{close_quotes} and were stored for later recovery of the plutonium. While large quantities of residues were processed, others, primarily those more difficult to process, accumulated at the Site in storage. Two important events regarding residues have occurred at the Site since production activities ceased. One event was the end of the Cold War in 1991, which made the return to production of nuclear weapons, with their Rocky Flats-made components, unnecessary. This event led to DOE`s decision to permanently cease production at the Site, clean up and remove radioactive and chemical contamination at the Site, and find alternative uses for the Site. This document describes methods for processing of the wastes for safe interim storage. Environmental impacts from the processing and storage are discussed.

  12. Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome Journal of Moral form. What does it mean to say that rationality consists in responding correctly to reasons? Partly does not call for a response from you. Your punishment is the responsibility of the authorities

  13. Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database Rafail Ostrovsky UCLA@csail.mit.edu July 20, 2004 Abstract A consistent query protocol (CQP) allows a database owner to publish a very short string c which commits her and everybody else to a particular database D, so that any copy

  14. Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Consistency Proofs for Generalized Queries on a Committed Database #3; Rafail Ostrovsky asmith@csail.mit.edu July 20, 2004 Abstract A consistent query protocol (CQP) allows a database owner to publish a very short string c which commits her and everybody else to a particular database D, so that any

  15. Evaluation of agricultural residues for paper manufacture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaide, L.J.; Baldovin, F.L.; Herranz, J.L.F. (Univ. of Cordoba (Spain))

    1993-03-01

    Five agricultural residues-olive tree fellings, wheat straw, sunflower stalks, vine shoots, and cotton stalks-were evaluated for use as raw materials for paper manufacture. The untreated raw materials and their pulps were tested for hot-water solubles, 1%-NaOH solubles, alcohol-benzene extractables, ash, holocellulose, lignin, [alpha]-cellulose, and pentosans. Handsheets were tested for breaking length, stretch, burst index, and tear index. The results showed wheat straw to be the most promising material. Vine shoots showed the least promise.

  16. Robust bearing estimation for 3-component stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLAASSEN,JOHN P.

    2000-02-01

    A robust bearing estimation process for 3-component stations has been developed and explored. The method, called SEEC for Search, Estimate, Evaluate and Correct, intelligently exploits the inherent information in the arrival at every step of the process to achieve near-optimal results. In particular the approach uses a consistent framework to define the optimal time-frequency windows on which to make estimates, to make the bearing estimates themselves, to construct metrics helpful in choosing the better estimates or admitting that the bearing is immeasurable, and finally to apply bias corrections when calibration information is available to yield a single final estimate. The algorithm was applied to a small but challenging set of events in a seismically active region. It demonstrated remarkable utility by providing better estimates and insights than previously available. Various monitoring implications are noted from these findings.

  17. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  18. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 – 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  19. Quantum Residual Correlation: Interpreting through State Merging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indranil Chakrabarty; Abhishek Deshpande; Sourav Chatterjee

    2015-03-03

    In this brief report we revisit the concept of "quantum dissension", which was introduced as a natural extension of quantum discord for three qubit system. Here we bring in new expression for quantum dissensions and more interestingly we name one such expression as \\textit{residual correlation}. The basic objective behind the introduction of such a quantity is to capture the extra amount of correlation generated by doing measurement in a correlated system from a situation where we do not bring in a correlated system in the measurement process. Apart from this we also present an operational interpretation of this correlation in context of state merging. Remarkably, we find that for three qubit system if one discards relevant prior information, the change in the cost of state merging ( merging the quantum information of two parties into one) is captured by the \\textit{residual correlation}. In addition to that we found that this quantity can be negative for mixed states. This indeed opens up a new dimension in the tripartite scenario where we can observe situations where there is a decrease in the cost of state merging on discarding relevant prior information. We claim that this result establishes a re conceptualization of information processing tasks in tripartite situations where we can use suitable measurement and states to bring down the cost of the protocol.

  20. Morphing of Geometric Composites via Residual Swelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Pezzulla; Steven A. Shillig; Paola Nardinocchi; Douglas P. Holmes

    2015-05-30

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth--like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques.

  1. Correlations in Nuclei: Self-Consistent Treatment and the BAGEL Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Müther; L. D. Skouras

    1993-03-29

    An approach is presented which allows a self-consistent description of the fragmentation of single-particle strength for nucleons in finite nuclei employing the Greens function formalism. The self-energy to be considered in the Dyson equation for the single-particle Greens function contains all terms of first (Hartree-Fock) and second order in the residual interaction. It is demonstrated that the fragmentation of the single-particle strength originating from the terms of second order can efficiently be described in terms of the so-called BAGEL approximation. Employing this approximation the self-energy can be evaluated in a self-consistent way, i.e. the correlations contained in the Greens function are taken into account for the evaluation of the self-energy. As an example this scheme is applied to the nucleus $^{16}O$, using a realistic nucleon nucleon interaction. The effects of the correlations on the occupation probabilities and the binding energy are evaluated.

  2. Updated July 2014 PROGRAM COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    with a Student Affairs administrator and meet at least three times per semester. Students learn from mentors what in various activities. Learning occurs in different ways and through different avenues, therefore it is important to complete all of the following components: RETREATS are all day interactive activities focused

  3. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  4. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-21

    Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

  5. Time consistency and risk averse dynamic decision models ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-02

    sistent models as we provide practitioners with an intuitive economic inter- pretation for the ... ning and financial engineering problems. Based on ... consistency is shown to be one basic requirement to get suitable optimal de- cisions, in ...

  6. Synchronization in node of complex networks consist of complex chaotic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Qiang, E-mail: qiangweibeihua@163.com [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Faculty of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Xie, Cheng-jun [Beihua University computer and technology College, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132021, Jilin (China); Digital Images Processing Institute of Beihua University, BeiHua University, Jilin, 132011, Jilin (China); Liu, Hong-jun [School of Information Engineering, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China); Li, Yan-hui [The Library, Weifang Vocational College, Weifang, 261041 (China)

    2014-07-15

    A new synchronization method is investigated for node of complex networks consists of complex chaotic system. When complex networks realize synchronization, different component of complex state variable synchronize up to different scaling complex function by a designed complex feedback controller. This paper change synchronization scaling function from real field to complex field for synchronization in node of complex networks with complex chaotic system. Synchronization in constant delay and time-varying coupling delay complex networks are investigated, respectively. Numerical simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University “Lviv Polytechnic,” 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  8. Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

  9. Bioassays of weathered residues of several organic phosphorus insecticides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hightower, Billie Gene

    1959-01-01

    at high temperatures on the residual toxicities of Gut hi on, Sevin, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh........................ . . . . ........ 3^ 3? The effects of simulated wind on the residual toxicities of Guthion, dieldrin..., and toxaphene dusts to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh. 36 The effects of high temperatures on the residual toxicities of methyl parathion, malathion, and toxaphene to the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh...................... 3$ 5. The effects...

  10. Quantal self-consistent cranking model for monopole excitations in even-even light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gulshani

    2014-10-24

    In this article, we derive a quantal self-consistent time-reversal invariant parameter-free cranking model for isoscalar monopole excitation coupled to intrinsic motion in even-even light nuclei. The model uses a wavefunction that is a product of monopole and intrinsic wavefunctions and a constrained variational method to derive, from a many-particle Schrodinger equation, a pair of coupled self-consistent cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the monopole and intrinsic systems. The monopole co-ordinate used is the trace of the quadrupole tensor and hence describes the overall deformation of the nucleus. The monopole and intrinsic wavefunctions are coupled to each other by the two cranking equations and their associated parameters and by two constraints imposed on the intrinsic system. For an isotropic Nilsson shell model and an effective residual two-body interaction, the two coupled cranking equations are solved in the Tamm Dancoff approximation. The strength of the interaction is determined from a Hartree-Fock self-consistency argument. The excitation energy of the first excited state is determined and found to agree closely with those observed in the nuclei He-4, Be-8, C-12, O-16 , Ne-20, Mg-24, and Si-28. The variation of the model parameters are explained. In particular, it is found that the monopole excitation energy as a function of the mass number undergoes an increase whenever the nucleons begin to occupy a new sub-shell state with non-zero orbital angular momentum as a consequence of suppressing or constraining the resulting spurious monopole excitation in the intrinsic system.

  11. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  12. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  13. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  14. ABSTRACT: Bioenergy Harvesting Technologies to Supply Crop Residues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    objectives for the integration of advanced logistical systems and focused bioenergy harvesting technologies that supply crop residues and energy crops in a large bale format....

  15. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Meng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Huaiqiu, E-mail: hqzhu@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yao, Xin-Qiu [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University, Sakyo Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); She, Zhen-Su, E-mail: she@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Center for Theoretical Biology, and Center for Protein Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-01-29

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  16. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    melting and direct laser metal sintering Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron...

  17. Potential of biomass residue availability; The case of Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharya, S.C.; Shrestha, R.M.; Ngamkajornvivat, S. (Energy Technology Div., Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok 10501 (TH))

    1989-01-01

    An acute shortage of fuel wood and charcoal prevails in many developing countries. A logical approach to the problem places emphasis on the development of alternative energy sources, including use of biomass residues. An assessment of the potential of biomass residues for energy and other uses calls for an estimation of their annual production. Also, because the residues are normally bulky they should be utilized near their place of origin whenever possible to avoid high transportation costs. Thus knowledge of the total national generation of residues per year does not provide enough information for planning residue utilization. This article illustrates a method of residue estimation that takes the case of Thailand as an example. It presents the annual generation of nine agricultural resides (paddy husk, paddy straw, bagasse, cotton stalk, corn cob, groundnut shell, cassava stalk and coconut husk and shell) and one forestry residue (sawdust) in different agroeconomic zones and regions of Thailand. The methodology used for the investigation of crop-to-residue ratios is outlined. The annual generation figures for the different residues along with observations about their traditional uses are presented.

  18. Residual orientation in micro-injection molded parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, John; Edward, Graham H.; Knott, Robert B. (Monash); (ANSTO)

    2008-06-30

    The residual orientation following micro-injection molding of small rectangular plates with linear polyethylene has been examined using small-angle neutron scattering, and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The effect of changing the molding conditions has been examined, and the residual chain orientation has been compared to the residual orientation of the crystallites as a function of position in the sample. This study has found that, for micromoldings, the orientation of the crystallites decreases with increasing injection speed and increasing mold thickness. The combined data suggest that the majority of the orientation present comes from oriented crystal growth rather than residual chain orientation.

  19. Residual Stress Measurements in Side Bonded Resistance Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAUL, KORINKO

    2005-04-18

    Resistance upset welding is used to attach small diameter machined tubes to small gas vessels. Recently there has been interest in determining the level of residual stresses caused by this attachment method and its influence on environmental interactions. A test program was initiated to determine the residual stresses present due to welding using the nominal weld parameters and varying the interference between the foot and the counter bore. In this paper, the residual stress measurement technique is described, the welding conditions are provided, and the residual stress due to welding at the nominal conditions are presented.

  20. Catalyst deactivation model for residual oil hydrodesulfurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takatsuka, T.; Higasino, S.; Hirohama, S. [Chiyoda Corporation, Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Hydrodesulfurization process plays a dominant role in the modern refineries to upgrade residual oil either by removing heterogeneous atoms or by hydrocracking the bottom to distillates products. The practical model is proposed to predict a catalyst life which is the most concern in the process. The catalyst is deactivated in the early stage of the operation by coke deposition on the catalyst active site. The ultimate catalyst life is determined by pore mouth plugging depending on its metal capacity. The phenomena are mathematically described by losses of catalyst surface area and effective diffusivity of feedstock molecules in catalyst pore. The model parameters were collected through the pilot plant tests with different types of catalysts and feedstocks.

  1. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Loren A. (Santa Fe, NM); Michel, David J. (Alexandria, VA); Wyatt, Jeffrey R. (Burke, VA)

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  2. Primary Components of Binomial Ideals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eser, Zekiye

    2014-07-11

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 v LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2.1 The graph G pIpBqq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 2.2 The graph of M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.3 Examples of band graphs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 2.4 A band graph with an infinite component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 2.5 The band graph G6pMq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 2.6 Slice graphs for IpBq ? xx4z ? y4, x7z ? y7y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.7 Slice...

  3. Stack Components Nancy L. Garland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /manufacturing · Durability · Electrode performance · Thermal and water management #12;Stack Component Targets 500 @ 0.75 VmA/cm2Performance on O2 400 @ 0.8 VmA/cm2Performance on H2 10$/kWCostMEA 5000hoursDurability 1000ppm-) · In collaboration with LANL (K. Weisbrod) and NREL (H. Wang) · Initial testing at General Motors indicates nitrided

  4. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005deermay.pdf More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and...

  5. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, Michael A. (Livermore, CA); Aikens, David M. (Pleasanton, CA); Camp, David W. (Oakland, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA); Kiikka, Craig (Livermore, CA); Sheehan, Lynn M. (Livermore, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  6. Consistent Kaluza-Klein Truncations via Exceptional Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohm, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We present the generalized Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz for the full supersymmetric exceptional field theory in terms of group valued twist matrices subject to consistency equations. With this ansatz the field equations precisely reduce to those of lower-dimensional gauged supergravity parametrized by an embedding tensor. We explicitly construct a family of twist matrices as solutions of the consistency equations. They induce gauged supergravities with gauge groups SO(p,q) and CSO(p,q,r). Geometrically, they describe compactifications on internal spaces given by spheres and (warped) hyperboloides $H^{p,q}$, thus extending the applicability of generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions beyond homogeneous spaces. Together with the dictionary that relates exceptional field theory to D=11 and IIB supergravity, respectively, the construction defines an entire new family of consistent truncations of the original theories. These include not only compactifications on spheres of different dimensions (such as AdS$_5\\time...

  7. Multi-Component Harvesting of Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop commercially-viable technologies that will potentially overcome these barriers and enable the use of wheat residues as an inexpensive feedstock resource.

  8. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Duerr; Manfred Lindner; Kai Zuber

    2011-11-17

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited $0^+$ state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass.

  9. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technical University Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-01

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited 0{sup +} state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass .

  10. Remark on the Consistent Gauge Anomaly in Supersymmetric Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohshima, Y; Suzuki, H; Yasuta, H; Ohshima, Yoshihisa; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yasuta, Hirofumi

    1999-01-01

    We present a direct field theoretical calculation of the consistent gauge anomaly in the superfield formalism, on the basis of a definition of the effective action through the covariant gauge current. The scheme is conceptually and technically simple and the gauge covariance in intermediate steps reduces calculational labors considerably. The resultant superfield anomaly, being proportional to the anomaly $d^{abc}=\\tr T^a\\{T^b,T^c\\}$, is minimal even without supplementing any counterterms. Our anomaly coincides with the anomaly obtained by Marinkovi\\'c as the solution of the Wess-Zumino consistency condition.

  11. A Novel Method of Injection Molding Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weil, K. Scott

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a unique blend of powder injection molding feedstock materials in which only a small volume fraction of binder (< 8%) is required; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and a solid aromatic solvent. Because of the nature of the decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process.

  12. Very high residual resistivity ratios of heteroepitaxial superconducting niobium films on MgO substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC), San Leandro, CA 94577, USA; Valderrama, E. [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC), San Leandro, CA 94577, USA; Bures, B. [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC), San Leandro, CA 94577, USA; Wilson-Elliott, K. [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC), San Leandro, CA 94577, USA; Zhao, Xin [JLAB; Phillips, H. Larry [JLAB; Valente, Anne-Marie [JLAB; Spradlin, Joshua K. [JLAB; Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Seo, Kang [Norfolk State U.

    2011-11-01

    We report residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values (up to RRR-541) measured in thin film Nb grown on MgO crystal substrates, using a vacuum arc discharge, whose 60?160 eV Nb ions drive heteroepitaxial crystal growth. The RRR depends strongly upon substrate annealing and deposition temperatures. X-ray diffraction spectra and pole figures reveal that, as the crystal structure of the Nb film becomes more ordered, RRR increases, consistent with fewer defects or impurities in the lattice and hence longer electron mean free path. A transition from Nb(110) to purely Nb(100) crystal orientation on the MgO(100) lattice occurs at higher temperature.

  13. Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR®

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Residues in wax and honey after Apilife VAR® treatment Stefan Bogdanov Anton and foundation were exposed to the air during storage. © Inra/DIB/AGIB/Elsevier, Paris honey / wax / residue to accumulation of these substances in beeswax and less so in honey [1, 17]. The accumulation in wax depends

  14. Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

  15. Thermoacoustic method for relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshovyi, V.V.; Pakhn`o, M.I.; Tsykhan, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    We propose a thermoacoustic method for the relaxation of residual stresses in welded joints, present a block diagram of a generator of local thermoacoustic pulses designed for implementation of this method, and describe our experiment aimed at relaxation of residual tensile stresses.

  16. Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Kin K.

    Residual Energy-Aware Cooperative Transmission (REACT) in Wireless Networks Erwu Liu, Qinqing Zhang in the network can cooper- ate their transmissions of information to gain energy savings in a distributed network the lifetime of the network and we call the selection method a residual energy-aware cooperative transmission

  17. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multiplication based on Residue Num- ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA propose a new DPA countermeasure in the framework of RNS. It is only (slightly) memory consuming (1]. That is the reason why Residue Number Systems (RNS for short) can be very useful. RNS have the main advantage of fast

  18. Modular Arithmetic Implementation with the Residue Number System (RNS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, Leonel

    Modular Arithmetic Implementation with the Residue Number System (RNS) Samuel Antão and Leonel are the addition/subtraction, multiplication and reduction as well as the conversion of Residue Number System (RNS discussed in the following. 1 RNS Forward/Reverse Conversions Forward conversion corresponds

  19. Parallel FPGA Implementation of RSA with Residue Number Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Multiplication based on Residue Num­ ber Systems. Thanks to RNS, we develop a design able to perform an RSA propose a new DPA countermeasure in the framework of RNS. It is only (slightly) memory consuming (1]. That is the reason why Residue Number Systems (RNS for short) can be very useful. RNS have the main advantage of fast

  20. Identification of family-determining residues in PHD fingers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geman, Donald

    -evolution in their sequences. We measure the degree to which fixing the amino acid type at one position modifies the frequencies of amino acids at other positions. We then detect those position/amino acid combinations classify PHD fingers into different groups based on the analysis of residue­ residue co

  1. Show No Weakness: Sequentially Consistent Specifications of TSO Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotsman, Alexey

    Show No Weakness: Sequentially Consistent Specifications of TSO Libraries Alexey Gotsman1.g., for those that are data-race free (DRF). However, performance-critical libraries often violate, it is important for these libraries to protect their otherwise well-behaved clients from the weaker memory model

  2. Manipulator Control at Kinematic Singularities: A Dynamically Consistent Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mechanism [6]. These two models are the bases for implementing the control strategy for kinematicManipulator Control at Kinematic Singularities: A Dynamically Consistent Strategy Kyong-Sok Chang Abstract This paper presents a general strategy for manipu- lator control at kinematic singularities. When

  3. A static universe is consistent with type Ia supernovae observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David F. Crawford

    2015-04-18

    This paper considers the hypothesis that the universe is static and demonstrates that type Ia supernova observations which appear to provide strong support for time dilation (and thus for an expanding universe) are equally consistent with a static universe. It is shown that a property of the standard calibration method means that regardless of what redshift dependence the measured light curve widths may have the calibrated widths always have little or no redshift dependence. An important consideration is the Phillips relation, a correlation between the peak-luminosity and the width of type Ia supernovae. Using the Phillips relation the analysis of a recent compilation of type Ia supernova observations is re-examined and it is shown that these observations are fully consistent with a static universe. It is also argued that the photometric redshift relation and spectroscopic ages are fully consistent with a static universe. As a separate but related issue it is shown that in the static model the density distribution of type Ia supernovae as a function of redshift agrees with the observations. All the evidence shows that the hypothesis is consistent with a static universe.

  4. On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    On the consistency of Prony's method and related algorithms M.H. Kahn M.S.Mackisack M.R.Osborne§ G and of related algorithms based on maximum likelihood is discussed as the number of observations n are obtained for the frequency estimation problem. However, the algorithms considered are all scaling dependent

  5. Lightweight Logging for Lazy Release Consistent Distributed Shared Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neves, Nuno

    Lightweight Logging for Lazy Release Consistent Distributed Shared Memory Manuel Costa, Paulo Guedes, Manuel Sequeira, Nuno Neves, Miguel Castro IST - INESC R. Alves Redol 9, 1000 Lisboa PORTUGAL algorithm for a DSM system based on lazy release Manuel Costa, Nuno Neves and Miguel Castro were supported

  6. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  7. Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neutron skin of 208 Pb in consistency with neutron star observations K. Miyazaki E-mail: miyazakiro as varying the neutron radius of 208Pb. The neutron skin thickness Sn is determined in the comparison with the astronomical observations of massive neutron stars (NSs), the standard scenario of NS cooling

  8. A nuclear Frechet space consisting of C -functions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Dietmar

    A nuclear Fr´echet space consisting of C -functions and failing the bounded approximation property Dietmar Vogt Abstract An easy and transparent example is given of a nuclear Fre´echet space failing of Grothendieck whether every nuclear Fr´echet space has the bounded approximation property was open for quite

  9. Fluidized bed gasification of agricultural residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groves, John David

    1979-01-01

    at the operat- ing conditions used. The experimental data were also used to develop an empirical model based on temperature, fuel to air ratio, and their interactions. Cotton gin wastes were gasified with air to provide a fuel gas suitable for use... system include material balances for each of the components, process operating conditions, and applicable equilibrium relationships. Gumz (1950) applied these meth- ods to estimate the equilibrium gas composition from a fixed bed coal gasifier...

  10. Consistent Data Assimilation of Isotopes: 242Pu and 105Pd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti; H. Hiruta; M. Salvatores

    2012-09-01

    In this annual report we illustrate the methodology of the consistent data assimilation that allows to use the information coming from integral experiments for improving the basic nuclear parameters used in cross section evaluation. A series of integral experiments are analyzed using the EMPIRE evaluated files for 242Pu and 105Pd. In particular irradiation experiments (PROFIL-1 and -2, TRAPU-1, -2 and -3) provide information about capture cross sections, and a critical configuration, COSMO, where fission spectral indexes were measured, provides information about fission cross section. The observed discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are used in conjunction with the computed sensitivity coefficients and covariance matrix for nuclear parameters in a consistent data assimilation. The results obtained by the consistent data assimilation indicate that not so large modifications on some key identified nuclear parameters allow to obtain reasonable C/E. However, for some parameters such variations are outside the range of 1 s of their initial standard deviation. This can indicate a possible conflict between differential measurements (used to calculate the initial standard deviations) and the integral measurements used in the statistical data adjustment. Moreover, an inconsistency between the C/E of two sets of irradiation experiments (PROFIL and TRAPU) is observed for 242Pu. This is the end of this project funded by the Nuclear Physics Program of the DOE Office of Science. We can indicate that a proof of principle has been demonstrated for a few isotopes for this innovative methodology. However, we are still far from having explored all the possibilities and made this methodology to be considered proved and robust. In particular many issues are worth further investigation: • Non-linear effects • Flexibility of nuclear parameters in describing cross sections • Multi-isotope consistent assimilation • Consistency between differential and integral experiments

  11. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley (Vale of Glamorgan, GB); Crum, Bruce Robert (Madison, IN); Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank (Midland, MI)

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  12. Three-component gyrotropic metamaterial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tralle, Igor, E-mail: tralle@ur.edu.pl; Zi?ba, Pawe?; Pa?ko, Wioletta [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Theoretical Physics Department, University of Rzeszów, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszów (Poland)

    2014-06-21

    All of the proposed ever since designs of metamaterials are characterized by ever-increasing sophistication of fabrication methods. Here, a comparatively simple recipe for the fabrication of a metamaterial, which is both gyrotropic and of the simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, is proposed. The idea is to make a mixture of three ingredients, where one of them would be responsible for the negativity of ?, while the other two would be responsible for the negativity of ?. The first component of the mixture is the “swarm” of single-domain ferromagnetic nano-particles, immersed in a mixture of other two, silver and mercury cadmium telluride. By carrying out the computer simulations, the domains of gyromagnetic metamaterial exist, relative to all parameters characterizing the model, that is, the temperature, external magnetic field, parameters of nano-particles, and the fraction of cadmium in Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te-compound as well as relative concentrations of the mixture components are established.

  13. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

    2008-05-29

    Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

  14. A Residue Approach to the Finite Field Arithmetics 1/23 A Residue Approach to the Finite Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as integers. Residue Number System RNS base: a set of coprime numbers (m1, ..., mk ) RNS representation: (a1 of order (f (m)) then in RNS the complexities become (f (log m)). #12;A Residue Approach to the Finite ), we obtain a similar representation as RNS. Operations are made independently on each A(ei ) (like

  15. Full self-consistency versus quasiparticle self-consistency in diagrammatic approaches: Exactly solvable two-site Hubbard model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kutepov, A. L.

    2015-07-22

    Self-consistent solutions of Hedin's equations (HE) for the two-site Hubbard model (HM) have been studied. They have been found for three-point vertices of increasing complexity (? = 1 (GW approximation), ?? from the first-order perturbation theory, and the exact vertex ?E). Comparison is made between the cases when an additional quasiparticle (QP) approximation for Green's functions is applied during the self-consistent iterative solving of HE and when QP approximation is not applied. Results obtained with the exact vertex are directly related to the present open question—which approximation is more advantageous for future implementations, GW + DMFT or QPGW + DMFT.more »It is shown that in a regime of strong correlations only the originally proposed GW + DMFT scheme is able to provide reliable results. Vertex corrections based on Perturbation Theory systematically improve the GW results when full self-consistency is applied. The application of QP self-consistency combined with PT vertex corrections shows similar problems to the case when the exact vertex is applied combined with QP sc. An analysis of Ward Identity violation is performed for all studied in this work's approximations and its relation to the general accuracy of the schemes used is provided.« less

  16. ADAPTION OF NONSTANDARD PIPING COMPONENTS INTO PRESENT DAY SEISMIC CODES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. T. Clark; M. J. Russell; R. E. Spears; S. R. Jensen

    2009-07-01

    With spiraling energy demand and flat energy supply, there is a need to extend the life of older nuclear reactors. This sometimes requires that existing systems be evaluated to present day seismic codes. Older reactors built in the 1960s and early 1970s often used fabricated piping components that were code compliant during their initial construction time period, but are outside the standard parameters of present-day piping codes. There are several approaches available to the analyst in evaluating these non-standard components to modern codes. The simplest approach is to use the flexibility factors and stress indices for similar standard components with the assumption that the non-standard component’s flexibility factors and stress indices will be very similar. This approach can require significant engineering judgment. A more rational approach available in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which is the subject of this paper, involves calculation of flexibility factors using finite element analysis of the non-standard component. Such analysis allows modeling of geometric and material nonlinearities. Flexibility factors based on these analyses are sensitive to the load magnitudes used in their calculation, load magnitudes that need to be consistent with those produced by the linear system analyses where the flexibility factors are applied. This can lead to iteration, since the magnitude of the loads produced by the linear system analysis depend on the magnitude of the flexibility factors. After the loading applied to the nonstandard component finite element model has been matched to loads produced by the associated linear system model, the component finite element model can then be used to evaluate the performance of the component under the loads with the nonlinear analysis provisions of the Code, should the load levels lead to calculated stresses in excess of Allowable stresses. This paper details the application of component-level finite element modeling to account for geometric and material nonlinear component behavior in a linear elastic piping system model. Note that this technique can be applied to the analysis of B31 piping systems.

  17. Branch dependence in the "consistent histories" approach to quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Müller

    2006-11-12

    In the consistent histories formalism one specifies a family of histories as an exhaustive set of pairwise exclusive descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system. We define branching families of histories, which strike a middle ground between the two available mathematically precise definitions of families of histories, viz., product families and Isham's history projector operator formalism. The former are too narrow for applications, and the latter's generality comes at a certain cost, barring an intuitive reading of the ``histories''. Branching families retain the intuitiveness of product families, they allow for the interpretation of a history's weight as a probability, and they allow one to distinguish two kinds of coarse-graining, leading to reconsidering the motivation for the consistency condition.

  18. Method for computing self-consistent solution in a gun code

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Eric M

    2014-09-23

    Complex gun code computations can be made to converge more quickly based on a selection of one or more relaxation parameters. An eigenvalue analysis is applied to error residuals to identify two error eigenvalues that are associated with respective error residuals. Relaxation values can be selected based on these eigenvalues so that error residuals associated with each can be alternately reduced in successive iterations. In some examples, relaxation values that would be unstable if used alone can be used.

  19. A consistent formalism for the Thomas-Ehrman Level Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. He; A. St. J. Murphy

    2007-04-26

    Usage of the Thomas-Ehrman Level Displacement formalism has been examined. Mistakes and inconsistencies are found in several papers, being repeated in subsequent works. Here, we present a complete formalism with a consistent set of definitions. Full algorithms are made available, both as a {\\tt FORTRAN} source file and as a user-friendly Visual Basic executable tool, available for download on the World Wide Web.

  20. Microelectromechanical components in electrical metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manninen, Antti; Pesonen, Nadine; Oja, Aarne; Seppa, Heikki

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can offer a competitive alternative for conventional technology in electrical precision measurements. This article summarises recent work in development of MEMS solutions for electrical metrology. MEMS-based voltage references, RMS-to-DC converters, high frequency power sensors, and reference oscillators are discussed. The main principle of operation of the components is the balance between electrical forces and mechanical spring forces in micromachined silicon structures. In RMS sensors and RMS-to-DC converters, the quadratic voltage dependence of the force between plates of a moving-plate capacitor is utilised, and the operation of the MEMS voltage reference is based on the pull-in phenomenon of a moving-plate capacitor. Advantages of MEMS devices compared to more conventional solutions include small size, low power consumption, low price in mass production, and stability. The drift caused by electrostatic charging effects has turned out to be a major problem. This prob...

  1. Consistent Kaluza-Klein Truncations via Exceptional Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Hohm; Henning Samtleben

    2015-01-29

    We present the generalized Scherk-Schwarz reduction ansatz for the full supersymmetric exceptional field theory in terms of group valued twist matrices subject to consistency equations. With this ansatz the field equations precisely reduce to those of lower-dimensional gauged supergravity parametrized by an embedding tensor. We explicitly construct a family of twist matrices as solutions of the consistency equations. They induce gauged supergravities with gauge groups SO(p,q) and CSO(p,q,r). Geometrically, they describe compactifications on internal spaces given by spheres and (warped) hyperboloides $H^{p,q}$, thus extending the applicability of generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions beyond homogeneous spaces. Together with the dictionary that relates exceptional field theory to D=11 and IIB supergravity, respectively, the construction defines an entire new family of consistent truncations of the original theories. These include not only compactifications on spheres of different dimensions (such as AdS$_5\\times S^5$), but also various hyperboloid compactifications giving rise to a higher-dimensional embedding of supergravities with non-compact and non-semisimple gauge groups.

  2. Residual foreground contamination in the WMAP data and bias in non-Gaussianity estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chingangbam, Pravabati; Park, Changbom E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr

    2013-02-01

    We analyze whether there is any residual foreground contamination in the cleaned WMAP 7 years data for the differential assemblies, Q, V and W. We calculate the correlation between the foreground map, from which long wavelength correlations have been subtracted, and the foreground reduced map for each differential assembly after applying the Galaxy and point sources masks. We find positive correlations for all the differential assemblies, with high statistical significance. For Q and V, we find that a large fraction of the contamination comes from pixels where the foreground maps have positive values larger than three times the rms values. These findings imply the presence of residual contamination from Galactic emissions and unresolved point sources. We redo the analysis after masking the extended point sources cataloque of Scodeller et al. [7] and find a drop in the correlation and corresponding significance values. To quantify the effect of the residual contamination on the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the CMB we add estimated contaminant fraction to simulated Gaussian CMB maps and calculate the characteristic non-Gaussian deviation shapes of Minkowski Functionals that arise due to the contamination. We find remarkable agreement of these deviation shapes with those measured from WMAP data, which imply that a major fraction of the observed non-Gaussian deviation comes from residual foreground contamination. We also compute non-Gaussian deviations of Minkowski Functionals after applying the point sources mask of Scodeller et al. and find a decrease in the overall amplitudes of the deviations which is consistent with a decrease in the level of contamination.

  3. MINIMIZING WASTE AND COST IN DISPOSITION OF LEGACY RESIDUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. BALKEY; M. ROBINSON

    2001-05-01

    Research is being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) which is directed toward development of a quantitative basis for disposition of actinide-bearing process residues (both legacy residues and residues generated from ongoing programmatic operations). This research is focused in two directions: (1) identifying minimum negative consequence (waste, dose, cost) dispositions working within regulatory safeguards termination criteria, and (2) evaluating logistics/consequences of across-the-board residue discards such as authorized at Rocky Flats under a safeguards termination variance. The first approach emphasizes Laboratory commitments to environmental stewardship, worker safety, and fiscal responsibility. This approach has been described as the Plutonium Disposition Methodology (PDM) in deference to direction provided by DOE Albuquerque. The second approach is born of the need to expedite removal of residues from storage for programmatic and reasons and residue storage safety concerns. Any disposition path selected must preserve the legal distinction between residues as Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and discardable materials as waste in order to insure the continuing viability of Laboratory plutonium processing facilities for national security operations.

  4. LIMITATIONS OF EDDY CURRENT RESIDUAL STRESS PROFILING IN SURFACE-TREATED ENGINE ALLOYS OF VARIOUS HARDNESS LEVELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abu-Nabah, B. A. [General Electric Aviation, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Hassan, W. T. [Rolls-Royce Corporation, Indianapolis, IN 46241 (United States); Blodgett, M. P. [Air Force Research Laboratory, WPAFB, Dayton, OH 45433 (United States); Nagy, P. B. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2010-02-22

    Recent research results indicated that eddy current conductivity measurements might be exploited for nondestructive evaluation of subsurface residual stresses in surface-treated nickel-base superalloy components. This paper presents new results that indicate that in some popular nickel-base superalloys the relationship between the electric conductivity profile and the sought residual stress profile is more tenuous than previously thought. It is shown that in IN718 the relationship is very sensitive to the state of precipitation hardening and, if left uncorrected, could render the eddy current technique unsuitable for residual stress profiling in components of 36 HRC or harder, i.e., in most critical engine applications. The presented experimental results show that the observed dramatic change in the eddy current response of hardened IN718 to surface treatment is caused by very fine nanometer-scale features of the microstructure, such as gamma' and gamma'' precipitates, rather than micrometer-scale features, such as changing grain size or carbide precipitates.

  5. Consistent Evolution with Different Time-Slicings in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cosgrove

    1996-02-20

    Rovelli's `` quantum mechanics without time'' motivates an intrinsically time-slicing independent picture of reduced phase space quantum gravity, which may be described as ``quantization after evolution''. Sufficient criteria for carrying out quantization after evolution are developed in terms of a general concept of the classical limit of quantum mechanics. If these criteria are satisfied then it is possible to have consistent unitary evolution of operators, with respect to an infinite parameter family of time-slicings (and probably all time-slicings), with the correct classical limit. The criteria are particularly amenable to study in (2+1)-dimensional gravity, where the reduced phase space is finite dimensional.

  6. A consistent quantum model for continuous photodetection processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. de Oliveira; S. S. Mizrahi; V. V. Dodonov

    2003-07-11

    We are modifying some aspects of the continuous photodetection theory, proposed by Srinivas and Davies [Optica Acta 28, 981 (1981)], which describes the non-unitary evolution of a quantum field state subjected to a continuous photocount measurement. In order to remedy inconsistencies that appear in their approach, we redefine the `annihilation' and `creation' operators that enter in the photocount superoperators. We show that this new approach not only still satisfies all the requirements for a consistent photocount theory according to Srinivas and Davies precepts, but also avoids some weird result appearing when previous definitions are used.

  7. A Consistent Firm Objective When Markets are Incomplete: Profit Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabarwal, Tarun

    2004-08-11

    Markets are Incomplete: Profit Maximization Abstract In economies with private firm ownership, when markets are incomplete, and firm sharehold- ers change over time, there is no broad agreement on what ought to be a firm’s objective. It is shown that ex...-post, profit maximization is consistent with shareholder preferences in such economies; that is, along the equilibrium path, in every period and state of the world, every coalition of a firm’s shareholders in that period and state approves a profit...

  8. Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Metallic Bipolar Plates · Carbon Foam for Fuel Cell Humidification · High Temperature Proton ExchangeFuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN Crossover Fuel Cell Stack Components #12;Barriers

  9. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  10. End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Duranceau, C. M.; Pomykala, J. A.; Spangenberger, J. S.

    2011-02-22

    Each year, more than 25 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world, and this number is rising rapidly because the number of vehicles on the roads is rapidly increasing. In the United States, more than 95% of the 10-15 million scrapped vehicles annually enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, over 75% of automotive materials, primarily the metals, are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobile hulks, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials - commonly called shredder residue - constitutes about 25% of the weight of the vehicle, and it is disposed of in landfills. This practice is not environmentally friendly, wastes valuable resources, and may become uneconomical. Therefore, it is not sustainable. Over the past 15-20 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles, including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has been focused on developing technology to separate and recover non-metallic materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lightweighting materials - primarily polymers, polymer composites, high-strength steels, and aluminum - will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. Many of these materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals that are recovered. In addition, the number of hybrid vehicles and electric vehicles on the road is rapidly increasing. This trend will also introduce new materials for disposal at the end of their useful lives, including batteries. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), the Vehicle Recycling Partnership, LLC. (VRP) of the United States Council for Automotive Research, LLC. (USCAR), and the American Chemistry Council-Plastics Division (ACC-PD) are working to develop technology for recovering materials from end-of-life vehicles, including separating and recovering polymers and residual metals from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation and the world will most likely face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap, and thereby be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This will result in increased energy consumption and increased damage to the environment, including increased greenhouse gas emissions. The recycling of polymers, other organics, and residual metals in shredder residue saves the equivalent of over 23 million barrels of oil annually. This results in a 12-million-ton reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This document presents a review of the state-of-the-art in the recycling of automotive materials.

  11. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiro Fujita; Ryo Namba; Yuichiro Tada; Naoyuki Takeda; Hiroyuki Tashiro

    2015-04-15

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton $\\phi$ through the characteristic term $\\phi F\\tilde F$, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. The EM field is subsequently amplified by parametric resonance during the period of inflaton oscillation. Once the thermal plasma is formed (reheating), the produced helical magnetic fields undergo a turbulent process called inverse cascade, which shifts their peak correlation scales from smaller to larger scales. We consistently take all these effects into account within the regime where the perturbation of $\\phi$ is negligible and obtain $B_{\\rm eff} \\sim 10^{-19}$G, indicating the necessity of additional mechanisms to accommodate the observations.

  12. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yamauchi; Keitaro Takahashi

    2015-10-06

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the precision level needed to confirm the consistency inequality even for $f_{\\rm NL}\\approx 0.9$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}\\approx 8$, though it is still hard for a single survey to confirm it when $f_{\\rm NL}\\lesssim 1.5$.

  13. Self-consistent Green's functions with three-body forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arianna Carbone

    2014-07-24

    The present thesis aims at studying the properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter from a Green's functions point of view, including two-body and three-body chiral forces. An extended self-consistent Green's function formalism is defined to consistently incorporate three-body forces in the many-body calculations. The effect of three-nucleon interactions is included via the construction of a dressed two-body density dependent force. This is obtained performing an average of the leading order three-body terms in the chiral effective field theory expansion. The dressed force corresponds to the use of an in-medium propagator in the average which takes into account the correlations characterizing the system at each stage of the many-body calculation. The total energy of the system is obtained by means of a modified Galitskii-Migdal-Koltun sumrule to correctly account for the effect of three-body forces. Microscopic as well as macroscopic properties of symmetric nuclear and pure neutron matter are analyzed in detailed.

  14. Surface Tension of Electrolyte Solutions: A Self-consistent Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomer Markovich; David Andelman; Rudi Podgornik

    2014-04-09

    We study the surface tension of electrolyte solutions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Employing field-theoretical methods and considering short-range interactions of anions with the surface, we expand the Helmholtz free energy to first-order in a loop expansion and calculate the excess surface tension. Our approach is self-consistent and yields an analytical prediction that reunites the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We obtain analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of concentrations for different salts using one fit parameter, reproducing the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.10.1029

  15. SELF-CONSISTENT SIZE AND VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS OF COLLISIONAL CASCADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Margaret [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schlichting, Hilke E., E-mail: mpan@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    The standard theoretical treatment of collisional cascades derives a steady-state size distribution assuming a single constant velocity dispersion for all bodies regardless of size. Here we relax this assumption and solve self-consistently for the bodies' steady-state size and size-dependent velocity distributions. Specifically, we account for viscous stirring, dynamical friction, and collisional damping of the bodies' random velocities in addition to the mass conservation requirement typically applied to find the size distribution in a steady-state cascade. The resulting size distributions are significantly steeper than those derived without velocity evolution. For example, accounting self-consistently for the velocities can change the standard q = 3.5 power-law index of the Dohnanyi differential size spectrum to an index as large as q = 4. Similarly, for bodies held together by their own gravity, the corresponding power-law index range 2.88 < q < 3.14 of Pan and Sari can steepen to values as large as q = 3.26. Our velocity results allow quantitative predictions of the bodies' scale heights as a function of size. Together with our predictions, observations of the scale heights for different-sized bodies for the Kuiper belt, the asteroid belt, and extrasolar debris disks may constrain the mass and number of large bodies stirring the cascade as well as the colliding bodies' internal strengths.

  16. Is scalar-tensor gravity consistent with polytropic stellar models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaisa Henttunen; Iiro Vilja

    2015-03-01

    We study the scalar field potential $V(\\phi)$ in the scalar-tensor gravity with self-consistent polytropic stellar configurations. Without choosing a particular potential, we numerically derive the potential inside various stellar objects. We restrict the potential to conform to general relativity or to $f(R)$ gravity inside and require the solution to arrive at SdS vacuum at the surface. The studied objects are required to obtain observationally valid masses and radii corresponding to solar type stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars. We find that the resulting scalar-tensor potential $V(\\phi)$ for the numerically derived polytrope that conforms to general relativity, in each object class, is highly dependent on the matter configuration as well as on the vacuum requirement at the boundary. As a result, every stellar configuration arrives at a potential $V(\\phi)$ that is not consistent with the other stellar class potentials. Therefore, a general potential that conforms to all these polytropic stellar classes could not be found.

  17. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Brent F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Shihai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  18. NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Evelyn

    NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY Kalea Sebesta Department of Applied Mathematics, known as nucleation, in a two component metal alloy. The motivation behind this study is to use component metal alloys. These alloys are seen in material sciences; therefore, understanding

  19. An urban infill : a residual site in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savvides, Andreas L. (Andreas Loucas)

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the treatment of residual sites in the context of the urban environment and in particular with the wounds inflicted by the passage of the Massachusetts Turnpike through the city of Boston. The ...

  20. Residual zonal flows in tokamaks and stellarators at arbitrary wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, P; Sánchez, E; Parra, F I; Bustos, A; Könies, A; Kleiber, R; Görler, T

    2015-01-01

    In the linear collisionless limit, a zonal potential perturbation in a toroidal plasma relaxes, in general, to a non-zero residual value. Expressions for the residual value in tokamak and stellarator geometries, and for arbitrary wavelengths, are derived. These expressions involve averages over the lowest order particle trajectories, that typically cannot be evaluated analytically. In this work, an efficient numerical method for the evaluation of such expressions is reported. It is shown that this method is faster than direct gyrokinetic simulations. Calculations of the residual value in stellarators are provided for much shorter wavelengths than previously available in the literature. Electrons must be treated kinetically in stellarators because, unlike in tokamaks, kinetic electrons modify the residual value even at long wavelengths. This effect, that had already been predicted theoretically, is confirmed by gyrokinetic simulations.

  1. Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

  2. RetroFILL : residual spaces as urban infill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobel, Marika

    2010-01-01

    In any city there are small slivers and chunks of awkward spaces - in between buildings, occupying edge conditions, not large enough to warrant many forms of traditional use - which can be termed residual. These areas of ...

  3. Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D.

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

  4. Modeling, Optimization and Economic Evaluation of Residual Biomass Gasification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Adam

    2012-02-14

    and product options are available for gasification along with combinations thereof. The objective of this work is to create a systematic method for optimizing the design of a residual biomass gasification unit. In detail, this work involves development...

  5. The determination of thru-thickness residual bending stresses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Adam James

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the fatigue behavior of dents in pressurized pipelines it is necessary to understand the residual stresses that result from cyclic plastic bending. Three approaches are taken here in studying a beam cross section: a discrete...

  6. Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

  7. Residue disposal from waste-to-energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; O'Leary, P.; Cross, F.

    1987-05-01

    When considering a waste-to-energy project, some local officials believe that waste-to-energy is a complete alternative to landfilling. While these projects can reduce waste volume substantially, the process will still produce residues that must be properly handled in order to protect the environment. All systems produce fly ash and bottom ash, and some systems also produce wastewater. This article discusses alternative methods for addressing these residue control problems.

  8. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  9. An investigation of residual stress in welded joints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, William Hugh

    1951-01-01

    . flummery and Conclusions VII. '-. &uggested Procedure for I"uture Investigation 18 o i' VIII. ? . Ppendix IX. Bibliography LIST OP EIGURES Ro. Title Page 1. 'welded Plates snd Gptical Gage Used by Soulton and Martin ~ ~ 6 2. Dr. Rao~s Method... AN INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN WELDED JOINTS INTRODUCTION The object of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the magnitude of transverse and longi- tudial residual stress in a welded Joint. These are the stresses in a direction...

  10. Lamellar Diblock Copolymers on Rough Substrates: Self-consistent Field Theory Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingkun Man; Jiuzhou Tang; Pan Zhou; Dadong Yan; David Andelman

    2015-08-18

    We present numerical calculations of lamellar phases of di-block copolymers (BCP) confined between two surfaces, where the top surface is flat and the bottom one is corrugated. The corrugated substrate is assumed to have a single $q$-mode of lateral undulations with a wavenumber q_s and amplitude R. We focus on the effects of substrate roughness, parameterized by the dimensionless quantity, q_sR, on the relative stability between parallel and perpendicular orientations of the lamellar phase. The competition between film confinement, energy cost of elastic deformation and gain in surface energy induces a parallel-to-perpendicular transition of the BCP lamellae. Employing self-consistent field theory (SCFT), we study the critical substrate roughness value corresponding to this transition. The critical value increases as function of the surface preference towards one of the two BCP components, and as function of film thickness. But, it decreases with increasing values of the Flory-Huggins parameter. Our findings are equivalent to stating that the critical value decreases as the BCP molecular weight or the natural BCP periodicity increases. We further show that the rough substrate can overcome the formation of parallel lamellae in cases where the top surface has a preference towards one of the two BCP components. Our results are in good agreement with previous experiments, and highlight the physical conditions behind the perpendicular orientation of lamellar phases, as is desired in nanolithography and other industrial applications.

  11. Chaos detection tools: application to a self-consistent triaxial model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolás Maffione; Luciano Darriba; Pablo Cincotta; Claudia Giordano

    2012-12-13

    Together with the variational indicators of chaos, the spectral analysis methods have also achieved great popularity in the field of chaos detection. The former are based on the concept of local exponential divergence. The latter are based on the numerical analysis of some particular quantities of a single orbit, e.g. its frequency. In spite of having totally different conceptual bases, they are used for the very same goals such as, for instance, separating the chaotic and the regular component. In fact, we show herein that the variational indicators serve to distinguish both components of a Hamiltonian system in a more reliable fashion than a spectral analysis method does. We study two start spaces for different energy levels of a self-consistent triaxial stellar dynamical model by means of some selected variational indicators and a spectral analysis method. In order to select the appropriate tools for this paper, we extend previous studies where we make a comparison of several variational indicators on different scenarios. Herein, we compare the Average Power Law Exponent (APLE) and an alternative quantity given by the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Neary Orbits (MEGNO): the MEGNO's Slope Estimation of the largest Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (SElLCE). The spectral analysis method selected for the investigation is the Frequency Modified Fourier Transform (FMFT). Besides a comparative study of the APLE, the Fast Lyapunov Indicator (FLI), the Orthogonal Fast Lyapunov Indicator (OFLI) and the MEGNO/SElLCE, we show that the SElLCE could be an appropriate alternative to the MEGNO when studying large samples of initial conditions. The SElLCE separates the chaotic and the regular components reliably and identifies the different levels of chaoticity. We show that the FMFT is not as reliable as the SElLCE to describe clearly the chaotic domains in the experiments.

  12. Comparison of residual stresses in Inconel 718 simple parts made by electron beam melting and direct laser metal sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolbus, Lindsay M [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Cornwell, Paris A [ORNL; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh [ORNL; Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress profiles were mapped using neutron diffraction in two simple prism builds of Inconel 718: one fabricated with electron beam melting and the other with direct laser sintering. Spatially indexed stress-free cubes were obtained by EDM sectioning equivalent prisms of similar shape. The (311) interplanar spacing examined for the EDM sectioned sample was compared to the interplanar spacings calculated to fulfill force and moment balance. We have shown that Applying force and moment balance is a necessary supplement to the measurements for the stress-free cubes with respect to accurate stress calculations in additively manufactured components. In addition, our work has shown that residual stresses in electron beam melting parts are much smaller than that of direct laser metal sintering parts.

  13. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apolinário, Liliana; Milhano, Guilherme; Salgado, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest develop...

  14. Consistency of equations of motion in conformal frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    2014-11-05

    Four dimensional scalar-tensor theory is considered within two conformal frames, the Jordan frame (JF) and the Einstein frame (EF). The actions for the theory are equivalent and equations of motion can be obtained from each action. It is found that the JF equations of motion, expressed in terms of EF variables, translate directly into and agree with the EF equations of motion obtained from the EF action, provided that certain simple consistency conditions are satisfied, which is always the case. The implication is that a solution set obtained in one conformal frame can be reliably translated into a solution set for the other frame, and therefore the two frames are, at least, mathematically equivalent.

  15. Unified Field Theory From Enlarged Transformation Group. The Consistent Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Pandres, Jr.; Edward L. Green

    2004-01-21

    A theory has been presented previously in which the geometrical structure of a real four-dimensional space time manifold is expressed by a real orthonormal tetrad, and the group of diffeomorphisms is replaced by a larger group. The group enlargement was accomplished by including those transformations to anholonomic coordinates under which conservation laws are covariant statements. Field equations have been obtained from a variational principle which is invariant under the larger group. These field equations imply the validity of the Einstein equations of general relativity with a stress-energy tensor that is just what one expects for the electroweak field and associated currents. In this paper, as a first step toward quantization, a consistent Hamiltonian for the theory is obtained. Some concluding remarks are given concerning the need for further development of the theory. These remarks include discussion of a possible method for extending the theory to include the strong interaction.

  16. Consistency among distance measurements: transparency, BAO scale and accelerated expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Avgoustidis; Licia Verde; Raul Jimenez

    2009-06-11

    We explore consistency among different distance measures, including Supernovae Type Ia data, measurements of the Hubble parameter, and determination of the Baryon acoustic oscillation scale. We present new constraints on the cosmic transparency combining $H(z)$ data together with the latest Supernova Type Ia data compilation. This combination, in the context of a flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, improves current constraints by nearly an order of magnitude. We re-examine the recently reported tension between the Baryon acoustic oscillation scale and Supernovae data in light of possible deviations from transparency, concluding that the source of the discrepancy may most likely be found among systematic effects of the modelling of the low redshift data or a simple $\\sim 2-\\sigma$ statistical fluke, rather than in exotic physics. Finally, we attempt to draw model-independent conclusions about the recent accelerated expansion, determining the acceleration redshift to be $z_{acc}=0.35^{+0.20}_{-0.13}$ (1-$\\sigma$).

  17. Consistency condition for inflation from (broken) conformal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schalm, Koenraad; Aalst, Ted van der [Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden (Netherlands); Shiu, Gary, E-mail: kschalm@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: shiu@physics.wisc.edu, E-mail: vdaalst@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum, i.e. the three-point correlation function of primordial density fluctuations, in slow-roll inflation. It follows from the defining property of slow-roll inflation that primordial correlation functions inherit most of their structure from weakly broken de Sitter symmetries. Using holographic techniques borrowed from the AdS/CFT correspondence, the symmetry constraints on the bispectrum can be mapped to a set of stress-tensor Ward identities in a weakly broken 2+1-dimensional Euclidean CFT. We construct the consistency condition from these Ward identities using conformal perturbation theory. This requires a second order Ward identity and the use of the evolution equation. Our result also illustrates a subtle difference between conformal perturbation theory and the slow-roll expansion.

  18. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  19. Polarized CMB recovery with sparse component separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobin, Jerome; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology, and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting such information from microwave surveys requires disentangling between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which boils down to solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of CMB temperature anisotropies but quite rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to discriminate between the various components. More recent methods, which rather emphasize on the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimate of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, the present paper introduces a new component separation technique dubbed PolGMCA (Polarized Generalized Morphological Component Analysis), which r...

  20. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

  1. Hazard consistent structural demands and in-structure design response spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houston, Thomas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costantino, Carl J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Current analysis methodology for the Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analysis of nuclear facilities is specified in ASCE Standard 4. This methodology is based on the use of deterministic procedures with the intention that enough conservatism is included in the specified procedures to achieve an 80% probability of non-exceedance in the computed response of a Structure, System. or Component for given a mean seismic design input. Recently developed standards are aimed at achieving performance-based, risk consistent seismic designs that meet specified target performance goals. These design approaches rely upon accurately characterizing the probability (hazard) level of system demands due to seismic loads consistent with Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analyses. This paper examines the adequacy of the deterministic SSI procedures described in ASCE 4-98 to achieve an 80th percentile of Non-Exceedance Probability (NEP) in structural demand, given a mean seismic input motion. The study demonstrates that the deterministic procedures provide computed in-structure response spectra that are near or greater than the target 80th percentile NEP for site profiles other than those resulting in high levels of radiation damping. The deterministic procedures do not appear to be as robust in predicting peak accelerations, which correlate to structural demands within the structure.

  2. Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-06-30

    The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

  3. A consistent approach to falsifying ?CDM with rare galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Ian; Hotchkiss, Shaun E-mail: shaun.hotchkiss@helsinki.fi

    2013-07-01

    We consider methods with which to answer the question ''is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for ?CDM?'' After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which ?CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the ''equivalent mass at redshift zero'' for a cluster — the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2? deviations from the ?CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.

  4. Towards a consistent description of in-medium parton branching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liliana Apolinário; Néstor Armesto; Guilherme Milhano; Carlos A. Salgado

    2015-05-25

    Ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions are a window of opportunity to study QCD matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density, such as the quark-gluon plasma. Among the several possibilities, the study of jet quenching - generic name given to in-medium energy loss modifications of the parton branching - is a powerful tool to assess the properties of this new state of matter. The description of the parton shower is very well understood in vacuum (controlled reference) and medium-induced modifications of this process can be experimentally accessed through jet measurements. Current experimental data, however, cannot be entirely described only with energy loss phenomena. Transverse momentum broadening and decoherence effects, both theoretically established by now, and their interplay are essential to build a consistent picture of the medium-modifications of the parton branching and to achieve a correct description of the current experimental data. In this write-up, we will present the latest developments that address such unified description.

  5. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the...

  6. F-term uplifting via consistent D-terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Lalak; O. J. Eyton-Williams; R. Matyszkiewicz

    2007-02-13

    The issue of fine-tuning necessary to achieve satisfactory degree of hierarchy between moduli masses, the gravitino mass and the scale of the cosmological constant has been revisited in the context of supergravities with consistent D-terms. We have studied (extended) racetrack models where supersymmetry breaking and moduli stabilisation cannot be separated from each other. We show that even in such cases the realistic hierarchy can be achieved on the expense of a single fine-tuning. The presence of two condensates changes the role of the constant term in the superpotential, W_0, and solutions with small vacuum energy and large gravitino mass can be found even for very small values of W_0. Models where D-terms are allowed to vanish at finite vevs of moduli fields - denoted `cancellable' D-terms - and the ones where D-terms may vanish only at infinite vevs of some moduli - denoted `non-cancellable' - differ markedly in their properties. It turns out that the tuning with respect to the Planck scale required in the case of cancellable D-terms is much weaker than in the case of non-cancellable ones. We have shown that, against intuition, a vanishing D-term can trigger F-term uplifting of the vacuum energy due to the stringent constraint it imposes on vacuum expectation values of charged fields. Finally we note that our models only rely on two dimensionful parameters: M_P and W_0.

  7. Towards consistent Electroweak Precision Data constraints in the SMEFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laure Berthier; Michael Trott

    2015-05-06

    We discuss the impact of many previously neglected effects of higher dimensional operators when fitting to Electroweak Precision data (EWPD) in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). We calculate the general case of $2 \\rightarrow 2$ fermion scattering in the SMEFT to order $\\mathcal{O}(\\bar{v}_T^2/\\Lambda^2)$ valid on and off the $Z$ pole, in the massless fermion limit. We demonstrate that previously neglected corrections scale as $\\Gamma_Z M_Z/\\bar{v}_T^2$ in the partial widths extracted from measured cross sections at LEPI, compared to the leading effect of dimension six operators in anomalous $Z$ couplings. Further, constraints on leading effects of anomalous $Z$ couplings are also modified by neglected perturbative corrections and dimension eight operators. We perform a minimal EWPD fit to illustrate the size of the error these corrections induce, when bounding leading effects. These considerations relax bounds compared to a naive leading order analysis, and show that constraints that rise above the percent level are subject to substantial theoretical uncertanties. We also argue that renormalization group running global constraints expressed through $\\chi^2$ functions to a common scale, and then minimizing and performing a global fit of all data allows more consistent constraints to be obtained in the SMEFT.

  8. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Single-field consistency relations of large scale structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creminelli, Paolo; Noreña, Jorge; Simonovi?, Marko; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: jorge.norena@icc.ub.edu E-mail: filippo.vernizzi@cea.fr

    2013-12-01

    We derive consistency relations for the late universe (CDM and ?CDM): relations between an n-point function of the density contrast ? and an (n+1)-point function in the limit in which one of the (n+1) momenta becomes much smaller than the others. These are based on the observation that a long mode, in single-field models of inflation, reduces to a diffeomorphism since its freezing during inflation all the way until the late universe, even when the long mode is inside the horizon (but out of the sound horizon). These results are derived in Newtonian gauge, at first and second order in the small momentum q of the long mode and they are valid non-perturbatively in the short-scale ?. In the non-relativistic limit our results match with [1]. These relations are a consequence of diffeomorphism invariance; they are not satisfied in the presence of extra degrees of freedom during inflation or violation of the Equivalence Principle (extra forces) in the late universe.

  10. ERUPTION OF A SOLAR FILAMENT CONSISTING OF TWO THREADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bi Yi; Jiang Yunchun; Li Haidong; Hong Junchao; Zheng Ruisheng E-mail: jyc@ynao.ac.cn

    2012-10-10

    The trigger and driving mechanism for the eruption of a filament consisting of two dark threads was studied with unprecedented high cadence and resolution of He II 304 A observations made by the Atmospheric Imagining Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the observations made by the Solar Magnetic Activity Research Telescope and the Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) telescope on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREO-A). The filament was located at the periphery of the active region NOAA 11228 and erupted on 2011 June 6. At the onset of the eruption, a turbulent filament thread was found to be heated and to elongate in stride over a second one. After it rose slowly, most interestingly, the elongating thread was driven to contact and interact with the second one, and it then erupted with its southern leg being wrapped by a newly formed thread produced by the magnetic reconnection between fields carried by the two threads. Combining the observations from STEREO-A/EUVI and SDO/AIA 304 A images, the three-dimensional shape of the axis of the filament was obtained and it was found that only the southern leg of the eruptive filament underwent rotation. We suggest that the eruption was triggered by the reconnection of the turbulent filament thread and the surrounding magnetic field, and that it was mainly driven by the kink instability of the southern leg of the eruptive filament that possessed a more twisted field introduced by the reconnection-produced thread.

  11. Multi-wavelength constraints on the inflationary consistency relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meerburg, P Daniel; Hadzhiyska, Boryana; Meyers, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We present the first attempt to use a combination of CMB, LIGO, and PPTA data to constrain both the tilt and the running of primordial tensor power spectrum through constraints on the gravitational wave energy density generated in the early universe. Combining measurements at different cosmological scales highlights how complementary data can be used to test the predictions of early universe models including the inflationary consistency relation. Current data prefers a slightly positive tilt ($n_t = 0.13^{+0.54}_{-0.75}$) and a negative running ($n_{t, {\\rm run}} < -0.25$) for the tensor power spectrum spectrum. Interestingly, the addition of direct gravitational wave detector data puts strong bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio $r < 0.2 $ since the large positive tensor tilt preferred by the Planck temperature power spectrum is no longer allowed. We comment on possible effects of a large positive tilt on the background expansion and show that depending on the assumptions regarding the UV cutoff ($k_{\\...

  12. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2001-01-01

    Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

  13. Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) The residue method for the detection of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    and calculation Main sensitivities of residue Problems with the residue Conclusions and outlook #12;#12;o = 380 scattering and absorption #12;#12;#12;Nadir View Solar zenith angle = 45o Residue = 3.5 Rayleigh atmosphere View Solar zenith angle = 45o Residue = -1.0 Rayleigh atmosphere, As = 0.16 Scattering aerosol layer

  14. Fault-Tolerant Linear Convolution Using Residue Number M.G.Parker,M.Benaissa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    This paper proposes a Fault-Tolerant Linear Convolution architecture using Residue Number Systems (RNS) and Polynomial Residue Number Systems (PRNS). The RNS and PRNS are both given error-detection capability Residue Number Systems (RNS) [4]. A RNS performs computation over a number of independent residue channels

  15. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  16. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  17. Characterization of Residual Medium Peptides from Yersinia pestis Cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clowers, Brian H.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2013-04-03

    Using a range of common microbial medium formulations (TSB, BHI, LB, and G-media), two attenuated strains of Y. pestis (KIM D27 (pgm-) and KIMD1 lcr-) were cultivated in triplicate. These cellular suspensions were used to develop a method of extracting residual medium peptides from the final microbial preparation to assess their relative abundance and identity. Across the conditions examined, which included additional cellular washing and different forms of microbial inactivation, residual medium peptides were detected. Despite the range of growth medium sources used and the associated manufacturing processes used in their production, a high degree of peptide similarity was observed for a given medium recipe. These results demonstrate that residual medium peptides are retained using traditional microbial cultivation techniques and may be used to inform forensic investigations with respect to production deduction.

  18. Residual strain mapping of Roman styli from Iulia Concordia, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvemini, Filomena, E-mail: floriana.salvemini@fi.isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Università degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (Italy); Grazzi, Francesco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Angelini, Ivana [Università degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Davydov, Vadim; Vontobel, Peter [Paul Scherrer Institut, SINQ Spallation Neutron Source, Villigen (Switzerland); Vigoni, Alberto [Dedalo s.n.c., Vicolo dei Conti 6, I-35122 Padua (Italy); Artioli, Gilberto [Università degli Studi di Padova, Dipartimento di Geoscienze (Italy); Zoppi, Marco [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Iulia Concordia is an important Roman settlement known for the production of iron objects and weapons during the Roman Empire. A huge number of well-preserved styli were found in the past century in the bed of an old channel. In order to shed light about the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing, a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis was performed on the POLDI materials science diffractometer at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Here, we present results from our investigation conducted on 11 samples, allowing to define, in a non-invasive way, the residual strain map related to the ancient Roman working techniques. - Highlights: • We examined 11 Roman styli from the settlement of Iulia Concordia, Italy. • We performed a neutron diffraction residual strain analysis on POLDI at PSI (CH). • We identified the production processes used by Roman for stylus manufacturing. • We clarified the way and direction of working applied for different classes of styli.

  19. Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher Information Technology@ise.gmu.edu ABSTRACT One goal of integration testing for object-oriented software is to ensure high object. It addresses methods for identifying the relevant actions of a test component to be integrated into the system

  20. The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology George Dimitoglou SOHO ESA/NASA Project Science Team EER/L3 Space Sciences Division #12;2 SOHO Archive Components n-tier architecture are many more #12;6 Technology Review #12;7 Statistics CDS 157,350 CELIAS 62,466 EIT 237,158 ERNE 7

  1. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models, a class of powerful by a neural net- work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  2. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography a potential oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models by a neural net­ work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  3. Call for Papers Optoelectronic Interconnects and Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    -speed detectors for OI component assembly; fully embedded components 3D optical routing and assembly connectors for III-V and Si photonics multi-channel device packaging thermal and structural modeling optical International Symposium on SPIE OPTO: Optoelectronic Materials, Devices and Applications 22-27 January 2011

  4. Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2011-07-05

    A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

  5. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  6. Hybrid solar lighting systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2007-06-12

    A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

  7. A fast minimal residual solver for overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artan Borici; Alban Allkoci

    2006-02-09

    Computing quark propagators with overlap fermions requires the solution of a shifted unitary linear system. Jagels and Reichel have shown that for such systems it is possible to construct a minimal residual algorithm by short recurrences. The J\\"ulich-Wuppertal group have found this algorithm to be the fastest among overlap solvers. In this paper we present a three-term recurrence for the Arnoldi unitary process. Using the new recurrence we construct a minimal residual solver which is the fastest among all Krylov subspace algorithms considered so far for the overlap inversion.

  8. Wood residuals find big uses in small pieces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, J.

    1996-12-01

    With a history of finding economic uses for leftovers, the wood industry explores sustainable options for creating higher value products. Years ago, companies saw the use - any use - of residues as a sound, economic business practice. Today, many companies are looking to go beyond low value products such as mulch, animal bedding and fuel, and market to higher value end users. Additionally, with so much material from the primary industries already accounted for, consumers of wood residue are in need of additional supply from sources such as secondary mills (furniture manufacturers, etc.), as wells as the C&D and MSW streams. This paper discusses these products and markets.

  9. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  10. Key residues for the oligomerization of A{beta}42 protein in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ngo, Sam [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Guo, Zhefeng, E-mail: zhefeng@ucla.edu [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Molecular Biology Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} oligomers are neurotoxins and likely the causing agents for Alzheimer's disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein form globular oligomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta}42 fusion protein oligomers contain SDS-resistant tetramers and hexamers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cysteine substitutions at residues 31, 32, 34, 39-41 disrupt A{beta}42 oligomerization. -- Abstract: Deposition of amyloid fibrils consisting of amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) protein as senile plaques in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. However, a growing body of evidence shows that soluble A{beta} oligomers correlate better with dementia than fibrils, suggesting that A{beta} oligomers may be the primary toxic species. The structure and oligomerization mechanism of these A{beta} oligomers are crucial for developing effective therapeutics. Here we investigated the oligomerization of A{beta}42 in the context of a fusion protein containing GroES and ubiquitin fused to the N-terminus of A{beta} sequence. The presence of fusion protein partners, in combination with a denaturing buffer containing 8 M urea at pH 10, is unfavorable for A{beta}42 aggregation, thus allowing only the most stable structures to be observed. Transmission electron microscopy showed that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed globular oligomers, which bound weakly to thioflavin T and Congo red. SDS-PAGE shows that A{beta}42 fusion protein formed SDS-resistant hexamers and tetramers. In contrast, A{beta}40 fusion protein remained as monomers on SDS gel, suggesting that the oligomerization of A{beta}42 fusion protein is not due to the fusion protein partners. Cysteine scanning mutagenesis at 22 residue positions further revealed that single cysteine substitutions of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues (I31, I32, L34, V39, V40, and I41) led to disruption of hexamer and tetramer formation, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions between these residues are most critical for A{beta}42 oligomerization.

  11. Leptonic Dirac CP Violation Predictions from Residual Discrete Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girardi, I; Stuart, Alexander J; Titov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton) flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group $G_f$, and that $G_f$ is broken to specific residual symmetries $G_e$ and $G_\

  12. Leptonic Dirac CP Violation Predictions from Residual Discrete Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Girardi; S. T. Petcov; Alexander J. Stuart; A. V. Titov

    2015-09-08

    Assuming that the observed pattern of 3-neutrino mixing is related to the existence of a (lepton) flavour symmetry, corresponding to a non-Abelian discrete symmetry group $G_f$, and that $G_f$ is broken to specific residual symmetries $G_e$ and $G_\

  13. Modeling EU electricity market competition using the residual supply index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swinand, Gregory; Scully, Derek; Ffoulkes, Stuart; Kessler, Brian

    2010-11-15

    An econometric approach to related hourly Residual Supply Index to price-cost margins in the major EU electricity generation markets suggests that market structure, as measured by the RSI, is a significant explanatory factor for markups, even when scarcity and other explanatory variables are included. (author)

  14. PRTAD: A DATABASE FOR PROTEIN RESIDUE TORSION ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRTAD: A DATABASE FOR PROTEIN RESIDUE TORSION ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS By Xiaoyong Sun Di Wu Robert­0436 Phone: 612-624-6066 Fax: 612-626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;PRTAD: A Database for Protein@iastate.edu Abstract PRTAD is a dedicated database and structural bioinformatics system for protein analysis

  15. COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Yang

    COMMUNICATION Are Residues in a Protein Folding Nucleus Evolutionarily Conserved? Yan Yuan Tseng is the hallmark of life. It is important to understand how protein folding and evolution influence each other in protein folding nucleus as measured by experi- mental f-value and selection pressure as measured by v

  16. Effective Reverse Conversion in Residue Number System Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    propose effective Residue Number System (RNS) to Weighted Number System conversion techniques with k being the num- ber of moduli. First, we introduce an RNS to MRC technique, which ad- dresses in an RNS to MRC with an asymptotic complexity, in terms of arithmetic operations, in the order of O

  17. A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    A PROBABILISTIC FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF RESIDUAL STRESS FORMATION IN SHRINK-FIT CERAMIC shrink fitting of the jacket over the lining is studied using a probabilistic finite element analysis structural analysis approach, known as the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) method, is used which enables

  18. ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    ROBUST RESIDUAL VIBRATION SUPPRESSION USING IIR DIGITAL FILTERS D. Economou a , C. Mavroidis b and I. Antoniadis a a National Technical University of Athens Department of Mechanical Engineering, 9 Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

  19. Residual Reconstruction for Block-Based Compressed Sensing of Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, James E.

    -sensing reconstruction for still images is adapted to video. Incorporating reconstruction from a residual arising from thresholding within the framework introduced in [2]. The term block-based CS (BCS) sampling with smooth] revealed that BCS-SPL reconstruction usually offers at least the same quality of recovery as does other

  20. Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

    2014-11-11

    A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

  1. PeriodicitiesinSequenceResidueHydropathyandtheImplicationsonProteinFolds Nancy Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    1 PeriodicitiesinSequenceResidueHydropathyandtheImplicationsonProteinFolds Nancy Zhang March, 2000 algorithms is that there are hidden variables effecting the protein folding mechanism and explain why it is crucial to a protein's fold. In section III, I will explain how the Fourier transform

  2. NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman; Dane F. Wilson; Steven J. Pawel

    2007-09-01

    A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R&D decisions.

  3. Downhole component with a pressure equalization passageway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Reynolds, Jay T.; Breihan, James W.; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-08-22

    The present invention includes a downhole component adapted for transmitting downhole data. The downhole component includes a threaded end on a downhole component. The threaded end furthermore includes an interior region, and exterior region, and a mating surface wherein a cavity is formed. A data transmission element is disposed in the cavity and displaces a volume of the cavity. At least one passageway is formed in the threaded region between interior and exterior regions. The passageway is in fluid communication with both the interior and exterior regions and thereby relieves pressure build up of thread lubricant upon tool joint make up.

  4. Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

  5. About consistence between pi N Delta spin-3/2 gauge couplings and electromagnetic gauge invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Badagnani; C. Barbero; A. Mariano

    2015-03-05

    We analyze the consistence between the recently proposed "spin 3/2 gauge" interaction for the Delta resonance with nucleons and pions, and the fundamental electromagnetic gauge invariance in any radiative amplitude. Chiral symmetric pion-derivative pi N Delta couplings can be substituted through a linear transformation to get Delta-derivative ones, which have the property of decoupling the 1/2 field components of the Delta propagator. Nevertheless, the electromagnetic gauge invariance introduced through minimal substitution in all derivatives, can only be fulfilled at a given order n without destroying the spin 3/2 one by dropping n+1 order terms within an effective field theory (EFT) framework with a defined power counting. In addition, we show that the Ward identity for the gamma Delta gamma vertex cannot be fulfilled with a trimmed 3/2 propagator, which should be necessary in order to keep the spin 3/2 gauge symmetry in the radiative case for the gamma Delta gamma amplitude. Finally, it is shown that radiative corrections of the spin 3/2 gauge strong vertexes at one loop, reintroduce the conventional interaction.

  6. EXPERIMENTAL-BASED DISCUSSION FOR THE SEPARATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES AND COLD WORK IN SHOT PEENED IN718 USING HIGH FREQUENCY EDDY CURRENT SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillmann, S.; Heuer, H.; Robbert, A.; Meyendorf, N. [Fraunhofer Institute for Non-Destructive Testing, Dresden branch of IZFP, Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany); Baron, H.-U.; Bamberg, J. [MTU Aero Engines GmbH, Dachauer Str. 665, 80995 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-22

    Typical aero engine alloys, such as IN718, can be surface-treated by shot peening to induce near-surface compressive strains. To calculate the remaining operation time for those critical aero engine components, a quantitative nondestructive determination of near-surface strain gradients has to be developed. We have demonstrated in the past, that it is possible to obtain a characteristic depth profile (surface and sub-surface) of the electrical conductivity of shot peened specimen by using high-frequency eddy current techniques. The measured conductivity profile is resulting from residual stresses, cold work, surface roughness, and the microstructure of the material. The objective is to measure residual stresses (separately from other material properties) in such components after a defined life time. It can be assumed, that surface roughness and microstructure remain unchanged in IN718 materials over their lifetime, but cold work and residual stresses can change independently. Consequently, there is a need to clearly separate the information from both material properties of received eddy current conductivity signals in order to obtain specific information related to residual stresses. This paper presents results acquired from different experiments, conducted to separate both effects by using the eddy current technique on shot peened IN718 materials. We present different physical approaches and illustrate the experiments to solve them. In addition, we will demonstrate that there is a need to use additional techniques, for example ultrasonic time-of-flight measurements, to separate the effects of residual stresses from compound (mixed) signals obtained on cold work samples.

  7. Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

  8. Thermochemical nanolithography components, systems, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedo, Elisa; Marder, Seth R.; de Heer, Walt A.; Szoskiewicz, Robert J.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Jones, Simon C.; Okada, Takashi; Wang, Debin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Henderson, Clifford L.; Hua, Yueming

    2013-06-18

    Improved nanolithography components, systems, and methods are described herein. The systems and methods generally employ a resistively heated atomic force microscope tip to thermally induce a chemical change in a surface. In addition, certain polymeric compositions are also disclosed.

  9. Outsourcing the Design of Structural Building Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swearingin, Adam V.

    2008-05-16

    . This project contains an examination of the tasks associated with the design of structural building components. These tasks are evaluated to determine the feasibility of outsourcing any or all “core competencies” to a consultant which employs design...

  10. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  11. Principal Components Analysis for Binary Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seokho

    2010-07-14

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has been widely used as a statistical tool for the dimension reduction of multivariate data in various application areas and extensively studied in the long history of statistics. One of the limitations of PCA...

  12. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  13. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  14. SA3654 Component characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), was provided with production capability assurance program (PCAP) funding to develop, characterize, and qualify purchased product components for use on the PRESS-A program. The SA3654, N-Channel, Power MOSFET was identified as a component needing such activity to support PRESS-A. This report presents the characterization activities and results for the SA3654.

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1996-01-16

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

  17. Electrochemical components employing polysiloxane-derived binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2013-06-11

    A processed polysiloxane resin binder for use in electrochemical components and the method for fabricating components with the binder. The binder comprises processed polysiloxane resin that is partially oxidized and retains some of its methyl groups following partial oxidation. The binder is suitable for use in electrodes of various types, separators in electrochemical devices, primary lithium batteries, electrolytic capacitors, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells and sensors.

  18. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Smith, Frances N.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Scheele, Randall D.

    2014-02-10

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (?70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550?C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400?C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500?C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  19. ,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Oil Company Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Electric Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to...

  20. Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Ma,BonzongoandGao/UniversityofFlorida Characterization and Leachability of Coal Combustion Residues an important solid waste in Florida, i.e., coal combustion residues (CCR) detailed in #2-4 of the current

  1. Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfluger, Ron Atlan

    1995-01-01

    Critically refracted longitudinal (LCR) waves have been investigated as a possible technique for the evaluation of the residual stress gradients present in ductile iron castings. Residual stresses are likely to develop in ductile cast iron during...

  2. Techniques for identifying long-range residue correlations in the fifth binding module of LDLR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jennifer W

    2006-01-01

    The study of correlations between residues in distal regions of a protein structure may provide insights into the mechanism of protein folding. Such long-range correlations may exist between distant residues that are ...

  3. Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford and P. Westerhoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Making Photosynthetic Biofuel Renewable: Recovering Phosphorus from Residual Biomass J. M. Gifford to global warming. Biofuel from phototrophic microbes like algae and bacteria provides a viable substitute improves biofuel sustainability by refining phosphorus recycling. Biomass Production Residual Biomass

  4. Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated with Host Galaxy Masses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hubble Residuals of Nearby SN Ia Are Correlated...

  5. Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Code for LHCD Simulations with Self-consistent Treatment of Alpha Particles in Tokamak Geometry

  6. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hengartner, Nick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon G [CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  7. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  8. Residuals in steel products -- Impacts on properties and measures to minimize them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emi, Toshihiko [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Advanced Materials Processing; Wijk, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Process Metallurgy

    1996-12-31

    The effect of major residual elements on the properties of steel products is summarized. Measures to minimize these elements are discussed including the pretreatment of raw materials, innovative refining processes and environmental issues. This paper addresses (1) scrap situation, (2) upper limit of residual concentrations acceptable for processing and product quality, (3) possible means to reduce the residuals, and (4) consideration on the practicable measures to solve the residuals problem in a systematic way. 52 refs.

  9. Type Ia supernova Hubble residuals and host-galaxy properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, A. G.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Fleury, M.; Guy, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Énergies, Université Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Baltay, C. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06250-8121 (United States); Buton, C.; Feindt, U.; Greskovic, P.; Kowalski, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bonn, Nußallee 12, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Childress, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Université de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); Université de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-03-20

    Kim et al. introduced a new methodology for determining peak-brightness absolute magnitudes of type Ia supernovae from multi-band light curves. We examine the relation between their parameterization of light curves and Hubble residuals, based on photometry synthesized from the Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotometric time series, with global host-galaxy properties. The K13 Hubble residual step with host mass is 0.013 ± 0.031 mag for a supernova subsample with data coverage corresponding to the K13 training; at <<1?, the step is not significant and lower than previous measurements. Relaxing the data coverage requirement of the Hubble residual step with the host mass is 0.045 ± 0.026 mag for the larger sample; a calculation using the modes of the distributions, less sensitive to outliers, yields a step of 0.019 mag. The analysis of this article uses K13 inferred luminosities, as distinguished from previous works that use magnitude corrections as a function of SALT2 color and stretch parameters: steps at >2? significance are found in SALT2 Hubble residuals in samples split by the values of their K13 x(1) and x(2) light-curve parameters. x(1) affects the light-curve width and color around peak (similar to the ?m {sub 15} and stretch parameters), and x(2) affects colors, the near-UV light-curve width, and the light-curve decline 20-30 days after peak brightness. The novel light-curve analysis, increased parameter set, and magnitude corrections of K13 may be capturing features of SN Ia diversity arising from progenitor stellar evolution.

  10. Spatial autocorrelation approaches to testing residuals from least squares regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    In statistics, the Durbin-Watson test is always employed to detect the presence of serial correlation of residuals from a least squares regression analysis. However, the Durbin-Watson statistic is only suitable for ordered time or spatial series. If the variables comprise cross-sectional data coming from spatial random sampling, the Durbin-Watson will be ineffectual because the value of Durbin-Watson's statistic depends on the sequences of data point arrangement. Based on the ideas from spatial autocorrelation, this paper presents two new statistics for testing serial correlation of residuals from least squares regression based on spatial samples. By analogy with the new form of Moran's index, an autocorrelation coefficient is defined with a standardized residual vector and a normalized spatial weight matrix. Then on the analogy of the Durbin-Watson statistic, a serial correlation index is constructed. As a case, the two statistics are applied to the spatial sample of 29 China's regions. These results show th...

  11. The effect of magnetic flutter on residual flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, P. W.; Pueschel, M. J.; Carmody, D. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The hypothesis that stochastic magnetic fields disrupt zonal flows associated with ion temperature gradient turbulence saturation is investigated analytically with a residual flow calculation in the presence of magnetic flutter. The calculation starts from the time-asymptotic zero-beta residual flow of Rosenbluth and Hinton [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)] with the sudden application of an externally imposed, fixed magnetic field perturbation. The short-time electron response from radial charge loss due to magnetic flutter is calculated from the appropriate gyrokinetic equation. The potential evolution has quadratic behavior, with a zero crossing at finite time. The crossing time and its parametric dependencies are compared with numerical results from a gyrokinetic simulation of residual flow in the presence of magnetic flutter. The numerical and analytical results are in good agreement and support the hypothesis that the high-beta runaway of numerical simulations is a result of the disabling of zonal flows by finite-beta charge losses associated with magnetic flutter.

  12. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  13. Washing of Rocky Flats Combustible Residues (Conducted March - May 1995)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mary E. Barr; Ann R. Schake; David A. Romero; Gordon D. Jarvinen

    1999-03-01

    The scope of this project is to determine the feasibility of washing plutonium-containing combustible residues using ultrasonic disruption as a method for dislodging particulate. Removal of plutonium particulate and, to a lesser extent, solubilized plutonium from the organic substrate should substantially reduce potential fire, explosion or radioactive release hazards due to radiolytic hydrogen generation or high flammability. Tests were conducted on polypropylene filters which were used as pre-filters in the rich-residue ion-exchange process at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. These filters are similar to the Ful-Flo{reg_sign} cartridges used at Rocky Flats that make up a substantial fraction of the combustible residues with the highest hazard rating. Batch experiments were run on crushed filter material in order to determine the amount of Pu removed by stirring, stirring and sonication, and stirring and sonication with the introduction of Pu-chelating water-soluble polymers or surfactants. Significantly more Pu is removed using sonication and sonication with chelators than is removed with mechanical stirring alone.

  14. also indicate a positive correlation between residual neocortex and cerebellum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    brain components8 with variation in component size that is inde- pendent of whole-brain variation1 with brain size for any principal devel- opmental brain division"3 . As in primates, neocortex proportion the partly non-overlapping distri- butions of their multivariate representa- tions of brain proportions

  15. Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  16. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Daly, Jeffery E. (Cypress, TX)

    2009-05-05

    A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

  17. Component technology for Stirling power converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieme, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.

  18. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  19. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  20. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  1. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  2. Self-consistent QM/MM methodologies for structural refinement of photosystem II and other macromolecules of biological interest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sproviero, Eduardo M [YALE UNIV; Newcomer, Michael [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The combination of quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is one of the most promising approaches to study the structure, function, and properties of proteins and nucleic acids. However, there some instances in which the limitations of either the MM (lack of a proper electronic description) or QM (limited to a few number of atoms) methods prevent a proper description of the system. To address this issue, we review here our approach to fine-tune the structure of biological systems using post-QM/MM refinements. These protocols are based on spectroscopy data, and/or partitioning of the system to extend the QM description to a larger region of a protein. We illustrate these methodologies through applications to several biomolecules, which were pre-optimized at the QM/MM level and then further refined using postQM/MM refinement methodologies: mod(QM/MM), which refines the atomic charges of the residues included in the MM region accounting for polarization effects; mod(QM/MM)-opt that partition the MM region in smaller parts and optimizes each part in an iterative. self-consistent way, and the Polarized-Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (P-EXAFS) fitting procedure, which fine-tune the atomic coordinates to reproduce experimental polarized EXAFS spectra. The first two techniques were applied to the guanine quadruplex. while the P-EXAFS refinement was applied to the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  3. Self-consistent nonlinear kinetic simulations of the anomalous Doppler instability of suprathermal electrons in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, W. N. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsø, Tromsø (Norway); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Suprathermal tails in the distributions of electron velocities parallel to the magnetic field are found in many areas of plasma physics, from magnetic confinement fusion to solar system plasmas. Parallel electron kinetic energy can be transferred into plasma waves and perpendicular gyration energy of particles through the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI), provided that energetic electrons with parallel velocities v{sub ||}?(?+?{sub ce})/k{sub ||} are present; here ?{sub ce} denotes electron cyclotron frequency, ? the wave angular frequency, and k{sub ||} the component of wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present the first fully self-consistent relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the ADI, spanning the linear and nonlinear regimes of the ADI. We test the robustness of the analytical theory in the linear regime and follow the ADI through to the steady state. By directly evaluating the parallel and perpendicular dynamical contributions to j·E in the simulations, we follow the energy transfer between the excited waves and the bulk and tail electron populations for the first time. We find that the ratio ?{sub ce}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}) of energy transfer between parallel and perpendicular, obtained from linear analysis, does not apply when damping is fully included, when we find it to be ?{sub pe}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}); here ?{sub pe} denotes the electron plasma frequency. We also find that the ADI can arise beyond the previously expected range of plasma parameters, in particular when ?{sub ce}>?{sub pe}. The simulations also exhibit a spectral feature which may correspond to the observations of suprathermal narrowband emission at ?{sub pe} detected from low density tokamak plasmas.

  4. The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for High Performance Scientific Computing Jeremy G: (219) 631­9260 1 Introduction The Standard Template Library (STL) was released in 1995 and adopted by the tremendous success of the STL for general­purpose programming. What was not so obvious at the time, however

  5. Components of the Creep Strength of Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Components of the Creep Strength of Welds M. Murugananth and H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia Department://www.msm.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT Modern power plant steels and welding alloys, designed to resist creep deforma- tion at high in the sense that it covers all common ferritic steels and welding alloys of the type used in the construc

  6. Microwave heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2007-01-09

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  7. Fast Kernel-Based Independent Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAuliffe, Jon

    Fast Kernel-Based Independent Component Analysis Hao Shen , Stefanie Jegelka and Arthur Gretton instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). FastKICA (Fast HSIC-based Kernel ICA) is a new optimisation-based ICA algorithms, FastKICA is applicable to any twice differentiable kernel function. Experimental

  8. Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honavar, Vasant

    Assembling Composite Web Services from Autonomous Components Jyotishman PATHAK, Samik BASU, sbasu, honavar}@cs.iastate.edu Abstract. Web services are fast emerging as the technology of choice to an iterative and incremental technique for modeling composite Web services proposed by the authors. Keywords

  9. Principal component analysis within nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Al-Sayed

    2015-04-15

    The principal component analysis (PCA) of different parameters affecting collectivity of nuclei predicted to be candidate of the interacting boson model dynamical symmetries are performed. The results show that, the use of PCA within nuclear structure can give us a simple way to identify collectivity together with the parameters simultaneously affecting it.

  10. INTRODUCTION Structural components in the cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritort, Felix

    INTRODUCTION PROTEINS · Structural components in the cell · Function that maintain the cellular metabolism · ~50% dry weight of an organism · Human cell: more than 10.000 different proteins #12: PROTEIN STRUCTURE " Chain SECONDARY STRUCTURE AAx " Chain AAy Hidrogen bridge bond #12;INTRODUCTION

  11. Injection Molding of Micron-scale Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Injection Molding of Micron-scale Components ver. 1 1ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © 2009 #12;Micro MoldingMicro Molding · EquipmentEquipment · BioMEMS sensorsEjEjEjector Cylinders Bottom Mold Half Top Mold Half Nozzle Ejector Cylinders Bottom Mold Half Top Mold Half Nozzle

  12. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  13. Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally Intermingled Rod-like Grains Microstructural Contol of the Porous Si3N4 Ceramics Consisted of 3-Dimensionally...

  14. CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 CRAD, Nuclear Safety Component - June 29, 2011 June 29, 2011 Nuclear Safety Component and Services Procurement (HSS CRAD 45-12, Rev. 1)...

  15. Definite Integrals, Some Involving Residue Theory Evaluated by Maple Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Kimiko o [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The calculus of residue is applied to evaluate certain integrals in the range (-{infinity} to {infinity}) using the Maple symbolic code. These integrals are of the form {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup {infinity}} cos(x)/[(x{sup 2} + a{sup 2})(x{sup 2} + b{sup 2}) (x{sup 2} + c{sup 2})]dx and similar extensions. The Maple code is also applied to expressions in maximum likelihood estimator moments when sampling from the negative binomial distribution. In general the Maple code approach to the integrals gives correct answers to specified decimal places, but the symbolic result may be extremely long and complex.

  16. Methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2014-08-19

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity, which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate, which may include microchannels or other features.

  17. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  18. The Rocky Flats Plant Waste Stream and Residue Identification and Characterization Program (WSRIC): Progress and achievements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ideker, V.L.; Doyle, G.M.

    1994-02-01

    The Waste Stream and Residue Identification and Characterization (WSRIC) Program, as described in the WSRIC Program Description delineates the process knowledge used to identify and characterize currently-generated waste from approximately 5404 waste streams originating from 576 processes in 288 buildings at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Annual updates to the WSRIC documents are required by the Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement between the US Department of Energy, the Colorado Department of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. Accurate determination and characterization of waste is a crucial component in RFP`s waste management strategy to assure compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) storage and treatment requirements, as well as disposal acceptance criteria. The WSRIC Program was rebaselined in September 1992, and serves as the linchpin for documenting process knowledge in RFP`s RCRA operating record. Enhancements to the WSRIC include strengthening the waste characterization rationale, expanding WSRIC training for waste generators, and incorporating analytical information into the WSRIC building books. These enhancements will improve credibility with the regulators and increase waste generators` understanding of the basis for credible waste characterizations.

  19. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  20. Energy deposition in STARFIRE reactor components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Brooks, J.N.

    1985-04-01

    The energy deposition in the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor was calculated based on detailed models for the different reactor components. The heat deposition and the 14 MeV neutron flux poloidal distributions in the first wall were obtained. The poloidal surface heat load distribution in the first wall was calculated from the plasma radiation. The Monte Carlo method was used for the calculation to allow an accurate modeling for the reactor geometry.

  1. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve...

  2. Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Lithium Battery Cells and Cell Components 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  3. Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweight Valve Train Components Advanced Materials for Lightweight Valve Train Components Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review...

  4. Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Bio-inspired nanocomposite assemblies as smart skin components. There is...

  5. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

  6. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-01-01

    of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with allTable 1. actuator air handler boiler chiller coil controllerattribute lists for the boiler and actuator components. A

  7. AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  8. Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Scientific Solutions (TRL 5 6 Component) - Underwater Active...

  9. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vss033carlson2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB) Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components...

  10. Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2005-01-18

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  11. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (?/E = 7 · 10??) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (?/E = 14 · 10??).

  12. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulnessmore »of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (?/E = 7 · 10??) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (?/E = 14 · 10??).« less

  13. Cementation of residue ion exchange resins at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dustin, D.F.; Beckman, T.D.; Madore, C.M.

    1998-03-03

    Ion exchange resins have been used to purify nitric acid solutions of plutonium at Rocky Flats since the 1950s. Spent ion exchange resins were retained for eventual recovery of residual plutonium, typically by incineration followed by the aqueous extraction of plutonium from the resultant ash. The elimination of incineration as a recovery process in the late 1980s and the absence of a suitable alternative process for plutonium recovery from resins led to a situation where spent ion exchange resins were simply placed into temporary storage. This report describes the method that Rocky Flats is currently using to stabilize residue ion exchange resins. The objective of the resin stabilization program is: (1) to ensure their safety during interim storage at the site, and (2) to prepare them for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Included in the discussion is a description of the safety concerns associated with ion exchange resins, alternatives considered for their stabilization, the selection of the preferred treatment method, the means of implementing the preferred option, and the progress to date.

  14. A Multi-Factor Analysis of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared Abodeely; David Muth; Paul Adler; Eleanor Campbell; Kenneth Mark Bryden

    2012-10-01

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a near term source of cellulosic biomass for bioenergy production, but sustainable removal of agricultural residues requires consideration of the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. Previous work has developed an integrated model to evaluate sustainable agricultural residue removal potential considering soil erosion, soil organic carbon, greenhouse gas emission, and long-term yield impacts of residue removal practices. The integrated model couples the environmental process models WEPS, RUSLE2, SCI, and DAYCENT. This study uses the integrated model to investigate the impact of interval removal practices in Boone County, Iowa, US. Residue removal of 4.5 Mg/ha was performed annually, bi-annually, and tri-annually and were compared to no residue removal. The study is performed at the soil type scale using a national soil survey database assuming a continuous corn rotation with reduced tillage. Results are aggregated across soil types to provide county level estimates of soil organic carbon changes and individual soil type soil organic matter content if interval residue removal were implemented. Results show interval residue removal is possible while improving soil organic matter. Implementation of interval removal practices provide greater increases in soil organic matter while still providing substantial residue for bioenergy production.

  15. PEMEX selects the H-Oil{reg_sign} process for their hydrodesulfurization residue complex at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisdom, L.I.; Colyar, J.J. [Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) has selected the H-Oil Process for the conversion and upgrading of a blend of Maya and Isthmus vacuum residua at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery. The 8,450 metric ton/day (50,000 bpsd) H-Oil Plant will produce a low sulfur (0.8 wt%) fuel oil, diesel, naphtha, and LPG. The H-Oil Plant will be a key component of the Hydrodesulfurization Residue (HDR) Complex which will be located at the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Tula, State of Hidalgo, Mexico. The project is part of PEMEX`s Ecology Projects currently underway in Mexico. This paper describes the HDR Complex and the design basis of the H-Oil Plant and provides the current status of this project.

  16. Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

    2005-07-14

    Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

  17. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisohara, N. [Advanced Nuclear System Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Suzuki, H.; Akita, K. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Kasahara, N. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Management, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  18. Expansive components in H II regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Relano; J. E. Beckman

    2004-10-18

    We study the presence of low intensity high velocity components, which we have termed wing features in the integrated Halpha emission line profiles of the HII region populations of the spiral barred galaxies NGC 1530, NGC 3359 and NGC 6951. We find that more than a third of the HII region line profiles in each galaxy show these components. The highest fraction is obtained in the galaxy whose line profiles show the best S:N, which suggests that wing features of this type may well exist in most, if not all, HII region line profiles. Applying selection criteria to the wing features, we obtain a sample of HII regions with clearly defined high velocity components in their profiles. Deconvolution of a representative sample of the line profiles eliminates any doubt that the wing features could possibly be due to instrumental effects. We present an analysis of the high velocity low intensity features fitting them with Gaussian functions; the emission measures, central velocities and velocity dispersions for the red and blue features take similar values. We interpret the features as signatures of expanding shells inside the HII regions. Up to a shell radius of R(shell)~0.2R(reg), the stellar winds from the central ionizing stars appear to satisfy the energy and momentum requirements for the formation and driving the shell. Several examples of the most luminous HII regions show that the shells appear to have larger radii; in these cases additional mechanisms may well be needed to explain the kinetic energies and momenta of the shells.

  19. Remarks on the regularity criteria of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system in terms of two velocity field components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamazaki, Kazuo [Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University, 401 Mathematical Sciences, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, Oklahoma State University, 401 Mathematical Sciences, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    We study the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics system and obtain its regularity criteria in terms of only two velocity vector field components eliminating the condition on the third component completely. The proof consists of a new decomposition of the four nonlinear terms of the system and estimating a component of the magnetic vector field in terms of the same component of the velocity vector field. This result may be seen as a component reduction result of many previous works [C. He and Z. Xin, “On the regularity of weak solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic equations,” J. Differ. Equ. 213(2), 234–254 (2005); Y. Zhou, “Remarks on regularities for the 3D MHD equations,” Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 12(5), 881–886 (2005)].

  20. Slicing behavior specification of components* Ondej Ser1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Database encapsulates accounts with prepaid internet connection. The Token component is a dynamically created entity

  1. Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis: Existence and Uniqueness Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyvärinen, Aapo

    \\Lambda Corresponding author 1 #12; Nonlinear Independent Component Analysis: Existence and Uniqueness

  2. Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    Automated Assessment of Polyethylene Wear in Cemented Acetabular Components using Anteroposterior, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, DD1 9SY, UK Abstract Polyethylene wear in the acetabular components of hip to the polyethylene acetabular component of a prosthesis so that both it and the metal femoral head component can

  3. Review article Components manufacturing for solid oxide fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components is given and the fabrication techniques of ceramic components Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC); Components manufacturingReview article Components manufacturing for solid oxide fuel cells F. Tietz *, H.-P. Buchkremer, D

  4. Method of forming components for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mrazek, F.C.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-05-22

    A method of forming a component for a high-temperature secondary electrochemical cell having a positive electrode including a sulfide selected from the group consisting of iron sulfides, nickel sulfides, copper sulfides and cobalt sulfides, a negative electrode including an alloy of aluminum and an electrically insulating porous separator between said electrodes is described. The improvement comprises forming a slurry of solid particles dispersed in a liquid electrolyte such as the lithium chloride-potassium chloride eutectic, casting the slurry into a form having the shape of one of the components and smoothing the exposed surface of the slurry, cooling the cast slurry to form the solid component, and removing same. Electrodes and separators can be thus formed.

  5. Thermal Study of Inverter Components: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, N. R.; Thomas, E. V.; Quintana, M. A.; Barkaszi, S.; Rosenthal, A.; Zhang, Z.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    Thermal histories of inverter components were collected from operating inverters from several manufacturers and three locations. The data were analyzed to determine thermal profiles, the dependence on local conditions, and to assess the effect on inverter reliability. Inverter temperatures were shown to increase with the power dissipation of the inverters, follow diurnal and annual cycles, and have a dependence on wind speed. An accumulated damage model was applied to the temperature profiles and an example of using these data to predict reliability was explored.

  6. Method of making low work function component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Vance (Niskayuna, NY); Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Delmar, NY)

    2011-11-15

    A method for fabricating a component is disclosed. The method includes: providing a member having an effective work function of an initial value, disposing a sacrificial layer on a surface of the member, disposing a first agent within the member to obtain a predetermined concentration of the agent at said surface of the member, annealing the member, and removing the sacrificial layer to expose said surface of the member, wherein said surface has a post-process effective work function that is different from the initial value.

  7. Modeling the Phillips curve with unobserved components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andrew C

    is then nonstationary. However, writing the equation as #1;#25;t = #12;xt+"t makes it clear that what we have is not really a Phillips curve (though adding lags of xt and incorporating a unit root could retrieve the situation). On the other hand, a stationary model... -looking. The conditions under which a model with an expectational term reverts to (10) are derived below. The fact that the forecast function for a random walk component is constant simpli?es matters considerably. The reduced form of (10) is an ARMAX model in which #1;#25...

  8. Turbine engine component with cooling passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-01-17

    A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

  9. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  10. Communication adapter for use with a drilling component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Hall; Jr.; H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Bradford, Kline (Orem, UT); Rawle, Michael (Springville, UT)

    2007-04-03

    A communication adapter is disclosed that provides for removable attachment to a drilling component when the drilling component is not actively drilling and for communication with an integrated transmission system in the drilling component. The communication adapter comprises a data transmission coupler that facilitates communication between the drilling component and the adapter, a mechanical coupler that facilitates removable attachment of the adapter to the drilling component, and a data interface.

  11. Intelligent Component Monitoring for Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefteri Tsoukalas

    2010-07-30

    Reliability and economy are two major concerns for a nuclear power generation system. Next generation nuclear power reactors are being developed to be more reliable and economic. An effective and efficient surveillance system can generously contribute toward this goal. Recent progress in computer systems and computational tools has made it necessary and possible to upgrade current surveillance/monitoring strategy for better performance. For example, intelligent computing techniques can be applied to develop algorithm that help people better understand the information collected from sensors and thus reduce human error to a new low level. Incidents incurred from human error in nuclear industry are not rare and have been proven costly. The goal of this project is to develop and test an intelligent prognostics methodology for predicting aging effects impacting long-term performance of nuclear components and systems. The approach is particularly suitable for predicting the performance of nuclear reactor systems which have low failure probabilities (e.g., less than 10-6 year-). Such components and systems are often perceived as peripheral to the reactor and are left somewhat unattended. That is, even when inspected, if they are not perceived to be causing some immediate problem, they may not be paid due attention. Attention to such systems normally involves long term monitoring and possibly reasoning with multiple features and evidence, requirements that are not best suited for humans.

  12. Consistent Treatment of Inter-and Intramolecular Polarization in Molecular Mechanics Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponder, Jay

    Consistent Treatment of Inter- and Intramolecular Polarization in Molecular Mechanics Calculations multipoles for an arbitrary static structure or conformation is given. With the help of the intramolecular

  13. A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: A self-consistent phase-field approach to implicit solvation of charged molecules with Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics This content will become...

  14. Single-well experimental design for studying residual trapping of superciritcal carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    break- through curve (BTC) is measured. Tracer breakthrough1) compar- ison of the BTC from the fully watersaturated system and the BTC from the residual gas ?eld;

  15. The effects of drainage and amendments on the physical and chemical properties of bauxite residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Thomas Lee

    1987-01-01

    on the properties of the residue were studied. The objective was to improve the properties of the residue before adding it to sandy soils. The CEC increased with pH, as would be expected with variable-charge minerals, and the adsorption of phosphate decreased...), or into the ocean (Baseden, 1976). Baseden (1976) reported that seawater could be mixed with the residue, reducing the pH of the residue by precipitating Ca and Ng carbonates. The resulting supernatant solution was then pumped into the ocean. This method...

  16. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 441 Table A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon...

  17. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  18. Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 203 Table 42. Residual Fuel Oil Prices by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued...

  19. Erk phosphorylates threonine 42 residue of ribosomal protein S3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hag Dong [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Yung [Department of Biology, Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, and BioInstitute, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: joonkim@korea.ac.kr

    2005-07-22

    The ribosomal protein S3 (rpS3) is involved in ribosome biogenesis as a member of ribosomal small subunit and also plays a role in the repair of damaged DNA. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), a MAP kinase, is known to play important roles in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study, the sequence analysis of rpS3 protein revealed that this protein has a putative FXFP motif which is believed to be an Erk binding site. Indeed, the motif was demonstrated as an Erk binding site by co-immunoprecipitation. In addition to this, it was revealed that Erk specifically phosphorylated Thr 42 residue of rpS3 in vitro and in vivo using the various mutants of rpS3. Taken together, rpS3 appears to be phosphorylated by activated Erk in proliferating cells, resulting in the decreased interaction between two proteins.

  20. Description of the prototype diagnostic residual gas analyzer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younkin, T. R.; Biewer, T. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Marcus, C.

    2014-11-15

    The diagnostic residual gas analyzer (DRGA) system to be used during ITER tokamak operation is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to measure fuel ratios (deuterium and tritium), fusion ash (helium), and impurities in the plasma. The eventual purpose of this instrument is for machine protection, basic control, and physics on ITER. Prototyping is ongoing to optimize the hardware setup and measurement capabilities. The DRGA prototype is comprised of a vacuum system and measurement technologies that will overlap to meet ITER measurement requirements. Three technologies included in this diagnostic are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, an ion trap mass spectrometer, and an optical penning gauge that are designed to document relative and absolute gas concentrations.

  1. Residual energy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav Boldyrev; Jean Carlos Perez; Vladimir Zhdankin

    2011-08-30

    Recent observations indicate that kinetic and magnetic energies are not in equipartition in the solar wind turbulence. Rather, magnetic fluctuations are more energetic and have somewhat steeper energy spectrum compared to the velocity fluctuations. This leads to the presence of the so-called residual energy E_r=E_v-E_b in the inertial interval of turbulence. This puzzling effect is addressed in the present paper in the framework of weak turbulence theory. Using a simple model of weakly colliding Alfv\\'en waves, we demonstrate that the kinetic-magnetic equipartition indeed gets broken as a result of nonlinear interaction of Alfv\\'en waves. We establish that magnetic energy is indeed generated more efficiently as a result of these interactions, which proposes an explanation for the solar wind observations.

  2. Cost Methodology for Biomass Feedstocks: Herbaceous Crops and Agricultural Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Webb, Erin; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-12-01

    This report describes a set of procedures and assumptions used to estimate production and logistics costs of bioenergy feedstocks from herbaceous crops and agricultural residues. The engineering-economic analysis discussed here is based on methodologies developed by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) and the American Agricultural Economics Association (AAEA). An engineering-economic analysis approach was chosen due to lack of historical cost data for bioenergy feedstocks. Instead, costs are calculated using assumptions for equipment performance, input prices, and yield data derived from equipment manufacturers, research literature, and/or standards. Cost estimates account for fixed and variable costs. Several examples of this costing methodology used to estimate feedstock logistics costs are included at the end of this report.

  3. President Obama's National Network for Manufacturing Innovation consists of regional hubs that will accelerate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and carbon fiber composites that will allow components made from these materials to be recycled at the end clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. Another area of manufacturing that is poised

  4. Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R.R.

    1999-08-24

    The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

  5. Non-destructive component separation using infrared radiant energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simandl, Ronald F. (Knoxville, TN); Russell, Steven W. (Knoxville, TN); Holt, Jerrid S. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, John D. (Harriman, TN)

    2011-03-01

    A method for separating a first component and a second component from one another at an adhesive bond interface between the first component and second component. Typically the method involves irradiating the first component with infrared radiation from a source that radiates substantially only short wavelengths until the adhesive bond is destabilized, and then separating the first component and the second component from one another. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is placed inside an enclosure and the assembly is illuminated from an IR source that is external to the enclosure. In some embodiments an assembly of components to be debonded is simultaneously irradiated by a multi-planar array of IR sources. Often the IR radiation is unidirectional. In some embodiments the IR radiation is narrow-band short wavelength infrared radiation.

  6. Futuristic concepts in engines and components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This publication includes papers on two-stroke engines and components, Brayton Stirling and Otto Cycles, alternative cycles, advanced combustion, and other related topics. Contents include: Paving the way to controlled combustion engines (CCE); A new class of stratified-charge internal combustion engine; Internal combustion (IC) engine with minimum number of moving parts; New type of heat engine -- externally heated air engine; A porous media burner for reforming methanol for fuel cell powered electric vehicles; Using a Stirling engine simulation program as a regenerator design aid; In-cylinder regenerated engines; High speed electronic fuel injection for direct injected rotary engine; and The characteristics of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the side exhaust port rotary engine.

  7. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  8. Journal of Economic Theory 112 (2003) 353364 Time-consistent policies$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    2003-01-01

    restriction under which the time-consistent open-loop policy is stationary. We use examples to illustrate-loop policy rule, such as a linear income tax, is time consistent. This approach also identifies the (possibly [1,6]). A representative agent chooses a consumption trajectory cðtÞ in order to maximize the present

  9. Statistical Learning : stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of Empirical Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consis- tent, so that they may algorithm satisfying it and, (b) necessary and sufficient for generalization and consistency of ERM. Thus for general learning algorithms while subsuming the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. We discuss al

  10. Statistical Learning : CVEEEloo stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Risk Minimization (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consistent, so, (b) necessary and sufficient for con- sistency of ERM. Thus CVEEEloo stability is a weak form subsuming the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. We discuss alternative forms of stability

  11. Statistical Learning : LOO stability is sufficient for generalization and necessary and sufficient for consistency of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Risk Minimization (ERM) ­ and almost-ERM when the minimizer does not exist ­ need to be consis- tent, (b) necessary and suffi- cient for consistency of ERM. Thus LOO stability is a weak form of stability the classical conditions for consistency of ERM. In particular, we conclude that a certain form of well

  12. PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajpoot, Nasir

    PHOTO-CONSISTENCY AND MULTIRESOLUTION METHODS FOR LIGHT FIELD DISPARITY ESTIMATION Adam Bowen for light fields: a global method based on the idea of photo-consistency and a local method which employs. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the two methods as compared to other photo

  13. Incorporating self-consistently calculated mineral physics into thermochemical mantle convection simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    the material properties density, thermal expansivity, specific heat capacity, and seismic velocity is probably due to self-consistent plate tectonics and depth-dependent viscosity. In conclusion, this combined approach of mantle convection and self-consistently calculated mineral physics is a powerful and useful

  14. Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4 Elekta Oy, Helsinki, Finland Abstract Ultra-low. (2013) Suppressing Multi-Channel Ultra-Low-Field MRI Measurement Noise Using Data Consistency and Image

  15. Self-tuning Speculation for Maintaining the Consistency of Client-Cached Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Consistency (AACC), in a page server DBMS architecture with page-level consistency. The simulation results. Keywords--self-tuning speculation; parallel comminication; concurrency control; data-shipping DBMS I. INTRODUCTION Client/server DBMS architectures fall into two main categories, query-shipping and data

  16. Aalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liso, Vincenzo

    ., & Liso, V. (2013). Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell oxide fuel cell system and absorption heat pump Irene Albacete Cachorroa ,Iulia Maria DarabanaAalborg Universitet Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel

  17. A new hybrid architecture consisting of highly mesoporous CNT/carbon nanofibers from starch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    A new hybrid architecture consisting of highly mesoporous CNT/carbon nanofibers from starch Yun the capacitance in electrochemical capacitors. This paper reports a new hybrid carbon nanofiber architecture successfully fabricated a new hybrid carbon architecture consisting of CNT reinforced-carbon nanofibers

  18. Consistency of the Geometric Brownian Motion Model of Stock Prices with Asymmetric Information.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    Consistency of the Geometric Brownian Motion Model of Stock Prices with Asymmetric Information on the microeconomic foundation of modern option pricing models. We develop a model of market agents' interactions, induced by heterogeneity of information, which is consistent with both modern option pricing models

  19. Relative energetics and structural properties of zirconia using a self-consistent tight-binding model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Relative energetics and structural properties of zirconia using a self-consistent tight We describe an empirical, self-consistent, orthogonal tight-binding model for zirconia, which allows orders the zero temperature energies of all zirconia polymorphs. The Zr-O matrix elements

  20. Page 1 of 2 80.3 Consistent Treatment of Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    Page 1 of 2 80.3 Consistent Treatment of Costs Policy Name: CONSISTENT TREATMENT OF COSTS October 2008 1. Policy Statement OMB Circular A21, Cost Principles for Educational Institutions, section J, contains a list of items that are deemed unallowable as direct costs on federally sponsored

  1. Consistency, Availability, and Convergence Prince Mahajan, Lorenzo Alvisi, and Mike Dahlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahlin, Michael D.

    Consistency, Availability, and Convergence Prince Mahajan, Lorenzo Alvisi, and Mike Dahlin identify fundamental tradeoffs among properties of consistency, availability, and convergence, and we close the gap between what is known to be impossible (i.e. CAP) and known systems that are highly-available

  2. ANALYSIS OF DUAL CONSISTENCY FOR DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN DISCRETIZATIONS OF SOURCE TERMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    , and diffusion of turbulent eddy viscosity, and state derivative dependent source terms appear in both the k to a dual inconsistent scheme. A straightforward procedure for correcting this dual inconsistency-dimensional test problem confirm that the dual consistent and asymp- totically dual consistent schemes achieve

  3. An Integrated Model for Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Muth; K. M. Bryden

    2003-12-01

    Agricultural residues have been identified as a significant potential resource for bioenergy production, but serious questions remain about the sustainability of harvesting residues. Agricultural residues play an important role in limiting soil erosion from wind and water and in maintaining soil organic carbon. Because of this, multiple factors must be considered when assessing sustainable residue harvest limits. Validated and accepted modeling tools for assessing these impacts include the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), and the Soil Conditioning Index. Currently, these models do not work together as a single integrated model. Rather, use of these models requires manual interaction and data transfer. As a result, it is currently not feasible to use these computational tools to perform detailed sustainable agricultural residue availability assessments across large spatial domains or to consider a broad range of land management practices. This paper presents an integrated modeling strategy that couples existing datasets with the RUSLE2 water erosion, WEPS wind erosion, and Soil Conditioning Index soil carbon modeling tools to create a single integrated residue removal modeling system. This enables the exploration of the detailed sustainable residue harvest scenarios needed to establish sustainable residue availability. Using this computational tool, an assessment study of residue availability for the state of Iowa was performed. This study included all soil types in the state of Iowa, four representative crop rotation schemes, variable crop yields, three tillage management methods, and five residue removal methods. The key conclusions of this study are that under current management practices and crop yields nearly 26.5 million Mg of agricultural residue are sustainably accessible in the state of Iowa, and that through the adoption of no till practices residue removal could sustainably approach 40 million Mg. However, when considering the economics and logistics of residue harvest, yields below 2.25 Mg ha-1 are generally considered to not be viable for a commercial bioenergy system. Applying this constraint, the total agricultural residue resource available in Iowa under current management practices is 19 million Mg. Previously published results have shown residue availability from 22 million Mg to over 50 million Mg in Iowa.

  4. POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

    2011-03-08

    At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

  5. The influence of quench sensitivity on residual stresses in the aluminium alloys 7010 and 7075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.S.; Tanner, D.A.; Truman, C.E.; Paradowska, A.M.; Wimpory, R.C.

    2012-03-15

    The most critical stage in the heat treatment of high strength aluminium alloys is the rapid cooling necessary to form a supersaturated solid solution. A disadvantage of quenching is that the thermal gradients can be sufficient to cause inhomogeneous plastic deformation which in turn leads to the development of large residual stresses. Two 215 mm thick rectilinear forgings have been made from 7000 series alloys with widely different quench sensitivity to determine if solute loss in the form of precipitation during quenching can significantly affect residual stress magnitudes. The forgings were heat treated and immersion quenched using cold water to produce large magnitude residual stresses. The through thickness residual stresses were measured by neutron diffraction and incremental deep hole drilling. The distribution of residual stresses was found to be similar for both alloys varying from highly triaxial and tensile in the interior, to a state of biaxial compression in the surface. The 7010 forging exhibited larger tensile stresses in the interior. The microstructural variation from surface to centre for both forgings was determined using optical and transmission electron microscopy. These observations were used to confirm the origin of the hardness variation measured through the forging thickness. When the microstructural changes were accounted for in the through thickness lattice parameter, the residual stresses in the two forgings were found to be very similar. Solute loss in the 7075 forging appeared to have no significant effect on the residual stress magnitudes when compared to 7010. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Through thickness residual stress measurements made on large Al alloy forgings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residual stress characterised using neutron diffraction and deep hole drilling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biaxial compressive surface and triaxial subsurface residual stresses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quench sensitivity of 7075 promotes significant microstructural differences to 7010. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When precipitation is accounted for, residual stress in both forgings are similar.

  6. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belotsky, K; Kouvaris, C; Laletin, M

    2015-01-01

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that th...

  7. High Energy Positrons and Gamma Radiation from Decaying Constituents of a two-component Dark Atom Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; C. Kouvaris; M. Laletin

    2015-08-12

    We study a two component dark matter candidate inspired by the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. Dark matter consists of a dominant SIMP-like dark atom component made of bound states between primordial helium nuclei and a doubly charged technilepton, and a small WIMP-like component made of another dark atom bound state between a doubly charged technibaryon and a technilepton. This scenario is consistent with direct search experimental findings because the dominant SIMP component interacts too strongly to reach the depths of current detectors with sufficient energy to recoil and the WIMP-like component is too small to cause significant amount of events. In this context a metastable technibaryon that decays to $e^+e^+$, $\\mu^+ \\mu^+$ and $\\tau^+ \\tau^+$ can in principle explain the observed positron excess by AMS-02 and PAMELA, while being consistent with the photon flux observed by FERMI/LAT. We scan the parameters of the model and we find the best possible fit to the latest experimental data. We find that there is a small range of parameter space that this scenario can be realised under certain conditions regarding the cosmic ray propagation and the final state radiation. This range of parameters fall inside the region where the current run of LHC can probe, and therefore it will soon be possible to either verify or exclude conclusively this model of dark matter.

  8. AR for the Masses: Building a Low-Cost Portable AR System from Off-the-Shelf Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chun-Fa

    to wear a head-mounted display (HMD). Its cost is low because the whole system consists of only two web of the head position. That is the main reason why we may build a low-cost head tracking system. 2 PreviousAR for the Masses: Building a Low-Cost Portable AR System from Off-the-Shelf Components Hsiang

  9. 2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone of Monochamus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanks, Lawrence M.

    2-(Undecyloxy)-ethanol is a major component of the male-produced aggregation pheromone and identified as 2-(undecyloxy)-ethanol. In analyses by GC coupled to electroantennography the only consistent, Sweden, and China. 2-(Undecyl- oxy)-ethanol was attractive to both male and female M. sutor beetles

  10. Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-04-03

    A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

  11. Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

    2008-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

  12. Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. RESIDUAL PREDICTION BASED ON UNIT SELECTION David Sundermann1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Alan W

    RESIDUAL PREDICTION BASED ON UNIT SELECTION David S¨undermann1,2,3 , Harald H¨oge1 , Antonio Recently, we presented a study on residual prediction tech- niques that can be applied to voice conversion based on lin- ear transformation or hidden Markov model-based speech synthesis. Our voice conversion

  14. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G Handling Editor: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused

  15. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused by the viscous

  16. Residual-Energy-Activated Cooperative Transmission (REACT) to Avoid the Energy Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingram, Mary Ann

    Residual-Energy-Activated Cooperative Transmission (REACT) to Avoid the Energy Hole Jin Woo Jung of the excess energy to do cooperative transmission (CT) to hop directly to the Sink, thereby relieving residual energy than the current node. The paper considers several criteria for selecting the cooperators

  17. J. Number Theory 124(2007), no. 1, 5761. SIMPLE ARGUMENTS ON CONSECUTIVE POWER RESIDUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    J. Number Theory 124(2007), no. 1, 57­61. SIMPLE ARGUMENTS ON CONSECUTIVE POWER RESIDUES Zhi-Wei Sun Department of Mathematics, Nanjing University Nanjing 210093, People's Republic of China zwsun: (i) If n is the least positive kth power non-residue modulo a positive integer m, then the greatest

  18. An Endogenous Drosophila Receptor for Glycans Bearing 1,3-Linked Core Fucose Residues*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Endogenous Drosophila Receptor for Glycans Bearing 1,3-Linked Core Fucose Residues* Received-terminal C-type carbohydrate-recognition do- main. Expression studies show that the full-length pro- tein-linked glycans bearing 1,3-linked fucose residues. Binding is enhanced by the additional presence of 1,6-linked

  19. FaultTolerant Linear Convolution Using Residue Number M.G.Parker,M.Benaissa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew Geoffrey

    (RNS) and Polynomial Residue Number Systems (PRNS). The RNS and PRNS are both given error in recent years. Another means of FT uses Residue Number Systems (RNS) [4]. A RNS performs computation over to detect and correct. A scheme similar to MR is therefore applicable using RNS by the addition of extra

  20. Managing N availability and losses by combining fertilizer-N with different quality residues in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Kessel, Chris

    Managing N availability and losses by combining fertilizer-N with different quality residues residues are often not available or affordable in sufficient quantities or qualities to be used alone the use of all available resources within each target environment (Kimani et al., 2003). The ISFM approach

  1. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morman, J.A.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Reifman, J.

    1999-07-27

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced. 5 figs.

  2. Process management using component thermal-hydraulic function classes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A process management expert system where following malfunctioning of a component, such as a pump, for determining system realignment procedures such as for by-passing the malfunctioning component with on-line speeds to maintain operation of the process at full or partial capacity or to provide safe shut down of the system while isolating the malfunctioning component. The expert system uses thermal-hydraulic function classes at the component level for analyzing unanticipated as well as anticipated component malfunctions to provide recommended sequences of operator actions. Each component is classified according to its thermal-hydraulic function, and the generic and component-specific characteristics for that function. Using the diagnosis of the malfunctioning component and its thermal hydraulic class, the expert system analysis is carried out using generic thermal-hydraulic first principles. One aspect of the invention employs a qualitative physics-based forward search directed primarily downstream from the malfunctioning component in combination with a subsequent backward search directed primarily upstream from the serviced component. Generic classes of components are defined in the knowledge base according to the three thermal-hydraulic functions of mass, momentum and energy transfer and are used to determine possible realignment of component configurations in response to thermal-hydraulic function imbalance caused by the malfunctioning component. Each realignment to a new configuration produces the accompanying sequence of recommended operator actions. All possible new configurations are examined and a prioritized list of acceptable solutions is produced.

  3. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-07-12

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

  4. Ammonia volatilization from soils with surface rice straw residue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barghassa, Peyam

    1995-01-01

    rice straw vs. no straw, (NH4)2SO4 VS-urea, surface broadcast vs. deep placement of N, immediate flooding vs. delayed flooding. The treatments in the field consisted of all possible combinations of the following variables: surface rice straw vs...

  5. 0;reptide Research mixtures (n = number of residues in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Kit S.

    but contained in the same reac- tion vessel. After identifying and iso- lating the active particle) and Houghten et al. (9)], a multiplicity of semi-random libraries is generated and tested. Theselibraries to this approach, as well as to the concept of positional scanning libraries (23), which consists of n groups

  6. The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    1 The Bolting of Magnesium Components in Car Engines Sarennah J.P. Longworth Newnham College of bolting together magnesium alloys components at temperatures around 100o C, such as those found in car

  7. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-04-29

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

  8. Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2005-01-01

    As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

  9. A Methodology of Component Integration and Xudong He2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    of behavioral observation developed in our previous work, this chapter proposes a formal model of component integration testing methods and a hierarchy of behavioral observation schemes suitable for component

  10. Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice, Strategy Supervisor #12;2 #12;Flexibility in Aerospace and Automotive Component Manufacturing Systems: Practice Traditionally, parts fabrication in the aerospace and automotive industries has been associated with a number

  11. Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Supply Chain Performance Assessment and Supplier and Component Importance Identification and Motivation The Multitiered Supply Chain Network Game Theory Model with Suppliers Supply Chain Network Performance Measures and Supplier and Component Importance Identification The Algorithm Numerical Examples

  12. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  13. Impact of Biodiesel on Fuel System Component Durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, B.

    2005-09-01

    A study of the effects of biodiesel blends on fuel system components and the physical characteristics of elastomer materials.

  14. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  15. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, Wen Y. (Houston, TX)

    1984-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  16. Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

    1999-06-29

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

  17. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.; Wernly, K.

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  18. Self-consistent computation of gamma-ray spectra due to proton-proton interactions in black hole systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bhattacharyya; N. Bhatt; R. Misra

    2006-06-07

    In the inner regions of an accretion disk around a black hole, relativistic protons can interact with ambient matter to produce electrons, positrons and $\\gamma$-rays. The resultant steady state electron and positron particle distributions are self-consistently computed taking into account Coulomb and Compton cooling, $e^-e^+$ pair production (due to $\\gamma-\\gamma$ annihilation) and pair annihilation. While earlier works used the diffusion approximation to obtain the particle distributions, here we solve a more general integro-differential equation that correctly takes into account the large change in particle energy that occur when the leptons Compton scatter off hard X-rays. Thus this formalism can also be applied to the hard state of black hole systems, where the dominant ambient photons are hard X-rays. The corresponding photon energy spectrum is calculated and compared with broadband data of black hole binaries in different spectral states. The results indicate that the $\\gamma$-ray spectra ($E > 0.8$ MeV) of both the soft and hard spectral states and the entire hard X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of the ultra-soft state, could be due to $p-p$ interactions. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that there always exists in these systems a $\\gamma$-ray spectral component due to $p-p$ interactions which can contribute between 0.5 to 10% of the total bolometric luminosty. The model predicts that {\\it GLAST} would be able to detect black hole binaries and provide evidence for the presence of non-thermal protons which in turn would give insight into the energy dissipation process and jet formation in these systems.

  19. Component-based Car Detection in Street Scene Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Component-based Car Detection in Street Scene Images by Brian Leung Submitted to the Department by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;Component-based Car consider the task of building a component-based detector in a more difficult domain: cars in natural images

  20. Process for protecting bonded components from plating shorts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Bonde, Wayne L. (Pleasanton, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method which protects the region between a component and the substrate onto which the components is bonded using an electrically insulating fillet of photoresist. The fillet protects the regions from subsequent plating with metal and therefore shorting the plated conductors which run down the sides of the component and onto the substrate.

  1. A Component Selection Algorithm for HighPerformance Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    A Component Selection Algorithm for High­Performance Pipelines Smita Bakshi Daniel D. Gajski the critical paths. This report presents a cost­optimized algorithm for selecting components and pipelining Problem Statement and Definitions 9 5 Component Selection and Pipelining 10 5.1 An overview

  2. Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACS 2006 Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces Jonas Elmqvist compositional rules and derived safety interfaces for each component. The derivation of safety interfaces and the automatically generated interfaces. The component model uses reactive modules as the formal notation

  3. Building America Webinar: Standardized Retrofit Packages — What Works to Meet Consistent Levels of Performance?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will focus on specific Building America projects that have examined methods to consistently meet high levels of energy performance in existing homes, with a focus on retrofit packages that can be replicated across many homes.

  4. Near-infrared photodetector consisting of J-aggregating cyanine dye and metal oxide thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osedach, Timothy P.

    We demonstrate a near-infrared photodetector that consists of a thin film of the J-aggregating cyanine dye, U3, and transparent metal-oxide charge transport layers. The high absorption coefficient of the U3 film, combined ...

  5. Electron cyclotron microinstability in the foot of a perpendicular shock: A self-consistent PIC simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muschietti, L; Lembege, B

    2006-01-01

    shock: a self-consistent PIC simulation L. Muschietti a andand run particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of shocks withe?ectively two-dimensional. PIC simulations of perpendicular

  6. Multi-Graph Matching via Affinity Optimization with Graduated Consistency Regularization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Hongyuan

    infusing the consistency. We also propose two mechanisms to elicit the common inliers against outliers is applied to infus- ing multi-source sensor data [8]. Graphic analysis often requires to model objects

  7. Fully self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation using a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fully self-consistent solution of the Dyson equation using a plane-wave basis set This content will become publicly available on March 22, 2016 Prev Next Title: Fully...

  8. The consistency, the composition and the causality of the asynchronous flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serban E. Vlad

    2015-04-21

    Let $\\Phi:\\{0,1\\}^{n}\\longrightarrow\\{0,1\\}^{n}$. The asynchronous flows are (discrete time and real time) functions that result by iterating the coordinates $\\Phi_{i}$ independently on each other. The purpose of the paper is that of showing that the asynchronous flows fulfill the properties of consistency, composition and causality that define the dynamical systems. The origin of the problem consists in modelling the asynchronous circuits from the digital electrical engineering.

  9. Design consistency and driver error as reflected by driver workload and accident rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Mark Douglas

    1992-01-01

    DESIGN CONSISTENCY AND DRIVER ERROR AS REFLECTED BY DRIVER WORKLOAD AND ACCIDENT RATES A Thesis by MARK DOUGLAS WOOLDRIDGE Approved as to style and content by: Daniel B. Fambro (Chair of Committee) Raymond A. Krammes (Member) Olga J.... Pendleton (Member) James T. P. Yao (Head of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Design Consistency and Driver Error as Reflected by Driver Workload and Accident Rates (May 1992) Mark Douglas Wooldridge, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory...

  10. Linear Consistency Testing Yonatan Aumann , Johan Hastad , Michael O. Rabin , and Madhu Sudan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudan, Madhu

    and Rubinfeld [8] to check the linear- consistency of three functions f1, f2, f3 mapping a finite Abelian group G to an Abelian group H: Pick x, y G uniformly and independently at random and check if f1(x) + f2 the consistency of multiple func- tions. Given a triple of functions f1, f2, f3 : G H, we say

  11. Tensor force effects and high-momentum components in the nuclear symmetry energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arianna Carbone; Artur Polls; Constança Providência; Arnau Rios; Isaac Vidaña

    2013-09-10

    We analyze microscopic many-body calculations of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. The calculations are performed in the framework of the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock and the Self-Consistent Green's Functions methods. Within Brueckner-Hartree-Fock, the Hellmann-Feynman theorem gives access to the kinetic energy contribution as well as the contributions of the different components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The tensor component gives the largest contribution to the symmetry energy. The decomposition of the symmetry energy in a kinetic part and a potential energy part provides physical insight on the correlated nature of the system, indicating that neutron matter is less correlated than symmetric nuclear matter. Within the Self-Consistent Green's Function approach, we compute the momentum distributions and we identify the effects of the high momentum components in the symmetry energy. The results are obtained for the realistic interaction Argonne V18 potential, supplemented by the Urbana IX three-body force in the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations.

  12. Common independent components of the P3b, N400, and P600 ERP components to deviant linguistic events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppe, David Martin

    2007-01-01

    A componential analysis of the ERP elicited by novel eventsL. (1993). The reliability of ERP components in the auditoryPrincipal components analysis of ERP data. In T. C. Handy (

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Can Be Used Safely to Boost Residual Disease in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddock, Jonathan; Arnold, Susanne M.; Department of Medical Oncology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky ; Shelton, Brent J.; Sinha, Partha; Conrad, Gary; Chen, Li; Rinehart, John; McGarry, Ronald C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a prospective, single-institution study evaluating the feasibility of conventional chemoradiation (CRT) followed by stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as a means of dose escalation for patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with residual disease. Methods and Materials: Patients without metastatic disease and with radiologic evidence of limited residual disease (?5 cm) within the site of the primary tumor and good or complete nodal responses after standard CRT to a target dose of 60 Gy were considered eligible. The SBRT boost was done to achieve a total combined dose biological equivalent dose >100 Gy to the residual primary tumor, consisting of 10 Gy × 2 fractions (20 Gy total) for peripheral tumors, and 6.5 Gy × 3 fractions (19.5 Gy total) for medial tumors using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0813 definitions. The primary endpoint was the development of grade ?3 radiation pneumonitis (RP). Results: After a median follow-up of 13 months, 4 patients developed acute grade 3 RP, and 1 (2.9%) developed late and persistent grade 3 RP. No patients developed grade 4 or 5 RP. Mean lung dose, V2.5, V5, V10, and V20 values were calculated for the SBRT boost, and none were found to significantly predict for RP. Only advancing age (P=.0147), previous smoking status (P=.0505), and high CRT mean lung dose (P=.0295) were significantly associated with RP development. At the time of analysis, the actuarial local control rate at the primary tumor site was 82.9%, with only 6 patients demonstrating recurrence. Conclusions: Linear accelerator-based SBRT for dose escalation of limited residual NSCLC after definitive CRT was feasible and did not increase the risk for toxicity above that for standard radiation therapy.

  14. Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing ash residue with a Stir Melter System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.C.; Kormanyos, K.R.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1996-10-01

    A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter{trademark} System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats residue stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{Sigma}Alkali/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt% of ash, the ash was modified to contain {approximately} 5 wt% CeO{sub 2} to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt% water to 40 wt% solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1,050 C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables` settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run.

  15. Red Noise in Anomalous X-ray Pulsar Timing Residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M. Archibald; Rim Dib; Margaret A. Livingstone; Victoria M. Kaspi

    2007-12-20

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs), thought to be magnetars, exhibit poorly understood deviations from a simple spin-down called "timing noise". AXP timing noise has strong low-frequency components which pose significant challenges for quantification. We describe a procedure for extracting two quantities of interest, the intensity and power spectral index of timing noise. We apply this procedure to timing data from three sources: a monitoring campaign of five AXPs, observations of five young pulsars, and the stable rotator PSR B1937+21.

  16. Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radenski, Atanas

    Page 1: Atanas Radenski: Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Anomaly-Free Component Adaptation with Class Overriding Atanas Radenski Chapman University Department of Computer Science://www.chapman.edu/~radenski/ Abstract Software components can be implemented and distributed as collections of classes, then adapted

  17. Microstructure and residual stress evaluation of ductile cast iron using the critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave propagation technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Robert Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Residual stress and microstructure evaluation of ductile cast iron using a nondestructive method (Critically Refracted Longitudinal Ultrasonic Wave Technique) was approached. Residual stresses, both good and bad graphite nodules, and different...

  18. Proven concepts for LLW-treatment of large components for free release and recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lena; Lindstrom, Anders; Lindberg, Maria; Wirendal, Bo; Lorenzen, Joachim [Studsvik RadWaste AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes Studsvik's technical concept of LLW-treatment of large, retired components from nuclear installations in operation or in decommissioning. Many turbines, heat exchangers and other LLW components have been treated in Studsvik during the last 20 years. This also includes development of techniques and tools, especially our latest experience gained under the pilot project for treatment of one full size PWR steam generator from Ringhals NPP, Sweden. The ambition of this pilot project was to minimize the waste volumes for disposal and to maximize the material recycling. Another objective, respecting ALARA, was the successful minimization of the dose exposure to the personnel. The treatment concept for large, retired components comprises the whole sequence of preparations from road and sea transports and the management of the metallic LLW by segmentation, decontamination and sorting using specially devised tools and shielded treatment cell, to the decision criteria for recycling of the metals, radiological analyses and conditioning of the residual waste into the final packages suitable for customer-related disposal. For e.g. turbine rotors with their huge number of blades the crucial moments are segmentation techniques, thus cold segmentation is a preferred method to keep focus on minimization of volumes for secondary waste. Also a variety of decontamination techniques using blasting cabinet or blasting tumbling machines keeps secondary waste production to a minimum. The technical challenge of the treatment of more complicated components like steam generators also begins with the segmentation. A first step is the separation of the steam dome in order to dock the rest of the steam generator to a specially built treatment cell. Thereafter, the decontamination of the tube bundle is performed using a remotely controlled manipulator. After decontamination is concluded the cutting of the tubes as well as of the shell is performed in the same cell with remotely controlled tools. Some of the sections of steam dome shell or turbine shafts can be cleared directly for unconditional reuse without melting after decontamination and sampling program. Experience shows that the amount of material possible for clearance for unconditional use is between 95 - 97 % for conventional metallic scrap. For components like turbines, heat exchangers or steam generators the recycling ratio can vary to about 80 - 85% of the initial weight. (authors)

  19. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  20. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  1. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  2. Technical Program Maintaining Consistent Conditions over a Wide Range of Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    of Material Deposition Rates in Beam-Based Additive Manufacturing: Jack Beuth1; Shane Esola1; Raymond Walker2 consideration for additive manufacturing and repair applications in the aerospace industry. To be successful Effect of Process Parameters on Electron Beam Melted (EBM) Additively Manufactured Components in Ti-6Al-4

  3. A Case Study of Sedimentation of Charged Colloids: The Primitive Model and the Effective One-Component Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldemar Torres; Alejandro Cuetos; Marjolein Dijkstra; Rene van Roij

    2007-02-20

    Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium density profiles of suspensions of charge-stabilized colloids are calculated theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation, both for a one-component model of colloidal particles interacting through pairwise screened-Coulomb repulsions and for a three-component model of colloids, cations, and anions with unscreened-Coulomb interactions. We focus on a state point for which experimental measurements are available [C.P. Royall et al., J. Phys.: Cond. Matt. {\\bf 17}, 2315 (2005)]. Despite the apparently different picture that emerges from the one- and three-component model (repelling colloids pushing each other to high altitude in the former, versus a self-generated electric field that pushes the colloids up in the latter), we find similar colloidal density profiles for both models from theory as well as simulation, thereby suggesting that these pictures represent different view points of the same phenomenon. The sedimentation profiles obtained from an effective one-component model by MC simulations and theory, together with MC simulations of the multi-component primitive model are consistent among themselves, but differ quantitatively from the results of a theoretical multi-component description at the Poisson-Boltzmann level. We find that for small and moderate colloid charge the Poisson-Boltzmann theory gives profiles in excellent agreement with the effective one-component theory if a smaller effective charge is used. We attribute this discrepancy to the poor treatment of correlations in the Poisson-Boltzmann theory.

  4. Community-wide benefits of targeted indoor residual spray for malaria control in the Western Kenya Highland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Minakawa, Noboru; Yan, Guiyun

    2010-01-01

    ecological settings [4]. Among those control measures, insecticide- treated bed nets (ITNs) and indoor residual-house

  5. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Alessandro; Passarini, Fabrizio; Vassura, Ivano; Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  6. Proposed plant will turn wood residues into synfuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    A group of entrepreneurs plan to have a plant operating in Burney, CA. The projected facility will produce an estimated 21,000 gallons of oil per day, converting about 300 tons of raw material. Converting cellulose into synthetic fuel is superior to alcohol production. The process yields approximately 84 gallons of synthetic fuel per ton of raw material. The entire LHG (liquid hydrogen gas) patented facility is self-sufficient and releases only carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Synfuel production is a three-phase process. First, butyl alcohol (butanol) and acetone are produced from a portion of the raw material. This is facilitated by adding to the raw material a bacteria culture. The planned facility in Burney will have thirty-five 2100 gallon fermentation tanks and will produce 1.25 million gallons of butanol. Next, organic material is blended with water and is pumped into patented LHG catalytic converters, charged with carbon monoxide gas as a catalyst and then heated to 350 degrees C at 2000 to 5000 psi. Here, the organic material is converted to No. 4 oil with bituminous tar as a residue. A patented gasifier system produces the carbon monoxide catalyst plus COH (carbon hydroxide) gas. The COH is used to power a gas turbine driving a 100 kW generator and a central hydraulic pump. The facility, which will be energy self-sufficient, will have approximately 50 kW of excess power to sell to the local utility power grid. Finally, the No. 4 oil, butanol and liquified COH gas are blended to produce any grade fuel oil or a gasoline substitute of very high octane.

  7. A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2011-01-15

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  8. Self-consistent treatment of the self-energy in nuclear matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kh. Gad; E. M. Darwish

    2003-10-30

    The influence of hole-hole propagation in addition to the conventional particle-particle propagation, on the energy per nucleon and the momentum distribution is investigated. The results are compared to the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) calculations with a continuous choice and conventional choice for the single-particle spectrum. The Bethe-Goldstone equation has been solved using realistic $NN$ interactions. Also, the structure of nucleon self-energy in nuclear matter is evaluated. All the self-energies are calculated self-consistently. Starting from the BHF approximation without the usual angle-average approximation, the effects of hole-hole contributions and a self-consistent treatment within the framework of the Green function approach are investigated. Using the self-consistent self-energy, the hole and particle self-consistent spectral functions including the particle-particle and hole-hole ladder contributions in nuclear matter are calculated using realistic $NN$ interactions. We found that, the difference in binding energy between both results, i.e. BHF and self-consistent Green function, is not large. This explains why is the BHF ignored the 2h1p contribution.

  9. Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UK energy-from-waste facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Ian

    Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UKE) Air pollution control residue (APC) Waste characterisation a b s t r a c t Air pollution control (APC://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/). 1. Introduction 1.1. Background Air pollution control (APC) residues from energy

  10. Evaluation of low-residue soldering for military and commercial applications: A report from the Low-Residue Soldering Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iman, R.L.; Anderson, D.J.; Burress, R.V.

    1995-06-01

    The LRSTF combined the efforts of industry, military, and government to evaluate low-residue soldering processes for military and commercial applications. These processes were selected for evaluation because they provide a means for the military to support the presidential mandate while producing reliable hardware at a lower cost. This report presents the complete details and results of a testing program conducted by the LRSTF to evaluate low-residue soldering for printed wiring assemblies. A previous informal document provided details of the test plan used in this evaluation. Many of the details of that test plan are contained in this report. The test data are too massive to include in this report, however, these data are available on disk as Excel spreadsheets upon request. The main purpose of low-residue soldering is to eliminate waste streams during the manufacturing process.

  11. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

  12. On testing and extending the inflationary consistency relation for tensor modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham Boyle; Kendrick M. Smith; Cora Dvorkin; Neil Turok

    2015-08-05

    If observations confirm BICEP2's claim of a tensor-scalar ratio $r\\approx 0.2$ on CMB scales, then the inflationary consistency relation $n_{t}=-r/8$ predicts a small negative value for the tensor spectral index $n_t$. We show that future CMB polarization experiments should be able to confirm this prediction at several sigma. We also show how to properly extend the consistency relation to solar system scales, where the primordial gravitational wave density $\\Omega_{gw}$ could be measured by proposed experiments such as the Big Bang Observer. This would provide a far more stringent test of the consistency relation and access much more detailed information about the early universe.

  13. Statistical dynamics of classical systems: A self-consistent field approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzetic, Douglas J. Wickham, Robert A.; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-06-28

    We develop a self-consistent field theory for particle dynamics by extremizing the functional integral representation of a microscopic Langevin equation with respect to the collective fields. Although our approach is general, here we formulate it in the context of polymer dynamics to highlight satisfying formal analogies with equilibrium self-consistent field theory. An exact treatment of the dynamics of a single chain in a mean force field emerges naturally via a functional Smoluchowski equation, while the time-dependent monomer density and mean force field are determined self-consistently. As a simple initial demonstration of the theory, leaving an application to polymer dynamics for future work, we examine the dynamics of trapped interacting Brownian particles. For binary particle mixtures, we observe the kinetics of phase separation.

  14. Lightweight combustion residues-based structural materials for use in mines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Zhang, Y.; Ghosh, A.K.; Palmer, S.R. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The overall goal of the project is to develop a 70--80 pcf, 2,500--3,000 psi-compressive-strength cellular concrete-type product from PCC fly ash, PCC bottom ash, and/or FBC spent bed ash alone or in suitable combination thereof. The developed combustion residue-based lightweight structural material will be used to replace wooden posts and crib members in underground mines. This report outlines the work completed in the first quarter of the project. The density gradient centrifuge (DGC) has been used to separate a power plant fly ash sample into fractions of different density. Each of the fly ash fractions obtained by DGC, an aliquot of the unseparated fly ash and an aliquot of a magnetic component of the fly ash, were digested in strong acids following the procedures outlined in ASTM 3050. Preliminary experiments have also been carried out to study the effect of mix proportions and curing regimes on the strength and density on the developed material. The DGC separation test reveals that most of the fly ash sample (approx. 90%) has a density above 1.9 g/cm{sup 3}. Indeed, nearly half of the sample has a density greater than 2.4 g/cm{sup 3}. Since only a very small amount of this fly ash has a reasonably low specific gravity, it appears unlikely at this time that enough low density material would be isolated to significantly enhance lightweight concrete production using fractionated material. A series of mixes have been made using fly ash, sodium silicate, cement, sand and water. Preliminary tests show that both cement and sodium silicate can be used as the binders to develop residues-based lightweight concrete. To date, compressive strength as high as 1,290 psi have been achieved with a density of 133 pcf, with 50 g of cement, 50 g of fly ash and 300 g of sand. Most of the work during the first quarter was done to understand the characteristics of the component materials.

  15. Self-Consistent RPA based on a Many-Body Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Jemai; Peter Schuck

    2010-11-23

    Self-Consistent RPA is extended in a way so that it is compatable with a variational ansatz for the ground state wave function as a fermionic many-body vacuum. Employing the usual equation of motion technique, we arrive at extended RPA equations of the Self Consistent RPA structure. In principle the Pauli principle is, therefore, fully respected. However, the correlation functions entering the RPA matrix can only be obtained from a systematic expansion in powers of some combinations of RPA amplitudes. We demonstrate for a model case that this expansion may converge rapidly.

  16. SM vacuum stability and the Weyl consistency conditions: Counting to three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krog, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how a new perturbative ordering may result from the structure of the Weyl anomaly. Respecting the abelian nature of the Weyl anomaly at the lowest order enforces the use of beta functions calculated to a different loop order for different types of couplings. These consistency conditions are found to be satisfied by the renormalization group equations of the standard model, and we perform an analysis of the vacuum stability of the Higgs potential respecting the consistency conditions and compare to the previous results. Hints toward unknown structure in the standard model renormalization group equations are found, although the vacuum stability results are in agreement with previous estimates.

  17. Temperature Fluctuation and an Expected Limit of Hubble Parameter in the Self-Consistent Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Morcos

    2004-12-08

    The temperature gradient of microwave background radiation (CMBR) is calculated in the Self Consistent Model. An expected values for Hubble parameter have been presented in two different cases. In the first case the temperature is treated as a function of time only, while in the other one the temperature depends on relaxation of isotropy condition in the self-consistent model and the assumption that the universe expands adiabatically. The COBE's or WMAP's fluctuations in temperature of CMBR may be used to predict a value for Hubble parameter.

  18. Consistent de Sitter String Vacua from Kahler Stabilization and D-term uplifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susha L. Parameswaran; Alexander Westphal

    2007-01-23

    In this note, we review our construction of de Sitter vacua in type IIB flux compactifications, in which moduli stabilization and D-term uplifting can be combined consistently with the supergravity constraints. Here, the closed string fluxes fix the dilaton and the complex structure moduli while perturbative quantum corrections to the K\\"ahler potential stabilize the volume Kahler modulus in an AdS_4-vacuum. Then, magnetized D7-branes provide consistent supersymmetric D-term uplifting towards dS_4. Based on hep-th/0602253.

  19. Self-consistent Green's functions calculation of the nucleon mean-free path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rios; V. Soma

    2011-12-22

    The extension of Green's functions techniques to the complex energy plane provides access to fully dressed quasi-particle properties from a microscopic perspective. Using self-consistent ladder self-energies, we find both spectra and lifetimes of such quasi-particles in nuclear matter. With a consistent choice of the group velocity, the nucleon mean-free path can be computed. Our results indicate that, for energies above 50 MeV at densities close to saturation, a nucleon has a mean-free path of 4 to 5 femtometers.

  20. A field demonstration project utilizing FBC/PCC residues for paving materials. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghafoori, N. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Mechanics

    1994-12-31

    Research has been undertaken into engineering properties of roller compacted concretes containing fluidized bed combustion/pulverized coal combustion (FBC/PCC) by-products as well as FBC/PCC-Portland Cement concrete mixtures prepared using conventional placement technique. This laboratory effort has resulted in identification of a number of potentially viable commercial applications for the FBC by-products residues derived from Illinois high-sulfur coal. One potential and promising application of the FBC/PCC solid waste residues, which also accounts for the large utilization of coal-based by-product materials, is in pavement construction. The proposal presented herein is intended to embark into a new endeavor in order to bring the commercialization aspect of the initial laboratory project a step closer to reality by conducting a field demonstration of the optimized mixtures identified during the two-year laboratory investigation. A total of twenty-three different pavement slabs will be constructed at an identified site located in the Illinois Coal Development Park, Carterville, Illinois, by two construction contractors who are part of the industrial participants of the initial project and have expressed interest in the construction of experimental slabs. Both conventional and roller compacted concrete placement techniques will be utilized. All sections will be subjected to an extensive engineering evaluation and will be monitored for nearly a year for both short and long-term performance. The field results will be compared to that of the equivalent laboratory-prepared mixes in order to ascertain the suitability, of the proposed mixes for field application. During this reporting period, the physico-chemical and preconditioning characteristics of the raw materials were evaluated. Construction of the experimental road consisting of twenty-three surface and base course slab sections was also completed.

  1. Ultrasonic measurement of the residual stresses in patch welded steel plates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junghans, Paul Gerard

    1994-01-01

    This study begins with a review of the nature and origins of residual stresses and the techniques currently used to measure these stresses, both destructive and nondestructive. The theory of ultrasonic stress measurement, ...

  2. Evaluation of Postpartum Reproductive Performance in Brahman Females with Divergent Residual Feed Intake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovey, Anna Kathryn

    2011-10-21

    These studies were designed to evaluate the relationships that exist between residual feed intake, parity, rate of return to estrous cyclicity and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations, as well as changes in ...

  3. Insulin Sensitivity in Tropically Adapted Cattle With Divergent Residual Feed Intake 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Gentrie

    2012-10-19

    Residual feed intake (RFI) is one method to identify feed efficient animals; however, this method is costly and time consuming therefore, identifying an indirect measure of RFI is important. Evaluating the glucoregulatory ...

  4. Ultrasonic measurement of residual stress relaxation in welded steel plates using critically refracted longitudinal waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Brent Houston

    2000-01-01

    This study investigates whether or not there is a measurable amount of residual transverse stress relaxation in welded steel. This was determined by using two different methods of stress measurement. These methods involved ...

  5. Disposal of tritium residues at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Audit repost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this audit was to determine whether Los Alamos disposed of wastewater containing tritium residues in a safe and cost-effective manner subsequent to an October 1991 report reviewing tritium facility management practices.

  6. Variation in energy expenditures between growing steers with divergent residual feed intakes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Monte Blaine III

    2006-04-12

    Objectives of this study were to determine if variation in energy expenditures contributed to differences in feed efficiency between low and high RFI steers. Nine steers with the lowest and highest residual feed intakes (RFI) were selected from 169...

  7. Sources of biological variation in residual feed intake in growing and finishing steers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Erin Gwen

    2006-04-12

    Objectives of this research were to characterize residual feed intake (RFI) in growing and finishing steers and examine phenotypic correlations between performance, feed efficiency, carcass, digestib ility, and physiological indicator traits...

  8. Roles of key active-site residues in flavocytochrome P450 BM3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael A.; Miles, Caroline S.; Chapman, Stephen K.; Lysek, Dominikus A.; MacKay, Angela C.; Reid, Graeme A.; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Munro, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of mutation of key active-site residues (Arg-47, Tyr-51, Phe-42 and Phe-87) in Bacillus megaterium flavocytochrome P450 BM3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on the oxidation of laurate and arachidonate showed ...

  9. Polymorphisms at amino acid residues 141 and 154 influence conformational variation in ovine PrP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Sujeong; Thackray, Alana M.; Hopkins, Lee; Monie, Tom P.; Burke, David F.; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2014-07-14

    transmissible between sheep, whereas this may not be the case with atypical scrapie. Critical amino acid residues will determine the range or stability of structural changes within the ovine prion protein or its functional interaction with potential cofactors...

  10. Protein fold recognition by alignment of amino acid residues using kernelized dynamic time warping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protein fold recognition by alignment of amino acid residues using kernelized dynamic time warping distances between proteins. This method shows significant improvement in protein fold recognition. Overall March 2014 Keywords: Protein sequence Fold recognition Alignment method Feature extraction

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Residual Stress of Bimetallic Joints and Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about residual stress...

  12. Characterization of residual stress relaxation in welded steel plate using TAP-NDE and wavelets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhun, Choon-Sik

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents the characterization of residual stress relaxation in a welded ASTM 1018 steel plate by using the Thermo-Acousto-Photonic Nondestructive Evaluation (TAP-NDE) technique and the Gabor Wavelet Transform (GWT) which together produce...

  13. The influence of calcium on the inhibition of arsenic desorption from treatment residuals in extreme environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, Julianna G.

    2006-04-12

    the surface properties of the oxy-hydroxide solid in solution. Results show that calcium enhances the removal by iron oxides and prevents the leaching of arsenic from the residuals. Isotherm experiments show that arsenic adsorption can be described...

  14. Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) ) Measuring the Residual Ferrite Content of Rapidly Solidified Stainless Steel Alloys. Electron beam welds, laser beam welds and rapidly solidified stainless steel alloys have small physical Fe content by measur- ing the magnetic properties of fully ferritic stainless steel specimens

  15. Determination of nonuniform residual stress using the ring-core method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajovalasit, A.; Petrucci, G.; Zuccarello, B.

    1996-04-01

    This paper considers residual stress analysis using the ring-core method. In particular, the so-called integral equation method is applied to evaluate nonuniform residual stress fields. The proposed method overcomes typical drawbacks of the incremental strain method which lead to incorrect results for strongly varying stress fields. The experimental results obtained with a specimen subjected to a bending load confirm the theoretical predictions.

  16. Evaluation of Residual Stress Levels in Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings using a Curvature Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, J.; Gu, T.; Clyne, T. W.

    2014-11-09

    of the residual substrate was obtained, via SEM microscopy of polished cross-sections. 2.3. Curvature measurement Residual stress in coatings formed on such thin strips will tend to give rise to curvature, which can be measured in order to obtain information about... plasma channels through to the substrate, combination of themetalwith oxygen in the vapour phase and melting of surrounding regions, followed by rapid condensation and solidification, and the creation of porosity and micro-cracks. Furthermore, even...

  17. Sand pack residual oil saturations as affected by extraction with various solvents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Clarence

    1958-01-01

    LIBRARY S 4 M COLLEGE OF TEXAS SAND PACK RESIDUAL OIL SATURATIONS AS AFFECTED BY EXTRACTION WITH VARIOUS SOLVENTS A Thesis CLARENCE MURRAY, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of The Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, I958 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SAND PACK RESIDUAL OIL SAT URATIONS AS AFFECTED BY EXTRACTION WITH VARIOUS SOLVENTS A Thesis By CLARENCE MURRAY, JR. Approved...

  18. Deformations associated with relaxation of residual stresses in the Barre Granite of Vermont 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Thomas Chester

    1972-01-01

    DEFORMATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAXATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE BARRE GRANITE OF VERMONT A Thesis by THOMAS CHESTER NICHOLS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AfM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER QF SCIENCE May, 1972 Major Subject: Geology DEFORMATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAXATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN THE BARRE GRANITE OF VERMONT A Thesis THOMAS CHESTER NICHOLS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: airman o Committee...

  19. Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Brian Douglas

    1980-01-01

    RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

  20. Removal of aqueous rinsable flux residues in a batch spray dishwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slanina, J.T.

    1992-02-01

    An alkaline detergent solution used in an industrial dishwasher was evaluated to remove aqueous rinsable flux residues on printed wiring boards (PWBs) after hot air solder leveling and hot oil solder dip and leveling. The dishwasher, a batch cleaning process, was compared to an existing conveyorized aqueous cleaning process. The aqueous soluble flux residues from both soldering processes were removed with a solution of a mild alkaline detergent dissolved in hot deionized (DI) water.