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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

A manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. 36 refs., 16 figs, 22 tabs.

Gilbert, T.L.; Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Jusko, M.J.; Wallo, A. III

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

3

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program and Remote Surplus Facilities Management Program Sites (Revision 2, March 1987) More Documents & Publications

4

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GUIDELINES FOR RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL AT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GUIDELINES FOR RESIDUAL RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL AT FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM AHD REMOTE SURPLUS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM SITES (Revision 2, March 1987) A. INTRODUCTION This document presents U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radiological protection guidelines for cleanup of residual radioactive material and management of the resulting wastes and residues. It is applicable to si~es - "C-- identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites l{emedia1 Ac:tionProgram (FUSRAP) .and remote sites identified by the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP).* The topics covered are basic dose limits, guidelines and authorized limits for allowable levels of residual radioactive material, and requirements for

5

Radiological surveys of properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines methods for determining the extent and nature of contamination on properties contaminated by residual radioactive materials from uranium processing sites. Methods are also examined for verifying the success of remedial actions in removing the residual radioactive materials. Using literature review and practical experiences from the Edgemont, South Dakota survey program a critical review is made of sampling programs, instrumentation, analytical procedures, data reporting format, and statistical analyses of data. Protocols are recommended for measuring indoor and outdoor gamma-ray exposure rates, surface and subsurface Radium-226 concentrations in soil, and radon daughter concentrations.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines using RESRAD, Version 5.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual presents information for implementing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines for residual radioactive material. It describes the analysis and models used to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil and the design and use of the RESRAD computer code for calculating doses, risks, and guideline values. It also describes procedures for implementing DOE policy for reducing residual radioactivity to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable. Two new pathways, radon inhalation and soil ingestion, have been added to RESRAD. Twenty-seven new radionuclides have also been added, and the cutoff half-life for associated radionuclides has been reduced to six months. Other major improvements to the RESRAD code include the ability to run sensitivity analyses, the addition of graphical output, user-specified dose factors, updated databases, an improved groundwater transport model, optional input of a groundwater concentration and a solubility constant, special models for tritium and carbon-14, calculation of cancer incidence risk, and the use of a mouse with menus.

Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.; Cheng, J.J. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the New Brunswick Site, Middlesex County, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the New Brunswick Site, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides of concern and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the New Brunswick Site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. The guidelines derived in this report are intended to apply to the remediation of these remaining residual radioactive materials at the site. The primary radionuclides of concern in these remaining materials are expected to be radium-226 and, to a lesser extent, natural uranium and thorium. The DOE has established generic cleanup guidelines for radium and thorium in soil; however, cleanup guidelines for other radionuclides must be derived on a site-specific basis.

Dunning, D.; Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the former Baker Brothers, Inc., Site, Toledo, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the former Baker Brothers, Inc., site in Toledo, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that following remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three scenarios were considered; each assumed that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site would be used without radiological restrictions. The three scenarios varied with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food and water consumed. The evaluation indicates that the dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of total combined uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the former Baker Brothers site did not exceed 710 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker, current use) or 210 pCi/g for Scenario B (resident - municipal water supply, a likely future use). The dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded at the site if the total uranium concentration of the soil did not exceed 500 pCi/g for Scenario C (subsistence farmer - on-site well water, a plausible but unlikely future use).

Nimmagadda, M.; Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site in Fairfield, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that, after remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed (1) 30 mrem/yr for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or (2) 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation.

Faillace, E.R.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

12

Radiological dose assessment for residual radioactive material in soil at the clean slate sites 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

A radiological dose assessment has been performed for Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 at the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The assessment demonstrated that the calculated dose to hypothetical individuals who may reside or work on the Clean Slate sites, subsequent to remediation, does not exceed the limits established by the US Department of Energy for protection of members of the public and the environment. The sites became contaminated as a result of Project Roller Coaster experiments conducted in 1963 in support of the US Atomic Energy Commission (Shreve, 1964). Remediation of Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 is being performed to ensure that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works on a Clean Slate site should not exceed 100 millirems per year. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline (RESRAD) computer code was used to assess the dose. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines (Yu et al., 1993a). In May and June of 1963, experiments were conducted at Clean Slate Sites 1, 2, and 3 to study the effectiveness of earth-covered structures for reducing the dispersion of nuclear weapons material as a result of nonnuclear explosions. The experiments required the detonation of various simulated weapons using conventional chemical explosives (Shreve, 1964). The residual radioactive contamination in the surface soil consists of weapons grade plutonium, depleted uranium, and their radioactive decay products.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material and disposed in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload package concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and a sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path.

Fields, Stanley R. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

16

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Storage depot for radioactive material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Storage depot for radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, M.J.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...

23

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

25

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Radioactive Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials Radioactive Materials Refer to transportation guidelines in the applicable Radioactive Work Authorization (RWA). Contact the Radiation Protection Group (x7652) if transportation assistance is needed or if radioactive materials need to be shipped. Refer to RPG's Zone sheet to identifying the RCT or HP for your building: https://ehswprod.lbl.gov/rpg/who_to_call.shtml Need radioactive material shipped from LBNL? Please complete the request for shipment form online, print, sign, and forward to your building assigned RPG support person: RPG Transportation - Request for Shipment Form: http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/rpg/assets/docs/Transportation4.pdf Receiving radioactive material at LBNL? If receiving radioactive material at LBNL; radioactive material should be sent to the following address:

26

Diverter assembly for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diverter assembly for diverting a pneumatically conveyed holder for a radioactive material between a central conveying tube and one of a plurality of radially offset conveying tubes includes an airtight container. A diverter tube having an offset end is suitably mounted in the container for rotation. A rotary seal seals one end of the diverter tube during and after rotation of the diverter tube while a spring biased seal seals the other end of the diverter tube which moves between various offset conveying tubes. An indexing device rotatably indexes the diverter tube and this indexing device is driven by a suitable drive. The indexing mechanism is preferably a geneva-type mechanism to provide a locking of the diverter tube in place. 3 figs.

Andrews, K.M.; Starenchak, R.W.

1988-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radioactive material are determined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Transportation (DOT), Department of Energy (DOE), and U.S. Postal...

28

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

29

Radiation Sources and Radioactive Materials (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations apply to persons who receive, transfer, possess, manufacture, use, store, handle, transport or dispose of radioactive materials and/or sources of ionizing radiation. Some...

30

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 0510 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q...

31

Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials Decontamination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for performing decontamination of individuals who have entered a “hot zone” during transportation incidents involving  radioactive.

32

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? SAFE are radioactive material transportations packages? RAM PACKAGES TESTING & CERTIFICATION REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SITE MAP This graphic was generated from a computer analysis and shows the results from a regulatory puncture test of a stainless steel packaging dropping 40 inches (10 MPH) onto a 6 inch diameter steel spike. U.S. DOE | Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Sandia National Laboratories | Nuclear Energy & Fuel Cucle Programs © Sandia Corporation | Site Contact | Sandia Site Map | Privacy and Security An internationally recognized web-site from PATRAM 2001 - the 13th International Symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. Recipient of the AOKI AWARD. PATRAM, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency brings government and industry leaders together to share information on innovations, developments, and lessons learned about radioactive materials packaging and transportation.

33

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive materials are carried by road, rail, water, and air. There are strict regulations that originate from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which cover the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. Road Rail Water Air [Road transport] Click to view picture [Rail transport] Click to view picture [Sea transport] Click to view picture [Air transport] Click to view picture 1998 DOE Radioactive Shipments in the United States Out of the 3 million hazardous material shipments are made each year, DOE accounts for less than 1% of all radioactive materials shipments and 75% of the total curies shipped in the United States Ship 0 Train 308

34

Using Neutrons to Study Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research ... to the unique infrastructure and specialized staff of the Nuclear Laboratory. Shielded cells enable neutron diffraction studies on highly radioactive ...

35

Radioactive materials shipping cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprising (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, Mark S. (Irwin, PA); Davis, James H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS Using Radioactive Samples / Materials at the APS The use of radioactive samples requires additional information for review and approval. All proposed experiments involving radioactive samples will be reviewed by the APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC). The review will be on a graded basis. Hence, the experimenters are strongly advised to send in the experiment proposal in detail at least 2 months before the expected scheduled date of the experiment. Previously approved containment, isotopes and weights can be submitted as late as 2 weeks in advance. If your ESAF was submitted less than seven (7) days in advance of its scheduled start date you may be delayed to allow time for a safety review. The following guidelines are to be followed for all experiments with

37

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? What are the requirements? Safety Record Radioactive material has been shipped in the U. S. for more than 50 years with no occurrences of death or serious injury from exposure of the contents of these shipments. Hazardous Material Shipments for 1 Year Internationally 300 million United States 3 million DOE <1% or 5,000 (out of 3 million) [U.S. DOE NTP, 1999, Transporting Radioactive Materials] All radioactive shipments are regulated by the Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Since transport accidents cannot be prevented, the regulations are primarily designed to: Insure safety in routine handling situations for minimally hazardous material Insure integrity under all circumstances for highly dangerous materials

38

Radioactivity Standard Reference Material Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Summary: The Standard Reference Materials Program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides science, industry, and ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

39

ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are the requirements? Safety Record The Agencies that Generate Rules that Promulgate the Transport of Radioactive Materials: Regulations to control the transport of radioactive material were initiated about 1935 by the Postal Service. Over the years, the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC) became involved and in 1948 promulgated regulations as Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In 1966, DOT received hazardous materials regulatory authority that had been exercised by the ICC, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and United States Costal Guard (USCG). Currently, five groups generate rules governing the transport of radioactive material -- the DOT, NRC, USPS, DOE, and various State agencies. Among these, DOT and NRC are the primary agencies issuing regulations based on the model regulations developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

42

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Activity Specific Activity Low Specific Activity (LSA) material means Class 7 (radioactive) material with limited specific activity which satisfies the descriptions and limits set forth below. Shielding materials surrounding the LSA material may not be considered in determining the estimated average specific activity of the package contents. LSA material must be in one of three groups: LSA-I (i) Ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides (e.g., uranium, thorium) and uranium or thorium concentrates of such ores; or (ii) Solid unirradiated natural uranium or depleted uranium or natural thorium or their solid or liquid compounds or mixtures; or (iii) Class 7 (radioactive) material, other than fissile material, for which the A2 value is unlimited; or

43

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Agencies U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT), U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Postal Services (USPS) U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Conference of State Legislatures - Environment, Energy and Transportation Program, Hazardous and Radioactive Materials International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10 - Energy Code of Federal Regulations: Title 10, PART 71 - Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49 - Transportation Code of Federal Regulations: Title 49, PART 173 - Shippers - General

44

DISCHARGE DEVICE FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described fur unloading bodies of fissionable material from a neutronic reactor. It is comprised essentially of a wheeled flat car having a receptacle therein containing a liquid coolant fur receiving and cooling the fuel elements as they are discharged from the reactor, and a reciprocating plunger fur supporting the fuel element during discharge thereof prior to its being dropped into the coolant. The flat car is adapted to travel along the face of the reactor adjacent the discharge ends of the coolant tubes.

Ohlinger, L.A.

1958-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

System for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for chemically digesting low level radioactive, solid waste material having a high through-put. The solid waste material is added to an annular vessel (10) substantially filled with concentrated sulfuric acid. Concentrated nitric acid or nitrogen dioxide is added to the sulfuric acid within the annular vessel while the sulfuric acid is reacting with the solid waste. The solid waste is mixed within the sulfuric acid so that the solid waste is substantilly fully immersed during the reaction. The off gas from the reaction and the products slurry residue is removed from the vessel during the reaction.

Cowan, Richard G. (Kennewick, WA); Blasewitz, Albert G. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Industry Survey of Radioactive Material Control Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workers and materials entering and exiting the radiation control areas (RCAs) of nuclear power plants are carefully monitored for radioactivity. This report documents a survey developed to evaluate the range of instrumentation and practices used by the industry for performing such measurements.

2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Packagings are used to safely transport radioactive materials across the United States in over 1.6 million shipments per year. [Weiner et. al., 1991, Risk Analysis, Vol. 11, No. 4, p. 663] Most shipments are destined for hospitals and medical facilities. Other destinations include industrial, research and manufacturing plants, nuclear power plants and national defense facilities. The last comprehensive survey showed that less than 1 percent of these shipments involve high-level radioactive material. [Javitz et. al., 1985, SAND84-7174, Tables 4 and 8] The types of materials transported include: Surface Contaminated Object (SCO) Low Specific Activity (LSA) materials, Low-Level Waste (LLW),

48

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emer Emer Emer Emer Emer Emergency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a T gency Response to a Transportation ransportation ransportation ransportation ransportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material Accident Involving Radioactive Material DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional

49

Radioactive Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex Material Use at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex The EMSL Radiochemistry Annex, located in the 3410 Material Science and Technology Building, is authorized to work with small to moderate amounts of radioactive material. In order to work within 3410 facility radiological limits, potential users must provide detailed information about the type and quantity of radioactive material, the form and packaging of the material and the type of work that will be performed at the EMSL Radiochemistry Annex. Radioactive material includes both purchased radioactive material and samples that contain concentrations of radioactive material in excess of normal background levels. Please realize that some samples that may not be considered to be radioactive material at your institution will be managed as radioactive material at

50

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMA 358, 05/10 FEMA 358, 05/10 Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

51

RadTrac: Portable and Compact Tracking Radioactive Materials  

Hot cell exits where radioactive materials are used, or at nonproliferation sites Defense companies and airport security equipment manufacturers

52

Corrosion resistant storage container for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion resistant long-term storage container for isolating high-level radioactive waste material in a repository is claimed. The container is formed of a plurality of sealed corrosion resistant canisters of different relative sizes, with the smaller canisters housed within the larger canisters, and with spacer means disposed between juxtaposed pairs of canisters to maintain a predetermined spacing between each of the canisters. The combination of the plural surfaces of the canisters and the associated spacer means is effective to make the container capable of resisting corrosion, and thereby of preventing waste material from leaking from the innermost canister into the ambient atmosphere.

Schweitzer, D.G.; Davis, M.S.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Recovery of recyclable materials from shredder residue  

SciTech Connect

Each year, about 11 million tons of metals (ferrous and nonferrous) are recovered in the US from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75% of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material or shredder residue, which amounts to about 3 million tons annually, is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This paper discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two-stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. Status of the technology is discussed and process economics reviewed.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Brockmeier, N.F.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources of Radiation Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Radiation is all around us, occurring naturally in the environment. We are always exposed to radiation from: radon in the air uranium, radium and thorium in the earth cosmic rays from outer space and the sun radioactive potassium in our food and water naturally occuring radioactive material within our own bodies. This is commonly called "naturally-occurring background radiation." TYPES OF IONIZING RADIATION Alpha Alpha particles can be shielded by a sheet of paper or by human skin. If alpha emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer. Beta Beta radiation can be stopped by a shield like aluminum foil or wood. If beta emitters are inhaled, ingested, or enter the body through a cut, they can cause cancer.

56

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council of State Governments Council of State Governments Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee May 15, 2012 Knoxville, Tennessee Revised Agenda 9 - 9:45 am Welcome, Introductions, and Committee Reports Report from co-chairs Tim Runyon (Illinois) Project update Lisa Janairo, CSG Midwest Work group reports Integrated Spent Fuel Management Work Group Teri Engelhart (Wisconsin) NTSF-related reports Planning Committee Tim Runyon (Illinois) Communications Ad Hoc Working Group Jane Beetem (Missouri) WIPP Security Communications Protocol Major Lance Evans (Iowa) Ad Hoc Working Group Information and Communications Work Group Lisa Janairo 9:45 - 10:45 am Committee Discussion Blue Ribbon Commission final report: state reactions, next steps

57

RECLAMATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive material packages are withdrawn from use for various reasons; loss of mission, decertification, damage, replacement, etc. While the packages themselves may be decertified, various components may still be able to perform to their required standards and find useful service. The Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems group of the Savannah River National Laboratory has been reducing the cost of producing new Type B Packagings by reclaiming, refurbishing, and returning to service the containment vessels from older decertified packagings. The program and its benefits are presented.

Abramczyk, G.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Bellamy, S.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Radioactivity in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 26, 2008 ... This video introduces terms and concepts associated with radioactivity and shows how to identify radioactive substances that might enter a ...

59

Experiment Hazard Class 8.1 - Radioactive Materials/Samples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Radioactive Materials 1 - Radioactive Materials Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving radioactive materials as samples. The requirements of this hazard class also apply to sealed radioactive sources that are used as a sample (i.e. a target for x-ray radiation). Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard controls may also apply to experiments in this hazard class. The current requirements can be found in the APS Policy for Conducting Radioactive Sample Experiments in APS Experiment Enclosures. NOTE: The APS must be notified of shipment of any radioactive materials to the site well in advance of the proposed experiment. All radioactive materials must arrive through Argonne Receiving in Building 46 and the Argonne Materials Control & Accountability group (MC&A). Please contact

60

Radiation Awareness TrainingRadiation Awareness Training Radioactive Material &Radioactive Material &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Regulatory Agencies · Radioactive Materials ­ Broad Scope License ­ Issued by GA Department of Natural Resources · X-Ray Machines ­ Units registered with the GA Department of Human Resources ­ They regulate x) · Sealed sources ­ Nickel-63 (Gas chromatograph) ­ Cesium-137 (Liquid Scintillation Counter) ­ Neutron

Löffler, Frank E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. A packaging is certified when it can survive a sequence of impact, crush, puncture, fire, and immersion tests designed to replicate transport accident conditions. Type B Packages must meet the testing requirements of: Compliance Testing, as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.85 and 10 CFR Part 71.87 Normal Conditions of Transport, Ten tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.71 Hypothetical Accident Conditions, Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 The ability of radioactive material packages to withstand testing environments can be demonstrated by full-scale testing, scale-model

63

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Dose Rate Calculator Click to use calculator. This tool calculates a dose rate (DR) at 2 meters (about 6 ft) from the surface of a package containing radioactive material IF you know the dose rate at 1 meter (about 3 ft). It will also calculate the reverse; DR at 1 meter if you know the DR at 2 meters. These two distances are used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to define acceptable dose rates for packages. Dose (Rad) Biological Effect < 5 rad No immediate observable effects 5 - 50 rad Slight blood changes may be detected by medical evaluation 50 - 150 rad Slight blood changes will be noted and likely symptoms of nausea, fatigue, vomiting, etc.

64

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Video User' s Guide Video User' s Guide DECONTAMINATION DRESSDOWN AT A TRANSPORTATION ACCIDENT INVOLVING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond

66

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

67

Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

69

Engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, and investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Data collection handbook to support modeling the impacts of radioactive material in soil  

SciTech Connect

A pathway analysis computer code called RESRAD has been developed for implementing US Department of Energy Residual Radioactive Material Guidelines. Hydrogeological, meteorological, geochemical, geometrical (size, area, depth), and material-related (soil, concrete) parameters are used in the RESRAD code. This handbook discusses parameter definitions, typical ranges, variations, measurement methodologies, and input screen locations. Although this handbook was developed primarily to support the application of RESRAD, the discussions and values are valid for other model applications.

Yu, C.; Cheng, J.J.; Jones, L.G.; Wang, Y.Y.; Faillace, E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Loureiro, C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Chia, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Geology

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

72

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

74

Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material ... Sandia technology used to remove radioactive material at Fukushima Posted By Office of Public Affairs

75

NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Press Release NNSA Removes High-Activity Radioactive Materials from Boston Nov 22, 2013

76

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Press Release High-Activity Radioactive Materials Removed From Mexico Nov 15, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

77

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Fact Sheet NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material Apr 12, 2013 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA),

78

Radioactive-materials shipping-cask anticontamination enclosure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anticontamination device for use in storing shipping casks for radioactive materials comprises (1) a seal plate assembly; (2) a double-layer plastic bag; and (3) a water management system or means for water management.

Belmonte, M.S.; Davis, J.H.; Williams, D.A.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

Safety philosophy in the transportation of radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

From Winter meeting of American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Detroit, Michigan, USA (11 Nov 1973). The radiological'' and common cause risks'' involved in transporting radioactive materials are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Langhaar, J.W.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development and implementation of automated radioactive materials handling systems  

SciTech Connect

Material handling of radioactive and hazardous materials has forced the need to pursue remotely operated and robotic systems in light of operational safety concerns. Manual maneuvering, repackaging, overpacking and inspecting of containers which store radioactive and hazardous materials is the present mode of operation at the Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in Fernald Ohio. The manual methods are unacceptable in the eyes of concerned site workers and influential community oversight committees. As an example to respond to the FEMP material handling needs, design efforts have been initiated to provide a remotely operated system to repackage thousands of degradated drums containing radioactive Thorium: Later, the repackaged Thorium will be shipped offsite to a predesignated repository again requiring remote operation.

Jacoboski, D.L.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

part. It may consist of one or more receptacles, absorbent materials, spacing structures, thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and devices for cooling or absorbing mechanical...

82

NNSA: Securing Domestic Radioactive Material | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Feb 1, 2011 The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), which has unique expertise in nuclear weapons and nuclear material, plays a key role in the...

83

Waste minimization for commercial radioactive materials users generating low-level radioactive waste. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this document is to provide a resource for all states and compact regions interested in promoting the minimization of low-level radioactive waste (LLW). This project was initiated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and Massachusetts waste streams have been used as examples; however, the methods of analysis presented here are applicable to similar waste streams generated elsewhere. This document is a guide for states/compact regions to use in developing a system to evaluate and prioritize various waste minimization techniques in order to encourage individual radioactive materials users (LLW generators) to consider these techniques in their own independent evaluations. This review discusses the application of specific waste minimization techniques to waste streams characteristic of three categories of radioactive materials users: (1) industrial operations using radioactive materials in the manufacture of commercial products, (2) health care institutions, including hospitals and clinics, and (3) educational and research institutions. Massachusetts waste stream characterization data from key radioactive materials users in each category are used to illustrate the applicability of various minimization techniques. The utility group is not included because extensive information specific to this category of LLW generators is available in the literature.

Fischer, D.K.; Gitt, M.; Williams, G.A.; Branch, S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Otis, M.D.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Schurman, D.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

85

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record USERS OF PACKAGINGS CARRIER PACKAGE TYPE Hospitals and their suppliers common carrier Type A Industrial radiography companies private carrier Type B Soil testing laboratories private carrier Type B Food irradiators contract carrier Type B Medical supply sterilizers contract carrier Type B Academic research institutes common & contract carrier all types Nuclear energy fuel cycle facilities common & contract carrier all types Nuclear weapons complex contract & government carrier all types An agency or company that wants to ship RAM (shipper) often makes arrangements with a common or contract carrier or (where appropriate) a private carrier may transport the material. Packagings may be procured or

86

Radioactive Material Transportation Requirements for the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) created the National Transportation Program (NTP) whose goal is to ensure the availability of safe, efficient, and timely transportation of DOE materials. The Integration and Planning Group of the NTP, assisted by Global Technologies Incorporated (GTI), was tasked to identify requirements associated with the transport of DOE Environmental Management (EM) radiological waste/material. A systems engineering approach was used to identify source documents, extract requirements, perform a functional analysis, and set up a transportation requirements management database in RDD-100. Functions and requirements for transporting the following DOE radioactive waste/material are contained in the database: high level radioactive waste (HLW), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW), nuclear materials (NM), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and transuranic waste (TRU waste). The requirements will be used in the development of standard transportation protocols for DOE shipping. The protocols will then be combined into a DOE Transportation Program Management Guide, which will be used to standardize DOE transportation processes.

John, Mark Earl; Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Bolander, Thane Weston

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Self-closing shielded container for use with radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container is described for storage of radioactive material comprising a container body and a closure member. The closure member being coupled to the container body to enable the closure body to move automatically from a first position (e.g., closed) to a second position (open). 1 fig.

Smith, J.E.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Oak Ridge National Laboratory shipping containers for radioactive materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The types of containers used at ORNL for the transport of radioactive materials are described. Both returnable and non-returnable types are included. Containers for solids, liquids and gases are discussed. Casks for the shipment of uranium, irradiated fuel elements, and non-irradiated fuel elements are also described. Specifications are provided. (DC)

Schaich, R.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Guidelines for the Use of Radioactive Materials in Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Definition of a Radiation Worker 6 Instruction 6 Exposure Monitoring 8 Radiation Exposure Limits 8 Radiation Exposure During Pregnancy 8 Dosimeters 9 Internal Monitoring 10 Radioactive Work Areas 12 Posting Material NCRP National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements ICRP International Council

90

The radioactive materials packaging handbook: Design, operations, and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its required activities in 1994, the US Department of Energy (DOE) made over 500,000 shipments. Of these shipments, approximately 4% were hazardous, and of these, slightly over 1% (over 6,400 shipments) were radioactive. Because of DOE`s cleanup activities, the total quantities and percentages of radioactive material (RAM) that must be moved from one site to another is expected to increase in the coming years, and these materials are likely to be different than those shipped in the past. Irradiated fuel will certainly be part of the mix as will RAM samples and waste. However, in many cases these materials will be of different shape and size and require a transport packaging having different shielding, thermal, and criticality avoidance characteristics than are currently available. This Handbook provides guidance on the design, testing, certification, and operation of packages for these materials.

Shappert, L.B.; Bowman, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Arnold, E.D. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year. Equipment may become contaminated when NORM-containing scale or sludge accumulates inside water-handling equipment. The primary radionuclides of concern in these NORM wastes are radium-226 and radium-228. NORM-contaminated equipment generated by the petroleum industry currently is managed several ways. Some equipment is routinely decontaminated for reuse; other equipment becomes scrap metal and may be disposed of by burial at a licensed landfill, encapsulation inside the wellbore of an abandoned well, or shipment overseas for smelting. In view of the increased regulatory activities addressing NORM, the economic burden of managing NORM-contaminated wastes, including radioactive scrap metal, is likely to continue to grow. Efforts to develop a cost-effective strategy for managing radioactive scrap metal should focus on identifying the least expensive disposition options that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, efforts should focus on better characterizing the quantity of radioactive scrap available for recycle or reuse, the radioactivity concentration levels, and the potential risks associated with different disposal options.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

RECERTIFICATION OF THE MODEL 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

The Model 9977 Packaging was initially issued a Certificate of Compliance (CoC) by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) for the transportation of radioactive material (RAM) in the Fall of 2007. This first CoC was for a single radioactive material and two packing configurations. In the five years since that time, seven Addendums have been written to the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and five Letter Amendments have been written that have authorized either new RAM contents or packing configurations, or both. This paper will discuss the process of updating the 9977 SARP to include all the contents and configurations, including the addition of a new content, and its submittal for recertification.

Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Loftin, B.; Nathan, S.

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Q A RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program U.S. Department of Energy TRANSPORTATION AND INCIDENT RESPONSE Q&A About Incident Response Q Q Law Enforcement ____________________________________ Fire ___________________________________________ Medical ____________________________________________ State Radiological Assistance ___________________________ Local Government Official ______________________________ Local Emergency Management Agency ___________________ State Emergency Management Agency ___________________ HAZMAT Team ______________________________________ Water Pollution Control ________________________________ CHEMTEL (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-255-3924 _________ CHEMTREC (Toll-free US & Canada) 1-800-424-9300 _______

94

Method of encapsulating solid radioactive waste material for storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-level radioactive wastes are encapsulated in vitreous carbon for long-term storage by mixing the wastes as finely divided solids with a suitable resin, formed into an appropriate shape and cured. The cured resin is carbonized by heating under a vacuum to form vitreous carbon. The vitreous carbon shapes may be further protected for storage by encasement in a canister containing a low melting temperature matrix material such as aluminum to increase impact resistance and improve heat dissipation.

Bunnell, Lee Roy (Kennewick, WA); Bates, J. Lambert (Richland, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

97

Control levels for residual contamination in materials considered for recycle and reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is collecting data and conducting technical analyses to support joint efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Guidance, Air, Water and Radiation Division (DOE/EH-232); by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop radiological control criteria for the recycle and reuse of scrap materials and equipment that contain residual radioactive contamination. The initial radiological control levels are the concentrations in or on materials considered for recycle or reuse that meet the individual (human) or industrial (electronics/film) dose criteria. The analysis identifies relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and methods to determine possible non-health-related impacts from residual radioactive contamination in materials considered for recycle or reuse. The generic methodology and scenarios described here provide a basic framework for numerically deriving radiological control criteria for recycle or reuse. These will be adequately conservative for most situations.

Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Applications of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RESIL4D family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question ''How clean is clean?'' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper.

Yu, C.; Kamboj, S.; Cheng, J.-J.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Zielen, A.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.

1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

99

Best Practices for the Security of Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is funded under a grant provided by the US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control. The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) awarded a contract to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop best practices guidance for Office of Radiological Health (ORH) licensees to increase on-site security to deter and prevent theft of radioactive materials (RAM). The purpose of this document is to describe best practices available to manage the security of radioactive materials in medical centers, hospitals, and research facilities. There are thousands of such facilities in the United States, and recent studies suggest that these materials may be vulnerable to theft or sabotage. Their malevolent use in a radiological-dispersion device (RDD), viz., a dirty bomb, can have severe environmental- and economic- impacts, the associated area denial, and potentially large cleanup costs, as well as other effects on the licensees and the public. These issues are important to all Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Agreement State licensees, and to the general public. This document outlines approaches for the licensees possessing these materials to undertake security audits to identify vulnerabilities in how these materials are stored or used, and to describe best practices to upgrade or enhance their security. Best practices can be described as the most efficient (least amount of effort/cost) and effective (best results) way of accomplishing a task and meeting an objective, based on repeatable procedures that have proven themselves over time for many people and circumstances. Best practices within the security industry include information security, personnel security, administrative security, and physical security. Each discipline within the security industry has its own 'best practices' that have evolved over time into common ones. With respect to radiological devices and radioactive-materials security, industry best practices encompass both physical security (hardware and engineering) and administrative procedures. Security regimes for these devices and materials typically use a defense-in-depth- or layered-security approach to eliminate single points of failure. The Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Defense, the American Society of Industrial Security (ASIS), the Security Industry Association (SIA) and Underwriters Laboratory (UL) all rovide design guidance and hardware specifications. With a graded approach, a physical-security specialist can tailor an integrated security-management system in the most appropriate cost-effective manner to meet the regulatory and non-regulatory requirements of the licensee or client.

Coulter, D.T.; Musolino, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrating the Clearance in NPP Residual Material Management  

SciTech Connect

Previous Experiences in decommissioning projects are being used to optimize the residual material management in NPP, metallic scrap usually. The approach is based in the availability of a materials Clearance MARSSIM-based methodology developed and licensed in Spain. A typical project includes the integration of segregation, decontamination, clearance, quality control and quality assurance activities. The design is based in the clearance methodology features translating them into standard operational procedures. In terms of ecological taxes and final disposal costs, significant amounts of money could be saved with this type of approaches. The last clearance project managed a total amount of 405 tons scrap metal and a similar amount of other residual materials occupying a volume of 1500 m{sup 3}. After less than a year of field works 251 tons were finally recycled in a non-licensed smelting facility. The balance was disposed as LILW. In the planning phase the estimated cost savings were 4.5 Meuro. However, today a VLLW option is available in European countries so, the estimated cost savings are reduced to 1.2 Meuro. In conclusion: the application of materials clearance in NPP decommissioning lessons learnt to the NPP residual material management is an interesting management option. This practice is currently going on in Spanish NPP and, in a preliminary view, is consistent with the new MARSAME Draft. An interesting parameter is the cost of 1 m3 of recyclable scrap. The above estimates are very project specific because in the segregation process other residual materials were involved. If the effect of this other materials is removed the estimated Unit Cost were in this project around 1700 euro/m{sup 3}, this figure is clearly below the above VLLW disposal cost of 2600 euro. In a future project it appears feasible to descend to 839 euro/m{sup 3} and if it became routine values and is used in big Decommissioning projects, around 600 euro/m{sup 3} or below possibly could be achieved. A rough economical analysis permits to estimate a saving around 2000 US$ to 13000 US$ per cubic meter of steel scrap according the variability of materials and disposal costs. Many learnt lessons of this practice were used as a feed back in the planning of characterization activities for decommissioning a Spanish NPP and today are considered as a significant reference in our Decommissioning engineering approaches.

Garcia-Bermejo, R.; Lamela, B. [Iberdrola Ingenieria y Construccion, Jose Bardasano Baos 28036, Madrid (Spain)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

THERMAL UPGRADING OF 9977 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL (RAM) TYPE B PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 9977 package is a radioactive material package that was originally certified to ship Heat Sources and RTG contents up to 19 watts and it is now being reviewed to significantly expand its contents in support of additional DOE missions. Thermal upgrading will be accomplished by employing stacked 3013 containers, a 3013 aluminum spacer and an external aluminum sleeve for enhanced heat transfer. The 7th Addendum to the original 9977 package Safety Basis Report describing these modifications is under review for the DOE certification. The analyses described in this paper show that this well-designed and conservatively analyzed package can be upgraded to carry contents with decay heat up to 38 watts with some simple design modifications. The Model 9977 package has been designed as a replacement for the Department of Transportation (DOT) Fissile Specification 6M package. The 9977 package is a very versatile Type B package which is certified to transport and store a wide spectrum of radioactive materials. The package was analyzed quite conservatively to increase its usefulness and store different payload configurations. Its versatility is evident from several daughter packages such as the 9978 and H1700, and several addendums where the payloads have been modified to suit the Shipper's needs without additional testing.

Gupta, N.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

102

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are organized. The RMUS Interview Form with the attached RMUS Process Form(s) provides the radioactive materials survey data by technical area (TA) and building number. The survey data for each release point includes information such as: exhaust stack identification number, room number, radioactive material source type (i.e., potential source or future potential source of air emissions), radionuclide, usage (in curies) and usage basis, physical state (gas, liquid, particulate, solid, or custom), release fraction (from Appendix D to 40 CFR 61, Subpart H), and process descriptions. In addition, the interview form also calculates emissions (in curies), lists mrem/Ci factors, calculates PEDEs, and states the location of the critical receptor for that release point. [The critical receptor is the maximum exposed off-site member of the public, specific to each individual facility.] Each of these data fields is described in this section. The Tier classification of release points, which was first introduced with the 1999 usage survey, is also described in detail in this section. Section 4 includes a brief discussion of the dose estimate methodology, and includes a discussion of several release points of particular interest in the CY 2011 usage survey report. It also includes a table of the calculated PEDEs for each release point at its critical receptor. Section 5 describes ES's approach to Quality Assurance (QA) for the usage survey. Satisfactory completion of the survey requires that team members responsible for Rad-NESHAP (National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants) compliance accurately collect and process several types of information, including radioactive materials usage data, process information, and supporting information. They must also perform and document the QA reviews outlined in Section 5.2.6 (Process Verification and Peer Review) of ES-RN, 'Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Rad-NESHAP Compliance Project' to verify that all information is complete and correct.

Sturgeon, Richard W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

104

Alternatives for the disposal of NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) wastes in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios.

Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C. (Rogers Associates Engineering Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Pollard, C.G. (Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

SciTech Connect

Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) to improve reliability and longevity since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and gammas. Examples include NdFeB magnets, considered for the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus, electronic and electro-optic devices to be utilized in detector readout, accelerator controls and the CCDs required for the vertex detector, as well as high and low temperature superconducting materials (LTSMs) because some magnets will be superconducting. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented for NdFeB materials at EPAC04 where the damage appeared proportional to the distances between the effective operating point and Hc. We have extended those doses, included other manufacturer's samples and measured induced radioactivities. We have also added L and HTSMs as well as a variety of relevant semiconductor and electro-optic materials including PBG fiber that we studied previously only with gamma rays.

Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; /SLAC; Gallagher, G.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis; Volk, J.; /Fermilab

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

SEM Facility for Examination of Reactive and Radioactive Materials  

SciTech Connect

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ETEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. A glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate detector and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed. The SEM is also equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (ORTEC) and a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (3M) attachments. This latter attachment allows analysis of secondary ions with masses ranging from 1-300 amu.

Downs, G. L.; Tucker, P. A.

1973-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Priorities for technology development and policy to reduce the risk from radioactive materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Standing Committee on International Security of Radioactive and Nuclear Materials in the Nonproliferation and Arms Control Division conducted its fourth annual workshop in February 2010 on Reducing the Risk from Radioactive and Nuclear Materials. This workshop examined new technologies in real-time tracking of radioactive materials, new risks and policy issues in transportation security, the best practices and challenges found in addressing illicit radioactive materials trafficking, industry leadership in reducing proliferation risk, and verification of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, Article VI. Technology gaps, policy gaps, and prioritization for addressing the identified gaps were discussed. Participants included academia, policy makers, radioactive materials users, physical security and safeguards specialists, and vendors of radioactive sources and transportation services. This paper summarizes the results of this workshop with the recommendations and calls to action for the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) membership community.

Duggan, Ruth Ann

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Is anyone regulating naturally occurring radioactive material? A state survey  

SciTech Connect

As far as we know, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has surrounded humankind since the beginning of time. However, recent data demonstrating that certain activities concentrate NORM have increased concern regarding its proper handling and disposal and precipitated the development of new NORM-related regulations. The regulation of NORM affects the management of government facilities as well as a broad range of industrial processes. Recognizing that NORM regulation at the federal level is extremely limited, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a 50-state survey to determine the extent to which states have assumed the responsibility for regulating NORM as well as the NORM standards that are currently being applied at the state level. Though the survey indicates that NORM regulation comprises a broad spectrum of controls from full licensing requirements to virtually no regulation at afl, a trend is emerging toward recognition of the need for increased regulation of potential NORM hazards, particularly in the absence of federal standards.

Gross, E.M.; Barisas, S.G.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES IN TRANSPORT CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect

Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR Part 71. The packages are transported in specially designed vehicles like Safe Secure Transport (SST) for safety and security. In the transport vehicles, the packages are placed close to each other to maximize the number of units in the vehicle. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are spaced sufficiently apart to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals and the impact limiter to ensure the structural integrity of the package. This paper presents a simple methodology to assess thermal performance of a typical 9975 packaging in a transport configuration.

Gupta, N.

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Numerical estimation on free electrons generated by shielded radioactive materials under various gaseous environments  

SciTech Connect

We report simulation results on generation of free electrons due to the presence of radioactive materials under controlled pressure and gases using a general Monte Carlo transport code (MCNPX). A radioactive material decays to lower atomic number, simultaneously producing high energy gamma rays that can generate free electrons via various scattering mechanisms. This paper shows detailed simulation works for answering how many free electrons can be generated under the existence of shielded radioactive materials as a function of pressure and types of gases.

Kim, D. S. [Department of Physics, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. S.; So, J. H. [Agency for Defence Development (ADD), Daejeon 305-152 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, E. M. [Department of Physics, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Source holder collimator for encapsulating radioactive material and collimating the emanations from the material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a transportable device capable of detecting normal levels of a trace element, such as lead in a doughnutshaped blood sample by x-ray fluorescence with a minimum of sample preparation in a relatively short analyzing time. In one embodiment, the blood is molded into a doughnut-shaped sample around an annular array of low-energy radioactive material that is at the center of the doughnut-shaped sample but encapsulated in a collimator, the latter shielding a detector that is close to the sample and facing the same so that the detector receives secondary emissions from the sample while the collimator collimates ths primary emissions from the radioactive material to direct these emissions toward the sample around 360 deg and away from the detector. (Official Gazette)

Laurer, G.R.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Inelastic analysis acceptance criteria for radioactive material transportation containers  

SciTech Connect

The design criteria currently used in the design of radioactive material (RAM) transportation containers are taken from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME, 1992). These load-based criteria are ideally suited for pressure vessels where the loading is quasistatic and all stresses are in equilibrium with externally applied loads. For impact events, the use of load-based criteria is less supportable. Impact events tend to be energy controlled, and thus, energy-based acceptance criteria would appear to be more appropriate. Determination of an ideal design criteria depends on what behavior is desired. Currently there is not a design criteria for inelastic analysis for RAM nation packages that is accepted by the regulatory agencies. This lack of acceptance criteria is one of the major factors in limiting the use of inelastic analysis. In this paper inelastic analysis acceptance criteria based on stress and strain-energy density will be compared for two stainless steel test units subjected to impacts onto an unyielding target. Two different material models are considered for the inelastic analysis, a bilinear fit of the stress-strain curve and a power law hardening model that very closely follows the stress-strain curve. It is the purpose of this paper to stimulate discussion and research into the area of strain-energy density based inelastic analysis acceptance criteria.

Ammerman, D.J.; Ludwigsen, J.S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation 4/13/00 The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. PTS13-01.doc More Documents & Publications Order Module--DOE O 460.1C, PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION SAFETY, DOE O

114

RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

VALIDATION OF COMPUTER MODELS FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL SHIPPING PACKAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer models are abstractions of physical reality and are routinely used for solving practical engineering problems. These models are prepared using large complex computer codes that are widely used in the industry. Patran/Thermal is such a finite element computer code that is used for solving complex heat transfer problems in the industry. Finite element models of complex problems involve making assumptions and simplifications that depend upon the complexity of the problem and upon the judgment of the analysts. The assumptions involve mesh size, solution methods, convergence criteria, material properties, boundary conditions, etc. that could vary from analyst to analyst. All of these assumptions are, in fact, candidates for a purposeful and intended effort to systematically vary each in connection with the others to determine there relative importance or expected overall effect on the modeled outcome. These kinds of models derive from the methods of statistical science and are based on the principles of experimental designs. These, as all computer models, must be validated to make sure that the output from such an abstraction represents reality [1,2]. A new nuclear material packaging design, called 9977, which is undergoing a certification design review, is used to assess the capability of the Patran/Thermal computer model to simulate 9977 thermal response. The computer model for the 9977 package is validated by comparing its output with the test data collected from an actual thermal test performed on a full size 9977 package. Inferences are drawn by performing statistical analyses on the residuals (test data--model predictions).

Gupta, N; Gene Shine, G; Cary Tuckfield, C

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

116

Molten salt oxidation of mixed wastes: Separation of radioactive materials and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in a program to apply a molten salt oxidation (MSO) process to the treatment of mixed wastes at Oak Ridge and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Mixed wastes are defined as those wastes that contain both radioactive components, which are regulated by the atomic energy legislation, and hazardous waste components, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). A major part of our ORNL program involves the development of separation technologies that are necessary for the complete treatment of mixed wastes. The residues from the MSO treatment of the mixed wastes must be processed further to separate the radioactive components, to concentrate and recycle residues, or to convert the residues into forms acceptable for final disposal. This paper is a review of the MSO requirements for separation technologies, the information now available, and the concepts for our development studies.

Bell, J.T.; Haas, P.A.; Rudolph, J.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Not Listed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

120

ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Savannah River Site Experiences in In Situ Field Measurements of Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses some of the field gamma-ray measurements made at the Savannah River Site, the equipment used for the measurements, and lessons learned during in situ identification and characterization of radioactive materials.

Moore, F.S.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Method for measuring residual stresses in materials by plastically deforming the material and interference pattern comparison  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring residual stress in a material comprising the steps of establishing a speckle pattern on the surface with a first laser then heating a portion of that pattern with an infrared laser until the surface plastically deforms. Comparing the speckle patterns before and after deformation by subtracting one pattern from the other will produce a fringe pattern that serves as a visual and quantitative indication of the degree to which the plasticized surface responded to the stress dung heating and enables calculation of the stress.

Pechersky, Martin J. (241 Chardonnat La., Aiken, SC 29803)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vitrification of simulated radioactive Rocky Flats plutonium containing ash residue with a Stir Melter System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration trial has been completed in which a simulated Rocky Flats ash consisting of an industrial fly-ash material doped with cerium oxide was vitrified in an alloy tank Stir-Melter{trademark} System. The cerium oxide served as a substitute for plutonium oxide present in the actual Rocky Flats residue stream. The glass developed falls within the SiO{sub 2} + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/{Sigma}Alkali/B{sub 2}O{sub 3} system. The glass batch contained approximately 40 wt% of ash, the ash was modified to contain {approximately} 5 wt% CeO{sub 2} to simulate plutonium chemistry in the glass. The ash simulant was mixed with water and fed to the Stir-Melter as a slurry with a 60 wt% water to 40 wt% solids ratio. Glass melting temperature was maintained at approximately 1,050 C during the melting trials. Melting rates as functions of impeller speed and slurry feed rate were determined. An optimal melting rate was established through a series of evolutionary variations of the control variables` settings. The optimal melting rate condition was used for a continuous six hour steady state run of the vitrification system. Glass mass flow rates of the melter were measured and correlated with the slurry feed mass flow. Melter off-gas was sampled for particulate and volatile species over a period of four hours during the steady state run. Glass composition and durability studies were run on samples collected during the steady state run.

Marra, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kormanyos, K.R.; Overcamp, T.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling U.S. Works With Kazakhstan to Stop Nuclear and Radioactive Material Smuggling May 6, 2006 - 10:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - As part of the overall U.S. strategy to prevent nuclear and dangerous radiological materials from falling into the hands of terrorists, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced today that an agreement with the government of Kazakhstan had been signed to create a partnership under the Second Line of Defense program. U.S. Ambassador Ordway joined Kazakhstan Customs Control Committee Chairman Askar Shakirov in signing the accord. The agreement will pave the way for NNSA to work collaboratively with the Kazakhstan Customs Control Committee

127

Shipment of Small Quantities of Unspecified Radioactive Material in Chalfant Packagings  

SciTech Connect

In the post 6M era, radioactive materials package users are faced with the disciplined operations associated with use of Certified Type B packagings. Many DOE, commercial and academic programs have a requirement to ship and/or store small masses of poorly characterized or unspecified radioactive material. For quantities which are small enough to be fissile exempt and have low radiation levels, the materials could be transported in a package which provides the required containment level. Because their Chalfant type containment vessels meet the highest standard of containment (helium leak-tight), the 9975, 9977, and 9978 are capable of transporting any of these contents. The issues associated with certification of a high-integrity, general purpose package for shipping small quantities of unspecified radioactive material are discussed and certification of the packages for this mission is recommended.

Smith, Allen; Abramczyk, Glenn; Nathan, Steven; Bellamy, Steve

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

128

A SUMMARY OF INCIDENTS INVOLVING USAEC SHIPMENTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, 1957-1961  

SciTech Connect

Data are summarized on incidents that have been sustained by the AEC in the transport of radioactive materials from 1957 through 1981. In the period covered by this report there were 47 incidents reported. Twenty-nine did not result in the release of radioactive materials. Of the remaining 18 cases there was none that involved any serious radiological consequences or involved costly cleanup. Six of the incidents involved onsite movements of materials. The incidents are classified in accordance with the type of radiation release that occurred, mode of transport, and type of incident. Photographs are included for a number of the incidents. (C.H.)

Patterson, D.E.; DeFatta, V.P.

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Residual Stress Measurement in Amorphous Materials by the Micro ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... minimal human guidance in its operation. We demonstrate the influence of particular sources of errors on RS estimates in homogeneous amorphous materials ...

130

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FIXATION OF RADIOACTIVE RESIDUES, QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT, OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1961  

SciTech Connect

Resesrch and development activities in fixation of radioactive wastes are reported. Spray calcination, batch calcination, in-tank solidification, off- gas treatment, sorption snd extraction studies, low- and intermediate-level wastes, and high-level wastes are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Irish, E.R. ed.

1962-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Consumer Products Containing Radioactive Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everything we encounter in our daily lives contains some radioactive material, some naturally occurring and some man-made: the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, the ground we walk upon, and the consumer products we purchase and use. Although many might be familiar with the use of radiation to diagnose disease and treat cancer, some people, when they hear the terms “radioactive ” and “radiation, ” might recall images of mushroom clouds or monster mutants that inhabit the world of science fiction movies and comic books. Unfortunately, those false images can cause inordinate fear that is not justified regarding low levels of radioactive material. Many consumer items containing naturally occurring radioactivity can be safely used. This fact sheet describes a photo courtesy of Ray Johnson few of the more commonly encountered and familiar consumer products. Included are the items that can contain sufficient radioactive material to be distinguished from the general environmental background radiation with a simple handheld radiation survey meter. Smoke Detectors Most residential smoke detectors contain a low-activity

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying hazardous materials and in characterizing radioactive contamination, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer has conducted research in two aspects: (1) to develop terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging system that can be used to analyze environmental samples such as asbestos in the field, and (2) to develop algorithms for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profiles in real-time in the field using gamma spectroscopy. The basic research focused on the following: (1) mechanism of generating of broadband pulsed radiation in terahertz region, (2) optimal free-space electro-optic sampling for asbestos, (3) absorption and transmission mechanisms of asbestos in THz region, (4) the role of asbestos sample conditions on the temporal and spectral distributions, (5) real-time identification and mapping of asbestos using THz imaging, (7) Monte Carlo modeling of distributed contamination from diffusion of radioactive materials into porous concrete and asbestos materials, (8) development of unfolding algorithms for gamma spectroscopy, and (9) portable and integrated spectroscopy systems for field testing in DOE. Final results of the project show that the combination of these innovative approaches has the potential to bring significant improvement in future risk reduction and cost/time saving in DOE's D and D activities.

XU, X. George; Zhang, X.C.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fluorescent Functionalized Mesoporous Silica for Radioactive Material Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous silica with covalently bound salicylic acid molecules incorporated in the structure was synthesized with a one-pot, co-condensation reaction at room temperature. The as-synthesized material has a large surface area, uniform particle size, and an ordered pore structure as determined by characterization with transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and infrared spectra, etc. Using the strong fluorescence and metal coordination capability of salicylic acid, functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) was developed to track and extract radionuclide contaminants, such as uranyl [U(VI)] ions encountered in subsurface environments. Adsorption measurements showed a strong affinity of the FMS toward U(VI) with a Kd value of 105 mL/g, which is four orders of magnitude higher than the adsorption of U(VI) onto most of the sediments in natural environments. The new materials have a potential for synergistic environmental monitoring and remediation of the radionuclide U(VI) from contaminated subsurface environments.

Li, Juan; Zhu, Kake; Shang, Jianying; Wang, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Guo, Ruisong; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Li, Xiaolin; Liu, Jun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gamma motes for detection of radioactive materials in shipping containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shipping containers can be effectively monitored for radiological materials using gamma (and neutron) motes in distributed mesh networks. The mote platform is ideal for collecting data for integration into operational management systems required for efficiently and transparently monitoring international trade. Significant reductions in size and power requirements have been achieved for room-temperature cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma detectors. Miniaturization of radio modules and microcontroller units are paving the way for low-power, deeply-embedded, wireless sensor distributed mesh networks.

Harold McHugh; William Quam; Stephan Weeks; Brendan Sever

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes  

SciTech Connect

A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LABORATORY SAFETY REPORT, MARTIN NUCLEAR FACILITY, QUEHANNA SITE  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the safety features and the major alterations to be performed prior to occupancy. The evaluation was made in support of fubrication work on the production of safe isotopic power sources from Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/. The chemical, nuclear, and radiobiological properties of Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/ are outlined. The projected physical fiow of materials for production of the isotopic power souroes is schematically given. An evaluation of the malfunctions, operational hazards, and remedial health physics procedures is presented. The analysis and evaluation of postulated maximum credible incidents are demonstrated. (B.O.G.)

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

AGING PERFORMANCE OF VITON GLT O-RINGS IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive material packages used for transportation of plutonium-bearing materials often contain multiple O-ring seals for containment. Packages such as the Model 9975 are also being used for interim storage of Pu-bearing materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the seal materials used in such packages is Viton{reg_sign} GLT fluoroelastomer. The aging behavior of containment vessel O-rings based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT at long-term containment term storage conditions is being characterized to assess its performance in such applications. This paper summarizes the program and test results to date.

Skidmore, E; Kerry Dunn, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Elise Fox, E; Kathryn Counts, K

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hydro-mechanical behaviour of bentonite-based materials used for high-level radioactive waste disposal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study deals with the hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted bentonite-based materials used as sealing materials in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The pure MX80 bentontie, mixtures… (more)

Wang, Qiong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

APPLICATION FO FLOW FORMING FOR USE IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the development and testing performed to demonstrate the use of flow forming as an alternate method of manufacturing containment vessels for use in radioactive material shipping packaging designs. Additionally, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Subsection NB compliance along with the benefits compared to typical welding of containment vessels will be discussed. SRNL has completed fabrication development and the testing on flow formed containment vessels to demonstrate the use of flow forming as an alternate method of manufacturing a welded 6-inch diameter containment vessel currently used in the 9975 and 9977 radioactive material shipping packaging. Material testing and nondestructive evaluation of the flow formed parts demonstrate compliance to the minimum material requirements specified in applicable parts of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section II. Destructive burst testing shows comparable results to that of a welded design. The benefits of flow forming as compared to typical welding of containment vessels are significant: dimensional control is improved due to no weld distortion; less final machining; weld fit-up issues associated with pipes and pipe caps are eliminated; post-weld non-destructive testing (i.e., radiography and die penetrant tests) is not necessary; and less fabrication steps are required. Results presented in this paper indicate some of the benefits in adapting flow forming to design of future radioactive material shipping packages containment vessels.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.; Abramczyk, G.

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radioactive material package closures with the use of shape memory alloys  

SciTech Connect

When heated from room temperature to 165 C, some shape memory metal alloys such as titanium-nickel alloys have the ability to return to a previously defined shape or size with dimensional changes up to 7%. In contrast, the thermal expansion of most metals over this temperature range is about 0.1 to 0.2%. The dimension change of shape memory alloys, which occurs during a martensite to austenite phase transition, can generate stresses as high as 700 MPa (100 kspi). These properties can be used to create a closure for radioactive materials packages that provides for easy robotic or manual operations and results in reproducible, tamper-proof seals. This paper describes some proposed closure methods with shape memory alloys for radioactive material packages. Properties of the shape memory alloys are first summarized, then some possible alternative sealing methods discussed, and, finally, results from an initial proof-of-concept experiment described.

Koski, J.A.; Bronowski, D.R.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Legal aspects of the maritime transport of radioactive materials its regulation in Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work has the object to analyse the International as much as National legal frameworks, the scopes and limits of the instruments which form it as well as the congruous that exist between them and the situation which actually prevails in the maritime transport field of radioactive materials in worldwide level and in Mexico taking into account the technical advances, the operational experience and radiological protection principles. In the chapter 1, the background on the uses of nuclear energy are described and its development by more of fifty years. The chapter 2 analyses about the establishment of nuclear technologies in Mexico as well as their evolution in medicine, agriculture, research and electric power generation areas. In chapter 3 it was analysed the role what the International Organizations have been playing for the establish of an International legal framework in the maritime transport of radioactive materials field. In the chapter 4, the International legal framework was analysed which is appli...

Aguilar, S

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Behavior of radioactive species during water injection into alloy breeder material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion safety experiment was conducted to determine the consequences of water injection into lead-lithium alloy under postulated reactor accident conditions. The fraction of water reacted, quantity of hydrogen produced, and behavior of radioactive species associated with the use of this alloy as a breeder material were determined. The reaction products were identified, and the aerosol was characterized for particle size, chemical composition, and deposition rate. 2 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Jeppson, D.W.; Serinni, G. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA); Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Gas Generation Test Support for Transportation and Storage of Plutonium Residue Materials - Part 1: Rocky Flats Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present experimental results that can be used to establish one segment of the safety basis for transportation and storage of plutonium residue materials.

Livingston, R.R.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Dublin, CA); Jessup, James L. (Tracy, CA); Bianchini, Greg M. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Wayne O. (Livermore, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Property Valuation and Radioactive Materials Transportation: A Legal, Economic and Public Perception Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shipment of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico raised a serious socioeconomic issue - the potential devaluation of property values due to the transportation of TRU waste from generator sites to the disposal facility. In 1992, the New Mexico Supreme Court held in City of Santa Fe v. Komis that a loss in value from public perception of risk was compensable. This issue has become an extremely important one for the development of the Yucca Mountain repository in Nevada for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much research has been conducted about the potential impacts of transportation of spent fuel and radioactive waste. This paper examines the pertinent studies conducted since the Komis case. It examines how the public debate on radioactive materials transportation continues and is now focused on transportation of high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel to the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Finally, the paper suggests a path forward DOE can take to address this issue.

Holm, J. A.; Thrower, A. W.; Widmayer, D. A.; Portner, W.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

CLOSURE WELDING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) responsibility for the disposition of radioactive materials has given rise to several unique welding applications. Many of these materials require packaging into containers for either Interim or long-term storage. It is not uncommon that final container fabrication, i.e., closure welding, is performed with these materials already placed into the container. Closure welding is typically performed remote to the container, and routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE) are often times not feasible. Fluor Hanford has packaged many such materials in recent years as park of the Site's cleanup mission. In lieu of post-weld testing and NDE, the Fluor-Hanford approach has been to establish weld quality through ''upfront'' development and qualification of welding parameters, and then ensure parameter compliance during welding. This approach requires a rigor not usually afforded to typical welding development activities, and may involve statistical analysis and extensive testing, including burst, drop, sensitive leak testing, etc. This paper provides an instructive review of the development and qualification activities associated with the closure of radioactive materials containers, including a brief report on activities for closure welding research reactor, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site.

CANNELL, G.R.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

Partitioning of residual D-limonene cleaner vapor among organic materials in weapons  

SciTech Connect

D-limonene is a replacement solvent selected by Sandia and Allied-Signal to clean solder flux from electronics assemblies in firesets and programmers. D-limonene is much slower drying than the solvents it has replaced and this has raised concerns that residual quantities of the cleaner could be trapped in the electronics assemblies and eventually carried into warhead assemblies. This paper describes a study designed to evaluate how vapors from residual d-limonene cleaner would be partitioned among typical organic materials in a Livermore device. The goal was to identify possible compatibility problems arising from the use of d-limonene and, in particular, any interactions it may have with energetic materials. To predict the partitioning behavior of d-limonene, a simple model was developed and its predictions are compared to the experimental findings.

LeMay, J.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

THE USE OF DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY IN THE EVALUATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGING PERFORMANCE TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New designs of radioactive material shipping packages are required to be evaluated in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71, ''Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material''. This paper will discuss the use of digital radiography to evaluate the effects of the tests required by 10 CFR 71.71, Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT), and 10 CFR 71.73, Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). One acceptable means of evaluating packaging performance is to subject packagings to the series of NCT and HAC tests. The evaluation includes a determination of the effect on the packaging by the conditions and tests. That determination has required that packagings be cut and sectioned to learn the actual effects on internal components. Digital radiography permits the examination of internal packaging components without sectioning a package. This allows a single package to be subjected to a series of tests. After each test, the package is digitally radiographed and the effects of particular tests evaluated. Radiography reduces the number of packages required for testing and also reduces labor and materials required to section and evaluate numerous packages. This paper will include a description of the digital radiography equipment used in the testing and evaluation of the 9977 and 9978 packages at SRNL. The equipment is capable of making a single radiograph of a full-sized package in one exposure. Radiographs will be compared to sectioned packages that show actual conditions compared to radiographic images.

May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Boyd Howard, B

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

154

Critically safe vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vacuum pickup of critically safe quantity and geometric shape is used in cleanup of radioactive materials. Collected radioactive material is accumulated in four vertical, parallel, equally spaced canisters arranged in a cylinder configuration. Each canister contains a filter bag. An upper intake manifold includes four 90 degree spaced, downward facing nipples. Each nipple communicates with the top of a canister. The bottom of each canister communicates with an exhaust manifold comprising four radially extending tubes that meet at the bottom of a centrally located vertical cylinder. The top of the central cylinder terminates at a motor/fan power head. A removable HEPA filter is located intermediate the top of the central cylinder and the power head. Four horizontal bypass tubes connect the top of the central cylinder to the top of each of the canisters. Air enters the vacuum cleaner via a hose connected to the intake manifold. Air then travels down the canisters, where particulate material is accumulated in generally equal quantities in each filter bag. Four air paths of bag filtered air then pass radially inward to the bottom of the central cylinder. Air moves up the central cylinder, through the HEPA filter, through a vacuum fan compartment, and exits the vacuum cleaner. A float air flow valve is mounted at the top of the central cylinder. When liquid accumulates to a given level within the central cylinder, the four bypass tubes, and the four canisters, suction is terminated by operation of the float valve.

Zeren, Joseph D. (390 Forest Ave., Boulder, CO 80304)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

156

Bibliography of reports, papers, and presentations on naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was created to support projects conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) addressing issues related to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes. The bibliography provides citations for many of the available published reports, papers, articles, and presentations on petroleum industry NORM. In the past few years, the rapid expansion of NORM treatment and disposal technologies, the efforts to characterize NORM wastes and their associated potential risks, and the promulgation of state-level NORM regulatory programs have been well-documented in project reports and in papers presented at technical conferences and symposia. There are 221 citations.

Smith, K.P.; Wilkey, M.L.; Hames, R.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in welds fabricated from highly anisotropic materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

neutron diffraction to neutron diffraction to engineering problems T.M. Holden Northern Stress Technologies Deep River, Ontario, Canada Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 13 nd June 2011 Reference material * "Introduction to the characterization of residual stress by neutron diffraction". M.T. Hutchings, P.J. Withers, T.M. Holden and T. Lorentzen, (Taylor and Francis: Boca Raton) 2005 * "Introduction to diffraction in Materials Science and Engineering", A.D. Krawitz (John Wiley and Sons ,Inc.: New York) 2001 * "Non-destructive testing-Standard Test Method for

158

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing materials. Transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials (NM), and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organization to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This "program level" roadmapping involves linking technology development (and deployment) efforts to the programs’ needs and requirements for dispositioning the material/waste that generates combustible gas through radiolysis and chemical decomposition. The roadmapping effort focused on needed technical & programmatic support to the baselines (and to alternatives to the baselines) where the probability of success is low (i.e., high uncertainty) and the consequences of failure are relatively high (i.e., high programmatic risk). A second purpose for roadmapping was to provide the basis for coordinating sharing of "lessons learned" from research and development (R&D) efforts across DOE programs to increase efficiency and effectiveness in addressing gas generation issues.

Luke, Dale Elden; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Hamp, S.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR GENERAL PURPOSE RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyurethane foam has been employed in impact limiters for large radioactive materials packagings since the early 1980's. Its consistent crush response, controllable structural properties and excellent thermal insulating characteristics have made it attractive as replacement for the widely used cane fiberboard for smaller, drum size packagings. Accordingly, polyurethane foam was chosen for the overpack material for the 9977 and 9978 packagings. The study reported here was undertaken to provide data to support the analyses performed as part of the development of the 9977 and 9978, and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

2009-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

Gupta, N

2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Test methods for selection of materials of construction for high-level radioactive waste vitrification. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate materials of construction were evaluated for a facility at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant to vitrify high-level radioactive waste. Limited operating experience was available under the corrosive conditions of the complex vitrification process. The objective of the testing program was to provide a high degree of assurance that equipment will meet or exceed design lifetimes. To meet this objective in reasonable time and minimum cost, a program was designed consisting of a combination of coupon immersion and electrochemical laboratory tests and pilot-scale tests. Stainless steels and nickel-based alloys were tested. Alloys that were most resistant to general and local attack contained nickel, molybdenum (>9%), and chromium (where Cr + Mo > 30%). Alloy C-276 was selected as the reference material for process equipment. Stellite 6 was selected for abrasive service in the presence of formic acid. Alloy 690 and ALLCORR were selected for specific applications.

Bickford, D F; Corbett, R A; Morrison, W S

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Compendium of federal and state radioactive materials transportation laws and regulations: Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB)  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB) is an on-line information service containing detailed information on legislation and regulations regarding the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The system is dedicated to serving the legislative and regulatory information needs of the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies; state, tribal, and local governments; the hazardous materials transportation industry; and interested members of the general public. In addition to the on-line information service, quarterly and annual Legal Developments Reports are produced using information from the TLDB. These reports summarize important changes in federal and state legislation, regulations, administrative agency rulings, and judicial decisions over the reporting period. Information on significant legal developments at the tribal and local levels is also included on an as-available basis. Battelle's Office of Transportation Systems and Planning (OTSP) will also perform customized searches of the TLDB and produce formatted printouts in response to specific information requests.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Materials Reliability Program: Validation of Welding Residual Stress Models for PWR Piping Dissimilar Metal Welds (MRP-271)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Dissimilar Metal (DM) piping butt welds in PWRs. Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations have demonstrated a high sensitivity to the welding residual stress distribution inputs. As part of the ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

164

In-situ remediation of naturally occurring radioactive materials with high-permeability hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of removal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials, NORM, and describes an effective alternative to the current treatment method for their removal. High-pen-meability fracturing, recently established in the petroleum industry, is the recommended technique. NORM are found throughout subterranean formations. Whenever fluids from petroleum or water reservoirs are produced NORM are present in varying quantities. NORM can only be sensed with radiation detectors. However, they have proven carcinogens, and the US Environmental Protection Agency has set a limit on the maximum contaminated level of any stream. Until now, the preferred method of treatment was to remove NORM from contaminated waters with specially designed filters, which in turn create a new problem. The same filters that are used to treat the water themselves become highly radioactive with a considerable disposal problem. In the petroleum industry, NORM become concentrated in the scale that is deposited inside the well or surface pipes. When scale is removed, it can be so radioactive that it can only be stored in toxic sites. Additionally, as water is produced along with oil, so are NORM. Until now, for the Gulf of Mexico at least, produced water has been released into the ocean, but the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is threatening to change this. In the North Sea the regulations are already stricter. There is then a compelling motivation to remove NORM before they are produced, and thus, eliminate the disposal problem. A high-permeability fracture design is presented which modifies existing petroleum practices by introducing within the proppant pack highly selective radionuclide sorbents. These sorbents, at calculated concentrations, can remove NORM readily for several years from typical flow rates containing typical NORM concentrations.

Demarchos, Andronikos Stavros

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Instrumentation, Equipment and Methods for the In Vivo Measurement of Radioactive Material in the Body  

SciTech Connect

The current applications for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material can be divided into three broad categories: (1) occupational exposure monitoring, (2) monitoring of the public, and (3) medical monitoring. The focus of this chapter is on occupational exposure monitoring that is part of an internal dosimetry program for monitoring workers for intakes and assessing the dose consequences of an intake. In the 1920's when electroscopes were first used to measure radium in the body of dial painters issues affecting the measurement accuracy were identified related to external contamination interferences, properly measuring the instrument background, need for measurement QC, microphonic interferences, shielding and others. The sophistication of the radiation detection instrumentation has evolved to the point where most systems today employ one or more detectors primarily either sodium iodide or germanium. Many different styles of detectors and cryostat designs are used at different facilities. However, the same issues identified in the 1920's are still issues today. The in vivo measurement systems are calibrated with anthropometric phantoms that simulate the body or parts of the body. Whole body phantoms, torso phantoms, lung phantoms, thyroid phantoms and skeletal phantoms are just some of the different types used.The systems are typically shielded with low background materials such as pre-World War II steel from battleships. Interferences can come from naturally occurring radioactive material, medically administered radiopharmaceuticals, equipment instability, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation and other sources. These contribute to the uncertainties in measurement results that can range from 10% to 1000% or more depending on the measurement system, the energy of the radiation associated with the radionuclide to be measured, the accuracy of the phantom versus the person especially how well the distributions of activity match.

Lynch, Timothy P.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimates of fire environments in ship holds containing radioactive material packages  

SciTech Connect

Fire environments that occur on cargo ships differ significantly from the fire environments found in land transport. Cargo ships typically carry a large amount of flammable fuel for propulsion and shipboard power, and may transport large quantities of flammable cargo. As a result, sea mode transport accident records contain instances of long lasting and intense fires. Since Irradiated Nuclear Fuel (INF) casks are not carried on tankers with large flammable cargoes, most of these dramatic, long burning fires are not relevant threats, and transport studies must concentrate on those fires that are most likely to occur. By regulation, INF casks must be separated from flammable cargoes by a fire-resistant, liquid-tight partition. This makes a fire in an adjacent ship hold the most likely fire threat. The large size of a cargo ship relative to any spent nuclear fuel casks on board, however, may permit a severe, long lasting fire to occur with little or no thermal impact on the casks. Although some flammable materials such as shipping boxes or container floors may exist in the same hold with the cask, the amount of fuel available may not provide a significant threat to the massive transport casks used for radioactive materials. This shipboard fire situation differs significantly from the regulatory conditions specified in 10 CFR 71 for a fully engulfing pool fire. To learn more about the differences, a series of simple thermal analyses has been completed to estimate cask behavior in likely marine and land thermal accident situations. While the calculations are based on several conservative assumptions, and are only preliminary, they illustrate that casks are likely to heat much more slowly in shipboard hold fires than in an open pool fire. The calculations also reinforce the basic regulatory concept that for radioactive materials, the shipping cask, not the ship, is the primary protection barrier to consider.

Koski, J.A.; Cole, J.K.; Hohnstreiter, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of containers for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. This waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr. During the first 50 yr after emplacement, they must be retrievable from the disposal site. Shortly after the containers are emplaced in the repository, they will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of the high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on oxidation and corrosion of the iron- to nickel-based austenitic materials (Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825) and the copper-based alloy materials (CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni)), which are the present candidates for fabrication of the containers. Studies that provided a large amount of data are highlighted, and those areas in which little data exists are identified. Examples of successful applications of these materials are given. On the basis of resistance to oxidation and general corrosion, the austenitic materials are ranked as follows: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is as follows: CDA 715 and CDA 613 (both best), and CDA 102 (worst). 110 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs.

Gdowski, G.E.; Bullen, D.B. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

INVESTIGATION OF THE PRESENCE OF DRUGSTORE BEETLES WITHIN CELOTEX ASSEMBLIES IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During normal operations at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Hanford, WA, drugstore beetles, (Stegobium paniceum (L.) Coleoptera: Anobiidae), were found within the fiberboard subassemblies of two 9975 Shipping Packages. Initial indications were that the beetles were feeding on the Celotex{trademark} assemblies within the package. Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is used in numerous radioactive material packages serving as both a thermal insulator and an impact absorber for both normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. The Department of Energy's Packaging Certification Program (EM-63) directed a thorough investigation to determine if the drugstore beetles were causing damage that would be detrimental to the safety performance of the Celotex{trademark}. The Savannah River National Laboratory is conducting the investigation with entomological expertise provided by Clemson University. The two empty 9975 shipping packages were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory in the fall of 2007. This paper will provide details and results of the ongoing investigation.

Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Balancing health effects and economics in the management of radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

The public perception of the benefits offered by nuclear energy and the risks to health and safety from ionizing radiation has dramatically altered over the fifty years since the advent of nuclear fission. The {open_quotes}Atomic Age{close_quotes} is seldom mentioned anymore. The attitudinal change from the acceptance of nuclear energy as an essential component of national defense, {open_quotes}Atoms for Peace,{close_quotes} and a new, abundant, and clean energy source for mankind to the perception of it as an object of protest and fear has resulted from events that included nuclear fallout from atmospheric weapons testing, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, classified radiation experiments, and a generally hostile news media. As a reflection of public concerns over radiation, federal, state, and local regulations have greatly multiplied in both the types of radioactive materials addressed and the threshold activity levels at which these regulations become effective.

Sandquist, G.M.; Slaughter, D.M.; Rogers, V.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Regulatory analysis on criteria for the release of patients administered radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received two petitions to amend its regulations in 10 CFR Parts 20 and 35 as they apply to doses received by members of the public exposed to patients released from a hospital after they have been administered radioactive material. While the two petitions are not identical they both request that the NRC establish a dose limit of 5 millisieverts (0.5 rem) per year for individuals exposed to patients who have been administered radioactive materials. This Regulatory Analysis evaluates three alternatives. Alternative 1 is for the NRC to amend its patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to use the more stringent dose limit of 1 millisievert per year in 10 CFR 20.1301(a) for its patient release criteria. Alternative 2 is for the NRC to continue using the existing patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 of 1,110 megabecquerels of activity or a dose rate at one meter from the patient of 0.05 millisievert per hour. Alternative 3 is for the NRC to amend the patient release criteria in 10 CFR 35.75 to specify a dose limit of 5 millisieverts for patient release. The evaluation indicates that Alternative 1 would cause a prohibitively large increase in the national health care cost from retaining patients in a hospital longer and would cause significant personal and psychological costs to patients and their families. The choice of Alternatives 2 or 3 would affect only thyroid cancer patients treated with iodine-131. For those patients, Alternative 3 would result in less hospitalization than Alternative 2. Alternative 3 has a potential decrease in national health care cost of $30,000,000 per year but would increase the potential collective dose from released therapy patients by about 2,700 person-rem per year, mainly to family members.

Schneider, S.; McGuire, S.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Behling, U.H.; Behling, K.; Goldin, D. [Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyurethane foam has been widely used as an impact absorbing and thermal insulating material for large radioactive materials packages, since the 1980's. With the adoption of the regulatory crush test requirement, for smaller packages, polyurethane foam has been adopted as a replacement for cane fiberboard, because of its ability to withstand the crush test. Polyurethane foam is an engineered material whose composition is much more closely controlled than that of cane fiberboard. In addition, the properties of the foam can be controlled by controlling the density of the foam. The conditions under which the foam is formed, whether confined or unconfined have an affect on foam properties. The study reported here reviewed the application of polyurethane foam in RAM packagings and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Survey of degradation modes of candidate materials for high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three copper-based alloys and three iron- to nickel-based austenitic alloys are being considered as possible materials for fabrication of high-level radioactive-waste disposal containers. The waste will include spent fuel assemblies from reactors as well as high-level waste in borosilicate glass and will be sent to the prospective site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for disposal. The copper-based alloy materials are CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper), CDA 613 (Cu-7Al), and CDA 715 (Cu-30Ni). The austenitic materials are Types 304L and 316L stainless steels and Alloy 825. The waste-package containers must maintain substantially complete containment for at least 300 yr and perhaps as long as 1000 yr, and they must be retrievable from the disposal site during the first 50 yr after emplacement. The containers will be exposed to high temperatures and high gamma radiation fields from the decay of high-level waste. This volume surveys the available data on the phase stability of both groups of candidate alloys. The austenitic alloys are reviewed in terms of the physical metallurgy of the iron-chromium-nickel system, martensite transformations, carbide formation, and intermetallic-phase precipitation. The copper-based alloys are reviewed in terms of their phase equilibria and the possibility of precipitation of the minor alloying constituents. For the austenitic materials, the ranking based on phase stability is: Alloy 825 (best), Type 316L stainless steel, and then Type 304L stainless steel (worst). For the copper-based materials, the ranking is: CDA 102 (oxygen-free copper) (best), and then both CDA 715 and CDA 613. 75 refs., 24 figs., 6 tabs.

Bullen, D.B.; Gdowski, G.E. (Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TYPE A(F)RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

SciTech Connect

In a coordinated effort, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed the elimination of the Specification Packaging from 49 CFR 173.[1] In accordance with the Federal Register, issued on October 1, 2004, new fabrication of Specification Packages would no longer be authorized. In accordance with the NRC final rulemaking published January 26, 2004, Specification Packagings are mandated by law to be removed from service no later than October 1, 2008. This coordinated effort and resulting rulemaking initiated a planned phase out of Specification Type B and Type A fissile (F) material transportation packages within the Department of Energy (DOE) and its subcontractors. One of the Specification Packages affected by this regulatory change is the UN1A2 Specification Package, per DOT 49 CFR 173.417(a)(6). To maintain continuing shipments of DOE materials currently transported in UN1A2 Specification Package after the existing authorization expires, a replacement Type A(F) material packaging design is under development by the Savannah River National Laboratory. This paper presents a summary of the prototype design effort and testing of the new Type A(F) Package development for the DOE. This paper discusses the progress made in the development of a Type A Fissile Packaging to replace the expiring 49 CFR UN1A2 Specification Fissile Package. The Specification Package was mostly a single-use waste disposal container. The design requirements and authorized radioactive material contents of the UN1A2 Specification Package were defined in 49 CFR. A UN1A2 Specification Package was authorized to ship up to 350 grams of U-235 in any enrichment and in any non-pyrophoric form. The design was specified as a 55-gallon 1A2 drum overpack with a body constructed from 18 gauge steel with a 16 gauge drum lid. Drum closure was specified as a standard 12-gauge ring closure. The inner product container size was not specified but was listed as any container that met Specification 7A requirements per 49 CFR 178.350. Specification 7A containers were required to withstand Type A packaging tests required by 49CFR173.465 with compliance demonstrated through testing, analysis or similarity to other containers. The maximum weight of the 7A product container, the radioactive content, and any internal packaging was limited to 200 lbs. The total gross weight for the UN1A2 Specification Package was limited to 350 lbs. No additional restrictions were applied. Authorization for use did not require the UN1A2 Specification Package to be tested to the Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) required for performance based, Type A(F) packages certified by the NRC or DOE. The Type A(F) Packaging design discussed in this paper is required to be in compliance with the regulatory safety requirements defined in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR 71.41 through 71.47 and 10 CFR71.71. Sub-criticality of content must be maintained under the Hypothetical Accident Conditions specified under 10 CFR71.73. These federal regulations, and other applicable DOE Orders and Guides, govern design requirements for a Type A(F) package. Type A(F) packages with less than an A2 quantity of radioactive material are not required to have a leak testable boundary. With this exception a Type A(F) package design is subject to the same test requirements set forth for the design of a performance based Type B packaging.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

Egidi, P.V.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Materials Reliability Program: Welding Residual Stress Dissimilar Metal Butt-Weld Finite Element Modeling Handbook (MRP-317)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in the process of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 82/182 nickel-alloy (i.e., dissimilar metal) piping butt welds in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Numerical methods by finite element analyses are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations, in ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

179

IMPROVING THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DRUM TYPEPACKAGES BY USING HEAT PIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a feasibility study to improve thermal loading of existing radioactive material packages by using heat pipes. The concept could be used to channel heat in certain directions and dissipate to the environment. The concept is applied to a drum type package because the drum type packages are stored and transported in an upright position. This orientation is suitable for heat pipe operation that could facilitate the heat pipe implementation in the existing well proven package designs or in new designs where thermal loading is high. In this position, heat pipes utilize gravity very effectively to enhance heat flow in the upward direction Heat pipes have extremely high effective thermal conductivity that is several magnitudes higher than the most heat conducting metals. In addition, heat pipes are highly unidirectional so that the effective conductivity for heat transfer in the reverse direction is greatly reduced. The concept is applied to the 9977 package that is currently going through the DOE certification review. The paper presents computer simulations using typical off-the-shelf heat pipe available configurations and performance data for the 9977 package. A path forward is outlined for implementing the concepts for further study and prototype testing.

Gupta, N

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modelling of residual stresses in the shot peened material C-1020 by artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study consists of two cases: (i) The experimental analysis: Shot peening is a method to improve the resistance of metal pieces to fatigue by creating regions of residual stress. In this study, the residual stresses induced in steel specimen type ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Layer removal technique, Residual stresses, Shot peening

Cetin Karata?; Adnan Sozen; Emrah Dulek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Confidentiality and the Desire for Open Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and Confidentiality, Security and the Desire for Open the Desire for Open Communication in the Communication in the Transport of Radioactive Transport of Radioactive Material to a National Material to a National Repository Repository A presentation to the A presentation to the DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) DOE Transportation External Coordination (TEC) Working Group Meeting Working Group Meeting Albuquerque, NM Albuquerque, NM 21 21 - - 23 April 2004 23 April 2004 Ronald B. Pope Consultant April 2004 April 2004 Confidentiality Confidentiality - - TEC Working TEC Working Group Group - - Albuquerque Albuquerque 2 2 Objectives Objectives Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues Address and prompt TEC discussion on issues

182

Method for making a low density polyethylene waste form for safe disposal of low level radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method of the invention low density polyethylene pellets are mixed in a predetermined ratio with radioactive particulate material, then the mixture is fed through a screw-type extruder that melts the low density polyethylene under a predetermined pressure and temperature to form a homogeneous matrix that is extruded and separated into solid monolithic waste forms. The solid waste forms are adapted to be safely handled, stored for a short time, and safely disposed of in approved depositories.

Colombo, P.; Kalb, P.D.

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fate and transport processes controlling the migration of hazardous and radioactive materials from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS)  

SciTech Connect

Desert vadose zones have been considered as suitable environments for the safe and long-term isolation of hazardous wastes. Low precipitation, high evapotranspiration and thick unsaturated alluvial deposits commonly found in deserts make them attractive as waste disposal sites. The fate and transport of any contaminant in the subsurface is ultimately determined by the operating retention and transformation processes in the system and the end result of the interactions among them. Retention (sorption) and transformation are the two major processes that affect the amount of a contaminant present and available for transport. Retention processes do not affect the total amount of a contaminant in the soil system, but rather decrease or eliminate the amount available for transport at a given point in time. Sorption reactions retard the contaminant migration. Permanent binding of solute by the sorbent is also possible. These processes and their interactions are controlled by the nature of the hazardous waste, the properties of the porous media and the geochemical and environmental conditions (temperature, moisture and vegetation). The present study summarizes the available data and investigates the fate and transport processes that govern the migration of contaminants from the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). While the site is currently used only for low-level radioactive waste disposal, past practices have included burial of material now considered hazardous. Fundamentals of chemical and biological transformation processes are discussed subsequently, followed by a discussion of relevant results.

Estrella, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

A workshop on developing risk assessment methods for medical use of radioactive material. Volume 2: Supporting documents  

SciTech Connect

A workshop was held at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, August 16--18, 1994 on the topic of risk assessment on medical devices that use radioactive isotopes. Its purpose was to review past efforts to develop a risk assessment methodology to evaluate these devices, and to develop a program plan and a scoping document for future methodology development. This report contains presentation material and a transcript of the workshop. Participants included experts in the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, risk assessment, human-error analysis, and human factors. Staff from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) associated with the regulation of medical uses of radioactive materials and with research into risk-assessment methods participated in the workshop. The workshop participants concurred in NRC`s intended use of risk assessment as an important technology in the development of regulations for the medical use of radioactive material and encouraged the NRC to proceed rapidly with a pilot study. Specific recommendations are included in the executive summary and the body of this report.

Tortorelli, J.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radioactivity in consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

188

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen- containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, Dale Elden; Hamp, S.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

191

Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

WNA Working Group Position Statement on Removal from Regulatory Control of Material Containing Radioactivity - Exemption and Clearance  

SciTech Connect

The removal from regulatory control of materials containing trace levels of radioactivity, often referred to as 'exemption' or 'clearance', is of considerable importance to the nuclear industry and is subject to ongoing international debate. Its significance is indeed increasing as some sites move towards decommissioning, with much material being capable of recovery, recycling and re-use or simple disposal while maintaining the highest levels of public safety. This Statement outlines the key issues under consideration within the regulatory framework. Moreover, it identifies those aspects necessary for the successful application of a practical system of control. In this regard, the recent IAEA safety guide called Application of the Concept of Exclusion, Exemption and Clearance (RS-G-1.7) is paving the way towards implementing greater international convergence and consistency. (authors)

Saint-Pierre, S.; Coates, R. [World Nuclear Association (WNA), 22a St. James's Square London SWIY 4JH (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A guide for the ASME code for austenitic stainless steel containment vessels for high-level radioactive materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and fabrication criteria recommended by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for high-level radioactive materials containment vessels used in packaging is found in Section III, Division 1, Subsection NB of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This Code provides material, design, fabrication, examination, and testing specifications for nuclear power plant components. However, many of the requirements listed in the Code are not applicable to containment vessels made from austenitic stainless steel with austenitic or ferritic steel bolting. Most packaging designers, engineers, and fabricators are intimidated by the sheer volume of requirements contained in the Code; consequently, the Code is not always followed and many requirements that do apply are often overlooked during preparation of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that constitutes the basis to evaluate the packaging for certification.

Raske, D.T.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Evaluation of solid-based separation materials for the pretreatment of radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Separation science will play an important role in pretreating nuclear wastes stored at various US Department of Energy Sites. The application of separation processes offers potential economic and environmental benefits with regards to remediating these sites. For example, at the Hanford Site, the sizeable volume of radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks could be partitioned into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) and a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW). After waste separation, only the smaller volume of HLW would require costly vitrification and geologic disposal. Furthermore, the quality of the remaining LLW form (e.g., grout) would be improved due to the lower inventory of radionuclides present in the LLW stream. This report investigates extraction chromatography as a possible separation process for Hanford wastes.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Wester, D.W.; Morrey, J.R.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Strengthening, Crack Arrest And Multiple Cracking In Brittle Materials Using Residual Stresses.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments include a method for forming a glass which displays visible cracking prior to failure when subjected to predetermined stress level that is greater than a predetermined minimum stress level and less than a failure stress level. The method includes determining a critical flaw size in the glass and introducing a residual stress profile to the glass so that a plurality of visible cracks are formed prior to failure when the glass is subjected to a stress that is greater than the minimum stress level and lower than the critical stress. One method for forming the residual stress profile includes performing a first ion exchange so that a first plurality of ions of a first element in the glass are exchanged with a second plurality of ions of a second element that have a larger volume than the first ions. A second ion exchange is also performed so that a plurality of the second ions in the glass are exchanged back to ions of the first element.

Green, David J. (State College, PA); Sglavo, Vincenzo M. (Roncegno, IT); Tandon, Rajan (Fremont, CA)

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of U.S. Regulations for the Transportation of Radioactive Materials - A Look Back Over the Past 40 Years  

SciTech Connect

The discussion in this Chapter is a relatively straightforward, chronological description of the development of U.S. transportation regulations for radioactive materials over the past 40 years. Although primarily based on the development of U.S. regulations for the shipment of what is now known as Type B quantities of radioactive materials, the information presented details the interactions between a number of U.S. governmental agencies, commissions, and departments, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the most part, the information that follows was taken directly from the Federal Register, between 1965 and 2004, which, within the boundaries of the U.S., is considered law, or at least policy at the federal level. Starting in 1978, however, the information presented also takes a look at a series of so-called Guidance Documents, including Regulatory Guides (Reg. Guides), NUREGs, and NUREG/CRs. Developed originally by the U.S. Atomic Energy Agency (AEC), and later adapted by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the NUREGs and NUREG/CRs cited in this Chapter clearly specify a preferred methodology that can be used to meet the regulatory requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR Part 71, or, more simply, 10 CFR 71). As is appropriate for the discussion in this Chapter, the methodology preferred by the NRC, not as law but as guidance, was adapted directly from the requirements of the ASME's Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code. The information provided below is provided with little embellishment. By taking the information directly from the Federal Register, it becomes a story that tells itself. The information is self-consistent, and it provides all of the details behind the numerous policy decisions that led to the development of the U.S. regulations, as they were in their time, and as they are now.

Hafner, R S

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

197

Calculation of releases of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents from pressurized water reactors (PWR-GALE Code). Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report revises the original issuance of NUREG-0017, ''Calculation of Releases of Radioactive Materials in Gaseous and Liquid Effluents from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR-GALE-Code)'' (April 1976), to incorporate more recent operating data now available as well as the results of a number of in-plant measurement programs at operating pressurized water reactors. The PWR-GALE Code is a computerized mathematical model for calculating the releases of radioactive material in gaseous and liquid effluents (i.e., the gaseous and liquid source terms). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses the PWR-GALE Code to determine conformance with the requirements of Appendix I to 10 CFR Part 50.

Chandrasekaran, T.; Lee, J.Y.; Willis, C.A.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the period from April 1, 2001 through June 30, 2001, under the NGA grant.

Ethan W. Brown

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY  

SciTech Connect

Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Materials Reliability Program: Weld Residual Stress Measurement and Implications for Stress Corrosion Testing (MRP-282)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) data for heat-affected zones (HAZs) in thick-walled components of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT are needed to support the Materials Reliability Program (MRP) crack growth rate (CGR) disposition relationship for Alloy 600 (EPRI report 1006695, MRP-55 Revision 1). Such data are also needed to ensure that welding of Alloy 690TT does not deleteriously affect its inherent resistance to PWSCC. Various welded plates of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT were produced...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

RESRAD Computer Code- Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989.

204

RADIOACTIVE BATTERY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

1959-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

205

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from May 1, 1999, through July 30, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and continued to facilitate interactions between the states and DOE to develop a foundation for an ongoing substantive relationship between the Governors of key states and Secretary Richardson.

Ann M. Beauchesne

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from February 1, 1999, through April 30, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and continued to serve as a liaison between the NGA FFCA Task Force states and the Department.

Ann M. Beauchesne

1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in DOE's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure strategy and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from December 31, 1997 through April 30, 1998 under the NGA project. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and provided ongoing support to state-DOE interactions in preparation for the March 30-31, 1998 NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force Meeting with DOE. maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, DOE's Environmental Management Budget, and DOE's proposed Intersite Discussions.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Governors Association (NGA) project ``Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; Interstate waste and materials shipments; and Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the period from October 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past three months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; convened and facilitated the October 6--8 NGA FFCA Task Force Meeting in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and continued to facilitate interactions between the states and DOE to develop a foundation for an ongoing substantive relationship between the Governors of key states and the Department.

Ann M. Beauchesne

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials. Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities. Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex. Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in DOE's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure strategy and contractor integration analysis. Interstate waste and materials shipments. Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from April 30, 1998 through June 30, 1998 under the NGA project. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; and provided ongoing support to state-DOE interactions. maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, DOE's Environmental Management Budget, and DOE's proposed Intersite Discussions.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: (1) Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; (2) Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; (3) Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; (4) Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; (5) Interstate waste and materials shipments; and (6) Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from October 1, 1998 through January 31, 1999, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: (1) maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; (2) maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and (3) continued to serve as a liaison between the NGA FFCA Task Force states and the Department.

Ann M. Beauchesne

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

THE NGA-DOE GRANT TO EXAMINE CRITICAL ISSUES RELATED TO RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND MATERIALS DISPOSITION INVOLVING DOE FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Through the National Governors' Association (NGA) project ''Critical Issues Related to Radioactive Waste and Materials Disposition Involving DOE Facilities'' NGA brings together Governors' policy advisors, state regulators, and DOE officials to examine critical issues related to the cleanup and operation of DOE nuclear weapons and research facilities. Topics explored through this project include: (1) Decisions involving disposal of mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and disposition of nuclear materials; (2) Decisions involving DOE budget requests and their effect on environmental cleanup and compliance at DOE facilities; (3) Strategies to treat mixed, low-level, and transuranic (TRU) waste and their effect on individual sites in the complex; (4) Changes to the FFCA site treatment plans as a result of proposals in the Department's Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure plan and contractor integration analysis; (5) Interstate waste and materials shipments; and (6) Reforms to existing RCRA and CERCLA regulations/guidance to address regulatory overlap and risks posed by DOE wastes. The overarching theme of this project is to help the Department improve coordination of its major program decisions with Governors' offices and state regulators and to ensure such decisions reflect input from these key state officials and stakeholders. This report summarizes activities conducted during the quarter from June 1, 1998 through September 30, 1998, under the NGA grant. The work accomplished by the NGA project team during the past four months can be categorized as follows: (1) maintained open communication with DOE on a variety of activities and issues within the DOE environmental management complex; (2) maintained communication with NGA Federal Facilities Compliance Task Force members regarding DOE efforts to formulate a configuration for mixed low-level waste and low-level treatment and disposal, external regulation of DOE; and EM Integration activities; and (3) continued to serve as a liaison between the NGA FFCA Task Force states and the Department.

Ann B. Beauchesne

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

WEB RESOURCE: Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 8, 2007 ... This resource offers a a very broad explanation of how the Belgian Agency for Management of Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Material ...

213

SOME RESULTS OF STUDIES ON THE UPTAKE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS BY MARINE AND ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ORGANISMS USING CONTINUOUS CULTURE TECHNIQUES. Technical Report XXI  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in studies on the uptake of radioactive waste products by phytoplackton organisms in a marine environment. Laboratory studies were made of the growth requirements of a number of phytoplankton algae. Data are included on the uptake of Ru/sup 103/ by a green algae and oysters and the uptake of Zn/sup 65/ by selected marine algae. The advantages of the use of continuous culturing techniques for the study of the uptake of radioactive materials by phytoplankton organisms are discussed. (C.H.)

Taylor, W.R.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

BIOLOGICAL DECOMPOSITION OF RADIOACTIVE LAUNDRY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests was conducted on a laundry waste containing radtoactive materials, using an activated sludge process, to determine whether the organic materials which would interfere with a process of flocculation and adsorption could be removed along with a substantial quantity of the radioactive material. A trickling filter was used to treat the waste over a long period of time. The filter removed nearly all of the activity and most of the organic compounds. However, sufficient residual activity remained in the effluent to require either two-stage operation or final processing by flocculation and adsorption. Recirculation was beneficial. A supplementary bacteria feed of ammonium nitrate was necessary. (auth)

Wiederhold, E.W.

1954-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

INSPECTION OF THE ACCOUNTABILITY AND CONTROL OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OF THE ACCOUNTABILITY AND CONTROL OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES AT SELECTED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SITES, IG-0544 Sealed radioactive sources consist of radioactive material either...

216

Uses of ANSI/HPS N13.12-1999, "Surface and Volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance" and Comparison with Existing Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August of 1999, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved a standard for clearance of materials contaminated with residual levels of radioactivity. "Clearance," as used in the standard, means the movement of material from the control of a regulatory agency to a use or disposition that has no further regulatory controls of any kind. The standard gives derived screening levels (DSLs) in Bq/g and Bq/cm2 for 50 radionuclides. Items or materials with residual surface and volume radioactivity levels below the DSLs can be cleared, that is, managed without regard to their residual radioactivity. Since federal agencies are to use voluntary, industry standards developed by the private sector whenever possible, the standard should play an important role in DOE's regulatory process. The thrust of this report is to explain the standard, make simple observations on its usefulness to DOE, and to explore uses of the standard within DOE facilities beyond the clearance of radioactive materials.

Stansbury, Paul S.; Strom, Daniel J.

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Radioactive Materials License Commitments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personnel Dosimeters Used at Nuclear Power Reactors," NUREG/CR-1204, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

218

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Radioactive Nickel-63 - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Making Radioactive Nickel-63 Making Radioactive Nickel-63 ORNL-Supplied Nickel-63 Enables High-Sensitivity Explosives, Chemical Weapons, and Narcotics Detectors at Airports Explosives and narcotics detector. Detectors based on ion mobility spectrometry using ORNL 63Ni can now satisfy enhanced Homeland Security requirements at airports and other sensitive locations. When Transportation Security Administration (TSA) inspectors swipe a cloth over your luggage and then place it in an analyzer to check for explosives residue, they are using a device containing 63Ni, a radioactive isotope of nickel, made at ORNL. ORNL is the exclusive producer for 63Ni in North America and perhaps worldwide. "Our only competition would probably be Russia. They have high-flux research reactors and may well be supplying the material also,"

220

10/2/2006 SLAC-I-760-2A08Z-001-R002 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL DECLARATION FORM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation exposure rate: Contact: _____________mR/h 30 cm: _____________mR/h Radioactive contamination: [ ] N/A (Activated only) Internal: _______________dpm/100cm2 [ ] Unknown (External contamination must

Wechsler, Risa H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrocarbon evaluation proposed southeastern New Mexico radioactive material storage site Eddy County, New Mexico. Volume I. Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The proposed radioactive waste material storage site is located in the northern portion of the Delaware Basin. No hydrocarbon production exists within the current boundaries of the ''site area'', but oil and gas are being produced from 60 wells in a 368 square-mile area around the site. These wells produce from the Delaware, Bone Springs, Wolfcamp, Strawn, Atoka and Morrow zones at a total rate of about 22,682 MCF of gas and 429 barrels of oil per day. This area is considered to be potentially rich in hydrocarbon reserves and the lack of fuller development and exploration drilling is due primarily to low gas prices, lack of sales outlets and/or pipelines and moratoriums on drilling in the potash areas. Proved producing and proved nonproducing reserves are present in two wells in the Los Medanos Field area immediately adjacent to the southwest corner of the ''site area''. In addition, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves exist at six potential drilling locations in the Los Medanos Field. Further, probable and possible reserves were assigned to fifteen other potential drilling locations in the northwest and south-central portions of the ''site area''. Total future economically recoverable reserves projected for these wells are 62,253,244 MCF of gas and 409,628 barrels of oil. The future net undiscounted revenue to the oil operators was determined to be $48,410,821. The discounted future net revenue is $21,216,899, discounted at 10 percent per annum. The fair market value for these projected reserves is $12,730,139, assuming a fair market factor of 0.60.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

User`s guide for the KBERT 1.0 code: For the knowledge-based estimation of hazards of radioactive material releases from DOE nuclear facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of worker exposure to radioactive materials during accidents at nuclear facilities is a principal concern of the DOE. The KBERT software has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories under DOE support to address this issue by assisting in the estimation of risks posed by accidents at chemical and nuclear facilities. KBERT is an acronym for Knowledge-Based system for Estimating hazards of Radioactive material release Transients. The current prototype version of KBERT focuses on calculation of doses and consequences to in-facility workers due to accidental releases of radioactivity. This report gives detailed instructions on how a user who is familiar with the design, layout and potential hazards of a facility can use KBERT to assess the risks to workers in that facility. KBERT is a tool that allows a user to simulate possible accidents and observe the predicted consequences. Potential applications of KBERT include the evaluation of the efficacy of evacuation practices, worker shielding, personal protection equipment and the containment of hazardous materials.

Browitt, D.S.; Washington, K.E.; Powers, D.A. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microstructure, residual stress, and mechanical properties of thin film materials for a microfabricated solid oxide fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The microstructure and residual stress of sputter-deposited films for use in microfabricated solid oxide fuel cells are presented. Much of the work focuses on the characterization of a candidate solid electrolyte: Yttria ...

Quinn, David John, Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Submicro and Nano Structured Porous Materials for the Production of High-Intensity Exotic Radioactive Ion Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISOLDE, the CERN Isotope Separator On-line DEvice is a unique source of low energy beams of radioactive isotopes - atomic nuclei that have too many or too few neutrons to be stable. The facility is like a small ‘chemical factory’, giving the possibility of changing one element to another, by selecting the atomic mass of the required isotope beam in the mass separator, rather as the ‘alchemists’ once imagined. It produces a total of more than 1000 different isotopes from helium to radium, with half-lives down to milliseconds, by impinging a 1.4 GeV proton beam from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) onto special targets, yielding a wide variety of atomic fragments. Different components then extract the nuclei and separate them according to mass. The post-accelerator REX (Radioactive beam EXperiment) at ISOLDE accelerates the radioactive beams up to 3 MeV/u for many experiments. A wide international user radioactive ion beam (RIB) community investigates fundamental aspects of nuclear physics, particle...

Fernandes, Sandrina; Stora, Thierry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

MRS (monitored retrievable storage) systems study Task G report: The role and functions of surface storage of radioactive material in the federal waste management system  

SciTech Connect

This is one of nine studies undertaken by contractors to the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), to provide a technical basis for re-evaluating the role of a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The study investigates the functions that could be performed by surface storage of radioactive material within the federal radioactive waste management system, including enabling acceptance of spent fuel from utility owners, scheduling of waste-preparation processes within the system, enhancement of system operating reliability, and conditioning the thermal (decay heat) characteristics of spent fuel emplaced in a repository. The analysis focuses particularly on the effects of storage capacity and DOE acceptance schedule on power reactors. Figures of merit developed include the storage capacity (in metric tons of uranium (MTU)) required to be added beyond currently estimated maximum spent fuel storage capacities and its associated cost, and the number of years that spent fuel pools would remain open after last discharge (in pool-years) and the cost of this period of operation. 27 refs., 36 figs., 18 tabs.

Wood, T.W.; Short, S.M.; Woodruff, M.G.; Altenhofen, M.K.; MacKay, C.A.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ORNL radioactive waste operations  

SciTech Connect

Since its beginning in 1943, ORNL has generated large amounts of solid, liquid, and gaseous radioactive waste material as a by-product of the basic research and development work carried out at the laboratory. The waste system at ORNL has been continually modified and updated to keep pace with the changing release requirements for radioactive wastes. Major upgrading projects are currently in progress. The operating record of ORNL waste operation has been excellent over many years. Recent surveillance of radioactivity in the Oak Ridge environs indicates that atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity were not significantly different from other areas in East Tennesseee. Concentrations of radioactivity in the Clinch River and in fish collected from the river were less than 4% of the permissible concentration and intake guides for individuals in the offsite environment. While some radioactivity was released to the environment from plant operations, the concentrations in all of the media sampled were well below established standards.

Sease, J.D.; King, E.M.; Coobs, J.H.; Row, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

229

Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

Huang Hu; Zhao Hongwei; Shi Chengli; Wu Boda; Fan Zunqiang; Wan Shunguang; Geng Chunyang [College of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Renmin Street 5988, Changchun, Jilin 130025 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lightweight combustion residues-based structural materials for use in mines. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this PrOject is to develop, design, and test artificial supports (post and crib members), for use in mines, which will be manufactured from coal combustion by-products (CCB) based lightweight structural materials. During the last quarter (Dec. 1, 1994--Feb. 28, 1995), it was reported that low LOI ({approx}5%) F-fly ash-based lightweight materials with density ranging from 70-1 110 pcf and compressive strength ranging from about 1,500 psi to 5,000 psi had been developed. During this quarter, 1) similar materials were developed using higher LOI ({approx}1O%) F-fly ash, 2) performance of materials using nylon fibers rather than polypropylene fibers was examined, 3) effect of addition of small amounts of FBC spent bed material on strength-deformation properties was evaluated, 4) flexural strength tests were performed on 2 in. X 2 in. X 12 in. cast beams, 5) compressive strength tests were performed on cast hollow cylinders (6 in. outer diameter, 2.762 in. inner diameter and 12 in. long) and 6) limited number of tests were conducted to determine the effect of mixing speed on strength of developed materials. The results of these studies indicate that 1) suitable lightweight materials using 60--65% higher LOI F-fly ash can be developed for fabrication of artificial supports, 2) nylon fibers perform significantly better than Polypropylene fibers, 3) loss of strength and deformability due to the use of higher LOI fly ash can be offset to some extent by adding 5--10% FBC spent bed material, 4) relationship between flexural strength and compressive strength, similar to that in concrete exists, 5) strength-deformation properties of hollow cylinders are similar to 3 in. X 6 in. solid cylinders, and 6) strength and deformation modulus increase with mixing speed. Two mixes for final development of lightweight materials have been identified and final test` will begin June 1, 1995.

Chugh, Y.P.; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Ghosh, A.K.; Palmer, S.R.; Peng, Suping; Xiao, Y

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF FIRE DEBRIS RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating highly radioactive fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of FD residue from radionuclide metals involves using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers to remove the residues of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most (radioactive) metals. The focus of this research was to develop an examination protocol that was applicable to safe work in facilities where high radiation doses are shielded from the workers (as in radioactive shielded cells or ''hot cells''). We also examined the affinity of stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr and Nd) for sorption by the SPME fibers. This was done under exposure conditions that favor the uptake of FD residues under conditions that will provide little contact between the SPME and the FD material (such as charred carpet or wood that contains commonly-used accelerants). Our results from mass spectrometric analyses indicate that SPME fibers show promise for use in the room temperature head space uptake of organic FD residue (namely, diesel fuel oil, kerosene, gasoline and paint thinner) with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. No inorganic forms of ignitable fluids were included in this study.

Duff, M; Keisha Martin, K; S Crump, S

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of toxic emissions and residues from the controlled combustion of selected polystyrene, polyoelfins, and polyester materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of the plastic industry over the past ten years has more than doubled and has been a significant factor in the growing Municipal Solid Waste disposal problems. The objective of this research was to identify toxic species that may be present in selected cellular plastics that could prove harmful to health and environment once disposed. An experimental procedure was established that would simulate foamed plastics in an open burning situation. The data collected is indicative of a incinerator situation, a method of disposal that is becoming more popular as landfills are more restrictive. To determine the possible release and effect of toxic species during combustion four analyses, were conducted. An Arapahoe Smoke Chamber was utilized to determine the smoke mass from selected materials in accordance with ASTM 4100-D, Standard Gravimetric Determination of Smoke Particulates from Combustion of Plastic Materials. Combustion analysis to determine the concentration (ppm) of NO, and S02 was conducted through the use of a Bacharach combustion analyzer model 300 NSX combustion analyzer. It was observed that the greatest releases of the by-products was from the materials that were characterized as sponges. The 6 lb/ ft2 carpet padding had the highest concentration of NOX with 346.03ppm/m while undergoing combustion in an enclosed environment. This material also had the greatest concentration of S02 at 97.20 ppm/mg. An Anderson 2000 Inc. 1 ACFM Ambient Particle Sizing Sampler (9 stage cascade impactor) was utilized to determine the percent particles that were respirable. The smoke generated during combustion produced particles that were 9195% respirable. The final analyses conducted was the determination of heavy metals content in the cellular plastic materials. Results from the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis indicated that there was a significant concentration of Tin, Aluminum, and Zinc in most of the plastics.

Bertrand, Charlotte Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Protocols for implementing DOE authorized release of radioactive scrap metals  

SciTech Connect

A process to implement the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) policy for authorized release of radioactive materials from DOE facilities is provided in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material, published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. A computerized management tool--P2Pro(RSM)--has been developed to aid in carrying out the release process for radioactive metals. It contains protocols for the authorized release process and relevant information to facilitate the evaluation of scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The P2Pro(RSM) protocols provide DOE and its contractors with an effective, user-friendly tool for managing authorized release activities P2Pro(RSM) is designed to be used in the Windows{sup {trademark}} environment. The protocols incorporate a relational database coupled with a graphic-user interface to guide the user through the appropriate steps so authorized release limits can be developed. With the information provided in the database, an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) optimization process can be easily set up and run for up to 10 alternatives for disposition of radioactive scrap metals. The results of the ALARA optimization process can be printed in a series of reports and submitted as part of the application for the authorized release of the radioactive scrap metals.

Chen, S.Y.; Arnish, J.; Kamboj, S.; Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Pyrolysis of plastic packaging waste: A comparison of plastic residuals from material recovery facilities with simulated plastic waste  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of plastic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of different samples: real waste, simulated and real waste + catalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the effects of inorganic components in the pyrolysis products. - Abstract: Pyrolysis may be an alternative for the reclamation of rejected streams of waste from sorting plants where packing and packaging plastic waste is separated and classified. These rejected streams consist of many different materials (e.g., polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), aluminum, tetra-brik, and film) for which an attempt at complete separation is not technically possible or economically viable, and they are typically sent to landfills or incinerators. For this study, a simulated plastic mixture and a real waste sample from a sorting plant were pyrolyzed using a non-stirred semi-batch reactor. Red mud, a byproduct of the aluminum industry, was used as a catalyst. Despite the fact that the samples had a similar volume of material, there were noteworthy differences in the pyrolysis yields. The real waste sample resulted, after pyrolysis, in higher gas and solid yields and consequently produced less liquid. There were also significant differences noted in the compositions of the compared pyrolysis products.

Adrados, A., E-mail: aitziber_adrados@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Marco, I. de; Caballero, B.M.; Lopez, A.; Laresgoiti, M.F.; Torres, A. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, School of Engineering of Bilbao, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toward the Framework and Implementation for Clearance of Materials from Regulated Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of solid materials from nuclear facilities has been a subject of public debate for several decades. The primary concern has been the potential health effects resulting from exposure to residual radioactive materials to be released for unrestricted use. These debates have intensified in the last decade as many regulated facilities are seeking viable management decisions on the disposition of the large amounts of materials potentially containing very low levels of residual radioactivity. Such facilities include the nuclear weapons complex sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), commercial power plants licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other materials licensees regulated by the NRC or the Agreement States. Other facilities that generate radioactive material containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) or technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) are also seeking to dispose of similar materials that may be radioactively contaminated. In contrast to the facilities operated by the DOE and the nuclear power plants licensed by the NRC, NORM and TENORM facilities are regulated by the individual states. Current federal laws and regulations do not specify criteria for releasing these materials that may contain residual radioactivity of either man-made or natural origin from regulatory controls. In fact, the current regulatory scheme offers no explicit provision as to permit materials being released as ''non-radioactive'', including those that are essentially free of contamination. The only method used to date with limited success has been case-by-case evaluation and approval. In addition, there is a poorly defined and inconsistent regulatory framework for regulating NORM and TENORM. Some years ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) introduced the concept of clearance, that is, controlling releases of any such materials within the regulatory domain. This paper aims to clarify clearance as an important disposition option for solid materials, establish the framework and basis of release, and discuss resolutions regarding the implementation of such a disposition option.

Chen, Shih-Yew; Moeller, Dade W.; Dornsife, William P.; Meyer, H Robert; Lamastra, Anthony; Lubenau, Joel O.; Strom, Daniel J.; Yusko, James G.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, in Areas 2, 3, 9, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 545 is comprised of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): • 02-09-01, Mud Disposal Area • 03-08-03, Mud Disposal Site • 03-17-01, Waste Consolidation Site 3B • 03-23-02, Waste Disposal Site • 03-23-05, Europium Disposal Site • 03-99-14, Radioactive Material Disposal Area • 09-23-02, U-9y Drilling Mud Disposal Crater • 20-19-01, Waste Disposal Site While all eight CASs are addressed in this CADD/CR, sufficient information was available for the following three CASs; therefore, a field investigation was not conducted at these sites: • For CAS 03-08-03, though the potential for subsidence of the craters was judged to be extremely unlikely, the data quality objective (DQO) meeting participants agreed that sufficient information existed about disposal and releases at the site and that a corrective action of close in place with a use restriction is recommended. Sampling in the craters was not considered necessary. • For CAS 03-23-02, there were no potential releases of hazardous or radioactive contaminants identified. Therefore, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for CAU 545 concluded that: “Sufficient information exists to conclude that this CAS does not exist as originally identified. Therefore, there is no environmental concern associated with CAS 03-23-02.” This CAS is closed with no further action. • For CAS 03-23-05, existing information about the two buried sources and lead pig was considered to be sufficient, and safety concerns existed about the stability of the crater component. Therefore, a corrective action of close in place with a use restriction is recommended, and sampling at the site was not considered necessary. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure of CAU 545 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from August 20 through November 02, 2007, as set forth in the CAU 545 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the DQO process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 545 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels established in this CADD/CR. The results of the CAI identified no COCs at the five CASs investigated in CAU 545. As a best management practice, repair of the fence enclosing CAS 03-08-03 has been completed. Therefore, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Close in place COCs at CASs 03-08-03 and 03-23-05 with use restrictions. • No further corrective action for CAU 545. • No Corrective Action Plan. • Corrective Action Unit 545 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 545.

Alfred Wickline

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, consists of seven inactive sites located in the Yucca Flat area and one inactive site in the Pahute Mesa area. The eight CAU 545 sites consist of craters used for mud disposal, surface or buried waste disposed within craters or potential crater areas, and sites where surface or buried waste was disposed. The CAU 545 sites were used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat area during the 1950s through the early 1990s, and in Area 20 in the mid-1970s. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval.

Alfred Wickline

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Materials Interface Interactions Test: Papers presented at the Commission of European Communities workshop on in situ testing of radioactive waste forms and engineered barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three papers in this report were presented at the second international workshop to feature the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT). This Workshop on In Situ Tests on Radioactive Waste Forms and Engineered Barriers was held in Corsendonk, Belgium, on October 13--16, 1992, and was sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities (CEC). The Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre D`Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN, Belgium), and the US Department of Energy (via Savannah River) also cosponsored this workshop. Workshop participants from Belgium, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United States gathered to discuss the status, results and overviews of the MIIT program. Nine of the twenty-five total workshop papers were presented on the status and results from the WIPP MIIT program after the five-year in situ conclusion of the program. The total number of published MIIT papers is now up to almost forty. Posttest laboratory analyses are still in progress at multiple participating laboratories. The first MIIT paper in this document, by Wicks and Molecke, provides an overview of the entire test program and focuses on the waste form samples. The second paper, by Molecke and Wicks, concentrates on technical details and repository relevant observations on the in situ conduct, sampling, and termination operations of the MIIT. The third paper, by Sorensen and Molecke, presents and summarizes the available laboratory, posttest corrosion data and results for all of the candidate waste container or overpack metal specimens included in the MIIT program.

Molecke, M.A.; Sorensen, N.R. [eds.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Wicks, G.G. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (US)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Radioactive isotopes on the Moon  

SciTech Connect

A limited review of experiments and studies of radioactivity and isotope ratios in lunar materials is given. Observations made on the first few millimeters of the surface where the effects of solar flare particles are important, some measurements on individual rocks, and some studies of radioactivities produced deep in the lunar soil by galactic cosmic rays, are among the experiments discussed. (GHT)

Davis, R. Jr.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SRNL - Cementitious Materials Workshop  

... the Department of Energy, ... engineers, project managers, ... status and future direction of the cement materials technology in radioactive waste ...

244

Initial report on the application of laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the analysis of radioactive Hanford Tank Waste materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial LA/MS analyses of Hanford tank waste samples were performed successfully using laboratory and hot cell LA/MS instrumentation systems. The experiments described in this report have demonstrated that the LA/MS data can be used to provide rapid analysis of solid, radioactive Hanford tank waste samples to identify major, minor, and trace constituents (elemental and isotopic) and fission products and radioactive isotopes. The ability to determine isotopic constituents using the LA/MS method yielded significant advantages over ICP/AES analysis by providing valuable information on fission products and radioactive constituents.

Smith, M.R.; Hartman, J.S.; Alexander, M.L.; Mendoza, A.; Hirt, E.H.; Stewart, T.L.; Hansen, M.A.; Park, W.R.; Peters, T.J.; Burghard, B.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NATURE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The integrated processes of nuclear industry are considered to define the nature of wastes. Processes for recovery and preparation of U and Th fuels produce wastes containing concentrated radioactive materials which present problems of confinement and dispersal. Fundamentals of waste treatment are considered from the standpoint of processes in which radioactive materials become a factor such as naturally occurring feed materials, fission products, and elements produced by parasitic neutron capture. In addition, the origin of concentrated fission product wastes is examined, as well as characteristics of present wastes and the level of fission products in wastes. Also, comments are included on high-level wastes from processes other than solvent extraction, active gaseous wastes, and low- to intermediate-level liquid wastes. (J.R.D.)

Culler, F.L. Jr.

1959-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to deal with laboratory waste Radioactive waste: Any laboratory waste, whether chemical or biological, containing radioactive material, should be disposed as radioactive waste. Radioactive waste should be removed from the laboratory to the departmental waste area, soon after finishing the experiment

Maoz, Shahar

247

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

248

SELF SINTERING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for disposal of radioactive liquid waste materials. The wastes are mixed with clays and fluxes to form a ceramic slip and disposed in a thermally insulated container in a layer. The temperature of the layer rises due to conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat boillng off the liquid to fomn a dry mass. The dry mass is then covered with thermal insulation, and the mass is self-sintered into a leach-resistant ceramic cake by further conversion of the energy of radioactivity to heat.

McVay, T.N.; Johnson, J.R.; Struxness, E.G.; Morgan, K.Z.

1959-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method for storing radioactive combustible waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

Dominick, J

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

252

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING In general, building materials contain low levels of radioactivity. For example, the range of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.0 RISK FROM URANIUM MINING WASTE IN BUILDING MATERIALS In general, building materials contain low, especially in buildings constructed with materials containing uranium TENORM mine wastes. In the Grand the wastes from uranium mines have been removed from mining sites and used in local and nearby communities

254

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radioactive waste systems and radioactive effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive waste systems for handling gaseous, liquid, and solid wastes generated at light and pressurized water reactors are described. (TFD)

Row, T.H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

257

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

258

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container.

Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Ziegler, Anton A. (Darien, IL); Serino, David F. (Maplewood, MN); Basnar, Paul J. (Western Springs, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

260

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials More Documents & Publications Status and Future of TRANSCOM Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview NTSF...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Radiological control criteria for materials considered for recycle and reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting technical analyses to support the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Guidance, Air, Water, and Radiation Division (DOE/EH-232) in developing radiological control criteria for recycling or reuse of metals or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The criteria, framed as acceptable concentrations for release of materials for recycling or reuse, are risk-based and were developed through analysis of generic radiation exposure scenarios and pathways. The analysis includes evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and non-health-related impacts of residual radioactivity on electronics and film. The analysis considers 42 key radionuclides that DOE operations are known to generate and that may be contained in recycled or reused metals or equipment. Preliminary results are compared with similar results reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency, by radionuclide grouping.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wallo, A. III [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

Wanetick, S.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"How SAFE are radioactive material transportation packages?" RADCAT 2.0 Now Available RADCATRADTRAN Brochure pdf 237kb...

264

APS Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee March 6, 2012 1. Purpose The APS Safety Radioactive Sample Safety Review Committee (RSSRC) advises the AES Division Director on the radioactive samples to be used at the APS and the adequacy of controls in place for the duration of their use. The RSSRC reviews the radioactive material samples proposed to be run at the APS to ensure that they fall within established safety envelopes of the APS. 2. Membership The RSSRC members are appointed by the AES Division Director. The current members of the RSRC are: B. Glagola AES - Chair S. Davey AES G. Pile AES L. Soderholm CHM J. Vacca RSO W. VanWingeren AES M. Beno XSD E. Alp XSD M. Rivers PUC 3. Method The AES User Safety Coordinator will notify the RSSRC of any samples

265

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

266

Radioactive waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for use in processing radioactive waste materials for shipment and storage in solid form in a container is disclosed. The container includes a top, and an opening in the top which is smaller than the outer circumference of the container. The apparatus includes an enclosure into which the container is placed, solution feed apparatus for adding a solution containing radioactive waste materials into the container through the container opening, and at least one rotatable blade for blending the solution with a fixing agent such as cement or the like as the solution is added into the container. The blade is constructed so that it can pass through the opening in the top of the container. The rotational axis of the blade is displaced from the center of the blade so that after the blade passes through the opening, the blade and container can be adjusted so that one edge of the blade is adjacent the cylindrical wall of the container, to insure thorough mixing. When the blade is inside the container, a substantially sealed chamber is formed to contain vapors created by the chemical action of the waste solution and fixant, and vapors emanating through the opening in the container. The chamber may be formed by placing a removable extension over the top of the container. The extension communicates with the apparatus so that such vapors are contained within the container, extension and solution feed apparatus. A portion of the chamber includes coolant which condenses the vapors. The resulting condensate is returned to the container by the force of gravity.

Nelson, R.E.; Ziegler, A.A.; Serino, D.F.; Basnar, P.J.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

Napier, Bruce A.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

ICME for Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Application of ICME to Weld Process Innovations and Residual Stress ... Incorporation of Residual Stresses into Design of Ni-Base Superalloy ...

269

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

270

Radioactive anomaly discrimination from spectral ratios  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for discriminating a radioactive anomaly from naturally occurring radioactive materials includes detecting a first number of gamma photons having energies in a first range of energy values within a predetermined period of time and detecting a second number of gamma photons having energies in a second range of energy values within the predetermined period of time. The method further includes determining, in a controller, a ratio of the first number of gamma photons having energies in the first range and the second number of gamma photons having energies in the second range, and determining that a radioactive anomaly is present when the ratio exceeds a threshold value.

Maniscalco, James; Sjoden, Glenn; Chapman, Mac Clements

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Simplified scheme or radioactive plume calculations  

SciTech Connect

A simplified mathematical scheme to estimate external whole-body $gamma$ radiation exposure rates from gaseous radioactive plumes was developed for the Rio Blanco Gas Field Nuclear Stimulation Experiment. The method enables one to calculate swiftly, in the field, downwind exposure rates knowing the meteorological conditions and $gamma$ radiation exposure rates measured by detectors positioned near the plume source. The method is straightforward and easy to use under field conditions without the help of mini-computers. It is applicable to a wide range of radioactive plume situations. It should be noted that the Rio Blanco experiment was detonated on May 17, 1973, and no seep or release of radioactive material occurred. (auth)

Gibson, T.A.; Montan, D.N.

1976-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

RADIOACTIVITY IN RAIN WATER IN BANGKOK  

SciTech Connect

In order to check the effect of nuclear explosions on the atmosphere over Bangkok, rain water was evaporated and the radioactivity of the residue obtained was counted by a G. M. counter. The result shows that the radioactivity in the rain water began to rise from the normal level since 26 September 1961, reached the maximum on 10 November 1961, and then slowly declined. Because the level of radiation remained above that of the Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) for only a short time, it did not constitute a health hazard. Analysis of the residue of rain water indicates that the increase in radiation is caused by the fall-out from the Russian tests of nuclear weapons in the air from September to October 1961. (auth)

Sundara-vicharana, Y.; Bhodigen, S.; Hayodom, V.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Costing forest residue recovery through simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The search for alternative energy sources has renewed interest in the energy potential of wood. Supplies of wood residue seem to be a likely source of material and the greatest volumes of residue are located in the forest. Methods are needed to more ...

Leonard R. Johnson; Edward L. Fisher

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

What are Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste are materials from nuclear power plants and government defense programs. These materials contain highly radioactive elements, such as cesium, strontium, technetium, and neptunium. Some of these elements will remain radioactive for a few years, while others will be radioactive for millions of years. Exposure to such radioactive materials can cause human health problems. Scientists worldwide agree that the safest way to manage these materials is to dispose of them deep underground in what is called a geologic repository.

DOE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radioactive Waste Management Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

SCAVENGING OF RADIOACTIVE AEROSOLS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of decontaminatinig an atmosphere from suspended radioactive particles by introducing silicon tetrafluoride whereby the particles precipitate and are removed, is described. (AEC)

Rosinski, J.; Werle, D.K.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Upgrading the Radioactive Waste Management Infrastructure in Azerbaijan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radionuclide uses in Azerbaijan are limited to peaceful applications in the industry, medicine, agriculture and research. The Baku Radioactive Waste Site (BRWS) 'IZOTOP' is the State agency for radioactive waste management and radioactive materials transport. The radioactive waste processing, storage and disposal facility is operated by IZOTOP since 1963 being significantly upgraded from 1998 to be brought into line with international requirements. The BRWS 'IZOTOP' is currently equipped with state-of-art devices and equipment contributing to the upgrade the radioactive waste management infrastructure in Azerbaijan in line with current internationally accepted practices. The IAEA supports Azerbaijan specialists in preparing syllabus and methodological materials for the Training Centre that is currently being organized on the base of the Azerbaijan BRWS 'IZOTOPE' for education of specialists in the area of safety management of radioactive waste: collection, sorting, processing, conditioning, storage and transportation. (authors)

Huseynov, A. [Baku Radioactive Waste Site IZOTOP, Baku (Azerbaijan); Batyukhnova, O. [State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ojovan, M. [Sheffield Univ., Immobilisation Science Lab. (United Kingdom); Rowat, J. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Safety and Security, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REGULATIONS & GUIDANCE SEARCH SITE MAP SITE MAP SAFE HOME Search Site RAM PACKAGES What are they? When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record TESTING & CERTIFICATION How are packages certified? What are full-scale tests? What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents?

279

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Mack Truck and Subaru Collision Crush Test 200,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [CRUSH test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 60,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [CRUSH scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test* is designed to protect against include: the package being under a vehicle during a pile-up accident the package being pinned between two vehicles during a collision. The 55 gallon drum is an overpack for a smaller (6-inch diameter x 18-inch long, 1/4-inch thick stainless steel walled) package that is inside. Note*: This test is ONLY for packages weighing less than 500 kg (1100 lbs). On April 25, 1996, a Mack truck with a concrete mixer body, unable to stop, proceeded through an intersection at the bottom of an exit ramp. It collided with and overrode a Subaru passenger car near Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.

280

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Purpose Background Results References Demonstrating Target Hardness between an Unyielding Target vs. Concrete Target During 30-foot Drop Tests. 30-foot 1/2 scale DHLW (Defense High-Level Waste) cask drop onto an unyielding target click to play, avi 4.7MB 30-foot 1/2 scale DHLW (Defense High-Level Waste) cask drop onto a 1/2 scale (5 1/2 inch) concrete pad click to play, avi 2.5MB 30-foot van drop onto an unyielding target click to play, avi 3.7MB 30-foot van drop onto an 11 inch concrete pad click to play, avi 3.4MB Purpose [ Back to top of page ] The purpose of this series of tests is to visually demonstrate the severity of the Type B Hypothetical Accident Condition impact test (10 CFR Part

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Fire Test to a Gasoline Tanker and Sedan collision under an Overpass Fire Test [FIRE test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison [FIRE scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that the above test is designed to protect against include being involved in an accident with a gasoline tanker truck, causing the gasoline contents to burn the package. The amount of fuel being burned is approximately 5000 gallons in a pool 30 feet in diameter. During this test, the package is fully engulfed in the fire and is not protected by a transporting vehicle. On October 9, 1997, a truck tractor pulling a cargo tank semitrailer was going under an overpass of the New York State Thruway in Yonkers, New York when it was struck by a sedan. The car hit the right side of the cargo tank in the area of the tank's external loading/unloading lines, releasing the 8800 gallons of gasoline they contained.

282

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Structural Analysis and Thermal Analysis of RAM Packaging Sandia National Laboratories jpeg, 24K Click to view picture AVI, 344K Click to view movie jpeg, 100K Click to view picture AVI, 1.5 MB Click to view movie C-1500 Truck Model Crash Analysis National Crash Analysis Center jpeg, 60K Click to view picture AVI, 616K Click to view movie AVI, 1.4 MB Click to view movie AVI, 368K Click to view movie Ship-to-Ship Collision Sandia National Laboratories Simulation Testing of Tire Designs Sandia National Laboratories jpeg, 72K Click to view picture AVI, 6.9 MB Click to view movie jpeg, 88K

283

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Responses Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions [RAD Pie Chart] Exposure Source Average annual dose to an individual in the United States (millirem) Natural sources (including radon) - Ground, cosmic, and terrestrial - Internal radiation 200 mrem 100 mrem Occupational 0.9 mrem Nuclear Fuel Cycle 0.05 mrem Consumer Products - Tobacco - Other (i.e., smoke detectors, exit signs, luminous watch dials) Dose to lungs ~16,000 mrem 5 - 13 mrem Environmental Sources 0.06 mrem Medical - Diagnostic X-rays - Nuclear Medicine 39 mrem 14 mrem Approximate Annual Total 360 mrem [Radiation] Everyone in the world is continuously exposed to naturally-occuring background radiation. The average radiation dose received by the United

284

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Accurate determination of package behavior for impact and puncture accidents can be obtained by testing sub-scale models. This technique is frequently used in conjunction with full-scale tests and computer analyses. Full-scale spent fuel packages can weigh 250,000 pounds (three fully loaded semi-trucks) or more, therefore the ability to determine the behavior with scale-models improves testing safety and reduces testing costs. *** 1/4 Scale Free Drop Test 1/4 Scale Component Free Drop Test 1/3 Scale Puncture Test 1/2 Scale Puncture Test 1/8 Scale Rail Crush Test [scale model DROP test] Click to view picture [scale model component test]

285

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Package Certification Using Computer Analysis Engineering Principles Established by Three Early Scientists Engineering Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysis Structures Analyzed WITH the Use of Computer Analysis What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. Computer analysis is an application of known engineering principles that take advantage of high-power computing capabilities in solving the response of computer models to various environments with complex mathematical calculations. Computer analysis can be used for package certification by generating a

286

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are examples of severe testing? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target hardness. These full-scale tests, conducted at Sandia National Laboratories Transportation Programs, demonstrate how spent fuel casks perform in accident environments that are more similar to what may happen during actual shipments. Each of the tests included the transportation vehicle as well as the cask. The damage to the casks from these tests was less than the damage during the regulatory hypothetical accident tests, demonstrating that the regulatory tests are more severe. DESCRIPTION PHOTO DURING TEST PHOTO AFTER TEST PHOTO OF PACKAGE AFTER TEST VIDEO OF TEST CRASH TEST Cask rail car with a 74 ton Type B Package on it crashing into a 690 ton concrete block at 81 miles per hour [photo]

287

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Free Drop Comparison Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Hypothetical Accident Conditions: Six tests as defined in 10 CFR Part 71.73 of the NRC transportation regulations were established to provide repeatable and definable conditions that encompass most real-life accidents. The real-life accidents on this page are comparisons to the environments that the regulatory hypothetical accidents protect against. The collision forces or fire temperature and duration that were present in each accident are similar to the conditions that spent fuel casks are designed to survive. Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision [DROP scenario] Mack Truck and Subaru Collision [CRUSH scenario] Freight Train and Freight Train Collision

288

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comments & Questions Gary Lanthrum, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: glanthrum@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-5277 Fax: (505) 845-5508 Ashok K. Kapoor, DOE/NTP Albuquerque, NM E-mail: akapoor@doeal.gov Phone: (505) 845-4574 Fax: (505) 845-5508 David R. Miller, SNL/TP Manager, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: drmille@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 284-2574 Fax: (505) 844-2829 Mona L. Aragon, SNL/TP Advanced Visualization, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: mlrage@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-2541 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Doug Ammerman, SNL/TP Structural Analysis, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: djammer@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 845-8158 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Fran Kanipe, SNL/TP Computer Programming, Albuquerque, NM E-mail: flkanip@sandia.gov Phone: (505) 844-1121 Fax: (505) 844-0244 Carlos Lopez, SNL/TP Thermal Analysis, Albuquerque, NM

289

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary of Nuclear Terms [Majority from NRC] Contacts Comments & Questions Photos 30-Foot Free Drop Test jpeg, 788K [photo] Click to view picture 1100-Pound Crush Test jpeg, 448K [photo] Click to view picture 40-Inch Puncture Test jpeg, 912K [photo] Click to view picture 30-Minute Pool Fire Test jpeg, 88K [photo] Click to view picture 8-Hour Immersion Test jpeg, 416K [photo] Click to view picture Graphics Unyielding Target jpeg, 144K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic title jpeg, 000K [graphic] Click to view graphic Movies 30-Foot Free Drop Test AVI, 4.5 MB [movie] Click to view movie 1/3-Scale Puncture Test AVI, 3.3 MB [movie] Click to view movie 30-Minute

290

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crush Comparison Puncture Comparison Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Free Drop Test to a Passenger Train and Semi-truck Trailer Collision Free Drop Test 3,000,000 lbs of force present in this package certification test. [DROP test] Click to view picture Real-life Accident Comparison 1,000,000 lbs of force present in this real-life accident. [DROP scenario] Click to view picture Real-life scenarios that are encompassed by the above test include: the package being struck by a train traveling 60 MPH the package falling off of a 30-foot high bridge onto solid rock or from a higher bridge onto a highway or railroad the package running into a bridge support or rock slope at 45 MPH. Packages are transported onboard trucks or rail cars, which absorb some of the impact energy, reducing the resulting damage to the packages from the accident. On May 2, 1995, an O&J Gordon Trucking Company truck consisting of a tractor and a lowbed semitrailer became lodged on a high-profile (hump) railroad grade crossing near Sycamore, South Carolina. About 35 minutes later, the truck was struck by southbound Amtrak train No. 81, Silver Star, en route from New York City to Tampa, Florida.

291

Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This booklet was written to answer questions most frequently asked by fire fighters, law enforcement officers, and emergency medical services personnel. The booklet is not intended as a substitute...

292

Radioactivity Standard Reference Material Quality Procedures ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of nuclear data and the examination of basic nuclear processes ... reviewed and approved by the NIST Occupational Health and Safety Division ...

2010-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are scale-model tests? What is computer analysis? What are examples of severe testing? How do the certification tests compare to real-life accidents? Demonstrating target...

294

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principles Applied to Ancient Structures Description of Computer Model in Computer Analysis Engineered Structures Built WITHOUT the Use of Computer Analysi Structures Analyzed...

295

CHAPTER: Corrosion of Containment Materials for Radioactive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Included in the ASM Handbook, Corrosion: Environments and Industries Created On: 6/22/2007 2:31 PM, Topic View: Linear, Threading, Single, Branch ...

296

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Analysis Fundamentals come from Engineering, Science, and Mathematics Mechanics Statics Deformable Body Mechanics Click to view picture Click to view picture Click...

297

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Effects History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions It is difficult to understand why some people die while others survive...

298

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Puncture Test to a Passenger Cruise Ship and Cargo Ship Collision Immersion Test IMMRSN test Click to view...

299

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z...

300

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Radiation History Gallery Glossary of Nuclear Terms Majority from NRC Contacts Comments & Questions Emergency Planning, Preparedness, and Response DOE Transportation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comments & Questions Send Your Comments andor Questions (Fill in blank fields and click on "Submit" to send) Send To: Webmaster Your Name: Your E-mail Address: Affiliation: Type...

302

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Comparison Immersion Comparison Demonstrating target hardness. Comparison of the Puncture Test to a Freight Train and Freight Train Collision Puncture Test 2,000,000 lbs of...

303

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance The NRC certifies packages as being Type A or Type B on the basis of Safety Analysis Reports submitted by the package designer that demonstrate the package can withstand...

304

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record Spent fuel casks are constructed with thick walls of various metals. This cask is approximately 18-feet...

305

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sandstone blocks and limestone facing (mostly missing), Pyramid of Khufu (largest) is as tall as a 50-story building 3200 BC, Egypt Brooklyn Bridge Steel cable and masonry piers,...

306

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used in reactor physics to describe the state when the number of neutrons released by fission is exactly balanced by the neutrons being absorbed (by the fuel and poisons) and...

307

PEROXIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

reduced state, from hexavalent uranium. It consists in treating an aqueous solution containing such uranium and plutonium ions with sulfate ions in order to form a soluble uranium sulfate complex and then treating the solution with a soluble thorium compound and a soluble peroxide compound in order to ferm a thorium peroxide carrier precipitate which carries down with it the plutonium peroxide present. During this treatment the pH of the solution must be maintained between 2 and 3.

Seaborg, G.T.; Perlman, I.

1958-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Regulatory Framework Site Characterization Activities Current Status of DOE Program Current Status of NRC Program A Short History of Nuclear Regulation published...

309

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

80AD - stone and wood Pantheon Rome, 118 - 126 AD - masonry Archimedes' Hydralic Screw Greece, 200's BC - wood Plumbing Valve Rome, 1st Century AD - bronze and lead Catapult...

310

Emergency Responder Radioactive Material Quick Reference Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This job aid is a quick reference to assist emergency responders in identifying preliminary safety precautions that should be taken during the initial response phase after arrival...

311

Data Analytics for Residual Stress in Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian inference of grain boundary properties from heterogeneous data · Comparison of Novel Microstructure Quantification Frameworks for Visualization,  ...

312

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Release of Residues from Melting NORM-Contaminated Steel Scrap - A German Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many raw materials like crude oil, natural gas, mineral sands, phosphor ores and others are contaminated by radionuclides from the Uranium and/or Thorium decay chain (NORM), also plants for processing these materials became contaminated during operation. When plants are shut down, large quantities of pipes, valves, pumps and other components have to be scrapped. As scrap yards and steel mills are equipped by large detector systems to avoid an input of radioactivity into the steel cycle, decontamination is required before recycling. Siempelkamp is operating a melting plant for processing NORM and/or chemically/ toxically contaminated steel scrap. Beside the decontaminated steel as output, residues like slag and filter dust have to be managed within the range of licensed values. Based on the European Safety Standard the European member states have to implement radiation exposure from work activities with NORM in their Radiation Protection Ordinances (RPO). The German government revised the RPO in July 2001. Part 3 describes exposure limits for workers and for the public. Exposures from residues management have to meet 1 mSv/year. Brenk Systemplanung has performed calculations for assessing the radiation exposure from residues of the Siempelkamp melting plant. These calculations have been based on the input of metal from different origins and include all relevant exposure pathways in a number of scenarios. The calculations have been based on the dose criterion of 1 mSv/y as required by the German RPO. The methods and results will be presented.

Quade, U.; Thierfeldt, S.; Wvrlen, S.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

314

The New Orphaned Radioactive Sources Program in the United States International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The New Orphaned Radioactive Sources Program in the United States International Conference on the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials. September 14-18, 1998 Neil Naraine Exposure of the public to uncontrolled radioactive sources has become an significant concern to the United

315

Application of the Evacuated Canister System for Removing Residual Molten Glass From the West Valley Demonstration Project High-Level Waste Melter  

SciTech Connect

The principal mission of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to meet a series of objectives defined in the West Valley Demonstration Project Act (Public Law 96-368). Chief among these is the objective to solidify liquid high-level waste (HLW) at the WVDP site into a form suitable for disposal in a federal geologic repository. In 1982, the Secretary of Energy formally selected vitrification as the technology to be used to solidify HLW at the WVDP. One of the first steps in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved designing, constructing and operating the Vitrification (Vit) Facility, the WVDP facility that houses the systems and subsystems used to process HLW into stainless steel canisters of borosilicate waste-glass that satisfy waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for disposal in a federal geologic repository. HLW processing and canister production began in 1996. The final step in meeting the HLW solidification objective involved ending Vit system operations and shut ting down the Vit Facility. This was accomplished by conducting a discrete series of activities to remove as much residual material as practical from the primary process vessels, components, and associated piping used in HLW canister production before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations. Flushing was the primary method used to remove residual radioactive material from the vitrification system. The inventory of radioactivity contained within the entire primary processing system diminished by conducting the flushing activities. At the completion of flushing activities, the composition of residual molten material remaining in the melter (the primary system component used in glass production) consisted of a small quantity of radioactive material and large quantities of glass former materials needed to produce borosilicate waste-glass. A special system developed during the pre-operational and testing phase of Vit Facility operation, the Evacuated Canister System (ECS), was deployed at the West Valley Demonstration Project to remove this radioactively dilute, residual molten material from the melter before Vit system operations were brought to a formal end. The ECS consists of a stainless steel canister of the same size and dimensions as a standard HLW canister that is equipped with a special L-shaped snorkel assembly made of 304L stainless steel. Both the canister and snorkel assembly fit into a stainless steel cage that allows the entire canister assembly to be positioned over the melter as molten glass is drawn out by a vacuum applied to the canister. This paper describes the process used to prepare and apply the ECS to complete molten glass removal before declaring a formal end to Vit system operations and placing the Vit Facility into a safe standby mode awaiting potential deactivation.

May, Joseph J.; Dombrowski, David J.; Valenti, Paul J.; Houston, Helene M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

316

CLEANING OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATED OCCUPATIONAL CLOTHING  

SciTech Connect

The soiling and contamination of work clothing and ways of removing this contamination are discussed. Means of disinfection, washing tests with radioactive-contaminated cotton clothing, construction of the laundry, and cleaning protective clothing of plastic and other materials with the help of washing methods and polyphosphates are described. (M.C.G.)

Siewert, G.; Schikora, Th.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - WEB ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear ... and fission products relevant for radioactive waste disposal projects.

318

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems—Water ... problems associated with spent fuel storage and radioactive waste disposal.

319

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid scintillation vials must be collected separately. 5. Any "mixed waste" must be cleared with the RSO and labeled

320

Radioactivity in Nature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fig. 3-8. The ratio of uranium to lead present on Earth today gives us an estimate of its age (4.5 billion years). Given Earths age, any much shorter lived radioactive nuclei...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

322

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) recently deployed a new version of the Transportation Tracking and Communication System (TRANSCOM) that is compatible with mobile devices, including smartphones. The recent enhancement, TRANSCOM version 3.0, improves the user interface

323

RADIOACTIVITY IN SILT OF THE CLINCH AND TENNESSEE RIVERS  

SciTech Connect

Surveys of radioactivity in the Clinch and Tennessee rivers during 1954 through 1958 are summarized. It is concluded that no immediate hazard exists due to the reconcentration of radioactive materials in downstream bottom sediments, However, if the amount of radioactivity in the bottom sediment continues to increase for the next few years, it will be necessary to re-evaluate our present waste disposal policy in order to further restrict the release of ralioactive wastes to the Clinch River. The most probable effect of the radioactive sediment on industry would be an increased background counting rate if sand from the river bottom were used in making concrete for the construction of counting rooms of instrument laboratories. The problem ofthe radioactivity in solution in the river water would have to be considered before using the downstream water as process water in the manufacture of film emulsions or other photographic materials, (auth)

Cottrell, W.D.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Direct vitrification of plutonium-containing materials (PCM`s) with the glass material oxidation and dissolution system (GMODS)  

SciTech Connect

The end of the cold war has resulted in excess PCMs from nuclear weapons and associated production facilities. Consequently, the US government has undertaken studies to determine how best to manage and dispose of this excess material. The issues include (a) ensurance of domestic health, environment, and safety in handling, storage, and disposition, (b) international arms control agreements with Russia and other countries, and (c) economics. One major set of options is to convert the PCMs into glass for storage or disposal. The chemically inert characteristics of glasses make them a desirable chemical form for storage or disposal of radioactive materials. A glass may contain only plutonium, or it may contain plutonium along with other radioactive materials and nonradioactive materials. GMODS is a new process for the direct conversion of PCMs (i.e., plutonium metal, scrap, and residues) to glass. The plutonium content of these materials varies from a fraction of a percent to pure plutonium. GMODS has the capability to also convert other metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass, destroy organics, and convert chloride-containing materials into a low-chloride glass and a secondary clean chloride salt strewn. This report is the initial study of GMODS for vitrification of PCMs as input to ongoing studies of plutonium management options. Several tasks were completed: initial analysis of process thermodynamics, initial flowsheet analysis, identification of equipment options, proof-of-principle experiments, and identification of uncertainties.

Forsberg, C.W. Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Haas, P.A.; Malling, G.F.; Elam, K.; Ott, L.

1995-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deployed Deployed Widely Used and Maintained Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division - RESRAD Program RESRAD codes are used at more than 300 sites since its first release in 1989. Page 1 of 2 Argonne National Laboratory Multiple States & Sites Illinois RESRAD Computer Code - Evaluation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites Challenge The evaluation of sites with radioactive contamination was a problem until the RESidual RADioactivity (RESRAD) Computer Code was first released in 1989. The RESRAD code has been updated since then to improve the models within the codes, to operate on new computer platforms, to use new state of science radiation dose and risk factors, and to calculate cleanup criteria ("Authorized Limits") for radioactively contaminated sites. A series of similar codes have been developed to address radiation dose, risk, and cleanup criteria

326

Background X-ray Spectrum of Radioactive Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) is commonly used with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the elemental compositions and microstructures of a variety of samples. For example, the microstructures of nuclear fuels are commonly investigated with this technique. However, the radioactivity of some materials introduces additional X-rays that contribute to the EDS background spectrum. These X-rays are generally not accounted for in spectral analysis software, and can cause misleading results. X-rays from internal conversion [1], Bremsstrahlung [2] radiation associated with alpha ionizations and beta particle interactions [3], and gamma rays from radioactive decay can all elevate the background of radioactive materials.

Shannon Yee; Dawn E. Janney

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HLW is the highly radioactive material resulting from the reprocessing of SNF. Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federal government is responsible for the disposal...

328

The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area  

SciTech Connect

EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Public involvement in radioactive waste management decisions  

SciTech Connect

Current repository siting efforts focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is conducting exploratory studies to determine if the site is suitable. The state of Nevada has resisted these efforts: it has denied permits, brought suit against DOE, and publicly denounced the federal government`s decision to study Yucca Mountain. The state`s opposition reflects public opinion in Nevada, and has considerably slowed DOE`s progress in studying the site. The Yucca Mountain controversy demonstrates the importance of understanding public attitudes and their potential influence as DOE develops a program to manage radioactive waste. The strength and nature of Nevada`s opposition -- its ability to thwart if not outright derail DOE`s activities -- indicate a need to develop alternative methods for making decisions that affect the public. This report analyzes public participation as a key component of this openness, one that provides a means of garnering acceptance of, or reducing public opposition to, DOE`s radioactive waste management activities, including facility siting and transportation. The first section, Public Perceptions: Attitudes, Trust, and Theory, reviews the risk-perception literature to identify how the public perceives the risks associated with radioactivity. DOE and the Public discusses DOE`s low level of credibility among the general public as the product, in part, of the department`s past actions. This section looks at the three components of the radioactive waste management program -- disposal, storage, and transportation -- and the different ways DOE has approached the problem of public confidence in each case. Midwestern Radioactive Waste Management Histories focuses on selected Midwestern facility-siting and transportation activities involving radioactive materials.

NONE

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Waste -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Do not transport or ship hazardous material wastes off-site. Only Waste Management, Radiation Protection or approved...

334

2010 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Management Sites at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2010. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2010 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site) relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

DETECTOR FOR RADIOACTIVE HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

A device of the Geiger-Mueller type is designed for detecting radioactive hydrogen in the presence of other radioactive substances. The device comprises an envelope with thin (1 to 5 mil thick) Ni or Pd windows at the ends, an anode and a cathode spaced apart in the envelope, and a counting gas within the envelope. In operation, the suspect atmosphere is blown against one of the windows, whereby only the hydrogen diffuses into the envelope for counting. Means is provided for heating the windows to the desired temperatures. (D.L.C.)

Christianson, C.; Gilman, M.; Maggio, R.C.

1963-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

336

European experience in transport / storage cask for vitrified residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the evolution of burnup of spent fuel to be reprocessed, the high activity vitrified residues would not be transported in the existing cask designs. Therefore, TN International has decided in the late nineties to develop a brand new design of casks with optimized capacity able to store and transport the most active and hottest canisters: the TN{sup TM}81 casks currently in use in Switzerland and the TN{sup TM}85 cask which shall permit in the near future in Germany the storage and the transport of the most active vitrified residues defining a thermal power of 56 kW (kilowatts). The challenges for the TN{sup TM}81 and TN{sup TM}85 cask designs were that the geometry entry data were very restrictive and were combined with a fairly wide range set by the AREVA NC Specification relative to vitrified residue canister. The TN{sup TM}81 and the TN{sup TM}85 casks have been designed to fully anticipate shipment constraints of the present vitrified residue production. It also used the feedback of current shipments and the operational constraints and experience of receiving and shipping facilities. The casks had to fit as much as possible in the existing procedures for the already existing flasks such as the TN{sup TM}28 cask and TS 28 V cask, all along the logistics chain of loading, unloading, transport and maintenance. In addition, years of feedback and experience in design and operations - together with ever improved materials - have allowed finding further optimization of this type of cask design. In order to increase the loading capacity in terms of radioactive source terms and heat load by 40%, the cask design relies on innovative solutions and benchmarks from the current shipping campaigns. Currently, TN{sup TM}81 and TN{sup TM}85 are the only licensed casks that can transport and store 28 canisters with a total decay heat of 56 kW. It contributes to optimise the number of required transports to bring back high level waste residues to their producers. Three units have already been loaded and transported to ZWILAG (Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG) in Switzerland where they are stored for 40 years. Based on the same design but integrating the German Authorities and German users specificities, the TN{sup TM}85 cask is dedicated to the transport and storage of vitrified residues to Germany. It is presently at the final licensing stage. The transport cask approval expertise has now been granted, and the storage expertise is in the final steps. The first transport with TN{sup TM}85 cask is scheduled up to now in 2007 and the commissioning operations are under preparation. These two casks are key elements for the whole reprocessing system of AREVA as they enable the transport and the storage of the vitrified residues. (authors)

Blachet, L.; Otton, C.; Sicard, D. [AREVA TN International (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method for immobilizing radioactive iodine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactive iodine, present as alkali metal iodides or iodates in an aqueous solution, is incorporated into an inert solid material for long-term storage by adding to the solution a stoichiometric amount with respect to the formation of a sodalite (3M.sub.2 O.3Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. 6SiO.sub.2.2MX, where M=alkali metal; X=I.sup.- or IO.sub.3.sup.-) of an alkali metal, alumina and silica, stirring the solution to form a homogeneous mixture, drying the mixture to form a powder, compacting and sintering the compacted powder at 1073 to 1373 K (800.degree. to 1100.degree. C.) for a time sufficient to form sodalite.

Babad, Harry (Richland, WA); Strachan, Denis M. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Fusion fuel cycle solid radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

Eight conceptual deuterium-tritium fueled fusion power plant designs have been analyzed to identify waste sources, materials and quantities. All plant designs include the entire D-T fuel cycle within each plant. Wastes identified include radiation-damaged structural, moderating, and fertile materials; getter materials for removing corrosion products and other impurities from coolants; absorbents for removing tritium from ventilation air; getter materials for tritium recovery from fertile materials; vacuum pump oil and mercury sludge; failed equipment; decontamination wastes; and laundry waste. Radioactivity in these materials results primarily from neutron activation and from tritium contamination. For the designs analyzed annual radwaste volume was estimated to be 150 to 600 m/sup 3//GWe. This may be compared to 500 to 1300 m/sup 3//GWe estimated for the LMFBR fuel cycle. Major waste sources are replaced reactor structures and decontamination waste.

Gore, B.F.; Kaser, J.D.; Kabele, T.J.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

TABLE OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS.  

SciTech Connect

For those chemical elements which have no stable nuclides with a terrestrial isotopic composition, the data on radioactive half-lives and relative atomic masses for the nuclides of interest and importance have been evaluated and the recommended values and uncertainties are listed.

HOLDEN,N.E.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

RADIOACTIVITY (NATURAL) Synonyms Definition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

rays to the natural dose of radioactivity is strongly depen- dent on altitude and ... a noble gas, and its migration in groundwater and soil gas is of ..... trometers available on the market. ... example, using an oil immersion objective (NA 1.4) with.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Security for Radioactive Sources: Fact Sheet Mar 23, 2012 Radioactive materials are a critical and beneficial component of global

342

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River July 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Dee_Millikin@rl.doe.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, away from the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. Today, DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) safely transferred the first large container of highly radioactive sludge from a basin next to a former plutonium production reactor to dry storage in the center of the site. Today's transfer is the first of six shipments

343

RADIOACTIVITY STORED UP BY ALGAE  

SciTech Connect

A fast radiometric method of measuring radioactivity uptake by marine organisms is described. (R.V.J.)

Akamsin, A.D.; Parchevskii, V.P.; Polikarpov, G.G.

1960-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method for calcining radioactive wastes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form by calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix.

Bjorklund, William J. (Richland, WA); McElroy, Jack L. (Richland, WA); Mendel, John E. (Kennewick, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Questions and Answers - How does the radioactivity of an atom affect the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is radioactivity measured? How is radioactivity measured? Previous Question (How is radioactivity measured?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Why do we use radioactivity to destroy cancers?) Why do we use radioactivityto destroy cancers? How does the radioactivity of an atom affect the body? You've asked a very broad question, so we'll have to split it up into smaller chunks in order to give you a reasonable answer. This is a topic that is very much misunderstood by most people and it's hard to give a short answer. You may know that all of us have radioactive material in our bodies naturally. There has always been radioactive material on earth (in fact, a million years ago, there was more present than there is today), and people have therefore always been exposed to it. There has also always been cosmic

346

Induced Radioactivity and Waste Classification of Reactor Zone Components of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 After Final Shutdown  

SciTech Connect

The dismantlement of the reactor core materials and surrounding structural components is a major technical concern for those planning closure and decontamination and decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Specific issues include when and how dismantlement should be accomplished and what the radwaste classification of the dismantled system would be at the time it is disassembled. Whereas radiation levels and residual radiological characteristics of the majority of the plant systems are directly measured using standard radiation survey and radiochemical analysis techniques, actual measurements of reactor zone materials are not practical due to high radiation levels and inaccessibility. For these reasons, neutron transport analysis was used to estimate induced radioactivity and radiation levels in the Chernobyl NPP Unit 1 reactor core materials and structures.Analysis results suggest that the optimum period of safe storage is 90 to 100 yr for the Unit 1 reactor. For all of the reactor components except the fuel channel pipes (or pressure tubes), this will provide sufficient decay time to allow unlimited worker access during dismantlement, minimize the need for expensive remote dismantlement, and allow for the dismantled reactor components to be classified as low- or medium-level radioactive waste. The fuel channel pipes will remain classified as high-activity waste requiring remote dismantlement for hundreds of years due to the high concentration of induced {sup 63}Ni in the Zircaloy pipes.

Bylkin, Boris K. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Davydova, Galina B. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Zverkov, Yuri A. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Krayushkin, Alexander V. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Neretin, Yuri A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Nosovsky, Anatoly V. [Slavutych Division of the International Chernobyl Center (Ukraine); Seyda, Valery A. [Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ukraine); Short, Steven M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low-level radioactive waste regulation: Science, politics and fear  

SciTech Connect

An inevitable consequence of the use of radioactive materials is the generation of radioactive wastes and the public policy debate over how they will be managed. In 1980, Congress shifted responsibility for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes from the federal government to the states. This act represented a sharp departure from more than 30 years of virtually absolute federal control over radioactive materials. Though this plan had the enthusiastic support of the states in 1980, it now appears to have been at best a chimera. Radioactive waste management has become an increasingly complicated and controversial issue for society in recent years. This book discusses only low-level wastes, however, because Congress decided for political reasons to treat them differently than high-level wastes. The book is based in part on three symposia sponsored by the division of Chemistry and the Law of the American Chemical Society. Each chapter is derived in full or in part from presentations made at these meetings, and includes: (1) Low-level radioactive wastes in the nuclear power industry; (2) Low-level radiation cancer risk assessment and government regulation to protect public health; and (3) Low-level radioactive waste: can new disposal sites be found.

Burns, M.E. (ed.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Agriculture Residues Recycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Saudi Arabia, as well as other countries in the Near East region, is characterized by erratic weather conditions, limited area of fertile arable lands, and with acute water shortage. Although agricultural residues (AGR) production in the region is huge (more than 440 million tons), most of these residues are either burned in the field or utilized in an inefficient way. Utilization of AGR as compost may contribute to expansion of arable lands through its use for reclamation of soil and reduce irrigation requirements. This study was conducted at Al Khalidiah farm, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to assess compost production at large commercial scale using several types of agricultural and animal by-products with addition of a BZT®Compost Activator (based mainly on microorganism, enzymes and yeast). In this study, two types of compost piles were made at the farm. The first pile of compost was made of different agriculture residues, namely: animal wastes (quail, goat and sheep manure), brownian agricultural wastes (windbreaks residues, date trees, citrus and olive trees pruning) and green landscape grasses (50%, 25 % and 25%, respectively) and was treated with a tested compost activator. The same agriculture residues combination was also made for the second pile as traditional compost

M. W. Sadik; H. M. El Shaer; H. M. Yakot

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Apparatus and method for downhole injection of radioactive tracer  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to downhole injection of radioactive .sup.82 Br and monitoring its progress through fractured structure to determine the nature thereof. An ampule containing granular .sup.82 Br is remotely crushed and water is repeatedly flushed through it to cleanse the instrument as well as inject the .sup.82 Br into surrounding fractured strata. A sensor in a remote borehole reads progress of the radioactive material through fractured structure.

Potter, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Archuleta, Jacobo R. (Espanola, NM); Fink, Conrad F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fusion of radioactive $^{132}$Sn with $^{64}$Ni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporation residue and fission cross sections of radioactive $^{132}$Sn on $^{64}$Ni were measured near the Coulomb barrier. A large sub-barrier fusion enhancement was observed. Coupled-channel calculations including inelastic excitation of the projectile and target, and neutron transfer are in good agreement with the measured fusion excitation function. When the change in nuclear size and shift in barrier height are accounted for, there is no extra fusion enhancement in $^{132}$Sn+$^{64}$Ni with respect to stable Sn+$^{64}$Ni. A systematic comparison of evaporation residue cross sections for the fusion of even $^{112-124}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn with $^{64}$Ni is presented.

J. F. Liang; D. Shapira; J. R. Beene; C. J. Gross; R. L. Varner; A. Galindo-Uribarri; J. Gomez del Campo; P. A. Hausladen; P. E. Mueller; D. W. Stracener; H. Amro; J. J. Kolata; J. D. Bierman; A. L. Caraley; K. L. Jones; Y. Larochelle; W. Loveland; D. Peterson

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

351

Finding Aids: Radioactive Fallout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing A Guide to Archival Collections Relating to Radioactive Fallout from Nuclear Weapon Testing Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Argonne National Laboratory Bancroft Library, University of California Boeing Aircraft Company Brookhaven National Laboratory Coordination and Information Center (CIC) Eastman Kodak EG&G, Energy Measurements Holmes and Narver Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Manuscript Division, Library of Congress National Academy of Sciences Archives Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pacific Northwest Laboratory Sandia National Laboratories Scripps Institution of Oceanography Archives Smithsonian Institution Archives U.S. Air Force Brooks Air Force Base Kirtland Air Force Base USAF Historical Research Center U.S. Army Chemical Corps (Aberdeen Proving Ground)

352

REPORT NO. 5 background material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be altered to reduce human intake of radioactive materials from fallout. In September 1962 the Federal should be taken. In the 1963 hearings, "Fallout, Radiation Standards, and Countermeasures," conducted

353

PROCESSING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating radioactive waste solutions prior to disposal is described. A water-soluble phosphate, borate, and/or silicate is added. The solution is sprayed with steam into a space heated from 325 to 400 deg C whereby a powder is formed. The powder is melted and calcined at from 800 to 1000 deg C. Water vapor and gaseous products are separated from the glass formed. (AEC)

Johnson, B.M. Jr.; Barton, G.B.

1961-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

354

Assessment of potential radiation exposures by uncontrolled recycle or reuse of radioactive scrap metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low-level waste, generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection measures need not be taken. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests an annual effective dose of 10 {micro}Sv as a limit for the individual radiation dose and derived the initial control levels of residual radioactivity based on the Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1990, new recommendations on radiation protection standards were developed by ICRP to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposure. Adoption of these recommendations necessitated a revision of the Commission's secondary limits contained in Publication 30. This study summarizes the potential radiation exposure from valuable scrap metal considered for uncontrolled recycle by new ICRP recommendations. Potential exposure pathways to people were analyzed and concentrations leading to an individual dose of 10 {micro}Sv/year were calculated for 14 key radionuclides. These potential radiation doses are compared with the results of previous study.

Lee, S.Y.; Lee, K.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

EOR: well logs sharpen focus on residual saturation. Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of what the enhanced recovery specialist must know about the reservoir under consideration can be measured, calculated, or deduced from well logging data. Appropriate well logging procedures for this type of formation evaluation would include resistivity, radioactivity, dielectric constant, and acoustic well logs. This work describes the principles and procedures for assessing residual oil saturation of a subsurface formation using these methods. The study explains what is actually being measured and compared when well logging data are obtained and processed.

Frederick, R.O.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

THE USE OF POLYMERS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS), one of the largest U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, has operated since the early 1950s. The early mission of the site was to produce critical nuclear materials for national defense. Many facilities have been constructed at the SRS over the years to process, stabilize and/or store radioactive waste and related materials. The primary materials of construction used in such facilities are inorganic (metals, concrete), but polymeric materials are inevitably used in various applications. The effects of aging, radiation, chemicals, heat and other environmental variables must therefore be understood to maximize service life of polymeric components. In particular, the potential for dose rate effects and synergistic effects on polymeric materials in multivariable environments can complicate compatibility reviews and life predictions. The selection and performance of polymeric materials in radioactive waste processing systems at the SRS are discussed.

Skidmore, E.; Fondeur, F.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

SRC Residual fuel oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

Tewari, Krishna C. (Whitehall, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Radioactivities in Solution by Particle Radiation can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges Junko Maeda Colorado State University Abstract Introduction Non-radioactive atoms can become radioactive from a nuclear reaction when atoms are hit by other high energy particles. These radioactivations are observed in nuclear facilities and may result in health effects in humans. Protons, carbon-ions, and iron-ions are tested to verify this hypothesis. Materials and Methods Protons were accelerated to 70MeV in cyclotron (NIRS-930) at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Carbon-ions and iron-ions were accelerated to 290MeV/n and 500MeV/n respectively, in HIMAC (Heavy ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) at NIRS. 60ml of sterilized Milli-Q ultra pure water or PBS were filled in Falcon T25 flasks and exposed to ionizing

360

EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located 99: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications EA-1599: Disposition of Radioactively Contaminated Nickel Located at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky, for Controlled Radiological Applications Summary This EA was being prepared to evaluate potential environmental impacts of a proposal to dispose of nickel scrap that is volumetrically contaminated with radioactive materials and that DOE recovered from equipment it had used in uranium enrichment. This EA is on hold. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

2009 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed an annual review of the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Wate Management Site (RWMS) Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) in fiscal year (FY) 2009. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2009 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Functionally Graded Material: Carbon Gradient on IF Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels for Structural Materials of Nuclear Power ... AND RESIDUAL STRESS FIELDS AND CRITICAL AND ALLOWABLE FLAW ...

363

Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2013 ... Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair: Residual Stresses and Numerical Simulation Sponsored by: Metallurgical ...

364

FAQ 5-Is uranium radioactive?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? Is uranium radioactive? All isotopes of uranium are radioactive, with most having extremely long half-lives. Half-life is a measure of the time it takes for one half of the atoms of a particular radionuclide to disintegrate (or decay) into another nuclear form. Each radionuclide has a characteristic half-life. Half-lives vary from millionths of a second to billions of years. Because radioactivity is a measure of the rate at which a radionuclide decays (for example, decays per second), the longer the half-life of a radionuclide, the less radioactive it is for a given mass. The half-life of uranium-238 is about 4.5 billion years, uranium-235 about 700 million years, and uranium-234 about 25 thousand years. Uranium atoms decay into other atoms, or radionuclides, that are also radioactive and commonly called "decay products." Uranium and its decay products primarily emit alpha radiation, however, lower levels of both beta and gamma radiation are also emitted. The total activity level of uranium depends on the isotopic composition and processing history. A sample of natural uranium (as mined) is composed of 99.3% uranium-238, 0.7% uranium-235, and a negligible amount of uranium-234 (by weight), as well as a number of radioactive decay products.

365

Low Radioactivity in CANDLES  

SciTech Connect

CANDLES is the project to search for double beta decay of 48Ca by using CaF2 crystals. Double beta decay of 48Ca has the highest Q value among all nuclei whose double beta decay is energetically allowed. This feature makes the study almost background free and becomes important once the study is limited by the backgrounds. We studied double beta decays of 48Ca by using ELEGANTS VI detector system which features CaF2(Eu) crystals. We gave the best limit on the lifetime of neutrino-less double beta decay of 48Ca although further development is vital to reach the neutrino mass of current interest for which CANDLES is designed. In this article we present how CANDLES can achieve low radioactivity, which is the key for the future double beta decay experiment.

Kishimoto, T.; Ogawa, I.; Hazama, R.; Yoshida, S.; Umehara, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Sakai, H.; Yokoyama, D.; Mukaida, K.; Ichihara, K.; Tatewaki, Y.; Kishimoto, K.; Hirano, Y.; Yanagisawa, A.; Ajimura, S. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the specific radioactive material and its physical form (e.g., solid, liquid, or gas). The regulations also specify many requirements for labeling, marking, training, and...

369

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

Brassell, Gilbert W. (13237 W. 8th Ave., Golden, CO 80401); Brugger, Ronald P. (Lafayette, CO)

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

FAQ 4-What is radioactivity and radiation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiation? What is radioactivity and radiation? Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both...

372

i TP?TT<$wft Environmental Radioactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the North Atlantic region including the Faroe Islands FALLOUT; GREENLAND; MAN; MILK; PLANTS; PLUTONIUM 239; PLU- TONIUM 240; RADIOACTIVITY; SEAWATER; SEAWEEDS

373

Environmental Radioactivity in the North Atlantic Region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactivity, Monaco Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the North Atlantic region including ISLANDS; FOOD CHAINS; GLOBAL FALLOUT GREENLAND; LEAD 210; MAN; MILK; MOLLUSCS; POLONIUM 210; PLANTS

374

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Education, Materials, Sustainability: Joining the Dots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper first describes how the Eco Audit Tool, created by Granta Design to ... Material and Energy Beneficiation of the Automobile Shredder Residues.

376

Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development of DOE complex wide authorized release protocols for radioactive scrap metals.  

SciTech Connect

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under the current DOE policy. The provisions for supporting this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. The objective of this study is to develop readily usable computer-based release protocols to facilitate implementation of the Handbook in evaluating the scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The protocols provide DOE with an effective oversight tool for managing release activities.

Chen, S. Y.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radioactive decay data tables  

SciTech Connect

The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

Kocher, D.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A critical review of residual stress technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current technology for evaluating residual in materials has been critically reviewed from the perspective of LLNL needs. The primary technique available continues to be x-ray diffraction (XRD). Substantial analytical and experimental refinements have been made in the past decade. An especially promising development in XRD is the use of energy dispersive spectroscopy for evaluating triaxial stress. This would provide an alternative to neutron diffraction, a technique limited to a relatively small number of outside laboratories. Recent research in residual stress measurement using ultrasonics have concentrated on shear wave techniques. Substantial progress has been made in the use of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT's), surface waves, corrections for texture, and, of special interest to LLNL, the ability to characterize interfacial stress. Strain gages and related technologies continue to be actively used in field measurements of residual stress, although there is generally some destructive nature to those techniques. An increased use of multiple technique approaches to residual stress evaluation is occurring for the purposes of both verification and complementary measurements. Among a number of miscellaneous techniques found in the recent literature are several involving the use of stress-sensitive magnetic properties and an especially promising use of the thermoelastic effect for noncontact stress mapping. Recommendations for LLNL activity include energy dispersive XRD, ultrasonics characterization of anisotropy and interfacial stress, and investigation of the thermoelastic effect. 57 refs.

Shackelford, J.F.; Brown, B.D.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Matrix Effects on Radiolytic Gas Generation in Plutonium Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation of plutonium bearing materials requires a shipping package that has been rigorously tested to withstand normal and accident conditions. Plutonium bearing materials can contribute to package internal pressure by producing heat and gases from chemical and radiochemical reactions. Of particular concern is the production of hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of moisture, which can result in flammable gas mixtures within the shipping package. Estimating the gas generation rates for plutonium residues is complicated by the large variability of material composition and process origin. In February 1999, the Savannah River Technology Center established a gas generation test program to support transportation of plutonium residue materials. The initial efforts of this program have focused on evaluation of residues identified as Sand, Slag, and Crucible (SS and C) generated as a byproduct of plutonium metal production.

Livingston, R.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M. (Greenbelt, MD); Krill, Stephen J. (Arlington, VA); Murray, Alexander P. (Gaithersburg, MD)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

385

Radioactivity of the Cooling Water  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

Wigner, E. P.

1943-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency Tests Focus on Lab Radioactivity Analyses. For Immediate ... Berne. Radioanalytical emergency response exercise. Journal ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

Environmental and economic evaluation of energy recovery from agricultural and forestry residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four conversion methods and five residues are examined in this report, which describes six model systems: hydrolysis of corn residues, pyrolysis of corn residues, combustion of cotton-ginning residues, pyrolysis of wheat residues, fermentation of molasses, and combustion of pulp and papermill wastes. Estimates of material and energy flows for those systems are given per 10/sup 12/ Btu of recovered energy. Regional effects are incorporated by addressing the regionalized production of the residues. A national scope cannot be provided for every residue considered because of the biological and physical constraints of crop production. Thus, regionalization of the model systems to the primary production region for the crop from which the residue is obtained has been undertaken. The associated environmental consequences of residue utilization are then assessed for the production region. In addition, the environmental impacts of operating the model systems are examined by quantifying the residuals generated and the land, water, and material requirements per 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy generated. On the basis of estimates found in the literature, capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates are given for the model systems. These data are also computed on the basis of 10/sup 12/ Btu of energy recovered. The cost, residual, material, land, and water data were then organized into a format acceptable for input into the SEAS data management program. The study indicates that the most serious environmental impacts arise from residue removal rather than from conversion.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 5) T. Gnaupel-Herold, HJ Prask, AV Clark, CS Hehman, TN Nguyen, A Comparison of Neutron and Ultrasonic Determinations of Residual Stress ...

389

BT8 Residual Stress Diffractometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Residual Stresses and Mechanical Damage in Gas Pipelines. ... Pressure in a pipeline superimposes a stress on ... are exceeded in pipelines with low ...

390

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress-relaxation techniques using electric

391

Techniques for Measuring Residual Stresses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Classification of techniques for measuring residual stress...stress A-1 Stress relaxation techniques using electric

392

CHAPTER 5-RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The ore pitchblende was discovered in the 1750's near Joachimstal in what is now the Czech Republic. Used as a colorant in glazes, uranium was identified in 1789 as the active ingredient by chemist Martin Klaproth. In 1896, French physicist Henri Becquerel studied uranium minerals as part of his investigations into the phenomenon of fluorescence. He discovered a strange energy emanating from the material which he dubbed 'rayons uranique.' Unable to explain the origins of this energy, he set the problem aside. About two years later, a young Polish graduate student was looking for a project for her dissertation. Marie Sklodowska Curie, working with her husband Pierre, picked up on Becquerel's work and, in the course of seeking out more information on uranium, discovered two new elements (polonium and radium) which exhibited the same phenomenon, but were even more powerful. The Curies recognized the energy, which they now called 'radioactivity,' as something very new, requiring a new interpretation, new science. This discovery led to what some view as the 'golden age of nuclear science' (1895-1945) when countries throughout Europe devoted large resources to understand the properties and potential of this material. By World War II, the potential to harness this energy for a destructive device had been recognized and by 1939, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman showed that fission not only released a lot of energy but that it also released additional neutrons which could cause fission in other uranium nuclei leading to a self-sustaining chain reaction and an enormous release of energy. This suggestion was soon confirmed experimentally by other scientists and the race to develop an atomic bomb was on. The rest of the development history which lead to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 is well chronicled. After World War II, development of more powerful weapons systems by the United States and the Soviet Union continued to advance nuclear science. It was this defense application that formed the basis for the commercial nuclear power industry.

Marra, J.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nondestructive Evaluation: Nondestructive Evaluation and Measurement of Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for residual stress measurements conducted on Alloy 600 samples that have undergone changes in material properties resulting from simulated operating conditions, including heat treatment, three-point bending load, cracking, and repair. The overall objective was to identify suitable NDE techniques that would augment the existing and proven surface residual stress measurements by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extend the measurem...

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Residual stress determination using strain gage measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strain gage technique, which relates the prior residual stress state in a material to the strain data obtained by fixing a strain gage on one surface and grinding off the other, has been proposed previously. In the current work, a generalized solution for obtaining an arbitrary residual stress profile from strain gage data is presented. Numerical analysis using the solution indicates that the formulation is insensitive to random errors of 10% or less in the experimental data. Based on the results of the analysis, a procedure for determining stress profiles from strain gage data is outlined. Experimental data for tempered glass was analyzed using the technique proposed. The stress profiles predicted are in good agreement with independent observations using indentation and strength data.

Tandon, R.; Green, D.J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Management of high sulfur coal combustion residues, issues and practices: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the following sessions are included in this proceedings: (1) overview topic; (2) characterization of coal combustion residues; (3) environmental impacts of residues management; (4) materials handling and utilization, Part I; and (5) materials handling and utilization, Part II. Selected paper have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Chugh, Y.P.; Beasley, G.A. [eds.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ND in Materials Science and Technology II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: ND in ... to the unique infrastructure and specialized staff of the Nuclear Laboratory. Shielded cells enable neutron diffraction studies on highly radioactive samples.

397

Questions and Answers - Do radioactive things glow in the dark?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Someone told me that Cherenkov radiationis analogous to breaking the sound barrier... Someone told me that Cherenkov radiation<br>is analogous to breaking the sound barrier... Previous Question (Someone told me that Cherenkov radiation is analogous to breaking the sound barrier...) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (If energy is formed by a generator, how does it form the energy?) If energy is formed by a generator,how does it form the energy? Do radioactive things glow in the dark? The short answer to your question is "no," radioactive things do not glow in the dark - not by themselves anyway. Radiation emitted by radioactive materials is not visible to the human eye. However, there are ways to"convert" this invisible energy to visible light. Many substances will emit visible light if "stimulated" by the ionizing radiation from

398

Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Resource Efficient Metal and Material Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Social - Licence to Operate (Legislation, consumer, policy, theft, manual labour ... Material and Energy Beneficiation of the Automobile Shredder Residues ... Sustainable Production of c-Si Solar Cell Materials – A Competitive Advantage ...

400

GROSS BETA RADIOACTIVITY OF THE ALGAE AT ENIWETOK ATOLL, 1954-1956  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to determine the amounts of radioactivity in marine algae, water, and lagoon bottom sand collected at Eniwetok Atoll during the period April 1954 to April 1956. The highest levels of beta radioactivity of algae collected after the detonation of a nuclear device (Nectar) were in algae from those islands closest to the site of detonation and in the downwind path of the fallout. With time after detonation, the decline of radioactivity in the algae at Belle Island was faster than can be accounted for on the basis of physical decay alone. In March 1955, algae and bottom sand collected in the deeper waters (20 to 140 feet) of the lagoon, one half to two miles offshore, contained as much or more radioactivity than samples collected in the shallow water near shore. The radioactive decay rates of algae samples collected from Leroy and Henry Islands were greater than those of algae from other islands, indicating that there was less residual contamination from previous detonations at these two islands. Study of the radioactive decay rates of the algae at Belle Island showed that the radioactivity was decaying at a relatively low rate, which became slower with samples collected late in the survey. These observations indicate that the longer-lived isotopes were being taken up by the algae. (auth)

Palumbo, R.F.

1959-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Process for Removing Radioactive Wastes from Liquid Streams  

SciTech Connect

The process is under development at Mound Laboratory to remove radioactive waste (principally plutonium-238) from process water prior to discharge of the water to the Miami river. The contaminated water, as normally received, is at a pH between 6 and 90. Under these conditions, plutonium in all its oxidation states is hydrolyzed; however, the level of the radioactive solids varies from about 50ppm down to about 50 ppb and the plutonium remains in a colloidal or subcolloidal condition. The permissible concentration for discharge to the river is about 50 parts per trillion. Pilot plant test show that 95-99% of the radioactive material is removed by adsorption on diatomaceous earth. The remainder is removed by passage through a bed of either dibasic or tribasic calcium phosphate. Ground phosphate rock is equally effective in removing the radioactive material if the flow rate is controlled to permit sufficient contact time. Parameters for optimizing the process are now under study. Future plans include application of the process to wastes from reactor fuels reprocessing.

Kirby, H. W.; Blane, D. E.; Smolin, R. I.

1972-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Residual Circulation and Tropopause Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of large-scale dynamics as represented by the residual mean meridional circulation in the transformed Eulerian sense, in particular its stratospheric part, on lower stratospheric static stability and tropopause structure is studied ...

Thomas Birner

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Environmental Radioactivity in the Faroes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN THE FAROES IN 1979 A. Aarkroo and J. Lippert Abstract. Measurements of fallout radioactivity in the Faroes Descriptors [0] DIET, ENVIRONMENT, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, FAROE ISLANDS, FISHES, FOOD, FOOD CHAINS, GLOBAL FALLOUT 62°N #12;- 7 - 1. INTRODUCTION 1*1*. The fallout programme for the Faroes, which was initiated

406

Summary of radioactive solid waste received in the 200 areas during calendar year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rust Federal Services of Hanford Inc. manages and operates the Hanford Site 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office under contract DE-AC06-87RL10930. These facilities include storage areas and disposal sites for radioactive solid waste. This document summarizes the amount of radioactive materials that have been buried and stored in the 200 Area radioactive solid waste storage and disposal facilities from startup in 1944 through calendar year 1996. This report does not include backlog waste, solid radioactive wastes in storage or disposed of in other areas, or facilities such as the underground tank farms. Unless packaged within the scope of WHC-EP-0063, Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria, liquid waste data are not included in this document.

Hladek, K.L.

1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

TRUPACT-II residue pipe payload container  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the project to develop, test and certify a new payload container for the TRUPACT-II, a Type B packaging for the shipment of transuranic waste. The new payload container will provide segregation of plutonium waste materials within the TRUPACT-II. This segregation of fissile contents will support a new criticality safety analysis that may allow an increase in the TRUPACT-II Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) limit from 325 grams to 2800 grams. The need for this project was brought about by the end of the Cold War and the resulting shift in value of plutonium residues from providing recoverable Defense Program material to being considered disposable waste. This paper will not cover many of the details of the project but will instead aim to provide a general picture of all the project activities.

Geinitz, R. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States); Gregory, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Radioactive Beam Program at Argonne  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this talk I will present selected topics of the ongoing radioactive beam program at Argonne and discuss the capabilities of the CARIBU radioactive ion production facility as well as plans for construction of a novel superconducting solenoid spectrometer.

B. B. Back

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

409

Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrient removal and net costs weigh on decisions to use crop residues as biofuel feedstocks. Crop residues as feedstock for renewable fuels Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Inform Archives Crop residues as feedstock for rene

410

Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 May 2010 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Chicago, Illinois May 2010 y May 2010 Page 1 Applying Risk Communication Principles Presented by: Ron Edmond Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education May 2010 Page 2 Spokesperson Training 6/3/2010 May 2010 2 ï‚ž Participants should expect to gain the following skills: following skills: ï‚¡ How to recognize how the stakeholders prefer to receive information ï‚¡ How to integrate risk communication principles into individual communication ï‚¡ How to recognize the importance of earning trust and credibility y ï‚¡ How to identify stakeholders ï‚¡ How to answer questions using a variety of templates designed to keep messages focused May 2010 Page 3 The Chinese word for crisis contains two

411

Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 for approved Quality Assurance programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved Quality Assurance programs prior to the publication date of the directory. Comments to make future revisions of this directory more useful are invited and should be directed to the Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,current range Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage StudiesJ. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage diation

Spencer, J.; Anderson, S. D.; Wolf, Z.; Volk, J. T.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Environmental Hazards: Radioactive Materials and Wastes: A Reference Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atomic Physics; Nuclear Weapons Development; Nucleartechnology, radiation, nuclear weapons and warfare, nuclear

Peterson, Christina A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation Protection Guide For Medical Use of Radioactive Materials &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Security Threat Possession of Deadly Weapons by Patients, Visitors, or Staff Bomb Threat UI Public Safety ­ 335 LIMITS and ASSESSMENT 6 3.1 Maximum Permissible Dose Limits 6 3.1.1 Radiation Workers 5 3.1.2 Declared Assessment 10 #12;v 4.0 RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING REQUIREMENTS 10 4.1 Initial Radiation Safety Training 10 4

415

Application for Possession and Use of Radioactive Materials in Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclide:_____________________ Chemical Form:______________________________________ Physical Form: ( )gas No. List of equipment used with RAM fume hood*, glove box, centrifuge, etc. Use *Please specify

Boufadel, Michel

416

UK Radioactive Waste: Classification, Sources and Management ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paper contents outlook: Introduction; Radioactive waste classification; Sources of waste (Nuclear power plant operation/decommissioning, Reprocessing and ...

417

Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on each response disciplines' activities or duties at the scene. During this discussion, the instructor can present response scenarios, each of which would have a different discipline arriving first at the accident scene. The purpose of this discussion

418

Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Integrated Management Program Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radioactive materials in ''public'' locations are typically contained in small, stainless steel capsules known as sealed radiation sources (RS). These capsules seal in the radioactive materials, but not the radiation, because it is the radiation that is needed for a wide variety of applications at hospitals, medical clinics, manufacturing plants, universities, construction sites, and other facilities in the public sector. Radiation sources are readily available, and worldwide there are hundreds of thousands of RS. The IMPRSS Project is a cooperative development between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA), Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), New Mexico Tech University (NMT), and Agriculture Cooperative Development International (ACDI/VOCA). SNL will coordinate the work scope between the participant organizations.

Hasan, A.; Cochran, J. R.; El-Adham, K.; El-Sorougy, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has received spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim storage since 1951 and reprocessing since 1953. Until recently, the major activity of the ICPP has been the reprocessing of SNF to recover fissile uranium; however, changing world events have raised questions concerning the need to recover and recycle this material. In April 1992, DOE chose to discontinue reprocessing SNF for uranium recovery and shifted its focus toward the management and disposition of radioactive wastes accumulated through reprocessing activities. Currently, 1.8 million gallons of radioactive liquid wastes (1.5 million gallons of radioactive sodium-bearing liquid wastes and 0.3 million gallons of high-level liquid waste) and 3,800 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of calcine waste are in inventory at the ICPP. Legal drivers and agreements exist obligating the INEL to develop, demonstrate, and implement technologies for safe and environmentally sound treatment and interim storage of radioactive liquid and calcine waste. Candidate treatment processes and waste forms are being evaluated using the Technology Evaluation and Analysis Methodology (TEAM) Model. This process allows decision makers to (1) identify optimum radioactive waste treatment and disposal form alternatives; (2) assess tradeoffs between various optimization criteria; (3) identify uncertainties in performance parameters; and (4) focus development efforts on options that best satisfy stakeholder concerns. The Systems Analysis technology evaluation presented in this document supports the DOE in selecting the most effective radioactive liquid and calcine waste management plan to implement in compliance with established regulations, court orders, and agreements.

Murphy, J.A.; Pincock, L.F.; Christiansen, I.N.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residual radioactive material" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

2008 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Review of the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the Performance Assessments (PAs) and Composite Analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, with the results submitted annually to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) performed an annual review in fiscal year (FY) 2008 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PAs and CAs. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2008 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors (e.g., waste forms and containers, facility design, and waste receipts), closure plans, monitoring results, and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed to determine the adequacy of the CAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

4. Nuclei and Radioactivity Paradoxes and Puzzles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radioactivity, it may not be legally sold in the United States. 4. Of those killed by the Hiroshima atomic bomb anecdotes and say, "Of course." Radioactivity Radioactivity is the explosion of the nucleus of the atom nucleus of one atom is about million times greater than in a chemical explosion of a single atom

Browder, Tom

423

Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect

The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

424

In-Situ Characterization of Underwater Radioactive Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental requirement underpinning safe clean-up technologies for legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ponds, pools and wet silos is the ability to characterize the radioactive waste form prior to retrieval. The corrosion products resulting from the long term underwater storage of spent nuclear fuel, reactor components and reprocessing debris present a major hazard to facility decontamination and decommissioning in terms of their radioactive content and physical / chemical reactivity. The ability to perform in-situ underwater non-destructive characterization of sludge and debris in a safe and cost-effective manner offers significant benefits over traditional destructive sampling methods. Several techniques are available for underwater measurements including (i) Gross gamma counting, (ii) Low-, Medium- and High- Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy, (iii) Passive neutron counting and (iv) Active Neutron Interrogation. The optimum technique depends on (i) the radioactive inventory (ii) mechanical access restrictions for deployment of the detection equipment, interrogation sources etc. (iii) the integrity of plant records and (iv) the extent to which Acceptable Knowledge which may be used for 'fingerprinting' the radioactive contents to a marker nuclide. Prior deployments of underwater SNF characterization equipment around the world have been reviewed with respect to recent developments in gamma and neutron detection technologies, digital electronics advancements, data transfer techniques, remote operation capabilities and improved field ruggedization. Modeling and experimental work has been performed to determine the capabilities, performance envelope and operational limitations of the future generation of non-destructive underwater sludge characterization techniques. Recommendations are given on the optimal design of systems and procedures to provide an acceptable level of confidence in the characterization of residual sludge content of legacy wet storage facilities such that retrieval and repackaging of SNF sludges may proceed safely and efficiently with support of the regulators and the public. (author)

Simpson, A.P.; Clapham, M.J.; Swinson, B. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

P2Pro(RSM) : a computerized management tool for implementing DOE's authorized release process for radioactive scrap metals.  

SciTech Connect

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal and several million cubic meters of concrete are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for release from regulatory control for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under current DOE policy. The provisions for implementing this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Non-Real Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE Field Offices for interim use and implementation. This manual describes a computer management tool, P2Pro(RSM), that implements the first 5 steps of the 10-step process stipulated by the Handbook. P2Pro(RSM) combines an easy-to-use Windows interface with a comprehensive database to facilitate the development of authorized release limits for non-real property.

Arnish, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Kamboj, S.; Nieves, L.

1999-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA's 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response. This model has been adopted and applied to work for response to transportation accidents involving radioactive material or other hazardous materials incidents Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure.docx More Documents & Publications Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Decontamination Dressdown at a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

427

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

428

Radioactive waste disposal characteristics of candidate tokamak demonstration reactors  

SciTech Connect

Results from the current physics, materials and blanket R and D programs are combined with physics and engineering design constraints to characterize candidate tokamak demonstration plant (DEMO) designs. Blanket designs based on the principal structural materials, breeding materials and coolants being developed for the DEMO were adapted from the literature. Neutron flux and activation calculations were performed, and several radioactive waste disposal indices were evaluated, for each design. Of the primary low-activation structural materials under development in the US, it appears that vanadium and ferritic steel alloys, and possibly silicon carbide, could lead to DEMO designs which could satisfy realistic low-level waste (LLW) criteria, provided that impurities can be controlled within plausible limits. Allowable LLW concentrations are established for the limiting alloying and impurity elements. All breeding materials and neutron multipliers considered meet the LLW criterion.

Hoffman, E.A.; Stacey, W.M.; Hertel, N.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Natural Gamma Emitters after a Selective Chemical Separation of a TENORM residue: Preliminary Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical procedure was established in order to obtain selective fractions containing radium isotopes ({sup 228}Ra), thorium ({sup 232}Th), and rare earths from RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras), a solid residue rich in rare earth elements, thorium isotopes and small amount of natural uranium generated from the operation of a thorium pilot plant for purification and production of pure thorium nitrate at IPEN -CNEN/SP. The paper presents preliminary results of {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 238}U, {sup 210}Pb, and {sup 40}K concentrations in the selective fractions and total residue determined by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, considering radioactive equilibrium of the samples.

Alves de Freitas, Antonio; Abrao, Alcidio [Centro de Quimica e do Meio Ambiente (Brazil); Godoy dos Santos, Adir Janete; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu [Centro de Metrologia das Radiacoes Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria-Zip Code 05508-000 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radioactive Waste Management BasisApril 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

Perkins, B K

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Transport Models for Radioactive Carbon Dioxide at RWMC  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive carbon dioxide (formed by oxidation of carbon-14) is a highly mobile, radioactive contaminant released from solid wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Radioactive CO2 is chemically active in the environment, volatile, water soluble, and subject to adsorption on solids. For this reason, its fate must be understood and controlled to meet radiological requirements (protection of the atmosphere, aquifer, vadose zones, plants and animals). In the present work, the migration of carbon-14 as dissolved bicarbonate was studied using miscible displacement experiments in water-saturated columns containing sediments from RWMC. Dissolved carbon-14 was retarded relative to the movement of water by a factor of about 3.6, which translates to a partition coefficient (Kd) of 0.8 ml/g. Two different adsorption sites were identified, with one site possibly having a nonlinear adsorption isotherm. A conservative tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride, was used to measure the tortuosity of sedimentary material for gaseous diffusion. The tortuosity of the RWMC sediment (Spreading Area B sediment) was determined to be 3.2, which is slightly greater than predicted by the commonly used Millington-Quirk equation. In terms of affecting the migration of carbon-14 to the aquifer, the relative importance of the parameters studied is: (1) natural moisture content of the sediments, (2) sediment tortuosity to gas-phase diffusion, and (3) adsorption onto solid phases.

Hull, Laurence Charles; Hohorst, Frederick August

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemistry of combined residual chlorination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The decay of the combined chlorine residual was investigated in this work. Recent concerns about the formation of undesirable compounds such as chloroform with free residual chlorination have focused attention on the alternative use of combined residual chlorination. This work investigates the applicability of reactions proposed to describe the transformations and decay of the combined residual with time. Sodium hypochlorite was added to buffered solutions of ammonia with the chlorine residual being monitored over periods extending up to 10 days. The reaction was studied at four initial concentrations of hypochlorite of 100, 50, 25 and 10 mg/L as Cl/sub 2/ with molar application ratios of chlorine to ammonia, defined herein as M ratios, of 0.90, 0.50, 0.25 and 0.05 at each hypochlorite dose. Sixty-eight experiments were conducted at the pH of 6.6 and 7.2. The conclusions are: (1) in the absence of free chlorine, the concentration of NH/sub 3/ does not seem to affect the rate of disappearance of the residual other than through the formation of NHCl/sub 2/ by NH/sub 2/Cl hydrolysis; (2) the reaction between NHCl/sub 2/ and NH/sub 4//sup +/ to form NH/sub 2/Cl is either much slower than reported by Gray et. al. or the mechanism is different with a rate limiting step not involving NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 4//sup +/; (3) a redox reaction in addition to the first-order decomposition of NHCl/sub 2/ appears necessary. Model simulation results indicated that a reaction of the type NH/sub 2/Cl + NHCl/sub 2/ ..-->.. P added to the first-order NHCl/sub 2/ decomposition can explain the results observed except at the higher chlorine doses.

Leao, S.F.; Selleck, R.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of