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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

2

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F24: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power ...

3

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

4

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

5

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

6

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

7

Today in Energy - Residential Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent residential consumption and efficiency issues and trends

8

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

9

Residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of the latest survey of residential fuelwood consumption and production in South Dakota. Topics examined include the geographic distribution of residential fuelwood consumption and production within the State; the species of trees used for residential fuelwood; the types of wood-burning facilities used; the reasons for burning fuelwood; and the land, ownership, and tree classes from which fuelwood was produced.

May, D.M.

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

The 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Two Decades  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey presents two decades of changes in energy consumption related Household Characteristics

11

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

12

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Using the 2009 microdata file to compute estimates and standard errors (RSEs) February 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis

13

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary ...

14

Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)...

15

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in...

16

South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption...

17

2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Built-in room heater burning gas, oil, or kerosene? 7 Heating stove burning wood, coal, or coke (IF VOLUNTEERED) 8 Portable electric heaters (IF VOLUNTEERED)

18

California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 522,122 ...

19

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use Pie chart of energy consumption in homes by end uses Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential...

20

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM2" "Date","New Mexico...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

22

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

State Residential Energy Consumption Shares  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This next slide shows what fuels are used in the residential market. When a This next slide shows what fuels are used in the residential market. When a energy supply event happens, particularly severe winter weather, it is this sector that the government becomes most concerned about. As you can see, natural gas is very important to the residential sector not only in DC, MD and VA but in the United States as well. DC residents use more natural gas for home heating than do MD and VA. While residents use heating oil in all three states, this fuel plays an important role in MD and VA. Note: kerosene is included in the distillate category because it is an important fuel to rural households in MD and VA. MD and VA rely more on electricity than DC. Both MD and VA use propane as well. While there are some similarities in this chart, it is interesting to note

24

1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Return to: Residential Home Page . Changes in the 1997 RECS: Housing Unit Type Per Household Member Per Building Increase. Residential Energy Consumption ...

25

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

PIA - Form EIA-475 A/G Residential Energy Consumption Survey...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA - Form EIA-475 AG Residential Energy Consumption Survey PIA...

28

Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate None Program Info State New York Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider New York State Department of Taxation and Finance New York exempts retail sales of wood used for residential heating purposes from the state sales tax. The law also permits local governments (municipalities and counties) to grant an exemption from local sales taxes. If a city with a population of 1 million or more chooses to grant the local exemption, it must enact a specific resolution that appears in the state law. Local sales tax rates in New York range from 1.5% to more than 4% in

29

Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. homes Title Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. homes Publication Type Report...

30

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 1, National data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 1984 RECS was the sixth national survey of US households and their energy suppliers. The purpose of these surveys is to provide baseline information on how households use energy. Households in all types of housing units - single family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public in published reports such as this one and on public-use data tapes. The report presents data on the US consumption and expenditures for residential use of these ''major fuels'' - natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) - from April 1984 through March 1985. These data are presented in tables in the Detailed Statistics section of this report. Except for kerosene and wood fuel, the consumption and expenditures data are based on actual household bills obtained, with the permission of the household, from the companies supplying energy to the household. Purchases of kerosene are based on respondent reports because records of ''cash and carry'' purchases of kerosene for individual households are usually unavailable. Data on the consumption of wood fuel (Table 27) covers the 12-month period ending November 1984 and are based on respondent recall of the amount of wood burned during the 12-month period. Both the kerosene and wood consumption data are subject to memory errors and other reporting errors. This report does not cover household use of motor fuel, which is reported separately.

Not Available

1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

31

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Homeowners energy conservation and consumption behavior: wood users and non/low wood users  

SciTech Connect

Relationships among energy expenditure, energy consumption, energy-budget share, energy managerial practices, housing, and household-membership factors for non/low wood-user and high wood-user households were examined to explain substitution of fuelwood for primary fuels. Data were from a nationwide representative sample of 1599 homeowners collected by the Department of Energy in 1982-1983 Residential Energy Conservation Survey. In three multivariate regression models, different dependent variables - energy expenditure, energy consumption, and energy budget share, were used. The same independent variables - housing factors, household energy managerial practices, and household membership factors, were used in the three models. Finally, in a fourth model, discriminant analysis with the dichotomous criterion variable of non/low or high wood users and significant variables from the multivariate regressions models were used to explain 34% of the variance. The amount of space heated, their appliance use, whether they had teenage children, and if they were single-earner households were significant explanatory variables in all four models.

Urich, J.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

34

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

35

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

36

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential...

37

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

38

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: housing characteristics, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, wood consumption, indoor temperatures, and weather. The 1982 survey included a number of questions on the reasons households make energy conservation improvements to their homes. Results of these questions are presented. Discussion also highlights data pertaining to: trends in home heating fuels, trends in conservation improvements, and characteristics of households whose energy costs are included in their rent.

Thompson, W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Like the Other: Residential Consumption Variability Phillipthe total annual energy consumption. The behavior patternsin total residential energy consumption per home, even when

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Residential Energy Consumption - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey provides national and regional information about U.S. households and their energy usage. The first survey was conducted in 1978.

45

Solid-State Lighting: Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The...

46

EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA has recently published state fact sheets highlighting interesting aspects of residential energy consumption and housing characteristics based on data released ...

47

"Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,...

48

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas prices may have also contributed to the decrease in natural gas consumption over the last 19 years. Residential natural gas prices have

49

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation analyzes the energy consumption behavior of residential adopters of solar photovoltaic systems (solar-PV). Based on large data sets from the San Diego region (more)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Figure 57. Change in residential delivered energy consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 57. Change in residential delivered energy consumption for selected end uses in four cases, 2011-2040 (percent) Best Available Technology

51

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

the Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, June 2010 1 Natural gas prices may have also contributed to the decrease...

52

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009).

Lejla Alic

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

Minneapolis residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with residential energy consumption in single - family, townhouse, low - rise, and high - rise structures in Minnapolis, Minn., with the year 1957 chosen as a typical weather year for the area. Design and structural features considered important in defining the residences were structural parameters (construction details, dimensions, and materials), energy consumption parameters (heating and cooling equipment, types of fuels and energy used, and appliances and their energy consumption levels), and lifestyle parameters (thermostat set points, relative humidity set points, type and number of appliances, daily profile of appliance use, and use of ventilation fans). Annual heating and cooling loads and resultant energy requirements were calculated using a time - response computer program. This program included subroutines for determining hourly load contributions throughout the year due to conduction, convection, air infiltration, radiation, and internal heat gain. The heating load was significantly higher than the cooling load for single - family and townhouse residences, as would be expected for the cold Minneapolis climate. Due to increased internal heat generation, low - rise and high - rise cooling and heating loads were similar in magnitude. Energy - conserving modifications involving both structural and comfort control system changes resulted in the following: single - family residences consumed 47 percent, townhouse residences consumed 52 percent, low - rise residences consumed 53 percent, and high - rise residences consumed 34 percent of the primary energy required by the characteristic residence. Supporting data, layouts of the residences, and references are included.

Reed, J.E.; Barber, J.E.; White, B.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Atlanta residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Energy consumption in Atlanta, Ga., was analyzed for single - family, townhouse, low - rise, and high - rise structures for 1955, which was selected as a typical weather year. A two - step procedure was employed in calculating energy requirements. In the first step, hourly heating and cooling loads were determined for each dwelling unit. In the second step, monthly and annual energy required to meet heating and cooling loads was calculated using specific heating, cooling, and ventilation systems. Design and structural features considered important in defining the residential structures were construction details and materials, heating and cooling equipment, types of fuels and energy used, and appliances and their energy consumption levels. Lifestyle parameters incorporated in the analysis included thermostat set points, relative humidity set points, type and number of appliances, daily profile of appliance use, and use of ventilation fans. The computer program for determining heating and cooling loads, or heat delivery / removal requirements, for each residence involved subroutines for ascertaining hourly load contributions throughout the year due to conduction, convection, air infiltration, radiation, and internal heat gain. The low - rise type of structure had a cooling load that was more than twice as large as the heating load. The other structures had cooling loads about 1.5 times as large as heating loads. Energy - conserving modifications, involving both structural and comfort control system changes, resulted in the following: single - family and townhouse residences achieved a 32 - percent annual heating load reduction and a 16 - percent cooling load reduction through structural modifications; and low - rise and high - rise residences achieved a 43 - percent reduction in primary energy consumption. Supporting data, illustrative layouts of the residences, and references are included.

Reed, J.E.; Barber, J.E.; White, B.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC. Steiner, R.L. (1994). Residential density and traveland Brownstone The Impact of Residential Density on VehicleUsage Total annual residential vehicular energy consumption

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per- customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to Lejla Alic at Lejla.Alic@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-0858.

57

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

58

State Residential Energy Consumption Shares 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential customers in the Northeast are more heavily dependent on heating oil than are residential consumers in the rest of the country. Rhode Island is no exception. In 1996,...

59

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

tni tni Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics, 1981 Energy Information Administration Washington. D.C August 1983 T86T -UJ9AO9 aiji uuojj pasenojnd uaaq (OdO) i|oii)/v\ suoijdijosqns o; Ajdde jou saop aoiiou :e|ON asBa|d 'pjBo^sod at|j noA j| 3Sj| Suiije'Lu vi3 3M1 uo ;u!Buuaj o^sn o} }i ujnja> isnoi nox 'pJBOisod iuB»jodoi! UB aABL) pjnons hoA '}s\\ BujUBUJ VI3 9L|} uo ajB noA|| 'MaiAaj jsij SUJMBUJ suouBOjiqnd |BnuuBS}j BUJ -jonpuoo Sj (vi3) uoijej^siujuupv UOIJBLUJOIUI Afijau^ agj 'uoiieinBaj iuaoiujaAOQ Aq pajmbaj sv 30HON 02-13 maoj aapao ay 05. pa^oajjp aq pus siuamnooa jo 0088-353 (303) S8SOZ "D'Q 'uoiSu-pqsBtt T rao°H 50 UOT^BOLIOJUI

60

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment and Energy Consumption of Urban Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: September 18, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In China, the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 90,994 ...

62

U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1973: 843,900: 747,331: 648,504: 465,867: 326,313 ...

63

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household. RECS 2009 Release date: June 6, 2012. Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained ...

64

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

65

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

66

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Study: Window % of Consumption 1. Categorize component loads

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

sample custom-designed to meet the analytic objectives for surveys of residential energy use; sample as many as 5,500 households; provide 2-day personal training sessions...

69

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 2, Regional data. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

Included here are data at the Census region and division level on consumption of and expenditures for the major fuels used in residential households - electricity, natural gas, fuel oil/kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on wood consumption. Section 1 of this report contains data on the average amount of energy consumed per household for space heating in 1984 and the corresponding expenditures. Sections 2 through 7 summarize the energy consumption and expenditure patterns. Appendices A through D contain information on how the survey was conducted, estimates of the size of the housing unit in square feet and the quality of the data. Procedures for calculating relative standard errors (RSE) are located in Appendix C, Quality of the Data. Procedures for estimating the end-use statistics are located in Appendix D. Census and weather maps, and related publications are located in Appendices E through G.

Not Available

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion: Final report: Norteast regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a resource document for the Northeastern states when pursuing the analysis of localized problems resulting from residential wood combustion. Specific tasks performed include assigning emission rates for total suspended particulates (TSP) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) from wood burning stoves, estimating the impact on ambient air quality from residential wood combustion and elucidating the policy options available to Northeastern states in their effort to limit any detrimental effects resulting from residential wood combustion. Ancillary tasks included providing a comprehensive review on the relevant health effects, indoor air pollution and toxic air pollutant studies. 77 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $6,000 Program Info Funding Source New Hampshire Renewable Energy Fund (FY 2013) Start Date 04/14/2010 Expiration Date When progr State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30% Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering rebates of 30% of the installed cost of qualifying new residential bulk-fed, wood-pellet central heating boilers or furnaces. The maximum rebate is $6,000. To qualify, systems must (1) become operational on or after May 1,

72

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy ...

73

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... video - Keeping Our Homes Warm, released November 2, 2012. Energy consumption per home has steadily declined over the last three decades ...

74

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum Weekly Petroleum Status Report Weekly Natural Gas ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively ...

75

Residential Energy Consumption Survey data show decreased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the ...

76

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

77

Residential fuelwood consumption and production in Michigan, 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Since fuelwood's heyday in the late 1800's, its use as a primary home heating and cooking fuel has declined dramatically as homeowners opted for the convenience and efficiency of fossil-based fuels. In Michigan, the resurgence in residential fuelwood use resulted in one in three households taking advantage of wood energy (Michigan Department of Natural Resources 1982), and sent the volume of fuelwood burned, i.e. consumption, skyrocketing to levels not seen in half a century.

May, D.M.; Weatherspoon, A.K.; Hackett, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

79

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › ResidentialAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. State Fact Sheets on Household Energy Use

80

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Water Heating (2005) for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in both physical units and Btus. The data is presented for numerous categories including: Census Region and Climate Zone; Housing Unit Characteristics (type, year of construction, size, income, race, age); and Water Heater and Water-using Appliance Characteristics (size, age, frequency of use, EnergyStar rating). Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Energy Consumption Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Consumption.for_.Water_.Heating.Phys_.Units_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 67.6 KiB)

82

Effects of feedback on residential electricity consumption: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews 17 studies assessing the effect of information feedback on residential electricity consumption. Most of the studies were conducted in experimental or quasi-experimental conditions. The studies reviewed used (1) both feedback and incentives, (2) goal setting, (3) cost information feedback, and (4) displays. The study findings, taken together, provide some evidence that feedback is effective in reducing electricity consumption, although questions remain concerning the conditions under which feedback can best be provided. Reductions in consumption found in most of the studies ranged from 5% to 20%. Utility companies are the most likely source of feedback information for residential customers. Three of the studies investigated utility feedback projects. The report discusses the policy implications of these as well as the other studies. The report also lists questions remaining to be researched. 13 refs., 1 tab.

Farhar, B.C.; Fitzpatrick, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding total residential transportation energy usageon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption total annual fuelUsage and Energy Consumption Gasoline-equivalent gallons per year total

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Health effects of residential wood combustion: survey of knowledge and research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Health and safety issues related to residential wood burning are examined. Current research and findings are also described, and research status is assessed in terms of future health and safety requirements. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Los angeles residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Heating and cooling energy requirements were determined for characteristic single - family, townhouse, low - rise, and high - rise residences in Los Angeles, Calif. Using 1951 as a typical weather year for the area, heating and cooling energy requirements were determined for modified versions of these characteristic residences after both structural and comfort control modifications had been incorporated. Parameters of concern were structural (construction details, dimensions, and materials), energy consumption (heating and cooling equipment, types of fuel and energy used, and appliances and their energy consumption levels), and lifestyle (thermostat set points, relative humidity points, type and number of appliances, daily profile of appliance use, and use of ventilation fans). Annual heating and cooling loads and resultant energy requirements were calculated with the aid of a computer program. This program included subroutines for determining hourly load contributions throughout the year due to conduction, convection, air infiltration, radiation, and internal heat gain. The cooling load for the single - family residence was moderately larger than the heating load. Due to increased internal heat generation, the cooling load for the remaining residences was much larger than the heating load. Energy - conserving modifications resulted in the following: single - family residences required 55 percent, townhouse residences required 57 percent, low - rise residences required 55 percent, and high - rise residences required 82 percent of the primary energy consumed by the characteristic structure. Supporting data, illustrative layouts of the residences, and a list of references are included.

Reed, J.E.; Barber, J.E.; White, B.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Residential energy-consumption survey: housing characteristics, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, and consumption of wood. Collected for the first time are data related to indoor temperatures and the use of air conditioning. A unique feature of the 1981 survey is an increased sampling of low-income households funded by the Social Security Administration to provide them information for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Discussion highlights data pertaining to these topics: changes in home heating fuel, secondary heating, indoor temperatures, features of new homes, use of air conditioning, use of solar collectors, and wood consumption.

Thompson, W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Where does RECS square footage data come from? Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow comparison of homes with varying characteristics. In-person measurements are vital because many alternate data sources, including property tax records, real estate listings, and, respondent estimates use varying definitions and under-estimate square footage as defined for the purposes of evaluating residential energy consumption.

89

San Francisco residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Heating and cooling energy requirements were determined by a computerized program for characteristic single-family, townhouse, low - rise, and high - rise residences in San Francisco, Calif., with 1951 selected as being a typical weather year for the area. Energy requirements were calculated using a two - step process. In the first step, hourly heating and cooling loads were calculated for each dwelling unit. In the second step, monthly and annual energy required to meet heating and cooling loads was calculated using specific heating, cooling, and ventilation systems. Examples of lifestyle parameters included in the analysis were thermostat set points, relative humidity set points, type and number of appliances, daily profile of appliance use, and use of ventilation fans. The computer program used to determine heating and cooling loads, or heat delivery / removal requirements, included subroutines for computing hourly load contributions throughout the year due to conduction, convection, air infiltration, radiation, and internal heat gain. The heating load was much greater than the cooling load for single - family and high - rise residences, due to large amounts of infiltration. Heating and cooling loads were similar in the townhouses. The low - rise residences had a cooling load larger than their heating load because of internal heat generation. After structural and comfort control system modifications were made to the residences, heating and cooling energy requirements were again determined. Reduced energy consumption as a result of the modifications were as follows: single - family residences consumed 50 percent, townhouses consumed 50 percent, low - rise residences consumed 57 percent, and high - rise residences consumed 64 percent of the primary energy required by the characteristic structure. Supporting data, illustrative layouts of the residences, and references are included.

Reed, J.E.; Barber, J.E.; White, B.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Residential energy consumption: An analysis-of-variance study  

SciTech Connect

In this report, tests of statistical significance of five sets of variables with household energy consumption (at the point of end-use) are described. Five models, in sequence, were empirically estimated and tested for statistical significance by using the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration. Each model incorporated additional information, embodied in a set of variables not previously specified in the energy demand system. The variable sets were generally labeled as economic variables, weather variables, household-structure variables, end-use variables, and housing-type variables. The tests of statistical significance showed each of the variable sets to be highly significant in explaining the overall variance in energy consumption. The findings imply that the contemporaneous interaction of different types of variables, and not just one exclusive set of variables, determines the level of household energy consumption.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Air emissions from residential heating: The wood heating option put into environmental perspective. Report for June 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The paper compares the national scale (rather than local) air quality impacts of the various residential space heating options. Specifically, it compares the relative contributions of the space heating options to fine particulate emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and acid precipitation impacts. The major space heating energy options are natural gas, fuel oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), electricity, coal, and wood. Residential wood combustion (RWC) meets 9% of the Nation`s space heating energy needs and utilizes a renewable resource. Wood is burned regularly in about 30 million homes. Residential wood combustion is often perceived as environmentally dirty due to emissions from older wood burners.

Houck, J.E.; Tiegs, P.E.; McCrillis, R.C.; Keithley, C.; Crouch, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate energy costs and usage for heating, cooling, appliances and other end uses â€" information critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. RECS uses a multi-stage area probability design to select sample methodology figure A multi-stage area probability design ensures the selection

94

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the MECS About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the downward trend in manufacturing energy use since the 1998 MECS report.

95

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation.

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA is releasing new benchmark estimates for home energy use for the year 2009 that include detailed data for 16 States, 12 more than in past EIA residential energy surveys. EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census Regions and nine Divisions. In 1997, EIA produced additional tabulations for the four most populous States (California, New York, Texas, and Florida). A threefold increase in the number of households included in the 2009 RECS offers more accuracy and coverage for understanding energy usage for all estimated States, Regions and Divisions.

97

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RECS Terminology RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," "Residential," and "Other" Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Adequacy of Insulation: The respondent's perception of the adequacy of the housing unit's insulation. Aggregate Ratio: The ratio of two population aggregates (totals). For

98

DOE/EIA-0314(82) Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4(82) 4(82) Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteri stics 1982 Published: August 1984 U-'VVv*' ^**" ^ Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. This public ation is availa ble from the Supe rinten dent of Docu ments , U.S. Gove rnme nt Printin g Office (GPO ). Order ing inform ation and purch ase of this and other Energ y Inform ation Admi nistra tion (EIA) public ations may be obtain ed from the GPO or the ElA's Natio nal Energ y Inform ation Cente r (NEIC ). Ques tions on energ y statis tics

99

An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate  

SciTech Connect

Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common energy package.'' Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the predominant residential electricity rate structure. Itresidential electricity customers, over 90%, are on the standard domestic residential (DR) rate,

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The impact of increasing home size on energy demand The impact of increasing home size on energy demand RECS 2009 - Release date: April 19, 2012 Homes built since 1990 are on average 27% larger than homes built in earlier decades, a significant trend because most energy end-uses are correlated with the size of the home. As square footage increases, the burden on heating and cooling equipment rises, lighting requirements increase, and the likelihood that the household uses more than one refrigerator increases. Square footage typically stays fixed over the life of a home and it is a characteristic that is expensive, even impractical to alter to reduce energy consumption. According to results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the stock of homes built in the 1970s and 1980s averages less than

103

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 Over the past three decades, the share of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics in U.S. homes has nearly doubled from 17 percent to 31 percent, growing from 1.77 quadrillion Btu (quads) to 3.25 quads. This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to 10.55 quads, and energy use per household fell 31 percent. Federal energy efficiency standards have greatly reduced consumption for home heating Total energy use in all U.S. homes occupied as primary residences decreased slightly from 10.58 quads in 1978 to 10.55 quads in 2005 as reported by the

104

Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy consumption structure and building conditions, living customs, family income, and thermal environment, as well as local climatic conditions, etc., is analyzed. Measures to optimize the energy utilization consumption are proposed, and further improvements to the energy efficiency of current residential buildings is also discussed.

Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motivations that will affect appliance energy consumption.that target specific appliances, whether air conditioning,California Statewide Residential Appliance Saturation Study.

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential transportation energy usage is vital for theDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption ReferencesDensity on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

38 3.2.1. SDG&E Residential Electric Rates and TheirFootprint of Single-Family Residential New Construction.Solar photovoltaic financing: residential sector deployment,

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

U.S. Residential Housing Weather Adjusted Site Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Housing Energy Intensities > Table 1b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Weather Adjusted ...

110

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's new in our home energy use? What's new in our home energy use? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 First results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) The 2009 RECS collected home energy characteristics data from over 12,000 U.S. households. This report highlights findings from the survey, with details presented in the Household Energy Characteristics tables. How we use energy in our homes has changed substantially over the past three decades. Over this period U.S. homes on average have become larger, have fewer occupants, and are more energy-efficient. In 2005, energy use per household was 95 million British thermal units (Btu) of energy compared with 138 million Btu per household in 1978, a drop of 31 percent. Did You Know? Over 50 million U.S. homes have three or more televisions.

111

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of U.S. households are now equipped with AC. This growth occurred among all housing types and in every Census region. Wider use has coincided with much improved energy efficiency standards for AC equipment, a population shift to hotter and more humid regions, and a housing boom during which average housing sizes increased.

112

Residential energy-consumption survey: consumption and expenditures, April 1978-March 1979  

SciTech Connect

Tables present data on energy consumption and expenditures for US households during a 12-month period. The total amount of energy consumed by the residential sector from April 1978 through March 1979 is estimated to have been 10,563 trillion Btu with an average household consumption of 138 million Btu. Table 1 summarizes residential energy consumption for all fuels (totals and averages) as wells as total amounts consumed and expenditures for each of the major fuel types (natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, and liquid petroleum gas). Tables 2 and 3 give the number of households and the average energy prices, respectively, for each of the major fuel types. In Tables 4 to 9, totals and averages for both consumption and expenditures are given for each of the major fuels. The consumption of each fuel is given first for all households using the fuel. Then, households are divided into those that use the fuel as their main source of heat and those using the fuel for other purposes. Electricity data (Tables 5 to 7) are further broken down into households that use electricity for air conditioning and those not using it for this purpose. Limited data are also presented on households that use each of the major fuels for heating water. Each of the consumption tables is given for a variety of general household features, including: geographical, structural and physical, and demographic characteristics. Tables 10 to 18 present the same information for the subgroup of households living in single-family owner-occupied detached houses. The third set of tables (19 to 27) is limited to households that paid directly for all of the energy they used. Tables 28 to 36 provide variance estimates for the data.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE/EIA-0262/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62/1 62/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1979-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part I: National Data (including Conservation) April 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division ' 1 7 T Z 8 0 T T 8 - 8 d * N u o f s s a o o y ' S O S ^ - m ( E O Z ) a u o q d a i a i . ' t j a o j S 9 j g ' u o - p s - p A f a s ^ o n p o a ^ a a ^ n d m o o - m o j j a j q B T T B A B ' ( a d B i J - p a a u S B K ) T O O / T 8 - J Q / 3 0 Q p j o q a s n o H r X a A j n s u o - p ^ d m n s u o o O Q ' 3 j o : m o a j a j q B j f ^ A ^ ^ ^ ^ s a a o d a a a A o q B a q ^ j o ' 8 - T Z T O O - C O O - T 9 0 ' Q N ^ 3 3 S O d O ' 9 f r Z Q - V I 3 / 3 0 Q * T 8 6 T € < 7 - 9 i T O O - e 0 0 - 1 9 0 O d O ' ^ / Z O Z O - V i a / a O Q ' 0 8 6 T a u n r * 6 ^ 6 T 3 s n 3 n y o ^ a u n f ' p j o q a s n o H j o s u a a ^ ^ B ^ u o f a d n m s u o o : X a A j n g u o f ^ d m n s u o o X

115

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

116

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

117

U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Housing Energy Intensities > Table 1c Glossary U.S. Resident ...

118

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

119

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of black and nonblack households in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by black and nonblack households are presented by Census region and for the nation based on the Energy Information Administration's 1982-83 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Black households were found to have significantly lower levels of electricity consumption at both the national and regional level. Natural gas is the dominant space heating fuel used by black households. Natural gas consumption was typically higher for black households. However, when considering natural gas consumption conditional on natural gas space heating no significant differences were found. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Vyas, A.D.; Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Consumption Survey : Sample Selection Activities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the 1983 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Consumption Survey is to obtain a comprehensive data base regarding household energy usage patterns incorporating not only general behavioral indicators of usage (e.g., temperature at which the dwelling is maintained at different times of day during the months of the year in which heating systems are activated or conservation measures effected) but also those characteristics lying further beyond the realm of immediate influence of the household dwellers which directly effect energy consumption (e.g., housing and household characteristics including square footage, number of floors or levels, the number and characteristics of the appliances in the household and household demographics/composition). The data base to be assembled as part of this research effort is also to include households' actual level of energy use for two major fuels (i.e., electricity and natural gas) obtained, with the consent of respondents, from their servicing utility(ies). Two samples have been incorporated in the study. The primary sample - the Regional Sample - will generate a large and comprehensive data base from a representative cross-section of individual households in the Pacific Northwest. A second, Supplementary Sample was incorporated in the survey design to ensure that a sufficient number of households not participating in qualified loan or grant programs, but comparable to participant households on a number of key descriptive characteristics, were included in the assessment. Inclusion of such households in the assessment will permit a formal evaluation of the loan/grant programs to be accomplished. Sampling procedures are described thoroughly.

Louis Harris and Associates

1983-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Housing Characteristics; Consumption & Expenditures; Microdata; Consumption & Expenditures Tables + EXPAND ALL. Summary Statistics (revised January 2009) PDF (all tables)

122

Oxidation of volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. Final technical report, September 1980-February 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to measure, through the use of laboratory combustors, those conditions which promote complete combustion of wood volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. The conditions of interest are combustion temperature, residence time, stoichiometry, and air mixing. The project objectives are met through two laboratory approaches: (1) model compound studies: in order to measure the overall rates of oxidative pyrolysis of biomass volatiles, and to determine the types of intermediate organic species which are likely to form as part of this process, model compounds have been reacted in a specialized jet-stirred reactor, which has been developed as part of this research. (2) high-intensity wood combustion: in order to study the clean combustion of wood, that is, to investigate the conceptual design features required for clean burning, and to ascertain the levels and types of pollutant and condensible species which are most difficult to oxidize, a high-intensity, research wood combustor has been developed and examined for the different phases of the wood burning cycle. Although the objectives of the project have been met, it has not been possible, because of support limitations, to thoroughly explore several interesting aspects which have arisen because of this research. For example, a third laboratory system in which wood pyrolysis gas is injected directly into the a well characterized reactor, so that the kinetics and mechanisms of the gas-phase reaction of the actual biomass volatiles can be studied, could not be thoroughly developed. Refinements in the high-intensity wood combustor, which would bring its design features closer to practicality for the industry, could not be considered. 32 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

Malte, P.C.; Thornton, M.M.; Kamber, P.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Purification of Vegetable Oils Post-Consumption Residential and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viscosity residential treated with clay Tonsil was lower compared to the crude ... Designing a Collaborative System for Socio-Environmental Management of...

124

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & PostGWh total Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 2 YearsInstall Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 3 Years

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005)

126

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

127

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ZIP (all tables) Release Date: January 11, 2013 : CE4.1 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, U.S. Homes: XLS: CE4.2 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, Northeast Homes ...

128

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. energy-related carbon-dioxide emissions, including both direct fuel consumption (primarily natural gas)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Analysis of changes in residential energy consumption, 1973-1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress of energy conservation in the residential sector since the 1973 to 1974 Arab oil embargo is assessed. To accomplish this goal, the reduction in residential energy use per household since 1973 is disaggregated into six possible factors. The factors considered were: (1) building shell efficiencies, (2) geographic distribution of households, (3) appliance efficiency, (4) size of dwelling units, (5) fuel switching, and (6) consumer attitudes. The most important factor identified was improved building shell efficiency, although the impact of appliance efficiency is growing rapidly. Due to data limitations, PNL was not able to quantify the effects of two factors (size of dwelling units and fuel switching) within the framework of this study. The total amount of the energy reduction explained ranged from 18 to 46% over the years 1974 to 1980.

King, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Callaway, J.M.; Adams, R.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heating Degree Day Data Applied to Residential Heating Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific total electric energy and heating oil consumption for individual residences show a very high correlation with National Weather Service airport temperature data when transformed to heating degree days. Correlations of regional total ...

Robert G. Quayle; Henry F. Diaz

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/EIA-0207/3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation February 1980 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Adminstration Assistant Administrater for Program Development Other NEICS Reports Preliminary Conservation Tables from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, August 1979, DOE/EIA-0193/P Characteristics of the Housing Stocks and Households: Preliminary Findings from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, October 1979, DOETllA-0199/P The above reports are available from the following address; U.S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center Attn:; EIA Coordinator P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Characteristics of the Housing Stock and Households, DOE/EIA-0207/2, GPO Stock No,, 061-003-00093-2; $4.25

133

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

134

Predicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(e.g., HVAC) for a specific building, optimizing control systems and strategies for a buildingPredicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study Richard building energy modeling suffers from several factors, in- cluding the large number of inputs required

Tennessee, University of

135

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

136

Residential electricity use, wood use, and indoor temperature; An econometric model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lagged-dependent variable, simultaneous-equation system model of residential electricity use for space heating and other uses, wood use, and indoor temperature is presented. The model is specified by means of a five-element model-building framework developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Data were collected from 100 households that had end-use metering installed as part of the Hood River Conservation Project. The most important finding is that the dependent variables are relatively independent of each other. Model results also indicate that houses with central heating use more electricity for space heating and that households with favorable attitudes toward conservation prefer lower indoor temperatures and use less energy.

Tonn, B.E.; White, D.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Electricity displacement by wood used for space heating in PNWRES (Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey) (1983) households  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the amount of electricity for residential space heating displaced by the use of wood in a sample of single-family households that completed the 1983 Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey. Using electricity bills and daily weather data from the period of July 1981 to July 1982, it was determined that the average household used 21,800 kWh per year, normalized with respect to weather. If no households had used any wood, electricity use would have increased 9%, to 23,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would also have increased, by 21%, to 47% of total electricity use. In the unlikely event that all households had used a great deal of wood for space heating, electricity use could have dropped by 23.5% from the average use, to 16,700 kWh; space heating electricity use would have dropped by 56%, to 24% of total electricity use. Indications concerning future trends regarding the displacement of electricity by wood use are mixed. On one hand, continuing to weatherize homes in the Pacific Northwest may result in less wood use as households find using electricity more economical. On the other hand, historical trends in replacement decisions regarding old space heating systems show a decided preference for wood. 11 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

White, D.L.; Tonn, B.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Residential energy consumption of low-income and elderly households: how non-discretionary is it  

SciTech Connect

The energy literature is replete with opinions that the poor and elderly have cut their residential energy consumption to a minimum. This paper challenges such conclusions through an analysis of data on a sample of 319 Decatur, Illinois homeowners. The data include utility bill histories and survey information on housing characteristics, energy-related behaviors, attitudes, and socio-economic and demographic characteristics. It shows that residential energy consumption per square foot of living space is significantly higher for the elderly and poor than for other groups of Decatur homeowners. By breaking energy use into seasonal components, the paper estimates consumption for various household uses. This information, combined with the survey data, suggests that both subgroups heat and cool their homes inefficiently, due in part to the conditions of their homes, but also due to energy-related behaviors. The public policy implications of the findings are discussed.

Brown, M.A.; Rollinson, P.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Statistical Analysis of Historical State-Level Residential Energy Consumption Trends  

SciTech Connect

Developing an accurate picture of the major trends in energy consumption in the nations stock of residential buildings can serve a variety of national and regional program planning and policy needs related to energy use. This paper employs regression analysis and uses the PRISM (Princeton Scorekeeping Method) approach with historical data to provide some insight into overall changes in the thermal integrity of the residential building stock by state. Although national energy use intensity estimates exist in aggregate, these numbers shed little light on what drives building consumption, as opposing influences are hidden within the measurement (e.g., more appliances that increase energy use while shell improvements reduce it). This study addresses this issue by estimating changes in the reference temperatures that best characterize the existing residential building stock on a state basis. Improvements in building thermal integrity are reflected by declines in the heating reference temperature, holding other factors constant. Heating and cooling-day estimates to various reference temperatures were computed from monthly average temperature data for approximately 350 climatic divisions in the U.S. A simple cross-sectional analysis is employed to try to explain the differential impacts across states. Among other factors, this analysis considers the impact that the relative growth in the number of residential buildings and the stringency of building energy codes has had on residential building energy use. This paper describes the methodology used, presents results, and suggests directions for future research.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

142

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

143

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing the types of heating fuel and equipment used for main and secondary heating purposes. PDF Tables: HC3 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing selected household characteristics including location, number of rooms and area cooled and air-conditioning usage. PDF

144

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace (HC1.3) PDF XLS Cooled Floorspace (HC1.4) PDF XLS Floorspace - Living Space PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.2.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.2.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.2.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.2.4) PDF XLS

145

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

146

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Tables HC1: Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Four Most Populated States PDF Urban/Rural Location PDF Northeast Census Region PDF Midwest Census Region PDF South Census Region PDF West Census Region PDF Tables HC2: Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Housing Unit PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Type of Rented Housing Unit PDF

147

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

148

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

149

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

150

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

151

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

152

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,1762 32554,1865 32582,1639 32613,1036 32643,562

153

User-needs study for the 1993 residential energy consumption survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a user-needs study for the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Every 3 years, the RECS collects information on energy consumption and expenditures for various classes of households and residential buildings. The RECS is the only source of such information within EIA, and one of only a few sources of such information anywhere. EIA sent letters to more than 750 persons, received responses from 56, and held 15 meetings with users. Written responses were also solicited by notices published in the April 14, 1992 Federal Register and in several energy-related publications. To ensure that the 1993 RECS meets current information needs, EIA made a specific effort to get input from policy makers and persons needing data for forecasting efforts. These particular needs relate mainly to development of the National Energy Modeling System and new energy legislation being considered at the time of the user needs survey.

Not Available

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

154

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sc2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sc2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010SC2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,3768 32554,3029 32582,3327 32613,1875

155

Predicting Future Hourly Residential Electrical Consumption: A Machine Learning Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whole building input models for energy simulation programs are frequently created in order to evaluate specific energy savings potentials. They are also often utilized to maximize cost-effective retrofits for existing buildings as well as to estimate the impact of policy changes toward meeting energy savings goals. Traditional energy modeling suffers from several factors, including the large number of inputs required to characterize the building, the specificity required to accurately model building materials and components, simplifying assumptions made by underlying simulation algorithms, and the gap between the as-designed and as-built building. Prior works have attempted to mitigate these concerns by using sensor-based machine learning approaches to model energy consumption. However, a majority of these prior works focus only on commercial buildings. The works that focus on modeling residential buildings primarily predict monthly electrical consumption, while commercial models predict hourly consumption. This means there is not a clear indicator of which techniques best model residential consumption, since these methods are only evaluated using low-resolution data. We address this issue by testing seven different machine learning algorithms on a unique residential data set, which contains 140 different sensors measurements, collected every 15 minutes. In addition, we validate each learner's correctness on the ASHRAE Great Energy Prediction Shootout, using the original competition metrics. Our validation results confirm existing conclusions that Neural Network-based methods perform best on commercial buildings. However, the results from testing our residential data set show that Feed Forward Neural Networks, Support Vector Regression (SVR), and Linear Regression methods perform poorly, and that Hierarchical Mixture of Experts (HME) with Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM) performs best - a technique not previously applied to this domain.

Edwards, Richard E [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Feedback as a means of decreasing residential energy consumption. Report PU/CES 34  

SciTech Connect

When residential units are analyzed in human factor terms, it is apparent that the consumption level feedback (typically a bill, calculated once a month, over all appliances) is inadequate to give the resident useful information about his energy consuming actions. The present study tested the hypothesis that providing immediate feedback to homeowners concerning their daily rate of electric usage would be effective in reducing electric consumption. In the studied homes, central air-conditioning is the largest single source of electric power consumption during the summer. Accordingly, it was possible to predict the household's expected electric consumption in terms of the average daily outdoor temperature. Predicted electric consumption was derived from a previous month's modeling period during which a regression line was fitted to predict consumption from average daily temperature, for each home. Feedback was expressed as a percentage of actual consumption over predicted consumption. Feedback was displayed to homeowners four times a week for approximately one month. The results confirmed the prediction. Before feedback began, the feedback and control groups were consuming electricity at approximately equal rates. During the feedback period, the feedback group used 10.5 percent less electricity. The effectiveness of the feedback procedure was explained in terms of its cueing, motivational, and commitment functions.

Seligman, C.; Darley, J.M.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTIONENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics on household residential choice and auto2009. The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and2010-05) The impact of residential density on vehicle usage

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Decision Making and Residential Energy Use. Annual Reviewand David Auslander. 2010. Residential Occupied NeighborhoodCommission (CEC). 2001. Residential Alternative Calculation

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it to the rank of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modelling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities. From this analysis, we can conclude that Chinese residential energy consumption will more than double by 2020, from 6.6 EJ in 2000 to 15.9 EJ in 2020. This increase will be driven primarily by urbanization, in combination with increases in living standards. In the urban and higher income Chinese households of the future, most major appliances will be common, and heated and cooled areas will grow on average. These shifts will offset the relatively modest efficiency gains expected according to current government plans and policies already in place. Therefore, levelling and reduction of growth in residential energy demand in China will require a new set of more aggressive efficiency policies.

Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Levine, Mark

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

164

Analysis of Energy Consumption and Research on Energy-Saving Technology of Rural Residential Buildings in Southern Shaanxi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article was to grasp trends of energy consumption of village in southern Shaanxi province. Selecting Huangjiagou village of Mian county in Hanzhong city as the investigation base Respectively, in January 2009 and July2010, investigation was conducted ... Keywords: rural region, investigation, residential dwellings, energy consumption, energy conservation

Yang Liu; Xia Fang; Meng Dan; An Yungang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Heating Energy Consumption in a Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In winter, much of the building energy is used for heating in the north region of China. In this study, the heating energy consumption of a residential building in Tianjin during a heating period was simulated by using the EnergyPlus energy simulation program. The study showed that the heat loss from exterior walls, exterior windows and infiltration took three main parts of the total heat loss. Furthermore, the results of on-site measurement are presented with the conclusion that the EnergyPlus program provides sufficient accuracy for this energy simulation application.

Liu, J.; Yang, M.; Zhao, X.; Zhu, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An analysis of residential energy consumption in a temperate climate. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Electrical energy consumption data have been recorded for several hundred submetered residential structures in Middle Tennessee. All houses were constructed with a common ``energy package.`` Specifically, daily cooling usage data have been collected for 130 houses for the 1985 and 1986 cooling seasons, and monthly heating usage data for 186 houses have been recorded by occupant participation over a seven-year period. Cooling data have been analyzed using an SPSSx multiple regression analysis and results are compared to several cooling models. Heating, base, and total energy usage are also analyzed and regression correlation coefficients are determined as a function of several house parameters.

Clark, Y.Y.; Vincent, W.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by end use for 1978, 1980, and 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-use estimates of the average household consumption and expenditures are statistical estimates based on the 1978, 1980, and 1981 Residential Enery Consumption Surveys (RECS) conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) rather than on metered observations. The end-use estimates were obtained by developing a set of equations that predict the percentage of energy used for each broad end-use category. The equations were applied separately to each household and to each fuel. The resulting household end-use estimates were averaged to produce estimates of the average end-use consumption and expenditures on a national and regional basis. The accuracy and potential biases of these end-use estimates vary depending on the fuel type, on the year of the survey, and on the type of end use. The figures and tables presented show the amount and the type of energy cosumed, plus the cost of this energy. National averages are given as well as averages for various categories including region, size and age of dwelling, number of heating degree-days, and income. Some of the significant findings; energy trends by end use for all fuels used in the home for 1978, 1980, and 1981; and electricity consumption and expenditures and natural gas consumption and expenditures are discussed.

Johnson, M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Impact of conservation measures on Pacific Northwest residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to estimate the relationship between residential space conditioning energy use and building conservation programs in the Pacific Northwest. The study was divided into two primary tasks. In the first, the thermal relationship between space conditioning energy consumption under controlled conditions and the physical characteristics of the residence was estimated. In this task, behavioral characteristics such as occupant schedules and thermostat settings were controlled in order to isolate the physical relationships. In the second task, work from the first task was used to calculate the thermal efficiency of a residence's shell. Thermal efficiency was defined as the ability of a shell to prevent escapement of heat generated within a building. The relationship between actual space conditioning energy consumption and the shell thermal efficiency was then estimated. Separate thermal equations for mobile homes, single-family residences, and multi-family residences are presented. Estimates of the relationship between winter electricity consumption for heating and the building's thermal shell efficiency are presented for each of the three building categories.

Moe, R.J.; Owzarski, S.L.; Streit, L.P.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DC. Steiner, R.L. (1994). Residential density and traveland Brownstone The Impact of Residential Density on VehicleWP-05-1 The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energymillion Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energyconsumption, future outlook, end-use, bottom-up analysis

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

24 24 Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes James Lutz, Camilla Dunham-Whitehead, Alex Lekov, and James McMahon Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 February 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies and Community Systems of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ABSTRACT In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

20 20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 4% 25% 4% 64% | 5% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 4% 24% 4% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 4% 26% 3% 65% | 5% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 4% 25% 2% 67% | 5% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 4% 25% 2% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 4% 26% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 3% 25% 4% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 4% 25% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.4 2001 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.3 2002 4% 24% 3% 68% | 5% 25% 68% 38.4 2003

182

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).section entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet.

184

Econometric model of the joint production and consumption of residential space heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study models the production and comsumption of residential space heat, a nonmarket good. Production reflects capital investment decisions of households; consumption reflects final demand decisions given the existing capital stock. In the model, the production relationship is represented by a translog cost equation and an anergy factor share equation. Consumption is represented by a log-linear demand equation. This system of three equations - cost, fuel share, and final demand - is estimated simultaneously. Results are presented for two cross-sections of households surveyed in 1973 and 1981. Estimates of own-price and cross-price elasticities of factor demand are of the correct sign, and less than one in magnitude. The price elasticity of final demand is about -0.4; the income elasticity of final demand is less than 0.1. Short-run and long-run elasticities of demand for energy are about -0.3 and -0.6, respectively. These results suggest that price-induced decreases in the use of energy for space heat are attributable equally to changes in final demand and to energy conservation, the substitution of capital for energy in the production of space heat. The model is used to simulate the behavior of poor and nonpoor households during a period of rising energy prices. This simulation illustrates the greater impact of rising prices on poor households.

Klein, Y.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Review and analysis of emissions data for residential wood-fired central furnaces  

SciTech Connect

The paper reviews data published over the past 10--15 years on domestic wood-fired central heaters. Emphasis is on stick-fired units, the most common type used in the US, but also presented are data on chip- and pellet-fired units, showing that they are capable of achieving lower emissions.

McCrillis, R.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to predict blower motor electrical power consumption for thegives the blower motor electrical power consumption. BE =the blower motor electrical power consumption. The following

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 and 5, the distributions of electricity consumption among01 Figure 4 Distribution of Electricity Consumption AmongSample Figure 5 - Distribution of Electricity Consumption

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenworthy (1989a). Gasoline consumption and cities. JournalVehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsvehicular energy consumption is graphed as a function of

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsresidential vehicular energy consumption is graphed as aon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with vehicles, but

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion in motor vehicles, electricity generation and industrial processes, as well as residential fireplaces and wood

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 1999 Single-Family Home Daily Water Consumption by End Use (Gallons per Capita) (1) Fixture/End Use Toilet 18.5 18.3% Clothes Washer 15 14.9% Shower 11.6 11.5% Faucet 10.9 10.8% Other Domestic 1.6 1.6% Bath 1.2 1.2% Dishwasher 1 1.0% Leaks 9.5 9.4% Outdoor Use (2) 31.7 31.4% Total (2) 101 100% Note(s): Source(s): Average gallons Total Use per capita per day Percent 1) Based analysis of 1,188 single-family homes at 12 study locations. 2) Total Water use derived from USGS. Outdoor use is the difference between total and indoor uses. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Residential End Uses of Water, 1999; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 2000, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1268, 2004, Table 6, p. 17; and Vickers, Amy, Handbook of Water Use and Conservation, June 2002, p. 15.

193

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1989. Residential End-Use Energy Consumption: A Survey ofCathy R. Zoi. 1986. Unit Energy Consumption of ResidentialResidential Unit Energy Consumption Coefficients, Palo Alto,

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

196

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% | 1.01 1.06 4.8% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.18 0.43 3.7% | 0.57 0.81 3.7% Computers 0.17 0.17 1.5% | 0.53 0.53 2.4% Other (8) 0.00 0.16 0.01 0.20 0.37 3.2% | 0.63 0.80 3.6% Adjust to SEDS (9) 0.42 0.42 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.8% Total 5.06 0.63 0.56 0.04 0.45 4.95 11.69 100% | 15.34 22.07 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.42 quad), solar water heating (0.01

197

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% | 0.95 1.01 4.3% Cooking 0.23 0.02 0.15 0.40 3.3% | 0.44 0.69 2.9% Computers 0.27 0.27 2.2% | 0.79 0.79 3.3% Other (8) 0.00 0.22 0.07 1.48 1.77 14.6% | 4.35 4.64 19.6% Total 4.76 0.35 0.51 0.03 0.55 5.94 12.14 100% | 17.50 23.69 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.44 quad), solar water heating (0.02

198

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% | 0.91 0.98 4.4% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.13 0.38 3.2% | 0.40 0.64 2.9% Computers 0.24 0.24 2.0% | 0.72 0.72 3.2% Other (8) 0.00 0.20 0.07 1.20 1.46 12.5% | 3.61 3.87 17.3% Total 4.88 0.43 0.50 0.03 1.00 5.30 11.69 100% | 16.00 22.39 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

199

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% | 0.98 1.04 5.0% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.11 0.36 3.1% | 0.34 0.59 2.8% Computers 0.19 0.19 1.7% | 0.57 0.57 2.7% Other (8) 0.00 0.17 0.05 0.94 1.17 10.2% | 2.85 3.07 14.6% Total 4.99 0.55 0.51 0.03 0.51 4.79 11.38 100% | 14.47 21.06 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

200

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in residential space conditioning are affected byinto space heating, air conditioning, appliances, cookingSpace heating North Transition Ordinary efficient Highly efficient Incandescent Florescent CFL Air conditioning

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Estimate Window % of Space Conditioning Use Original LBNLfactors to estimate space conditioning energy consumptionof Energy, in 2003 space conditioning in residential and

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

203

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenworthy (1989a). Gasoline consumption and cities. Journalon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomas

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomason Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Thomas F. Golob

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analysis of wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farmers in central Kenya  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farm households in central Kenya. The specific objective were: (1) to determine how households had responded to specific wood-energy policies; (2) to identify factors associated with household adoption or non-adoption of the strategies. Different programs aimed at addressing wood-energy shortages in Kenya were initiated or strengthened during the 1980s: fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting; development and dissemination of improved stoves and fireplaces; promotion of increased accessibility to wood-energy substitutes. Household adoption levels for policy-supported strategies have remained low despite promotion. Survey data from two villages in Nyeri district were collected to determine the factors associated with adoption of the Kenya Ceramic Jiko, the [open quotes]Kuni Mbili[close quotes] stove/fireplace, kerosene stoves, electric cookers, and fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting. Adoption rates varied from as low as 1 percent for electricity to 43 percent for the Kenya Ceramic Jiko. Important policy variables included extension visits per year, income levels, years of formal education received by head of household, access to different fuels, area of farm-land owned, household size, and locational characteristics of the villages. Policy recommendations included: use of research results to direct policy; improvement of information flows between policy makers, extension agents, and technology-users; increased support of agroforestry; and better program coordination. Recommendations for further research included: examining more areas where efficiency gains in energy production and consumption can be made, extending the study to cover the drier parts of central Kenya, and conducting regular case studies in order to better understand the adoption process over time.

Mwangi, A.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. Supplement, Regional  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

Relations between Temperature and Residential Natural Gas Consumption in the Central and Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased U.S. natural gas price volatility since the mid-to-late-1980s deregulation generally is attributed to the deregulated market being more sensitive to temperature-related residential demand. This study therefore quantifies relations ...

Reed P. Timmer; Peter J. Lamb

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliance, lighting, and heating and cooling usage in theseusage in rural households. Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Appliance Cooking lighting

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring March 31, 200X i U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEW Hello, I am __________________________ from Roper Starch Worldwide Inc., a social science research firm. We are conducting a study for the U.S. Department of Energy about energy consumption in homes. Although your participation is voluntary, we hope you will participate in this important study of energy usage. Your identity and all the responses you give me will be kept strictly confidential. The survey will take about 15 minutes.

210

Energy consumption and usage characteristics from field measurements of residential dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers  

SciTech Connect

The measured energy consumption and usage characteristics for household dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers for ten townhouses at Twin Rivers, N.J., are presented. Whenever the dishwashers and/or clothes washers were in use, the energy consumption, water consumption, frequency of usage, and water temperature were measured by a data acquisition system. The electrical energy of electric clothes dryers and the gas consumption of gas clothes dryers were measured, as well as their frequency and duration of use, and exhaust temperature. Typical household usage patterns of these major appliances are included.

Chang, Y.L.; Grot, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The dubuque electricity portal: evaluation of a city-scale residential electricity consumption feedback system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Dubuque Electricity Portal, a city-scale system aimed at supporting voluntary reductions of electricity consumption. The Portal provided each household with fine-grained feedback on its electricity use, as well as using incentives, ... Keywords: behavior change, consumption feedback systems, ecf, electricity, smart meters, social comparison, sustainability

Thomas Erickson; Ming Li; Younghun Kim; Ajay Deshpande; Sambit Sahu; Tian Chao; Piyawadee Sukaviriya; Milind Naphade

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The dubuque water portal: evaluation of the uptake, use and impact of residential water consumption feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dubuque Water Portal is a system aimed at supporting voluntary reductions of water consumption that is intended to be deployed city-wide. It provides each household with fine-grained, near real time feedback on their water consumption, as well as ... Keywords: behavior change, games, smart meters, social comparison, sustainability, water, water and energy feedback systems

Thomas Erickson; Mark Podlaseck; Sambit Sahu; Jing D. Dai; Tian Chao; Milind Naphade

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

214

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide estimates of residential use from public supplies in 2000. This value was estimated based on the residential portion of public supply in 1995 and applied to the total public supply water use in 2000. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

215

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is standard in HVAC design and fan selection books 6 . Theof modulating design options. The cooling fan curve passesfan curve and the duct system curve. We calculated the furnace fuel consumption for each design

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

1997 Consumption and Expenditures-Data Tables RECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

217

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

218

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

219

Household energy and consumption and expenditures, 1990. [Contains Division, Census Region, and Climate Zone maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this supplement to the Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990 report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential housing units, specifically at the four Census regions and nine Census division levels. This report includes household energy consumption, expenditures, and prices for natural gas, electricity, fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and kerosene as well as household wood consumption. For national-level data, see the main report, Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1990.

Not Available

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative furnaces used in each house required derivation of the heating and coolingalternative efficiency levels and design options to meet the same heating and coolingand cooling loads of each sample house are known, it is possible to estimate what the energy consumption of alternative (

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Regression analysis of residential air-conditioning energy consumption at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy consumption of a house air conditioner located at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, is modeled as a function of weather parameters and total (global) solar radiation on a horizontal surface. The selection of effective parameters that significantly influence energy consumption is carried out using general stepping regression methods. The problem of collinearity between the regressors is also investigated. The final model involves parameters of total solar radiation on a horizontal surface, wind speed, and temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. However, the model coefficients are functions of relative humidity and/or temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. Model adequacy is examined by the residual analysis technique. Model validation is carried out by the data-splitting technique. The sensitivity of the model indicates that relative humidity and temperature difference strongly influence the cooling energy consumption. It was found that an increase in relative humidity from 20% to 100% can cause a 100% increase in cooling energy consumption during the high cooling season.

Abdel-Nabi, D.Y.; Zubair, S.M.; Abdelrahman, M.A.; Bahel, V. (Energy Systems Group, Div. of Energy Resources, Research Inst., King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Vapnik's learning theory applied to energy consumption forecasts in residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the purpose of energy conservation, we present in this paper an introduction to the use of support vector (SV) learning machines used as a data mining tool applied to buildings energy consumption data from a measurement campaign. Experiments using ... Keywords: data mining, energy conservation, energy efficiency, predictive modelling, statistical learning theory

Florence Lai; Frederic Magoules; Fred Lherminier

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sensor-based physical interactions as interventions for change in residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interventions for behavior change in domestic energy consumption rely critically on energy usage data. To obtain this data, collection systems must be established. Pervasive sensing systems enable such monitoring, but populating homes with sensors is ... Keywords: just in time motivations, physical data interfaces, sensor networks, ubiquitous computing

Mailyn Fidler; Sharon Tan; Samar Alqatari; Nishant Bhansali; Alex Chang; Mia Davis; Eric Kofman; Krystal Lee; Phounsouk Sivilay; Marilyn Cornelius; Brendan Wypich; Banny Banerjee

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates charge a set price for each unit of water. Block rates charge a different price for each additional increment of usage. The prices for each increment is higher for increasing block rates and lower for decreasing block rates. Peak rates and seasonal rates charge higher prices when demand is highest. Flat fees charge a set price for

225

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 24% 41% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 23% 42% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 26% 39% 18% 3% | 32% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 26% 39% 17% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 25% 40% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 25% 40% 18% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 26% 40% 16% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 25% 41% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 26% 42% 15% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 25% 41% 16% 3% | 30% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 24% 43% 17% 3% | 30% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 23% 42% 18% 3% | 29% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 22% 42% 19% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 22% 43% 18% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 20% 43% 20% 3% | 27% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 21% 41% 21% 3% | 28% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 21% 40% 22% 3% | 29% 47% 3% 23.66 2001 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45% 3% 22.69 2002 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45%

226

The impact of thermostat performance on energy consumption and occupant comfort in residential electric heating systems  

SciTech Connect

A digital computer simulation was used to compare the energy consumption and comfort of an electric baseboard heating system using high performance thermostats (low droop, fast cycling) to that of the same system using poorer performing thermostats (high droop, slow cycling, such as many line voltage types). Since a thermostat which allows the controlled temperature to fall below the setpoint will obviously cause less energy consumption than a thermostat which maintains the controlled temperature closer to the setpoint, the key hypothesis of this study was that the user will reset the thermostat setpoint in some fashion during the heating season to obtain acceptable conditions for all heating loads. The major assumption of this study, therefore, was the mode of this ''user-thermostat interaction''. For every case in which the simulated ''user'' could intervene, the energy consumption using high performance thermostats was found to be less, while a greater degree of comfort was maintained, than systems using poorer performing thermostats. Energy savings ranged from 2% to 18% depending upon the mode of user interaction simulated. Where energy savings were small, the ''user'' was resetting the poorly performing thermostat as often as twice a day; i.e., the ''user'' was performing the function of a better performing thermostat.

Benton, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect

Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Residential energy-consumption analysis utilizing the DOE-1 computer program  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-1 computer program is used to examine energy consumption in a typical middle-class household in Cincinnati, Ohio. The program is used to compare energy consumption under different structural and environmental conditions, including various levels of insulation in the walls and ceiling, double and single glazing of windows, and thermostat setback schedules. In addition, the DOE-1 program is used to model the house under three energy distribution systems: a unit heater, a single-zone fan system with optional subzone reheat; and a unitary heat pump. A plant equipment simulation is performed to model the heating and cooling plant currently installed in the house. A simple economic analysis of life-cycle costs for the house is done utilizing the economic simulation portion of DOE-1. Utility bills over the past six years are analyzed to gain an actual energy-use profile for the house to compare with computer results. Results indicate that a 35% savings in heating load may be obtained with addition of proper amounts of insulation as compared with the house with no insulation. The installation of double glazing on windows may save close to 6% on heating load. Thermostat setbacks may result in savings of around 25% on energy consumed for heating. Similar results are achieved with regard to cooling load. Comparison of actual energy consumed by the household (from utility bills) with the computer results shows a 4.25% difference in values between the two. This small percent difference certainly strengthens the case for future use of computer programs in comparing construction alternatives and predicting building energy consumption.

Arentsen, S K

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window to wall. The integrated influence result will be different when the building is in different climate zone. This paper studies the variation rule of some aggregative indicators and building energy efficiency rates by simulation and analysis of the same building in different climate zones by eQuest, in order to determine how building energy efficiency works in different climate zones.

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Wood Use Across Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?Forest products history and use ?Forest resource- the big picture ?Consumption- the big picture ?Trends forest products industry ? pulp & paper ? solid woodBack in Time ?1492 ? Columbus sailed the ocean blue! ? wood use- fuelwood American Indians ?1634: Jean Nicolet

Scott Bowe; United States Wood Use

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Growth Rate Wood Solar Thermal Solar PV GSHP Total 2010-Year 1980 0.846 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.846 - 1981 0.873 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.873 - 1982 0.971 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.971 - 1983 0.970 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.970 - 1984 0.980 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.980 - 1985 1.010 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.010 - 1986 0.920 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.920 - 1987 0.853 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.853 - 1988 0.910 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.910 - 1989 0.920 0.052 N.A. 0.005 0.977 - 1990 0.582 0.056 N.A. 0.006 0.643 - 1991 0.610 0.057 N.A. 0.006 0.673 - 1992 0.640 0.059 N.A. 0.006 0.706 - 1993 0.548 0.061 N.A. 0.007 0.616 - 1994 0.520 0.063 N.A. 0.006 0.589 - 1995 0.520 0.064 N.A. 0.007 0.591 - 1996 0.540 0.065 N.A. 0.007 0.612 - 1997 0.428 0.064 N.A. 0.007 0.499 - 1998 0.380 0.064 N.A. 0.008 0.452 - 1999 0.400 0.063 N.A. 0.009 0.471 - 2000 0.430 0.060 N.A. 0.009 0.499 - 2001 0.374 0.059 N.A. 0.009 0.442 - 2002 0.380 0.057 N.A. 0.010 0.448 - 2003 0.400 0.057 N.A. 0.013 0.470 -

232

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5 18.19 186.1 1994 98.7 N.A. 105.2 18.08 183.2 1995 100.0 N.A. 104.6 18.49 185.0 1996 101.0 N.A. 110.2 19.48 192.9 1997 102.2 N.A. 104.4 18.94 185.3 1998 103.5 N.A. 98.9 18.93 182.8 1999 104.9 N.A. 101.5 19.53 186.1 2000 105.7 N.A. 105.6 20.37 192.7 2001 107.0 1.7% 102.1 20.01 187.0 2002 105.0 3.3% 106.6 20.75 197.7 2003 105.6 5.2% 109.2 21.07 199.6 2004 106.6 7.1% 106.6 21.06 197.6 2005 108.8 9.0% 105.7 21.59

233

Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savings in the California Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report. 2004. California Residential Appliance SaturationAdministration (EIA). 1996. Residential Energy ConsumptionEIA). 1999. A Look at Residential Energy Consumption in

Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

236

Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Energy Efficiency Report: Chapter 3 Figures (Residential)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 3.1. Total Site Residential Energy Consumption and Personal Consumption Expenditures Indices, 1980 to 1993. Notes: Personal consumption expenditures used ...

238

Econometric analysis of residential demand for fuelwood in the United States, 1980-1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an econometric study of residential fuelwood demand in the United States. It is based on a residential energy consumption survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1980-1981. Estimates are derived of the probability that a particular household will burn wood and of the wood that will be burned. Aggregate fuelwood demand is predicted for five census regions and for the contiguous United States. The predicted average probability of burning wood is 0.32, and the average predicted quantity burned is 1.57 cords. Residential fuelwood demand is found to be quite responsive to changes in the price of nonwood heating fuel. 16 references.

Hardie, I.W.; Hanssan, A.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wood pellet market and trade: a global perspective  

SciTech Connect

This perspective provides an overview of wood pellet markets in a number of countries of high significance, together with an inventory of market factors and relevant past or existing policies. In 2010, the estimated global wood pellet production and consumption were close to 14.3 Mt (million metric tonnes) and 13.5 Mt, respectively, while the global installed production capacity had reached over 28 Mt. Two types of pellets are mainly traded (i) for residential heating and (ii) for large-scale district heating or co-fi ring installations. The EU was the primary market, responsible for nearly 61% and 85% of global production and consumption, respectively in 2010. EU markets were divided according to end use: (i) residential and district heating, (ii) power plants driven market, (iii) mixed market, and (iv) export-driven countries. North America basically serves as an exporter, but also with signifi cant domestic consumption in USA. East Asia is predicted to become the second-largest consumer after the EU in the near future. The development perspective in Latin America remains unclear. Five factors that determine the market characteristics are: (i) the existence of coal-based power plants, (ii) the development of heating systems, (iii) feedstock availability, (iv) interactions with wood industry, and (v) logistics factor. Furthermore, intervention policies play a pivotal role in market development. The perspective of wood pellets industry was also analyzed from four major aspects: (i) supply potential, (ii) logistics issues, (iii) sustainability considerations, and (iv) technology development.

Chun Sheng Goh; Martin Junginger; Maurizio Cocchi; Didier Marchal; Daniela Thran; Christiane Hennig; Jussi Heinimo; Lars Nikolaisen; Peter-Paul Schouwenberg; Douglas Bradley; J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Leslie Ovard; Michael Deutmeyer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis: Studies in Residential Energy Demand. AcademicHousing Characteristics 1987, Residential Energy ConsumptionHousing Characteristics 1990, Residential Energy Consumption

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Wood and energy in connecticut. Staff report  

SciTech Connect

Telephone surveys of Connecticut households conducted in 1979 indicate a transition to wood heating in response to a series of conventional energy price increases and uncertainty in conventional energy supplies. Connecticut households consumed 668,000 cords of wood in the winter of 1978-79. The airtight wood stove has become the most commonly used wood-burning apparatus. Survey data of residential wood cutting, purchasing, and burning were analyzed by household tenure, wood-burning apparatus, and county. Residential use of wood for energy constitutes a new demand on the forest resource, increases local income and employment, displaces fuel oil and electricity, but may compromise household safety.

Bailey, M.R.; Wheeling, P.R.; Lenz, M.I.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

California DREAMing: the design of residential demand responsive technology with people in mind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in daily household energy consumption. Proceedings of thefeedback into energy consumption. Oxford: Environmentalin Residential Energy Consumption. Proceedings of the 2008

Peffer, Therese E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Realized and prospective impacts of U.S. energy efficiency standards for residential appliances: 2004 update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .residential primary energy consumption and CO 2 emissions inenergy efficiency and energy consumption of a given product

Meyers, Stephen; McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ABSTRACT Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

249

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

250

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Demand and Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Demand and Consumption Electricity Demand and Consumption Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity consumption and demand datasets, specifically: annual observed electricity consumption by sector (1974 to 2009); observed percentage of consumers by sector (2002 - 2009); and regional electricity demand, as a percentage of total demand (2009). The sectors included are: agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial (mining, food processing, wood and paper, chemicals, basic metals, other minor sectors); commercial; and residential. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago)

251

An Empirical Analysis of Causality in the Relationship between Telecommuting and Residential and Job Relocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Travel Behavior and Residential Location). Report to BMWwork places on urban residential location, consumption andapplication in study of residential mobility. Transportation

Ory, David T.; Mokhtarian, Patricia L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

An Empirical Analysis of Causality in the Relationship between Telecommuting and Residential and Job Relocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New telecommunications and residential location flexibility.on Travel Behavior and Residential Location). Report to BMWwork places on urban residential location, consumption and

Ory, D T; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An Empirical Analysis of Causality in the Relationship Between Telecommuting and Residential and Job Relocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New telecommunications and residential location flexibility.on Travel Behavior and Residential Location). Report to BMWwork places on urban residential location, consumption and

Ory, David T; Mokhtarian, Patricia L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seds.html. USDOE. 2009. Residential Energy ConsumptionUSEPA) 2008. Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: FinalExperiences of residential consumers and utilities. Oak

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 Figure 10. Residential Primary Energy Use in 2000 and3. Fuel Consumption in the Residential Sector in 2005 in10 Table 6. Residential Activity

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Finishing Wood Decks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction in recent years. However, there is considerable confusion regarding how these structures should be protected with finish. This paper summarizes the types, application techniques, and expected service lives of various finishes on both preservative treated and untreated lumber. Recommendations are made on the basis of decades of research on various wood species using a wide variety of finishes.

R. Sam Williams; et al.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Residential Two-Stage Gas Furnaces - Do They Save Energy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Furnaces andcalculating the energy consumption of two-stage furnaces.residential gas furnace energy consumption in the DOE test

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Lutz, James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Non-Space Heating Electrical Consumption in Manufactured Homes: Residential Construction Demonstration Project Cycle II : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes submeter data of the non-space heating electrical energy use in a sample of manufactured homes. These homes were built to Super Good Cents insulation standards in 1988 and 1989 under the auspices of RCDP Cycle 2 of the Bonneville Power Administration. They were designed to incorporate innovations in insulation and manufacturing techniques developed to encourage energy conservation in this important housing type. Domestic water heating (DWH) and other non-space heat energy consumption, however, were not generally affected by RCDP specifications. The purpose of this study is to establish a baseline for energy conservation in these areas and to present a method for estimating total energy saving benefits associated with these end uses. The information used in this summary was drawn from occupant-read submeters and manufacturersupplied specifications of building shell components, appliances and water heaters. Information was also drawn from a field review of ventilation systems and building characteristics. The occupant survey included a census of appliances and occupant behavior in these manufactured homes. A total of 150 manufactured homes were built under this program by eight manufacturers. An additional 35 homes were recruited as a control group. Of the original 185 houses, approximately 150 had some usable submeter data for domestic hot water and 126 had usable submeter data for all other nonheating consumption. These samples were used as the basis for all consumption analysis. The energy use characteristics of these manufactured homes were compared with that of a similar sample of RCDP site-built homes. In general, the manufactured homes were somewhat smaller and had fewer occupants than the site-built homes. The degree to which seasonal variations were present in non-space heat uses was reviewed.

Onisko, Stephen A.; Roos, Carolyn; Baylon, David

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics of Homethe stakes for energy consumption are high, as we hope atAir Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

means of decreasing residential energy consumption. Journalreductions gained through residential CPP rates, with or7. Hypothetical effects of residential CPP rates with and

Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.E. 1986. The LBL Residential Energy Model. LawrenceInc. MEANS. 1992. Residential Cost Data: 11th Annual EditionInstitute. 1989. Residential End-Use Energy Consumption: A

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, a simplified approach was used to determine plausible future penetration rates

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

266

Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Production equals consumption for all renewable energy sources except biofuels. 9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Total biomass inputs to the ...

267

Economic impacts of wood energy in the Northeast, 1985: Summary report: Northeast Regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wood energy in the Northeast accounts for an estimated average of 1.96 jobs and $46,634 of income for every 1000 tons of wood burned by households and businesses. This translates into an estimated total of over 78,000 jobs and $1.8 billion of personal income for Northeast residents and businesses. In addition, a total of $589 million in state and federal tax revenues are generated by wood energy-related economic activity. By choosing wood over other fuels, Northeast households and businesses saved $1.2 billion in their 1985 fuel bills. In the Northeast in 1985, wood displaced over 1 billion gallons of oil, 37 million tcf of natural gas and propane, 138,000 tons of coal, and 1858 million kilowatt-hours of electricity. Projected growth in wood energy consumption in the industrial and residential sectors indicate that the Northeast wood energy industry will support approximately 165,000 jobs and $3.8 billion of personal and business income by the year 2000, if projected growth continues. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Chamberlin, R.; High, C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

269

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) was designed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA)...

270

Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savings in the California Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of residential electricity consumption surpassed the rate ofresidential electricity consumption increased at a rate ofresidential electricity consumption grew 49%, a slightly lower growth rate

Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIA, 2004a. Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2001:between the average energy consumption of refrigerators inbetween the average energy consumption of SFR and MFR Energy

Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

273

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

274

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

275

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DC 20585, and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Public reporting burden for this form is estimated...

276

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

We pay directly to the utility or fuel ... STREET, CITY, STATE, AND ZIP CODE or KEROSENE ACCOUNT NUMBER (IF KNOWN) TELEPHONE NUMBER (IF KNOWN): AREA CODE AND ...

277

Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savings in the California Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only 27% of national energy consumption is consumed directlynational policies affecting the state. Nationwide, energy consumptionNational Association of Home Builders Personal Computer Portland Gas and Electric Residential Appliance Saturation Survey Residential Energy Consumption

Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Evaluation of High Performance Residential Housing Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy consumption of residential buildings in Canada accounts for 17% of national energy use (Trudeau, 2005). Production homes represent a considerable portion of new (more)

Grin, Aaron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

280

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

282

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

283

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

284

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

285

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

286

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

287

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

288

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

289

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

290

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

291

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

292

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

293

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

294

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

295

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

296

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

297

OTEC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trail Electric Cooperative (OTEC) assists residential members in reducing electric consumption by providing rebates for energy efficient equipment. Rebates are for appliances,...

298

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

299

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

300

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

302

Fuel consumption: industrial, residential, and general studies. Volume 2. 1977-October, 1979 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Citations of research on fuel supply, demand, shortages, and conservation through effective utilization are presented. A few abstracts pertain to energy consumption in the agricultural sector, fuel substitution, economic studies, and environmental concerns relating to energy consumption. Bibliographies on electric power consumption and fuel consumption by transportation also are available. (This updated bibliography contains 159 abstracts, 29 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Hundemann, A.S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

304

Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralK. 2013. Domestic energy consumption-What role do comfort,residential electricity consumption Energy Policy, 42(2012)

Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

306

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data; ... The major users are residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, and electric power generators.

307

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by County  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County (2006-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission sorted by County for Residential and Non-residential from 2006 to 2009.


...

308

Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate 500 Program Info Start Date 1/1/1994 State Arizona Program Type Personal Deduction Rebate Amount Total cost, exclusive of taxes, interest and other finance charges Provider Arizona Department of Revenue This incentive allows Arizona taxpayers to deduct the cost of converting an existing wood fireplace to a qualifying wood stove. The cost to purchase and install all necessary equipment is tax deductible, up to a maximum $500 deduction. Qualifying wood stoves must meet the standards of performance for new wood heaters manufactured after July 1990, or sold after July 1992 pursuant to [http://www.epa.gov/oecaerth/resources/policies/monitoring/caa/woodstover...

309

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

310

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

311

Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions in this ... non-combustion use of fossil ...

312

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years later, standards on these products alone were estimated to have reduced annual national electricity consumptionyear, given by UEC 0c (y) = UEC 0 (Income c (y),CDD) The total electricity consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Henderson (2005) Home air conditioning in Europe how muchA.A. Pavlova ( 2003). Air conditioning market saturation and+ paper 6,306 Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

315

2005 RECS Consumption and Expenditures Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Detailed Consumption and Expenditures (C&E) tables containing Space Heating, Air-Conditioning, Water Heating, and Appliance residential energy data are now available.

316

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

317

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planning Area (1990-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission by planning area for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight,...

318

PQ TechWatch: Understanding and Managing Residential Power Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This PQ TechWatch examines the changing face of the appliances providing the largest share of the power consumption in residential sites, and then it looks on the horizon at new additions to the residential load profile.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ho ...

320

Table 3. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This write-up presents 1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures by Origin of Householder. In 1997, there were 101.5 million residential ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wood and energy in New Hampshire. Staff report  

SciTech Connect

Telephone surveys of New Hampshire households conducted in 1979 and 1980 indicate a transition to wood heating in response to a series of conventional energy price increases and uncertainty in conventional energy supplies. New Hampshire households consumed 394,000 cords of wood in the winter of 1978-79; 504,000 cords were burnt during the next winter. The airtight wood stove has become the most commonly used wood-burning apparatus. Survey data of residential wood cutting, purchasing, and burning were analyzed by household tenure, wood-burning apparatus, and county. Residential use of wood for energy constitutes a new demand on the forest resource, increases local income and employment, displaces fuel oil and electricity, and may compromise household safety.

Bailey, M.R.; Wheeling, P.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Non-residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

05 05 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278105 Varnish cache server Non-residential Dataset Summary Description Natural gas consumption data from the California Energy Commission sorted by County for Residential and Non-residential from 2006 to 2009. Source California Energy Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption Energy Consumption Natural Gas Non-residential Residential Data text/csv icon Natural Gas Consumption By County (csv, 17 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2006-2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

323

Energy-related attitude/belief variables in conventional econometric equations: An empirical approach applied to residential energy consumption. Doctoral thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study analyzes a subsample of 523 households from the 1975 Lifestyles and Household Energy Use Survey conducted for the Washington Center for Metropolitan Studies. The study explores the empirical relationship between a set of four Energy-Related Attitude/Belief (ERAB) variables, household electricity and natural gas consumption, and three Energy-Related Discrete Choice (ERDC) variables. Using principal components factor analysis, the ERAB variables were constructed from a portion of the survey responses dealing with what households felt should be done to handle current or future energy shortages. A key finding of the study is that in the context of a conventional econometric specification of electricity and natural gas consumption, ERAB variables are statistically significant, although less significant than conventional explanatory variables for household energy consumption.

Wetzel, B.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

The national energy requirements of residential windows in the U.S.: Today and tomorrow  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an end-use analysis of the national energy requirements of US residential window technologies. The authors estimate that the current US stock of 19 billion square feet of residential windows is responsible for 1.7 quadrillion BTUs (or quads) per year of energy use--1.3 quads of heating and 0.4 quads of cooling energy--which represents about 2% of total US energy consumption. They show that national energy use due to windows could be reduced by 25% by the year 2010 through accelerated adoption of currently available, advanced window technologies such as low-e and solar control low-e coatings, vinyl and wood frames, and superwindows. The authors evaluate the economics of the technologies regionally, considering both climatic and energy price variations, and find that the technologies would be cost effective for most consumers.

Frost, K.; Eto, J.; Arasteh, D.; Yazdanian, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

327

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

328

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

329

Residential Energy Display Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy display devices provide direct feedback to consumers about their electricity use and cost, direct feedback that potentially can help customers manage electricity consumption. EPRI tested five different stand-alone display devices in its Energy Efficiency and Demand Response Living Laboratory to assess whether devices functioned according to manufacturer specifications. In addition to providing results of these tests, this Technology Brief describes how display devices operate, summariz...

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

331

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

332

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial buildings in the United States? Nearly 40% of total U.S. energy consumption in 2012 was consumed in ...

333

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Square footage includes attic, garage, and basement square footage. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. Share of Average Home Size (1) Average Home Size...

334

EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA has recently published state fact sheets highlighting interesting aspects of residential energy consumption and housing characteristics based on data released ...

335

Energy Use of Residential Refrigerators and Freezers: Function...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

These UAF functions were used to project energy use in the nearly 4,000 households in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), a statistical...

336

Table 5A. Residential Average Monthly Bill by Census Division ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5A. Residential Average Monthly Bill by Census Division, and State, 2009: Census Division State Number of Consumers Average Monthly Consumption ...

337

Characteristics of Residential Housing Units by Ceiling Fans, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A reporting of the number of housing units using ceiling fans in U.S. households as reported in the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

338

Community based outreach strategies in residential energy upgrade programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Home energy upgrades can reduce residential energy consumption and improve indoor conditions, thereby realizing environmental, economic, health and other social benefits. Utilities, government and other actors have established ...

McEwen, Brendan (Brendan Carl Francis)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Propane demand modeling for residential sectors- A regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents a forecasting model for the propane consumption within the residential sector. In this research we explore the dynamic behavior of different variables (more)

Shenoy, Nitin K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

residential sector key indicators | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential sector key indicators residential sector key indicators Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2009 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Source EIA Date Released March 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2009 Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 55.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

342

Jordan Woods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jordan Woods Windows and Envelope Materials Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2000 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2052C (510) 486-4931...

343

Drew Wood  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wood Indoor Air Quality Research Collaborative drew@iaqrc.org This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This...

344

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

345

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

346

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

347

California Energy Commission - Natural Gas Consumption by County  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County (2006-2009) Natural gas consumption data from the California Energy Commission sorted by County for Residential and Non-residential from 2006 to 2009. 2010-12-21T23:17:54Z...

348

Residential and Transport Energy Use in India: Past Trend and Future Outlook  

SciTech Connect

The main contribution of this report is to characterize the underlying residential and transport sector end use energy consumption in India. Each sector was analyzed in detail. End-use sector-level information regarding adoption of particular technologies was used as a key input in a bottom-up modeling approach. The report looks at energy used over the period 1990 to 2005 and develops a baseline scenario to 2020. Moreover, the intent of this report is also to highlight available sources of data in India for the residential and transport sectors. The analysis as performed in this way reveals several interesting features of energy use in India. In the residential sector, an analysis of patterns of energy use and particular end uses shows that biomass (wood), which has traditionally been the main source of primary energy used in households, will stabilize in absolute terms. Meanwhile, due to the forces of urbanization and increased use of commercial fuels, the relative significance of biomass will be greatly diminished by 2020. At the same time, per household residential electricity consumption will likely quadruple in the 20 years between 2000 and 2020. In fact, primary electricity use will increase more rapidly than any other major fuel -- even more than oil, in spite of the fact that transport is the most rapidly growing sector. The growth in electricity demand implies that chronic outages are to be expected unless drastic improvements are made both to the efficiency of the power infrastructure and to electric end uses and industrial processes. In the transport sector, the rapid growth in personal vehicle sales indicates strong energy growth in that area. Energy use by cars is expected to grow at an annual growth rate of 11percent, increasing demand for oil considerably. In addition, oil consumption used for freight transport will also continue to increase .

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Residential Energy Usage Comparison: Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The load shapes of major residential electric and gas appliances were compared in an integrated load and market research project in southern California. The energy consumption data provide a benchmark for comparing the costs of alternative technologies; the market research data relate customer attitudes with appliance load shapes.

1991-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

350

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

351

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

352

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Program Info Start Date 09/07/2012 State Maryland Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Stick Burning Stove: $500 Pellet Burning Stove: $700 The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program offers a flat grant award of $500 for stick burning wood stoves and $700 for pellet burning wood stoves that meet program eligibility requirements. Basic requirements for grant funding include: *The property must serve as primary residence *Clean burning wood stove must replace existing electric or non-natural gas

353

Is Efficiency Enough? Towards a New Framework for Carbon Savings in the California Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these years, residential electricity consumption grew 49%, aElectricity consumption has increased over the past 20 years,electricity consumption for single-family residences (7,105 kWh/year).

Moezzi, Mithra; Diamond, Rick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

355

2001 Consumption and Expenditures-Detailed Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This section contains the data collection forms used in 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Also included are the U.S. Census regions and climate zone ...

356

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

357

Guidelines for residential commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes.Delp. 2000. Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics Lawrence

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

359

Kartlggning av energianvndning under byggfasen vid nyproduktion av flerbostadshus; Investigation of the energy consumption during production of apartment buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The energy consumption in the sectors of residential and public buildings is 40 % of the total energy consumption in Sweden. The main part, (more)

Hatami, Valid

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 62.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm

362

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... State Energy Data System ...

363

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... standardized paper form, on-line fillable form or spreadsheet, ...

364

Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 17,593 16,517 16,940 11,858 7,552 4,053 3,006 2,683 2,901 4,839 7,495 16,224 1990 20,092 15,721 14,900 11,633 7,192 4,891...

365

Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,722,358 4,892,277 4,778,907 4,782,412 4,713,777 4,148,970 4,722,358 4,892,277 4,778,907 4,782,412 4,713,777 4,148,970 1930-2012 Alabama 35,481 37,793 36,061 42,215 36,582 27,582 1967-2012 Alaska 19,843 21,439 19,978 18,714 20,262 21,380 1967-2012 Arizona 38,321 38,453 34,732 37,812 38,592 34,974 1967-2012 Arkansas 32,731 35,718 33,252 36,240 33,737 26,191 1967-2012 California 492,378 489,304 480,721 494,890 512,565 477,931 1967-2012 Colorado 130,971 133,947 128,993 131,224 130,116 115,306 1967-2012 Connecticut 43,348 42,935 43,995 42,729 44,719 41,050 1967-2012 Delaware 10,000 9,875 10,049 10,126 10,030 8,564 1967-2012 District of Columbia 13,371 13,222 13,466 13,608 12,386 11,260 1980-2012 Florida 15,066 15,594 15,214 18,744 16,400 14,395 1967-2012 Georgia

366

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries. Country energy information, detailed and overviews. ... The South anchors growth in use of electricity for air conditioning since 1993 August 15, 2013.

367

California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 522,122 517,636 562,127 1970's 552,544 630,998 637,289 615,719 580,009 631,398 599,631 541,728...

368

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Background  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This information includes the physical characteristics of the housing units, the appliances utilized including space heating and cooling equipment, ...

369

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Release Date: March 7, 2013. For decades, space heating and cooling (space conditioning ...

370

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. ... For example, the average energy expenditure for a New Jersey household was $3,065, ...

371

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Appendix B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When respondents do not know the answer or refuse to answer a question or ; When ... Natural gas available in neighborhood. 186. 3.9. Deductive/Hot Deck.

372

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... particularly for space heating, ...

373

Residential Energy Consumption Survey data show decreased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... Improvements in efficiency for space heating, ...

374

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... The RECS gathers information through personal interviews with a nationwide sample of homes and energy suppliers.

375

Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 90,994 93,425 101,124 1970's 105,208 109,758 104,648 110,524 116,314 119,981 122,786 119,292...

376

Residential Energy Consumption Survey-Glossary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This definition includes appliances and lights used in the home during the year, including ... All types of light bulbs are included: incandescent, ...

377

1997 Survey Methods -- Residential Energy Consumption Survey ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of local sources of information, such as building-permit-issuing agencies, ... The FSA is interested in households living below the poverty level. ...

378

Mississippi Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,995 4,030 4,077 2,195 1,282 929 864 829 894 1,043 1,933 4,241 1990 6,060 3,307 2,793 2,205 1,266 922 850 809 798 948 2,070 3,018 1991 4,628 4,348...

379

Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

380

Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

368,670 193,869 128,608 112,802 108,847 120,681 1973-2013 Alabama 2,208 1,330 984 718 771 783 1989-2013 Alaska 1,901 1,121 589 500 593 994 1989-2013 Arizona 2,272 1,674 1,226 1,052...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Categories of Data in the Table Rows. The row categories classify data by specific features of the households. The following, listed in alphabetical order, are ...

382

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy ... Apartments in buildings with 5 or more units use less energy than other home types ... California ...

383

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System ... routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs ...

384

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Release Date: March 7, 2013. For decades, space heating and cooling (space ...

385

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

selected based on population and climatic or geographic diversity. Sample selection began by randomly choosing counties (Primary Sampling Units or PSUs.)

386

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. ... Incremental costs of higher efficiency can vary by appliance

387

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in suburban areas fell between 5.85 and 6.21 per million Btu. If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA Webmaster at wmaster@eia.doe.gov...

388

Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures -- Detailed Tables...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gas estimates, the difference is statistically significant. If you are having any technical problems with this site, please contact the EIA Webmaster at wmaster@eia.doe.gov...

389

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating and cooling no longer majority of ... 2012. Total United States ... as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of ...

390

Residential Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

368,670 193,869 128,608 112,802 108,847 120,681 1973-2013 368,670 193,869 128,608 112,802 108,847 120,681 1973-2013 Alabama 2,208 1,330 984 718 771 783 1989-2013 Alaska 1,901 1,121 589 500 593 994 1989-2013 Arizona 2,272 1,674 1,226 1,052 1,031 1,132 1989-2013 Arkansas 2,516 1,424 758 633 634 577 1989-2013 California 31,397 26,182 22,863 20,883 21,203 19,688 1989-2013 Colorado 12,415 6,719 3,653 2,677 2,661 3,201 1989-2013 Connecticut 4,273 1,676 1,202 903 981 1,167 1989-2013 Delaware 711 NA 196 149 158 180 1989-2013 District of Columbia 743 438 NA 274 248 275 1989-2013 Florida NA 959 639 703 712 842 1989-2013 Georgia 7,299 5,281 3,680 3,607 3,640 3,650 1989-2013 Hawaii 49 50 50 47 47 47 1989-2013 Idaho 1,844 897 649 471 422 647 1989-2013 Illinois

391

STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co 2 By decomposition to (2) - 0 in H cf 0 in wood TABLE VForced Balance - Wood to Char Output - 55 lbs char lbsuc -61 STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION Hubert G. Davis

Davis, Hubert G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An assessment of management practices of wood and wood-related wastes in the urban environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that yard waste{sup 1} accounts for approximately 16% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream (US EPA, 1994). Until recently, specific data and related information on this component of the (MSW) stream has been limited. The purposes of this study, phase two of the three-phase assessment of urban wood waste issues, are to assess and describe current alternatives to landfills for urban wood waste management; provide guidance on the management of urban wood waste to organizations that produce or manage wood waste; and clarify state regulatory and policy positions affecting these organizations. For this study, urban wood waste is defined as solid waste generated by tree and landscape maintenance services (public and private). Urban wood waste includes the following materials: unchipped mixed wood, unchipped logs, and unchipped tops and brush; clearing and grubbing waste; fall leaves and grass clippings; and chips and whole stumps. Construction and demolition debris and consumer-generated yard waste are not included in this study. Generators of urban wood waste include various organizations; municipal, county, and commercial tree care divisions; nurseries, orchards, and golf courses; municipal park and recreation departments; and electric and telephone utility power line maintenance, excavator and land clearance, and landscape organizations. (1) US EPA defines yard waste as ''yard trimmings'' which includes ''grass, leaves and tree brush trimmings from residential, institutional, and commercial sources.''

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

394

Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: In store discounts A/C Cycling: $20/summer Split System AC: $300 - $400 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $300 Home Energy Evaluation and Energy Efficiency Kit: Free Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30/unit Provider IPL Energy Incentives Program The Indianapolis Power and Light Energy Incentives Programs assist residential customers with reducing energy consumption. The program offers

395

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S. DepartmentProspective Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for2. US Residential and Commercial Primary Energy Consumption

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Investigation of Peak Load Reduction Strategies in Residential Buildings in Cooling Dominated Climates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This investigation of peak load reduction strategies in residential buildings contributes to the global international efforts in reducing energy consumption and is related directly to (more)

Atallah, Fady

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Responsiveness of residential electricity demand to changes in price, information, and policy .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study analyzes consumers' behavioral responsiveness to changes in price and policy regarding residential electricity consumption, using a hybrid method of econometric analyses and energy (more)

Baek, Youngsun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

1996 Residential Lighting Use and Potential Savings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Energy Information Administration Home Page Administration Home Page Welcome to the Energy Information Administration's Residential Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Energy Users > Residential Home >1996 Lighting DOE/EIA-0555(96)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Energy Consumption Series Residential Lighting Use and Potential Savings September 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Contacts This publication was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Office of Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112). Specific technical information may be obtained from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Manager, Robert Latta (202-586-1385). The FAX number for all EEUISD personnel is 202-586-0018.

399

Wood power - its potential in our energy crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wood is meeting about 2% of total U.S. energy needs and may eventually supply up to 7% of our nation's energy. Many forms of direct combustion equipment are available for residential heating and range from supplemental wood-burning stoves to complete house-heating multi-fuel furnaces. A recent survey conducted in New York indicated that one-third of the people contacted used wood for home heating. The total amount of fuelwood used in New York State in 1978 amounted to 1,716,000 standard cords. A Wisconsin study indicates that more than 1.2 million cords of firewood were burned by Wisconsin households during the 1979-80 heating season. A Pennsylvania survey indicated that 22% of single family households used wood for home heating. Corning Glass Works recently conducted a wood-burning stove market survey and found that 18% of all U.S. households own wood-burning stoves. On the basis of cost per unit of heat, wood heat is cheaper than its next closest commonly available rival (fuel oil) and is also cheaper than anthracite coal and electricity. Industrial wood-burning furnaces are commonly incorporated into boiler systems. Nearly 1700 wood-fired boiler systems are in operation in the United States. The economic value of a wood fuel will depend on its heating value and moisture content. For an indsutry considering use of densified wood for fuel, there is a question of whether the added expense is justified by increased ease of handling and improved burning efficiency. Where high sulfur emissions from coal are a problem, burning sulfur-free pellets in combination with coal may be a solution. In Maine a $3 million pellet-making plant is producing 600 tons of pellets per day. Nationally, the overall generating capacity of all known electrical generating plants using wood and wood derived fuels is about 4500 megawatts. Wood can be processed to produce liquid fuels and other chemicals.

Johnson, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). It is the mostmodels that forecast US residential energy consumption bySurveys of sector energy use (US DOE 1990a; A G A 1991; EEI

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Secondary residential demand trends in contemporary Japan and North Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research paper attempts to address the opportunity and challenges for Vacation Residential Development in North Asia, with specific geographic focus on Japan first through an analysis of national and regional consumption, ...

Lam, Michael M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption This datasetis the 2011 United...

404

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Residential Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. NEMS Residential Module Equipment Summary Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Characteristics of Selected Equipment Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from

405

Please cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential electrical consumption: A machine learning case study, Energy Buildings (2012), doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2012.03.010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-offs in the building design process, sizing components (e.g., HVAC) for a specific building, optimizing control systemsPlease cite this article in press as: R.E. Edwards, et al., Predicting future hourly residential.03.010 ARTICLE IN PRESSG Model ENB-3661; No.of Pages13 Energy and Buildings xxx (2012) xxx­xxx Contents lists

Parker, Lynne E.

406

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal Impact of Fasteners in High-Performance Wood-Framed Walls: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Buildings are heavy consumers of energy, and residential building design is rapidly addressing topics to maximize energy conservation en route to net-zero energy consumption. Annual energy analysis of a building informs the choice among disparate energy measures, for cost, durability, occupant comfort, and whole-house energy use. Physics-based and empirical models of elements of a building are used in such analyses. High-performance wood-framed walls enable builders to construct homes that use much less than 40% of the energy consumed by similar homes built to minimum code. Modeling for these walls has considered physical features such as framing factor, insulation and framing properties, roughness and convective effects, and air leakage. The thermal effects of fasteners used to construct these walls have not been fully evaluated, even though their thermal conductivity is orders of magnitudes higher than that of other building materials. Drywall screws and siding nails are considered in this finite element thermal conductivity analysis of wall sections that represent wood-framed walls that are often used in high-performance homes. Nails and screws reduce even the best walls' insulating performance by approximately 3% and become increasingly significant as the framing factor increases.

Christensen, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Analysis of end-use electricity consumption during two Pacific Northwest cold snaps  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest has experienced unusually cold weather during two recent heating seasons. Hourly end-use load data was collected from a sample of residential and commercial buildings during both cold snaps. Earlier work documented the changes in end-use load shapes as outdoor temperature became colder. This paper extends analysis of cold snap load shapes by comparing results from both cold snaps, exploring the variability of electricity consumption between sites, and describing the use of load shapes in simulating system load. Load shapes from the first cold snap showed that hot water use shifted to later in the morning during extremely cold weather. This shift in load also occurred during the second cold snap and is similar to the shift observed on a typical weekend. Electricity consumption averaged across many sites can mask widely varying behavior at individual sites. For example, electricity consumption for space heat varies greatly between homes, especially when many homes are able to burn wood. Electricity consumption for space heat is compared between a group of energy-efficient homes and a group of older homes.

Sands, R.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

413

The Effect on Electricity Consumption of the Commonwealth Edison Customer Applications Program: Phase 2 Final Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final Phase 2 analysis of the effects on residential customers' energy consumption patterns of Commonwealth Edison's (ComEd's) Customer Application Program (CAP).

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

End-Use Consumption of Electricity by End Use and Appliance  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Residential Home > Special Topics > Figure 1. Percent of Total Electricity Consumption in U.S. Housing Units, 2001 . Contact. Chip Berry

415

OpenEI - Wood and Derived Fuels  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UK Energy Statistics: UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/82 Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels.

License
Type of

416

A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A WATER CONSERVATION SCENARIO FOR THE RESIDENTIAL ANDWater 'consumption, water conservation. City of Sacramento.Daniel Stockton. Water conservation. Contra Costa County

Benenson, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of The Thermal Performance and Cost Effectiveness of Radiant Barrier Thermal Insulation Materials In Residential Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reducing heating and cooling systems loads in buildings is a cost effective way to decrease energy consumption in residential houses. This reduction can be achieved (more)

Asadi, Somayeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per-customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Categories: Consumption (Released, 6/23/2010, pdf format)

419

Residential Transportation Historical Publications reports, data and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Historical Publications Historical Publications Residential Transportation reports, data tables and transportation questionnaires Released: May 2008 The Energy Information Administration conducts several core consumption surveys. Among them was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). RTECS was designed by EIA to provide information on how energy is used by households for personal vehicles. It was an integral part of a series of surveys (i.e., core consumption surveys) designed by EIA to collect data on energy used by end-use economic sectors. The RTECS collected data on the number and type of vehicles used by the household. For each vehicle, data were collected on the number of miles traveled (commonly called VMT) for the year, the number of gallons of fuel consumed, the type of fuel used, the priced paid for fuel, and the number of miles per gallon. Additional electronic releases are available on the Transportation homepage.

420

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Florida Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Florida Department of Environmental Protection Local water management districts are required to establish programs and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

STEO October 2012 - wood  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

More U.S. households burning wood this winter to stay warm, More U.S. households burning wood this winter to stay warm, reversing two-decade decline Burning wood as the primary heating source in U.S. households has risen over the last 10 years, reversing the decline seen in the 1980s and 1990s. About 2.6 million households out of 115 million will rely on wood as the main way to warm their homes this winter. That's up 3 percent from last year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's new winter fuels forecast. The West will have the most households using wood as their primary space heating fuel, followed by the Midwest, South and Northeast regions of the United States. Wood is also the second most common backup fuel, after electricity, that households across the U.S. use as a supplemental heating source. Almost half of all rural households use wood this

422

MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICITY USE IN THE U.S. RESIDENTIAL SECTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2010). Our study has two components: a historical analysis of miscellaneous electricity use (1976- 1995 consumption increased at an annual rate of 4.6%. In 1995, miscellaneous electricity consumption totaled 235LBNL-40295 UC-1600 MISCELLANEOUS ELECTRICITY USE IN THE U.S. RESIDENTIAL SECTOR M. C. Sanchez, J. G

423

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

424

Residential Transportation Historical Data Tables for 1983-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RTECS Historical Data Tables RTECS Historical Data Tables Residential Transportation Historical Data Tables Released: May 2008 Below are historical data tables from the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) and Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends report. These tables cover the trends in energy consumption for household transportation throughout the survey years. The data focus on several important indicators of demand for transportation: number and type of vehicles per household; vehicle-miles traveled per household and per vehicle; fuel consumption; fuel expenditures; and fuel economy. Excel PDF Trends in Households & Vehicles Table 1. Number of Households with Vehicles excel pdf Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles excel pdf

425

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

426

Environmental Impacts of Preservative-Treated Wood Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, For decades chromated copper arsenate (CCA) was the primary preservative for treated wood used in residential construction. However, recent label changes submitted by CCA registrants will withdraw CCA from most residential applications. This action has increased interest in arsenic-free preservative systems that have been standardized by the American Wood Preservers Association. These include acid copper chromate (ACC), alkaline copper quat (ACQ), copper azole (CBA-A and CA-B), copper citrate (CC), copper dimethyldithiocarbamate (CDDC), and copper HDO (CX-A). All of these CCA alternatives rely on copper as their primary biocide, although some have co-biocides to help prevent attack by copper-tolerant fungi. They have appearance and handling properties similar to CCA and are likely to be readily accepted by consumers. Prior studies indicate that these CCA alternatives release preservative components into the environment at a rate greater than or equal to that of CCA, but because these components have lower mammalian toxicity they are less likely to cause concern in residential applications. As the treated wood industry evolves it is probable that a wider range of types and retentions of wood preservatives will become available, with the treatment more closely tailored to a specific type of construction application.

Stan Lebow

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Wood and Derived Fuels | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288361 Varnish cache server Wood and Derived Fuels Dataset Summary Description Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels. Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released July 29th, 2010 (4 years ago)

428

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

429

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

430

Residential sector: the demand for energy services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to project the demand for residential services, and, thereby, the demand for energy into the future. The service demands which best represent a complete breakdown of residential energy consumption is identified and estimates of the amount of energy, by fuel type, used to satisfy each service demand for an initial base year (1978) are detailed. These estimates are reported for both gross (or input) energy use and net or useful energy use, in the residential sector. The various factors which affect the consumption level for each type of energy and each identified service demand are discussed. These factors include number of households, appliance penetration, choice of fuel type, technical conversion efficiency of energy using devices, and relative energy efficiency of the building shell (extent of insulation, resistance to air infiltration, etc.). These factors are discussed relative to both the present and expected future values, for the purpose of projections. The importance of the housing stock to service demand estimation and projection and trends in housing in Illinois are discussed. How the housing stock is projected based on population and household projections is explained. The housing projections to the year 2000 are detailed. The projections of energy consumption by service demand and fuel type are contrasted with the various energy demand projections in Illinois Energy Consumption Trends: 1960 to 2000 and explains how and why the two approaches differ. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

432

Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities, 1978-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Sector Energy Intensities Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. excel table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b excel table 1b Total Primary Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1c) html Table 1c excel table 1c excel table 1c Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1d)

434

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:02:48Z 2011-08-04T15:59:26Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

435

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:48:13Z 2011-08-31T17:26:50Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

436

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.

2011-08-01T18:53:34Z 2011-08-23T22:30:24Z...

437

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:00:44Z 2011-08-04T16:01:41Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

438

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:10:42Z 2011-08-04T15:37:20Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

439

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:55:30Z 2011-08-23T22:29:34Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

440

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T19:04:37Z 2011-08-04T15:57:20Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption.
2011-08-01T18:57:56Z 2011-08-04T18:09:40Z http:www.eia.govoiafaeo...

442

Wood pellet production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Energy Limited's wood pellet refinery, Bristol, Florida, produces wood pellets for fuel from scrap wood from a nearby sawmill and other hog fuel delivered to the plant from nearby forest lands. The refinery will provide 50,000 tons of pellets per year to the Florida State Hospital at Chattahoochee to fire recently converted boilers in the central power plant. The pellets are densified wood, having a moisture content of about 10% and a heating value of 8000 Btu/lb. They are 0.5 inches in diameter and 2 to 3 inches in length.

Moore, J.W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

444

Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Appliances &...

445

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

446

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

447

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

448

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

449

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating &...

450

Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Construction Residential Savings For Other...

451

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Residential...

452

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

453

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial...

454

Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

455

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial...

456

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

457

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

458

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

459

HYDROLYZED WOOD SLURRY FLOW MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-10090 UC-61 HYDROLYZED WOOD SLURRY FLOW MODELING JimLBL-10090 HYDROLYZED WOOD SLURRY FLOW MODELING Jim Wrathallconversion of hydrolyzed wood slurry to fuel oil, Based on

Wrathall, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Residential Water Conservation in Australia and California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In much of the Western United States, reducing residential water use is a major source of water conservation, especially as population growth urbanizes agricultural land. While estimates of the potential of conservation are useful, the experience of Australia provides a realistic target for residential water conservation. Although reliability of urban water use data is often questionable, it is clear that Australians use less water than Californians, with a similar climate, economy, and culture. Per-capita usage is compared, and explanations for use differences are offered. If California had the same residential water use rates as Australia, it could have reduced gross urban water use by 2,600 GL (2.1 million acre-feet) in 2009 and potentially saved 1,800 GL (1.5 million acre-feet) for consumptive use by others.

Ryan Cahill; Jay Lund

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential wood consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

462

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate...

463

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling...

464

Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Appliances &...

465

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

466

HUD Residential Solar Demonstration Program data. Data file  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Solar Data Center (SDC) at the National Bureau of Standards was responsible for the establishment and operation of a computerized data base containing data collected from the DOE/HUD Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program. This card-image tape contains the files which comprised the solar data base including: grant, grantee reports, technical descriptions, technical concerns, marketing survey; and utility consumption. NBSIR 81-2369, Residential Solar Data Center: Data Resources and reports, describes these files in detail.

Christopher, P.M.; Freeborne, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Flexible Residential Smart Grid Simulation Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different scheduling and coordination algorithms controlling household appliances operations can potentially lead to energy consumption reduction and/or load balancing in conjunction with different electricity pricing methods used in smart grid programs. In order to easily implement different algorithms and evaluate their efficiency against other ideas, a flexible simulation framework is desirable in both research and business fields. However, such a platform is currently lacking or underdeveloped. In this thesis, we provide a simulation framework to focus on demand side residential energy consumption coordination in response to different pricing methods. This simulation framework, equipped with an appliance consumption library using realistic values, aims to closely represent the average usage of different types of appliances. The simulation results of traditional usage yield close matching values compared to surveyed real life consumption records. Several sample coordination algorithms, pricing schemes, and communication scenarios are also implemented to illustrate the use of the simulation framework.

Wang Xiang; Thomas Kunz; Marc St-hilaire; Wang Xiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

469

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

470

Residential/commercial market for energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

The residential/commercial market sector, particularly as it relates to energy technologies, is described. Buildings account for about 25% of the total energy consumed in the US. Market response to energy technologies is influenced by several considerations. Some considerations discussed are: industry characteristics; market sectors; energy-consumption characeristics; industry forecasts; and market influences. Market acceptance may be slow or nonexistent, the technology may have little impact on energy consumption, and redesign or modification may be necessary to overcome belatedly perceived market barriers. 7 figures, 20 tables.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Residential Energy Display Devices: Utility Pilot Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief is a snapshot of selected utility-sponsored programs and test pilots of residential energy display devices as of the third quarter of 2008. Also known as in-home displays, the devices used in these programs are stand-alone units; they are not incorporated with an advanced metering infrastructure system. Such displays provide real-timeor near real-timeinformation about a household's electricity consumption.

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

472

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Residential Price - Marketers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Marketers in Selected States (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet ...

474

Essays on residential desegregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many ethnically diverse countries have policies that encourage integration across ethnic groups. This dissertation investigates the impact and welfare implications of a residential desegregation policy in Singapore, the ...

Wong, Maisy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Choosing a Residential Window  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choosing a Residential Window LBNLs Windows and Daylighting Group provides technical support to government and industry efforts to help consumers and builders choose...

476

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

477

Residential wood-combustion-equipment standards and testing workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Explored are concerns related to proper safety, acceptable practices, and consumer protection as related to woodburning. Issues relating to safety and efficiency testing are discussed and the implications of these programs for the manufacturer, dealer and distributor are related. Also, consumer related problems regarding truth in advertising, product safety, building codes and standards, and insurance implications are dealt with. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

479

Residential coal use: 1982 international solid fuel trade show and conference Atlantic City, New Jersey. [USA; 1974; By state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's anthracite and residential coal programs are described. The residential coal effort is an outgrowth and extension of the anthracite program, which has been, and continues to be, involved in promoting increased production and use of anthracite and the restoration of anthracite as a viable economic alternative to soft coals and to imported oil and gas now supplying the Northeast. Since anthracite is a preferred fuel for residential heating, residential coal issues comprise an important part of our anthracite activities. We have commenced a study of residential coal utilization including: overview of the residential coal market; market potential for residential coal use; analysis of the state of technology, economics, constraints to increased use of coal and coal-based fuels in residential markets, and identification of research and development activities which would serve to increase the market potential for coal-fired residential systems. A considerable amount of information is given in this report on residential coal furnaces and coal usage in 1974, prices of heating oils and coal, methods of comparing these fuels (economics), air pollution, safety, wood and wood furnaces, regulations, etc.

Pell, J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2015 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 180.5 34.9 16.6 1.8 53.3 0.6 66.6 301.0 27.4% Space Cooling 0.0 161.1 161.1 14.7% Water Heating 69.6 5.1 3.1 8.2 75.3 153.1 13.9% Lighting 83.7 83.7 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 71.7 71.7 6.5% Electronics (6) 52.0 52.0 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.2 51.6 54.7 5.0% Cooking 11.5 1.8 1.8 17.9 31.1 2.8% Computers 30.0 30.0 2.7% Other (8) 10.6 10.6 149.3 160.0 14.6% Total 264.7 40.1 32.2 1.8 74.0 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 759.1 1,098.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

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481

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2010 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 185.5 38.8 18.7 2.2 59.7 0.7 77.6 323.5 26.3% Space Cooling 0.0 210.2 210.2 17.1% Water Heating 68.7 7.1 4.6 11.7 90.4 170.8 13.9% Lighting 126.0 126.0 10.2% Electronics (5) 96.5 96.5 7.8% Refrigeration (6) 80.7 80.7 6.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 2.9 57.8 60.8 4.9% Cooking 11.4 1.9 1.9 42.6 55.9 4.5% Computers 30.5 30.5 2.5% Other (8) 10.2 10.2 36.3 46.5 3.8% Adjust to SEDS (9) 30.1 30.1 2.4% Total 268.5 45.9 35.3 2.2 83.5 0.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 878.7 1,231.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

482

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2035 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (4) 169.7 22.8 14.1 1.5 38.3 0.5 76.7 285.3 23.1% Water Heating 67.2 2.6 2.1 4.7 84.8 156.7 12.7% Space Cooling 0.0 194.5 194.5 15.7% Electronics (5) 68.1 68.1 5.5% Refrigeration (6) 81.5 81.5 6.6% Lighting 74.3 74.3 6.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.5 50.0 53.4 4.3% Cooking 12.2 1.5 1.5 23.2 37.0 3.0% Computers 41.9 41.9 3.4% Other (8) 14.1 14.1 229.6 243.7 19.7% Total 252.7 25.4 31.9 1.5 58.7 0.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): Electricity (3) 924.5 1,236.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

483

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2025 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 173.9 27.9 15.2 1.6 44.7 0.6 73.2 292.3 25.1% Space Cooling 0.0 177.2 177.2 15.2% Water Heating 70.2 3.5 2.5 6.0 83.7 159.9 13.8% Lighting 74.1 74.1 6.4% Refrigeration (5) 75.8 75.8 6.5% Electronics (6) 58.7 58.7 5.1% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.3 47.9 51.2 4.4% Cooking 11.7 1.6 1.6 20.8 34.2 2.9% Computers 37.6 37.6 3.2% Other (8) 12.4 12.4 189.1 201.5 17.3% Total 259.1 31.3 31.8 1.6 64.7 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 838.1 1,162.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

484

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential wood consumption accounted for just over 45 percent of U.S. methane emissions from stationary combustion in 2009.

485

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

486

Residential Humidity Control Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Humidity Control Strategies Residential Humidity Control Strategies Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control goals  Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality  Control indoor humidity year-around, just like we do temperature  Durability and customer satisfaction  Reduce builder risk and warranty/service costs 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control challenges 1. In humid cooling climates, there will always be times of the year when there is little sensible cooling load to create thermostat demand but humidity remains high * Cooling systems that modify fan speed and temperature set point based on humidity can help but are still limited

487

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

488

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute exempts from the state sales tax all wood or "refuse-derived" fuel used for heating purposes. The law does not make any distinctions about whether the qualified fuels are used for...

489

Gregory H. Woods  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Gregory H. Woods was sworn in as the General Counsel of the Department of Energy on April 16, 2012, following the unanimous confirmation of his appointment by the United States Senate. Mr....

490

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Gregory H. Woods  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

H. Woods H. Woods Department· of Energy Fermi Site Office Post Office Box 2000 Batavia, Illinois 60510 JAN 1 1 2DD Office of the General Counsel GC-1, FORS SUBJECT: FERMI SITE OFFICE (FSO) 2013 ANNUAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) PLANNING SUMMARY Section 5(a) (7) of Department Of Energy Order 451.1 B Change 2, NEPA Compliance Program, requires each Secretarial Officer and Head of Field Organization to submit an annual NEPA

492

Treated Wood Pole Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document characterizes similarities and differences in international wood pole and wood pole preservative management. The research team identified practices for selection, regulation, and disposition of utility poles outside the United States. Most information is based on interviews and website and published literature searches. Additional research will clarify regulatory positions in other countries and generate improved understanding, which will support strategic planning for U.S. utilities. Utili...

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

493

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION TO INFORM DATA-DRIVEN ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Effective demand-side energy efficiency policies are needed to reduce residential electricity consumption and its harmful effects on the environment. The first step to devise such polices is to quantify the potential for energy efficiency by analyzing the factors that impact consumption. This paper proposes a novel approach to analyze large data sets of residential electricity consumption to derive insights for policy making and energy efficiency programming. In this method, underlying behavioral determinants that impact residential electricity consumption are identified using Factor Analysis. A distinction is made between long-term and short-term determinants of consumption by developing separate models for daily maximum and daily minimum consumption and analyzing their differences. Finally, the set of determinants are ranked by their impact on electricity consumption, using a stepwise regression model. This approach is then applied on a large data set of smart meter data and household information as a case example. The results of the models show that weather, location, floor area, and number of refrigerators are the most significant determinants of daily minimum (or idle) electricity consumption in residential buildings,

Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer; Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

End-use electrification in the residential sector : a general equilibrium analysis of technology advancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The residential sector in the U.S. is responsible for about 20% of the country's primary energy use (EIA, 2011). Studies estimate that efficiency improvements in this sector can reduce household energy consumption by over ...

Madan, Tanvir Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Residential energy demand modeling and the NIECS data base : an evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the 1978-79 National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS) data base in terms of its usefulness for estimating residential energy demand models based on household appliance ...

Cowing, Thomas G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Discussion on Energy-Efficient Technology for the Reconstruction of Residential Buildings in Cold Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Based on the existing residential buildings in cold areas, this paper takes the existing residential buildings in a certain district in Beijing to provide an analysis of the thermal characteristics of envelope and energy consumption in winter with the software PKPM, and provides the technical and economic analysis, which may provide reference for suitable plans for energy efficient reconstruction of buildings in cold areas.

Zhao, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Perpetual and low-cost power meter for monitoring residential and industrial appliances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent research efforts in smart grids and residential power management are oriented to monitor pervasively the power consumption of appliances in domestic and non-domestic buildings. Knowing the status of a residential grid is fundamental to keep ... Keywords: active ORing, energy harvesting, energy measuring, smart metering, wireless sensor networks

Danilo Porcarelli, Domenico Balsamo, Davide Brunelli, Giacomo Paci

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

500

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total