Sample records for residential ventilation systems

  1. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

  2. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  3. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, William; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

  4. Field Test of Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air with Two Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.; Anderson, R.; Barley, D.; Rudd, A.; Townsend, A.; Hancock, E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform distribution of outside air is one way to ensure that residential dilution ventilation systems will provide a known amount of fresh air to all rooms.

  5. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

  6. Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..........................................................................................9 Passive and Hybrid Ventilation ....................................................................................................................................19 4. WHOLE-HOUSE VENTILATION STRATEGIES..........................................................................................................21 Strategy 1: Whole-House Exhaust

  7. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

  8. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Review J. Indoor Air) 2007 LBNL-63193 Tarantola, Albert,Gas Measurement to Determine Air Movements in a House,Measurement Techniques”, Air Infiltration and Ventilation

  9. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

  10. Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise airflows? Homes need ventilation to maintain acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). In older homes

  11. Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when

  12. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark quality (IAQ), ventilation is a critical element for improving the energy efficiency of buildings. IAQ

  13. Residential ventilation standards scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  14. May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 1999 LBNL - 42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STANDARD: EXEGESIS OF PROPOSED STANDARD 62 standard. 1 Max Sherman is a Senior Scientist at LBNL and the group leader of its Energy Performance

  15. Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation dilutes or removes indoor contaminants to reduce occupant exposure. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining the exposure of occupants to given sources, but the zone- specific distribution of exhaust and supply air, and the mixing of ventilation air can have significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage through the building envelope, air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact that air mixing has on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. Evaluations of existing field measurements and simulations reported in the literature are combined with new analyses to provide an integrated overview of the topic. The results show that for extreme cases additional mixing can be a significant factor but for typical homes looking at average exposures mixing is not helpful and can even make exposures worse.

  16. Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 62341 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max H. Sherman of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max Sherman and Iain Walker SUMMARY The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published

  17. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to provide this ventilation service, either directly for moving the air or indirectly for conditioning continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs Berkeley, California The role of ventilation in the housing stock is to provide fresh air and to dilute

  18. Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

  19. Application Study on Combined Ventilation System of Improving IAQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, S.; Li, G.; Zhang, C.; Ye, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A type of combined ventilating system is put forward in this paper. Through CFD simulation and testing of contaminant concentrations in a prototype residential room, the results demonstrate that the new ventilating system is advantageous...

  20. Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name, trademark for ventilation system design. These standards are increasingly used by reference in building energy and IAQ codes

  1. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Energy and air quality implications of passive stack in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however

  2. Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for this workshop were to bring together those with different viewpoints on the implementation of energy efficient ventilation in homes to share their perspectives. The primary benefit of the workshop is to allow the participants to get a broader understanding of the issues involved and thereby make themselves more able to achieve their own goals in this area. In order to achieve this objective each participant was asked to address four objectives from their point of view: (1) Drivers for energy efficient residential ventilation: Why is this an important issue? Who cares about it? Where is the demand: occupants, utilities, regulation, programs, etc? What does sustainability mean in this context? (2) Markets & Technologies: What products, services and systems are out there? What kinds of things are in the pipeline? What is being installed now? Are there regional or other trends? What are the technology interactions with other equipment and the envelope? (3) Barriers to Implementation: What is stopping decision makers from implementing energy-efficient residential ventilation systems? What kind of barriers are there: technological, cost, informational, structural, etc. What is the critical path? (4) Solutions: What can be done to overcome the barriers and how can/should we do it? What is the role of public vs. private institutions? Where can investments be made to save energy while improving the indoor environment? Ten participants prepared presentations for the workshop. Those presentations are included in sections at the end of this workshop report. These presentations provided the principal context for the discussions that happened during the workshop. Critical path issues were raised and potential solutions discussed during the workshop. As a secondary objective they have listed key issues and some potential consensus items which resulted from the discussions.

  3. ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review...

  4. LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation Max Sherman Energy and Community Programs under U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC03- 76SF00098. #12;LBNL 53776 Table......................................................................................................12 2 #12;LBNL 53776 Introduction As HVAC&R professionals, our major concern is the engineering

  5. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Ventilation Center. Emmerich, S.J, Dols, W.S. , “LoopDA:8 Int. IPBSA Conf. (2003) Emmerich S.J. Nabinger, S. J. “53484. Wallace, L. A. , Emmerich, S. J. , and Howard-Reed,

  6. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Building America program has been conducting research leading to cost effective high performance homes since the early 1990's. Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this white paper is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  7. Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

  8. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

  9. Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation in Residential Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Less, Brennan; Walker, Iain

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because airtightening is a significant part of Deep Energy Retrofits (DERs), concerns about ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) have emerged. To investigate this, ventilation and IAQ were assessed in 17 non-smoking California Deep Energy Retrofit homes. Inspections and surveys were used to assess household activities and ventilation systems. Pollutant sampling performed in 12 homes included six-day passive samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde and air exchange rate (AER); time-resolved data loggers were used to measure particle counts. Half of the homes provided continuous mechanical ventilation. Despite these homes being twice as airtight (3.0 and 7.6 ACH50, respectively), their median AER was indistinguishable from naturally vented homes (0.36 versus 0.37 hr--1). Numerous problems were found with ventilation systems; however, pollutant levels did not reach levels of concern in most homes. Ambient NO2 standards were exceeded in some gas cooking homes that used legacy ranges with standing pilots, and in Passive House-style homes without range hoods exhausted to outside. Cooking exhaust systems were installed and used inconsistently. The majority of homes reported using low-emitting materials, and formaldehyde levels were approximately half those in conventional new CA homes (19.7 versus 36 ?g/m3), with emissions rates nearly 40percent less (12.3 versus 20.6 ?g/m2/hr.). Presence of air filtration systems led to lower indoor particle number concentrations (PN>0.5: 8.80E+06 PN/m3 versus 2.99E+06; PN>2.5: 5.46E+0.5 PN/m3 versus 2.59E+05). The results indicate that DERs can provide adequate ventilation and IAQ, and that DERs should prioritize source control, particle filtration and well-designed local exhaust systems, while still providing adequate continuous ventilation.

  10. Ventilation Air Preconditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khattar, M.; Brandemuehl, M. J.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity. Optional Morning Warm-up If connected to a liquid condenser bundle, the icemaking chiller can serve as a heat recovery heat pump. The chiller can freeze ice in the early morning to provide heat for morning warm-up, and use the ice... the cooling coil or drain pan re-evaporates and is delivered to occupied space during compressor off-cycles. Although heat recovery between the exhaust air and ventilation air can reduce the impact on the HVAC system, many buildings do not have central...

  11. 10/15/03 LBNL-53800 Residential Ventilation Standards Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10/15/03 LBNL-53800 Residential Ventilation Standards Scoping Study T-01 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Report Number: LBNL-53800 OVERVIEW This document presents contract no. DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;VENTILATIONS STANDARDS SCOPING STUDY PAGE LBNL-53800 2 TABLE

  12. MICRO-CHP System for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Gerstmann

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of progress under Phase I of a project to develop and commercialize a micro-CHP system for residential applications that provides electrical power, heating, and cooling for the home. This is the first phase of a three-phase effort in which the residential micro-CHP system will be designed (Phase I), developed and tested in the laboratory (Phase II); and further developed and field tested (Phase III). The project team consists of Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (AMTI), responsible for system design and integration; Marathon Engine Systems, Inc. (MES), responsible for design of the engine-generator subsystem; AO Smith, responsible for design of the thermal storage and water heating subsystems; Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, responsible for design of the HVAC subsystem; and AirXchange, Inc., responsible for design of the mechanical ventilation and dehumidification subsystem.

  13. Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

  14. Air Flow Distribution in a Mechanically-Ventilated High-Rise Residential Building* Richard C. Diamond and Helmut E. Feustel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    energy efficiency in public housing as part of a utility's Demand Side Management (DSM) Program of the supply ventilation register for each corridor. The building is exposed on all sides to the windAir Flow Distribution in a Mechanically-Ventilated High-Rise Residential Building* Richard C

  15. Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California

  16. ENERGY IMPACTS OF VARIOUS RESIDENTIAL MECHANICAL VENTILATION STRATEGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Lixing, G.; Wichers, M.

    The Building America program has been working with home builders for more than a decade using a variety of strategies for bringing fresh air into the homes. Many of these strategies utilize the central air handler fan from the HVAC system...

  17. Residential Geothermal Systems Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A resident individual taxpayer of Montana who installs a geothermal heating or cooling system in their principal dwelling can claim a tax credit based on the installation costs of the system, not...

  18. Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. The program includes rebates for insulation...

  19. Design of a Natural Ventilation System in the Dunhuang Museum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; Guan, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fresh air and good air quality can be obtained by a natural ventilation system, to fulfill the requirement of near natural conditions for the psychological health of mankind. A natural ventilation system is an ecological, energy saving system...

  20. SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

  1. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  2. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Cooling Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, D.; Kono, J.; Vieira, R.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season.

  3. Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Residential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Building HVAC Systems This report assesses 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and...

  4. Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type WaterTravelVentilation Systems for Cooling

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Ventilation Systems in a Single-Family Dwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koffi, Juslin; Akoua, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The French regulation on residential building ventilation relies on an overall and continuous air renewal. The fresh air should enter the building through the "habitable rooms" while the polluted air is extracted in the service rooms. In this way, internal air is drained from the lowest polluted rooms to the highest polluted ones. However, internal pressure equilibrium and air movements in buildings result from the combined effects ventilation system and parameters such as wind, temperature difference or doors opening. This paper aims to analyse the influence of these parameters on pollutant transfer within buildings. In so doing, experiments are carried out using tracer gas release for representing pollution sources in an experimental house. Mechanical exhaust, balanced and natural ventilation systems are thus tested. Results show the followings: - For all cases, internal doors' opening causes the most important pollutant spread. - When doors are closed, the best performances are obtained with balanced venti...

  6. Property Tax Exemption for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0233.pdf HB 233 of 2010] exempted residential solar energy systems from property tax assessments. According to state law, for the purposes of...

  7. Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential taxpayers who install an energy system using a recognized non-fossil form of energy on their home after December 31, 2001 are eligible for a tax credit equal to the amount of the cost...

  8. Estimated costs of ventilation systems complying with the HUD ventilation standard for manufactured homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.D.; Conner, C.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory estimated the material, labor, and operating costs for ventilation equipment needed for compliance with HUD`s proposed revision to the ventilation standard for manufactured housing. This was intended to bound the financial impacts of the ventilation standard revision. Researchers evaluated five possible prototype ventilation systems that met the proposed ventilation requirements. Of those five, two systems were determined to be the most likely used by housing manufacturers: System 1 combines a fresh air duct with the existing central forced-air system to supply and circulate fresh air to conditioned spaces. System 2 uses a separate exhaust fan to remove air from the manufactured home. The estimated material and labor costs for these two systems range from $200 to $300 per home. Annual operating costs for the two ventilation systems were estimated for 20 US cities. The estimated operating costs for System 1 ranged from $55/year in Las Vegas, Nevada, to $83/year in Bismarck, North Dakota. Operating costs for System 2 ranged from a low of $35/year in Las Vegas to $63/year in Bismarck. Thus, HUD`s proposed increase in ventilation requirements will add less than $100/year to the energy cost of a manufactured home.

  9. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  10. Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A process vessel ventilation system is being installed in a facility that houses two tanks that will process decontaminated salt solution at the Saltstone Production Facility. A...

  11. THE IMPACT OF REDUCED VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berk, James V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide fron gas appliances;quality, infiltration, nitrogen dioxide, radon, ventilation.carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (N02)• formaldehyde (

  12. Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

  13. Measure Guideline: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  14. Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication examines the solar lease option for residential PV systems and describes two solar lease programs already in place.

  15. Results of the Evaluation Study DeAL Decentralized Facade Integrated Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahler, B.; Himmler, R.

    Most office buildings in Germany have either no mechanical ventilation system or a centralized ventilation system with fresh and exhaust air supply. Within the last 10 years some projects using decentralized ventilation systems (DVS) came up. Common...

  16. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  17. Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This publication examines the solar lease option for residential PV systems and describes two solar lease programs already in place. As a result of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC being lifted in 2009, the expansion of the solar lease model across the United States may be slower than anticipated. The lease model, though, still offers homeowners some distinct advantages. This publication helps homeowners revisit the comparison between the solar lease and home-equity financing in light of the change to the ITC.

  18. Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

  19. Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    when the need is discovered, but a good preventive maintenance program will reduce the number. This fact sheet will emphasize corrective and preventive maintenance procedures for ventilation, evaporativeAE26 Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1 D. E

  20. Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

  1. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

  2. Floor-supply displacement ventilation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

  3. Comparison of Two Ventilation Systems in a Chinese Commercial Kitchen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, X.; Yu, L.; Hou, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of an indoor thermal environment in a Chinese commercial kitchen has been carried out using indoor zero-equation turbulence model. Two different ventilation systems in a Chinese commercial kitchen have been simulated...

  4. Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

  5. Commissioning Trial for Mechanical Ventilation System Installed in Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, I.; Fukushima, A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , commissioning process should be introduced more often. REFERENCES (1) Roger Anneling, The P-mark system for prefabricated houses in Sweden, 1998, CADDET (2) Hirai et al, Comparison between results from ventilation network model calculation...

  6. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practices for Residential HVAC Systems”. Boston, MA. Jump,techniques for measuring HVAC grille air flows". ASHRAEPractices Guide for Residential HVAC Retrofits. LBNL 53592.

  7. Assessment of Residential GSHP System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report first briefly reviews geothermal heat pump (GHP) technology and the current status of the GHP industry in the United States. Then it assesses the potential national benefits, in terms of energy savings, reduced summer peak electrical demand, consumer energy cost savings, and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions from retrofitting the space heating, space cooling, and water heating systems in existing U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems. The investment for retrofitting typical U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems is also analyzed using the metrics of net present value and levelized cost.

  8. Making the most of residential photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, S.; Parker, D.; Hayter, S.

    1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Making the Most of Residential Photovoltaic Systems, was recently produced by NREL Communications and Public Affairs. It showcases a demonstration project in Florida that produced some remarkable results by incorporating both energy efficiency and photovoltaic systems into newly built housing. The brochure points up the benefits of making wise personal choices about energy use, and how large-scale use of advanced energy technologies can benefit the nation. This is one of a series of brochures that presents stimulating information about photovoltaics, with a goal of helping to push this technology into the power-generation mix in different utilities, communities, and states.

  9. City of Portland- Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process,...

  10. Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

  11. Experiment on Residential Ventilation System In Actual House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiecheng, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?????????? ??????????????????? ??????????????????? ?????????????????? ??????????????????? ??????????????????? ??????????????????? ?????????????????? ?????????????? [1]? 1. ???? 1.1 ???? ????????????????? ???????????????????? ?????? 1 ??? ? 1 ?????? ???? ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? ??? ?? ?????? m2 13.4 9.4 8.1 4.5 2.4 37.8 ???? m3 36.2 25.4 21.9 12.2 6.5 102.1 ???? m3 2.8 1.5 1.2 0.8 1.1 7....4 ????? m3 33.4 23.9 20.7 11.3 5.4 94.7 1.2 ???? ???? CO2 ?????????? ??CO 2 ??????????????? ?? CO2 ?? CO2 ??????????? ?? CO2 ??????????????? ???? 1 ??? CO2 ????????? ???? 2?? 3 ??? ?? CO2 ?????????? CO2 ??? 2?4g/m 3???????????? ?????? [2...

  12. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California’s Solar Photovoltaic Subsidies? Center for thefrom Residential Photovoltaic Systems Naďm R. Darghouth,FROM RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS Naďm R. Darghouth

  13. Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

  14. A web based CBR system for heating ventilation and air conditioning systems sales support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Ian

    A web based CBR system for heating ventilation and air conditioning systems sales support D describes the implementation of a case-based reasoning (CBR) system to support heating ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) sales staff operating in remote locations. The system operates on the world wide

  15. Building America Webinar: Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Buildings (CARB), and discussed ventilation strategies for multifamily buildings, including how to successfully implement those strategies through smart design,...

  16. Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

  17. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  18. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

  19. Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

  20. CO 2 - Based Demand-Controlled Ventilation Control Strategies for Multi-Zone HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2-based demand-controlled ventilation DCV strategy offers a great opportunity to reduce energy consumption in HVAC systems while providing the required ventilation. However, implementing CO 2-based DCV under ASHRAE 62.1.2004 through 2010...

  1. Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom Sture Holmberg, Ph. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation

  2. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

  3. Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudha Patri MechanicalofVehicles - ORNLVentilation System

  4. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA.   CEC (2008b).  Residential Alternative Calculation Standard for Air Handlers in Residential Space Conditioning of Standards Options for Residential Air Handler Fans.   

  5. Room air stratification in combined chilled ceiling and displacement ventilation systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Tully, Brad; Rimmer, Julian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environments. Proceedings of Indoor Air 2005: 10 thInternational Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate,displacement ventilation hybrid air conditioning system-

  6. Some consideration on the (in)effectiveness of residential energy feedback systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Some consideration on the (in)effectiveness of residential energy feedback systems James Pierce systems, particularly residential energy feedback systems (REFS), have emerged as a key area for HCI [5]. Residential energy feedback systems (hereafter referred to as REFS) in particular are receiving

  7. Usability Heuristics and Qualitative Indicators for the Usability Evaluation of Touch Screen Ventilator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    system provides respiratory support to critically ill patients in the Intensive Care Unit. Increasing, multi-parameter monitoring system, defibrillator, ECG analyzer, etc. Mechanical age medical equipments evaluation. A ventilator system gives respiratory support to critically ill patients [5]. Ventilators can

  8. Building America Case Study: Selecting Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses adding -or improving - mechanical ventilation systems to existing homes. The purpose of ventilation is to remove contaminants from homes, and this report discusses where, when, and how much ventilation is appropriate in a home, including some discussion of relevant codes and standards. Advantages, disadvantages, and approximate costs of various system types are presented along with general guidelines for implementing the systems in homes. CARB intends for this document to be useful to decision makers and contractors implementing ventilation systems in homes. Choosing the "best" system is not always straightforward; selecting a system involves balancing performance, efficiency, cost, required maintenance, and several other factors. It is the intent of this document to assist contractors in making more informed decisions when selecting systems. Ventilation is an integral part of a high-performance home. With more air-sealed envelopes, a mechanical means of removing contaminants is critical for indoor environmental quality and building durability.

  9. Optimal Dispatch of Photovoltaic Inverters in Residential Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    , reactive power generation/consumption based on monitoring local electrical quantities has been recog- nized method for determining the active- and reactive-power set points for PV inverters in residential systems as a viable option to effect voltage regulation [4], [8]­[12]. However, such reactive power control (RPC

  10. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Final Report on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information with industry, a prototype improved heat pump air conditioner was developed to meet the specification. A one portable classrooms equipped with standard 10 SEER heat pump air conditioner equipment. The IHPAC units

  11. Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems Michael Wetter available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development

  12. awaiting residential aged: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of human... Willis, Gary 2011-12-16 14 Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: LBNL 4591E Meeting Residential...

  13. Smart Residential Energy Systems How Pervasive Com-puting can be used to conserve energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In order to be effective, residential energy feedback and control systems have to feature a low usageSmart Residential Energy Systems ­ How Pervasive Com- puting can be used to conserve energy Markus accounts for about 40% of total energy consumption [1]. The residential sector alone has seen a rise

  14. An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homeof homes with existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems havegrid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems were

  15. Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECT RESIDENTIAL SELLINGopportunity employer. DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECTin the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems

  16. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

  17. Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: Thethe marginal impacts of photovoltaic (PV) energy systems ons largest market for photovoltaic solar (PV), with nearly

  18. The Impact of Above-Sheathing Ventilation on the Thermal and Moisture Performance of Steep-Slope Residential Roofs and Attics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.; Karagiozis, A.; Wilson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    France of the Building Technologies Program. The IrBCP project team members are Andre? Desjarlais, William Miller, Tom Petrie, Jan Kosny and Achilles Karagiozis, all of ORNL’s Buildings Envelope Program. The Metal Construction Association and its affiliate members.... Beal, D., and S. Chandra. 1995. “The Measured Summer Performance of Tile Roof Systems and Attic Ventilation Strategies in Hot Humid Climates.” In Proceedings of the Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings VI. U.S. DOE/ORNL...

  19. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing -...

  20. Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-4 Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation Yanli Ren1, Deying Li2, Yufeng Zhang1 1...

  1. THE SOLARIZE GUIDEBOOK: A community guide to collective purchasing of residential PV systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE SOLARIZE GUIDEBOOK: A community guide to collective purchasing of residential PV systems #12 and Sustainability partnered with neighborhood coalition offices,

  2. Japan's Solar Photovoltaic (PV) Market: An Analysis of Residential System Prices (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes market and policy factors influencing residential solar photovoltaic system prices in Japan, and compares these factors to related developments in the United States.

  3. Modeling of Residential Buildings and Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masy, G.; Lebrun, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -zone building model is used in each case. A model of the heating system is also used for the multi-storey building. Both co-heating and tracer gas measurements are used in order to adjust the parameters of each building model. A complete monitoring...

  4. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  5. Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering-connected hybrid electrical energy storage (HEES) system can help residential users lower their electric bills system consists of different types of electrical energy storage (EES) elements, utilizing the benefits

  6. Assessment of Pollutant Spread from a Building Basement with three Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koffi, Juslin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ventilation aims at providing a sufficient air renewal for ensuring a good indoor air quality (IAQ), yet building energy policies are leading to adapting various ventilation strategies minimising energy losses through air renewal. A recent IAQ evaluation campaign in French dwellings shows important pollution of living spaces by VOCs such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde or hexanal, particularly in buildings equipped with a garage. Besides, radon emission from soil is a subject of concern in many countries. Several studies are done to understand its release mode and deal with the spread of this carcinogen gas. This paper aims to experimentally assess a contaminant spread from a house basement using mechanical exhaust and balanced ventilation systems, and natural ventilation.

  7. Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality Auswin George residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that has smart grid functionality. The qualifier, conditional on anticipated retail energy prices. The term "smart- grid functionality" means that retail energy

  8. Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

  9. A study of pressure losses in residential air distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop characteristics of residential duct system components that are either not available or not thoroughly (sometimes incorrectly) described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P--''Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings''. The flexible duct study covered compressibility and bending effects on the total pressure drop, and the results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression in flexible ducts that can increase pressure drops by up to a factor of nine. The supply boots were tested under different configurations including a setup where a flexible duct elbow connection was considered as an integral part of the supply boot. The supply boots results showed that diffusers can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of two in exit fittings, and the installation configuration can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of five. The results showed that it is crucial for designers and contractors to be aware of the compressibility effects of the flexible duct, and the installation of supply boots and diffusers.

  10. Cost goals for a residential photovoltaicthermal liquid collector system set in three northern locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares the allowable costs for a residential PV/T liquid collector system with those of both PV-only and side-by-side PV and thermal collector systems. Four types of conventional energy systems provide backup: ...

  11. Software Verification & Validation Report for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Ventilation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YEH, T.

    2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the analysis, testing and conclusions of the software verification and validation for the 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization ventilation system. Automation control system will use the Allen-Bradley software tools for programming and programmable logic controller (PLC) configuration. The 244-AR Interim Stabilization Ventilation System will be used to control the release of radioactive particles to the environment in the containment tent, located inside the canyon of the 244-AR facility, and to assist the waste stabilization efforts. The HVAC equipment, ducts, instruments, PLC hardware, the ladder logic executable software (documented code), and message display terminal are considered part of the temporary ventilation system. The system consists of a supply air skid, temporary ductwork (to distribute airflow), and two skid-mounted, 500-cfm exhausters connected to the east filter building and the vessel vent system. The Interim Stabilization Ventilation System is a temporary, portable ventilation system consisting of supply side and exhaust side. Air is supplied to the containment tent from an air supply skid. This skid contains a constant speed fan, a pre-filter, an electric heating coil, a cooling coil, and a constant flow device (CFD). The CFD uses a passive component that allows a constant flow of air to pass through the device. Air is drawn out of the containment tent, cells, and tanks by two 500-cfm exhauster skids running in parallel. These skids are equipped with fans, filters, stack, stack monitoring instrumentation, and a PLC for control. The 500CFM exhaust skids were fabricated and tested previously for saltwell pumping activities. The objective of the temporary ventilation system is to maintain a higher pressure to the containment tent, relative to the canyon and cell areas, to prevent contaminants from reaching the containment tent.

  12. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

  13. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  14. Review of Residential Low-Load HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Scott A.; Thornton, Brian; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building America Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an investigation to inventory commercially available HVAC technologies that are being installed in low-load homes. The first step in this investigation was to conduct a review of published literature to identify low-load HVAC technologies available in the United States and abroad, and document the findings of existing case studies that have evaluated the performance of the identified technologies. This report presents the findings of the literature review, identifies gaps in the literature or technical understanding that must be addressed before low-load HVAC technologies can be fully evaluated, and introduces PNNL’s planned research and analysis for this project to address identified gaps and potential future work on residential low-load HVAC systems.

  15. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations are executed.

  16. System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Jaehwi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drewer and D. Gann, Smart buildings, Journal of Facilities ,smart energy management system specically for residential buildings.buildings is rooted in relative eectiveness per system by a smart

  17. TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User`s Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications.

  18. Distributed Control of Residential Energy Systems using a Market Maker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,JĂĽrgen

    , in particular reverse power flow during daytime periods of peak generation coupled with low residential load distribution networks and shave peak demand without large-scale capital costs for feeder replacement.weller}@newcastle.edu.au) Abstract: The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) installations provides many

  19. Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

    2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. For example, Walker et al. (1998a) found large variations in thermal distribution system efficiency, as much as a factor of two even between side-by-side houses with the same system design and installation crew. This and other studies (e.g., Jump et al. 1996) indicate that duct leakage testing and sealing can readily achieve a 25 to 30% reduction in installed cooling capacity and energy consumption. As another example, consider that the building industry has recognized for at least 20 years the substantial impact that envelope airtightness has on thermal loads, energy use, comfort, and indoor air quality. However, Walker et al. (1998a) found 50% variances in airtightness for houses with the same design and construction crews, within the same subdivision. A substantial reason for these problems is that few houses are now built or retrofitted using formal design procedures, most are field assembled from a large number of components, and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Solving the problems requires field performance evaluations of houses using appropriate and agreed upon procedures. Many procedural elements already exist in a fragmented environment; some are ready now to be integrated into a new process called residential commissioning (Wray et al. 2000). For example, California's Title 24 energy code already provides some commissioning elements for evaluating the energy performance of new houses. A house consists of components and systems that need to be commissioned, such as building envelopes, air distribution systems, cooling equipment, heat pumps, combustion appliances, controls, and other electrical appliances. For simplicity and practicality, these components and systems are usually evaluated individually, but we need to bear in mind that many of them interact. Therefore, commissioning must not only identify the energy and non-energy benefits associated with improving the performance of a component, it must also indicate how individual components interact in the complete building system. For this paper, we limit our discussion to diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. The remainder of this paper first describes what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Subsequent sections describe a consolidated set of practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of these diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies. We conclude by describing areas in need of research and development, such as practical field diagnostics for envelope thermal conductance and combustion safety. There are several potential benefits for builders, consumers, code officials, utilities, and energy planners of commissioning houses using a consistent set of validated methods. Builders and/or commissioning agents will be able to optimize system performance and reduce consumer costs associated with building energy use. Consumers will be more likely to get what they paid for and builders can show they delivered what was expected. Code officials will be better able to enforce existing and future energy codes. As energy reduction measures are more effectively incorporated into the housing stock, utilities and energy planners will benefit through greater confidence in predicting demand and greater assurance that demand reductions will actually occur. Performance improvements will also reduce emissions from electricity generating plants and residential combustion equipment. Research to characterize these benefits is underway.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - america residential system Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Housing, Dining & Residential Services Housing, Dining... & Residential Services Housing, Dining & Residential ... Source: Balandin, Alexander- Department of...

  1. System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Jaehwi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Intelligent Energy Management in Residential Buildingsfor Intelligent Energy Management in Residential Buildingsthat can provide autonomous energy management to residential

  2. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  3. Consideration of air jet angle in open surface tank push-pull ventilation system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Wai-Hung David

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION SYSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree o... MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subjeot: Industrial Hygiene CONSIDERATION OF AIR JET ANGLE IN OPEN SURFACE TANK PUSH-PULL VENTILATION STSTEM DESIGN A Thesis by WAI-HUNG DAVID CHAN Approved as to style and content by: (C an of mmittee) J. Suggs...

  4. Expert system for the design of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, P.J.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expert systems are computer programs that seek to mimic human reason. An expert system shelf, a software program commonly used for developing expert systems in a relatively short time, was used to develop a prototypical expert system for the design of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings. Because HVAC design involves several related knowledge domains, developing an expert system for HVAC design requires the integration of several smaller expert systems known as knowledge bases. A menu program and several auxiliary programs for gathering data, completing calculations, printing project reports, and passing data between the knowledge bases are needed and have been developed to join the separate knowledge bases into one simple-to-use program unit.

  5. Ventilation system consequence calculations to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W.

    1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the radiological dose and toxicological exposure calculations for an accident scenario involved with the ventilation system used to support salt well pumping single-shell tank 241-A-101. This tank has been listed on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  6. Wireless Ventilation Control for Large-Scale Systems: the Mining Industrial Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy. 3 Automatic Control Department, SUPELEC, Gif sur Yvette, France. 4 strategies for fluid systems (pumps, fans and compressors) represent approximately 20 % of the total % or more of the energy consumed by the mining process may go into the ventilation (including heating

  7. Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 1: theory of steady states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolster, Diogo

    of the global population. According to the Energy Information Administration (http://www.eia.doe.gov/) the US of this energy is spent on ventilation of buildings with summer time cooling account for almost 10% of the US total energy budget. To reduce energy consumption various low-energy systems such as displacement

  8. Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings...

  9. Ventilation and Suppression Systems in Road Tunnels: Some Issues regarding their Appropriate Use in a Fire Emergency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvel, Ricky O; Rein, Guillermo; Torero, Jose L

    Two important tunnel safety technologies are addressed. The majority of long road tunnels have ventilation systems. In the event of a fire in a tunnel, such systems will influence fire development in a number of different ...

  10. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  11. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  12. Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF SYSTEM CYCLING, EVAPORATOR AIRFLOW, AND CONDENSER COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  13. Transition dynamics between the multiple steady states in natural ventilation systems : from theories to applications in optimal controls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Jinchao

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we investigated the multiple steady state behavior, an important observation in numerical and experimental studies in natural ventilation systems. The-oretical models are developed and their applications in ...

  14. Ventilation Based on ASHRAE 62.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    July 2010 CEC-400-2010-006 Minimum Best Practices Guide #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Craig in this report. #12;1 2008 Building Energy Efficiency Standards Residential Indoor Air Quality and Mechanical Ventilation (ASHRAE 62.2) Minimum Best Practices Guide - Exhaust-Only Ventilation Introduction: The California

  15. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  16. ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.

  17. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM WITH ANTIFREEZE SOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A RESIDENTIAL GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP SYSTEM WITH ANTIFREEZE SOLUTION M in a ground source heat pump system falls near or below 0o C, an antifreeze mixture must be used to prevent freezing in the heat pump. The antifreeze mixture type and concentration has a number of implications

  18. Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

  19. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits.? Confirming these findings in intervention studies is recommended. ? Energy costs of heating/cooling unoccupied classrooms statewide are modest, but a large portion occurs in relatively few classrooms.

  20. Ventilative cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

  1. Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of an HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system for Building 3862

  3. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

  4. Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

  5. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  6. Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-43724 Distribution Effectiveness and Impacts on Equipment Sizing for Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Walker, I., Sherman, M., and Siegel, J. Environmental Energy Technologies Division Energy .................................................................................................................. 14 Figure 1. Simulations of Pulldowns from 3:00 p.m. on a Sacramento Design Day

  7. Simulation of energy use in residential water heating systems Carolyn Dianarose Schneyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    around BC: Kamloops, Victoria and Williams Lake. Electric and gas-fired tank water heaters of various The resulting data is presented from a variety of angles, including the relative impacts of water heater ratingSimulation of energy use in residential water heating systems by Carolyn Dianarose Schneyer B

  8. The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings...

  9. Phase-change wallboard and mechanical night ventilation in commercial buildings: Potential for HVAC system downsizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetiu, C.; Feustel, H.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As thermal storage media, phase-change materials (PCMs) such as paraffin, eutectic salts, etc. offer an order-of-magnitude increase in thermal storage capacity, and their discharge is almost isothermal. By embedding PCMs in dypsum board, plaster, or other wall-covering materials, the building structure acquires latent storage properties. Structural elements containing PCMs can store large amounts of energy while maintaining the indoor temperature within a relatively narrow range. As heat storage takes place inside the building where the loads occur, rather than at a central exterior location, the internal loads are removed without the need for additional transport energy. Distributed latent storage can thus be used to reduce the peak power demand of a building, downsize the cooling system, and/or switch to low-energy cooling sources. The authors used RADCOOL, a thermal building simulation program based on the finite difference approach, to numerically evaluate the thermal performance of PCM wallboard coupled with mechanical night ventilation in office buildings offers the opportunity for system downsizing in climates where the outside air temperature drops below 18 C at night. In climates where the outside air temperature remains above 19 C at night, the use of PCM wallboard should be coupled with discharge mechanisms other than mechanical night ventilation with outside air.

  10. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications (Fact Sheet)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address performance issues and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

  11. Dojat et al. International Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing. 1992;9:239-250. A KNOWLEDGE-BASED SYSTEM FOR ASSISTED VENTILATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with respiratory insufficiency from mechanical ventilation may be complex and requires expertise obtained by long respiratory support and implemented a weaning procedure. The system is intended for patients whose spontaneous-based system, Medical decision-making, Process control, Real-time, Weaning from mechanical ventilation. inserm

  12. A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

    2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

  13. Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennehy, G

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

  14. The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bain, Joel Alan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air...

  15. Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the effectiveness of using duct tape in sealing residential air distribution systems through two laboratory longevity tests. The first test involved the aging of common “core-to-collar joints” of flexible duct to sheet metal...

  16. HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

  17. Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

  18. A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

  19. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

  20. Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

  1. Measured Performance of California Buydown Program Residential PV Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the basis of photovoltaic system "size". Both the magnitude and timing of photovoltaic system energy grid-tied photovoltaic systems installed in California during the past several years have received to characterize system performance. The nineteen monitored systems covered by this paper range in size from 1

  2. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Software developers who require residential retrofit performance and cost data for applications that evaluate residential efficiency measures are the primary audience for this database. In addition, home performance contractors and manufacturers of residential materials and equipment may find this information useful. The database offers the following types of retrofit measures: 1) Appliances, 2) Domestic Hot Water, 3) Enclosure, 4) Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), 5) Lighting, 6) Miscellaneous.

  3. RESIDENTIAL EXCHANGE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    establishes the right of Pacific Northwest electric utilities to participate in the Residential Exchange Program that provides wholesale power cost benefits for residential and...

  4. Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetter, Michael

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

  5. Measurement of HVAC system performance and local ventilation using passive perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 1993, two (2) perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) ventilation/indoor air quality assessment tests were performed in the Gleeson Hall building of the SUNY Farmingdale campus. The building was being modified, in part, as a result of significant occupant complaints of perceived poor air quality. The four story building had a basement first floor with air supplied normally by an HVAC system labelled as AC1. During this study, AC1 was inoperational and the basement interior rooms (walls) were primarily gone; the other three floors were still being used for classes. It is possible that a sense of poor air quality may have been perceived by first-floor occupants because they were working in the basement, but this issue could not be addressed. The second floor had two (2) lecture halls--Rm 202 (handled by AC4) and Rm 204 (handled by AC5); the balance of the second floor interior rooms and corridors was split between two other air handling systems, AC2 for the west side of the building and AC3 for the east side. The remaining 3rd and 4th floors were also split about evenly between AC2 and AC3. The perimeter rooms, equipped with wall units having their own outside air (OA) source plus centralized return air (RA) bypasses, were not included in this testing which was restricted to the basement floor (1st floor) and the four operating air handling systems, AC2 to AC5, during Test 1 and only AC2 to AC5 during Test 2. Two types of tests were performed using the full suite of 5 PFT types available. The first test was designed to measure the infiltration, exfiltration, and air exchange between the 5 AC zones above and the second test used the 5th tracer, which had been in the basement, as a distributed source throughout the four other zones to act as a surrogate pollutant source. This report provides final conclusions of both tests and suggestions regarding its usefulness in similar building ventilation and indoor air quality assessments.

  6. Summary Review of Advanced Inverter Technologies for Residential PV Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Energy Reliability As part of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Under Task 3.1: Photovoltaic Systems of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Hawai`i Energy Sustainability Program Subtask 3.1 Photovoltaic Systems: Report 2 Summary of Inverter Technologies Submitted

  7. sttesuhcassa RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    University Apartments To Amherst Center RON TNASAELPHT TS CENTRAL RESIDENTIAL AREA To Tillson Farm RESIDENTIAL AREA Lorden Field ATHLETIC FIELDS To Telecom, UMass Outreach & UMass Extension at 101 University Drive NORTHEAST RESIDENTIAL AREA ORCHARD HILL RESIDENTIAL AREA Chabad House HAIGIS MALL Newman Center

  8. sttesuhcassa RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Gordon To Amherst Center RON TNASAELPHT TS CENTRAL RESIDENTIAL AREA To Tillson Farm & Intermediate ORCHARD HILL DR. Track & Field ACO SDT KKG SK ADP IGU ZBT BUTTERFIELDTERRACE DZ SOUTHWEST RESIDENTIAL AREA NORTHEAST RESIDENTIAL AREA ORCHARD HILL RESIDENTIAL AREA Chabad House HAIGIS MALL Newman Center Textbook

  9. Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Corporate)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible, there is now an expiration date for the credit, and...

  10. Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible, there is now an expiration date for the credit, and...

  11. An ANFIS Based Sensor Network for a Residential Energy Management System D. Senthilkumar, S. Kumar, Y. Ozturk and G. Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sunil

    An ANFIS Based Sensor Network for a Residential Energy Management System D. Senthilkumar, S. Kumar management system project, an Integrated and Cognitive Home Energy Management System for Demand Response (DR management system which addresses demand response with efficient energy consumption. 1. Introduction State

  12. ASME AG-1 REQUIREMENT EXEMPTION JUSTIFICATIONS FOR VENTILATION SYSTEMS AT NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington State Department of Health regulations require compliance with the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-1, ''Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment,'' for all new radioactive air emission units. As a result, these requirements have been applied to systems that ventilate the radioactive waste storage tanks in the tank farm facilities on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. ASME AG-1 is applied as a regulatory constraint to waste tank ventilation systems at the Hanford Site, even though the code was not intended for these systems. An assessment was performed to identify which requirements should be exempted for waste tank ventilation systems. The technical justifications for requirement exemptions were prepared and presented to the regulator. The technical justifications were documented so that select requirement exemptions for specific projects and systems can be sought through the regulator's permitting process. This paper presents the rationale for attempting to receive requirement exemption and presents examples of the technical justifications that form the basis for these exemptions.

  13. Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

  14. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  15. Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doctor Instructor Professor The key laboratory of clean coal power generation and combustion technology of the ministry of education, southeast university College of energy sources & environment, Inner Mongolia University of Science & Technology...ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-7-1 Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors Xuan Wu Jingfang Gao Wenfei Wu...

  16. Measured Performance of Residential Dehumidifiers Under Cyclic Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential construction practices are progressing toward higher levels of energy efficiency. A proven strategy to save energy is to simultaneously increase building insulation levels and reduce outdoor air infiltration. Tight homes require intentional mechanical ventilation to ensure healthy indoor air. Overall, this strategy results in a shift in the mix of latent and sensible space conditioning loads, requiring proportionally more moisture to be removed compared to standard homes. There is currently not sufficient information available at a wide enough range of operating points to design dehumidification systems for high performance homes in hot-humid climates. The only industry information available on dehumidifier moisture removal and energy consumption are performance ratings conducted at a single test condition, which does not provide a full representation of dehumidifier operation under real-world conditions. Winkler et al. (2011) developed steady state performance maps to predict dehumidifier performance at a variety of indoor conditions. However, installed heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment rarely operates at steady state. Part load performance testing of residential dehumidifiers is not mandated by current test standards. Therefore, we tested the part load performance of four residential dehumidifiers in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory . The part load efficiency of each dehumidifier was measured under 13 cycling scenarios, and combined with NREL field data to develop part load fraction (PLF) performance curves under realistic cycling scenarios.

  17. An Analysis of Residential Energy Intensity in Iran, A System Dynamics Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed M. Jamshidi

    Abstract: substantial development of counties needs to use the resources in an efficient way. One indicator that shows the degree of efficient use of energy resources is energy intensity. Statistics show that Iran’s energy intensity was in a bad situation during past years and if this manner of using energy resources continues, it will get worse.In this study a system dynamics approach is used to model changes of energy intensity in residential sector in Iran. By implementation and simulation of this model we found some reasons of this problem in Iran. Then we tried to introduce some policies to make steady improvement in energy intensity in the future. Keywords:

  18. Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assuming north?south and east?west facings of the building. For each orientation, different types of glazing (Table 4) and different glazing areas are considered. The first case(the base case) assumes a single clear glazing with a window-to-wall ratio.... Floor plan of the east-west oriented residential building taken for study (not to scale) Table 1. The zones basic characteristics Zone Area (m2) Volume (m3) Occupancy (people/m2) Venti- lation (l/s) HVAC system Bed room1 15.12 52...

  19. Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E NERGY Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implicationsthe Revised Residential Credit ..ITC (capped at $2,000) for residential solar systems. Both

  20. Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

  1. M.H. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B.C. Singer, Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches -LBNL Report Number 3978-E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches - LBNL Report Number 3978-E M.H. Sherman, J and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches - LBNL Report Number 3978-E 1 Infiltration Effects Energy Commission through Contract 500-08-06. LBNL Report Number 3978-E #12;M.H. Sherman, J.M. Logue, B

  2. Commissioning of a Coupled Earth Tube and Natural Ventilation System at the Design Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshida, H.; Pan, S.; Zheng, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    design simulation software DeST(8): combined simulation of natural and mechanical Ventilation??Journal of HVAC. 35(2) (In Chinese) Kato, S. 1997,1998. ?Application to indoor atmosphere of CFD (1?7)?, SHASE. 71(6?11),72(1) (In Japanese) Li, Y. 2002... coupled simulation method using this tool in conjunction with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) to simultaneously calculate indoor air flow/temperature distribution and natural ventilation airflow rate. In this paper, at the design phase of an actual...

  3. SMUD- Residential Solar Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Residential Loan Program provides 100% financing to customers who install solar water heating systems. All solar water heating systems must meet...

  4. Integrated Demand Controlled Ventilation for Single Duct VAV System with Conference Rooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Y.; Liu, M.; Cho, Y.; Xu, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ), the overall outside air (OA) intake ratio has to consider the demands from all the zones with the method provided by ASHRAE 62. Some high-ventilation required rooms make it difficult to use a low OA intake ratio...

  5. Simulation of wind driven ventilative cooling systems for an apartment building in Beijing and Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    produce energy for buildings and industry. In order to reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions ventilation, CFD, Energy analysis 1. Introduction Throughout the entire world, buildings are major consumers of energy and major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. In China, buildings consume 17% of the total energy

  6. Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    house using the heating/cooling supply ducts. The outdoorfor continuous supply in CZ3 in cooling season R elative Ecooling climate zone 13. The economizer will be modeled as a large supply

  7. Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning: Recent Advances in Diagnostics and Controls to Improve Air-Handling System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, Craig; Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, I.S.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Federspiel, C.C.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of air-handling systems in buildings needs to be improved. Many of the deficiencies result from myths and lore and a lack of understanding about the non-linear physical principles embedded in the associated technologies. By incorporating these principles, a few important efforts related to diagnostics and controls have already begun to solve some of the problems. This paper illustrates three novel solutions: one rapidly assesses duct leakage, the second configures ad hoc duct-static-pressure reset strategies, and the third identifies useful intermittent ventilation strategies. By highlighting these efforts, this paper seeks to stimulate new research and technology developments that could further improve air-handling systems.

  8. Overview of existing residential energy-efficiency rating systems and measuring tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three categories of rating systems/tools were identified: prescriptive, calculational, and performance. Prescriptive systems include rating systems that assign points to various conservation features. Most systems that have been implemented to date have been prescriptive systems. The vast majority of these are investor-owned utility programs affiliated with the National Energy Watch program of the Edison Electric Institute. The calculational category includes computational tools that can be used to estimate energy consumption. This estimate could then be transformed, probably by indexing, into a rating. The available computational tools range from very simple to complex tools requiring use of a main-frame computer. Performance systems refer to residential energy-efficiency ratings that are based on past fuel consumption of a home. There are few of these systems. For each identified system/tool, the name, address, and telephone number of the developer is included. In addition, relevant publications discussing the system/tool are cited. The extent of field validation/verification of individual systems and tools is discussed. In general, there has been little validation/verification done. A bibliography of literature relevant to the use and implementation of a home energy rating system is also included.

  9. Public Response to Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: A Qualitative Market Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhar, B. C.; Buhrmann, J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The early adopters of residential grid-tied photovoltaics (PV) have complex motivations to pay today's costs, including altruistic, environmental, and financial reasons. Focused interviews were conducted with a self-selected purposive sample interested in purchasing 2-kW or 3-kW PV systems with an installed cost of $8,000 to $12,000. The sample tended to be men or married couples ranging in age from their early thirties to their mid-eighties; professionals, managers, or small business owners; relatively financially secure, with experience with energy efficiency and renewable energy. Product attributes they preferred were net metering, warranties, guarantees, utility financing, maintenance, an option to own or lease, a battery option, and an aesthetically pleasing system. Potential PV customers needed more information before making a purchase decision.

  10. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  11. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  12. System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical briefing to report the outcomes of a data monitoring effort to determine the nature of solar vent preheat system performance problems at a U.S. military installation. The analysis reports up-to-date research and findings regarding system design, helping to clarify the issue as a factor of system design, rather than a shortcoming of SVP systems.

  13. The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electricity retail rates or on the private economics ofelectricity rates and hence the customer economics of residential, behind-the-meter PV. We calculate the private

  14. Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thatcher, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R.J. : Effect of ventilation rate in a healthy building.IAQ '91: Healthy Buildings, American Society of Heating,

  15. Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  16. Airflow regulation in variable-speed systems for residential HVAC applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becerra, R.C.; Beifus, B.L. [General Electric Co., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the majority of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, air is the final medium for adding or extracting heat from or to the space to be air conditioned. Air is heated by passing it over a heat transfer device called a coil, which is a heat exchanger with air on the outside and the primary heating/cooling medium (water, steam, electricity, refrigerant, etc.) on the inside. One of the major factors determining heat transfer is the airflow rate, which can be controlled by mechanical means or by controlling the speed of the fan. Centrifugal fans driven by single-speed induction motors traditionally have been used in the JVAC industry but have an airflow characteristic that depends on the static pressure seen by the system. Variable-speed systems are starting to emerge as a strong alternative to traditional systems because of their ability to match the demand of the air-conditioned space, resulting in higher efficiencies and higher comfort. System efficiency can be improved by constraining the range of airflows provided by the fan or blower system in response to system pressure, that is, by controlling the airflow over the heat exchanger. This paper presents a method to regulate airflow independent of the static pressure and without the need for airflow sensors.

  17. Residential Mail Procedures Residential Mail Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Residential Mail Procedures Residential Mail Services 23 Owens Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061 Phone.mailservices.vt.edu #12;Residential Mail Procedures Table of Contents General information.................................................................................8 #12;Residential Mail Procedures The following procedures have been establishes by the University

  18. Literature Review of Displacement Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, S.; Im, P.; Haberl, J. S.

    is dependent on the flow rate from the diffuser, the temperature difference, and the diffuser type. #0;? The thermal plumes and supply air from diffusers play an important role in the displacement ventilation. #0;? It is necessary to carefully control... systems, although there are differences depending on the control strategies and the type of HVAC systems. In the energy calculation by Niu (1994), it is shown that the annual energy consumption of displacement ventilation with a water- cooled ceiling...

  19. Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

  20. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP System for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl Mayer

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ECR International and its joint venture company, Climate Energy, are at the forefront of the effort to deliver residential-scale combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) products to the USA market. Part of this substantial program is focused on the development of a new class of steam expanders that offers the potential for significantly lower costs for small-scale power generation technology. The heart of this technology is the scroll expander, a machine that has revolutionized the HVAC refrigerant compressor industry in the last 15 years. The liquid injected cogeneration (LIC) technology is at the core of the efforts described in this report, and remains an excellent option for low cost Micro-CHP systems. ECR has demonstrated in several prototype appliances that the concept for LIC can be made into a practical product. The continuing challenge is to identify economical scroll machine designs that will meet the performance and endurance requirements needed for a long life appliance application. This report describes the numerous advances made in this endeavor by ECR International. Several important advances are described in this report. Section 4 describes a marketing and economics study that integrates the technical performance of the LIC system with real-world climatic data and economic analysis to assess the practical impact that different factors have on the economic application of Micro-CHP in residential applications. Advances in the development of a working scroll steam expander are discussed in Section 5. A rigorous analytical assessment of the performance of scroll expanders, including the difficult to characterize impact of pocket to pocket flank leakage, is presented in Section 5.1. This is followed with an FEA study of the thermal and pressure induced deflections that would result from the normal operation of an advanced scroll expander. Section 6 describes the different scroll expanders and test fixtures developed during this effort. Another key technical challenge to the development of a long life LIC system is the development of a reliable and efficient steam generator. The steam generator and support equipment development is described in Section 7. Just one year ago, ECR International announced through its joint venture company, Climate Energy, that it was introducing to the USA market a new class of Micro-CHP product using the state-of-the-art Honda MCHP gas fired internal combustion (IC) engine platform. We now have installed Climate Energy Micro-CHP systems in 20 pilot demonstration sites for the 2005/2006 heating season. This breakthrough success with IC engine based systems paves the way for future advanced steam cycle Micro-CHP systems to be introduced.

  1. Evaluation and design of ventilation systems for autopsy and surgical examination tables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murgash, Mark John

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )-TLV of 1 ppm and the 2 ppm Short Term Exposure Limit. '" NIOSH has also lowered its 8-hr TWA and Ceiling Level to 0. 016 ppm and 0. 1 ppm, respectively. "' Formaldehyde is a gas at room temperature. Its threshold of odor is approximately 1 ppm. It is a... double cone down-draft local exhaust ventilation (LEV) design produced by Shandon Lipshaw was evaluated in order to determine if personnel working at dissection tables are overexposed to formaldehyde. Mannequin exposure monitoring and static pressure...

  2. Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

  3. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Zogg

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering will be available in the U.S. is unclear. Third, these products are typically not designed for use in households having forced hot-air heating, which is the dominant heating system in the U.S. The U.S. market will also require a major manufacturer that has the reputation and brand recognition, low-cost manufacturing capability, distribution, sales, and service infrastructure, and marketing power to achieve significant market size with a previously unknown and unproven product. History has proven time and time again that small-to-medium-size manufacturers do not have the resources and capabilities to achieve significant markets with such products. During the Phase I effort, the Team developed a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system that addresses key DOE and U.S. market needs: (1) Provides emergency power adequate for critical household loads, with none of the key drawbacks associated with typical, low-cost emergency generators, such as liquid fuel storage, inability to power ''hard-wired'' loads, need to run temporary extension cords for plug loads, manual set up required, susceptibility to overload, and risk of failure due to lack of maintenance and infrequent operation; (2) Requires no special skills to install--plumbers, electricians and HVAC technicians will typically have all necessary skills; (3) Can be used with the major residential fuels in the U.S., including natural gas and propane, and can be easily adapted to fuel oil as well as emerging fuels as they become available; and (4) Significantly reduces household energy consumption and energy costs.

  4. Residential solar-photovoltaic power systems: the need for battery storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, R.O.; Cha, B.K.; Giese, R.F.; Maslowski, C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benefits of battery storage used in conjunction with residential solar photovoltaic (PV) power systems were evaluated for a representative set of utility service areas. The PV systems were assumed capable of exporting excess power to the utility grid, and the batteries sited at the substation level were operated as a form of load-leveling utility storage. A cost-allocation model, SIMSTOR, was employed to determine utility fuel and capital cost savings resulting from the addition of batteries as a function of PV system penetration level. These benefits were compared with the savings of batteries used alone without introduction of the PV systems. Battery storage capacities and discharge rates were varied to determine the battery configurations that maximize net utility savings as a function of battery costs. Installed (rated) PV device capacities up to 20 percent of the generation peak load in each service area were considered. Findings indicate that batteries and PV systems are complementary rather than competing technologies, when attached to the electric supply grid. The utility benefits of the PV systems are primarily fuel savings, while those of the battery are primarily due to savings in utility capacity. The economic rationale for batteries does not change significantly as the penetration level for the PV systems increases. In some of the service areas, the addition of the PV systems tended to sharpen rather than flatten the peaks in the utility's load curves, with the magnitude of the effect becoming more pronounced at the higher PV system penetration levels. As a result of these load shape changes, batteries with higher discharge rates and larger storage capacities were favored.

  5. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ara Mooradian Way, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition. Maintenance of building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) balancing was critical to ensure proper airflow and worker safety. Approximately 103 m{sup 3} of equipment and materials were recovered or generated by the project. Low level waste accounted for approximately 37.4 m{sup 3}. Where possible, ducting was free released for metal recycling. Contaminated ducts were compacted into B-1000 containers and stored in a Shielded Modular Above-Ground Storage Facility (SMAGS) on the WL site awaiting final disposition. The project is divided into three significant phases, with Phases 1 and 2 completed. Lessons learned during the execution of Phases 1 and 2 have been incorporated into the current ventilation removal. (authors)

  6. Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

  7. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  8. An economic analysis of grid-connected residential solar photovoltaic power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Paul R.

    The question of the utility grid-connected residential market for photovoltaics is examined from a user-ownership perspective. The price is calculated at which the user would be economically indifferent between

  9. Ventilation | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type WaterTravelVentilation Systems for

  10. Residential Load Management Program and Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haverlah, D.; Riordon, K.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1986 LCRA embarked on residential load management to control peak summer loads. At that time, LCRA was considered a summer peaking utility, and residential air conditioning and water heating systems were selected for control. The program...

  11. Ventilation Model and Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Chipman

    2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

  12. Residential Solar Water Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire offers a rebate for residential solar water-heating systems and solar space-heating systems. The rebate is equal to $1,500 for systems with an annual estimated output of 5.5 MMBTU to...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive support ventilation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of the material on ventilation system design and maintenance is adapted from A Guide to Energy Efficient... Energy-Efficient Ventilation for Apartment Buildings 12......

  14. Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

  15. Children in Residential Care: A wicked problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Children in Residential Care: A wicked problem? Mary McKenna Flinders Law School 29 Nov 11 Mary in residential care · At what level of the system should changes occur? · Numbers in residential care in SA-discovery of child abuse in 1970s · Legislation & policy changes · Reporting and investigation · Types of abuse #12

  16. Characterizing Residential Broadband Networks Marcel Dischinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saroiu, Stefan

    Characterizing Residential Broadband Networks Marcel Dischinger MPI for Software Systems mdischin and rapidly growing proportion of users connect to the Internet via residential broadband networks such as Dig- ital Subscriber Lines (DSL) and cable. Residential networks are often the bottleneck in the last mile

  17. Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Home Energy SavingsCentral Program offers customers rebates of up to $1,000 on energy efficient equipment and measures for residential gas customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation...

  18. High SEER Residential AC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the new offerings of residential air conditioning systems with very high Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) ratings, the two regional areas dictating operations standards ("hot, humid" and "hot, dry"), and the potential energy savings these new systems can provide. The article concludes with a brief review of current market potential.

  19. A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

  20. Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

  1. Residential Renewable Energy Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established by ''The Energy Policy Act of 2005'', the federal tax credit for residential energy property initially applied to solar-electric systems, solar water heating systems and fuel cells. '...

  2. Impact of Charge Degradation on the Life Cycle Climate Performance of a Residential Air-Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor compression systems continuously leak a small fraction of their refrigerant charge to the environment, whether during operation or servicing. As a result of the slow leak rate occurring during operation, the refrigerant charge decreases until the system is serviced and recharged. This charge degradation, after a certain limit, begins to have a detrimental effect on system capacity, energy consumption, and coefficient of performance (COP). This paper presents a literature review and a summary of previous experimental work on the effect of undercharging or charge degradation of different vapor compression systems, especially those without a receiver. These systems include residential air conditioning and heat pump systems utilizing different components and refrigerants, and water chiller systems. Most of these studies show similar trends for the effect of charge degradation on system performance. However, it is found that although much experimental work exists on the effect of charge degradation on system performance, no correlation or comparison between charge degradation and system performance yet exists. Thus, based on the literature review, three different correlations that characterize the effect of charge on system capacity and energy consumption are developed for different systems as follows: one for air-conditioning systems, one for vapor compression water-to-water chiller systems, and one for heat pumps. These correlations can be implemented in vapor compression cycle simulation tools to obtain a better prediction of the system performance throughout its lifetime. In this paper, these correlations are implemented in an open source tool for life cycle climate performance (LCCP) based design of vapor compression systems. The LCCP of a residential air-source heat pump is evaluated using the tool and the effect of charge degradation on the results is studied. The heat pump is simulated using a validated component-based vapor compression system model and the LCCP results obtained using the three charge degradation correlations are compared.

  3. Optimal Design and Management of a Smart Residential PV and Energy Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    electric energy prices during peak hours. Given this pricing scheme, one way for residential users to lower and uses the stored energy during peak hours. As a result, energy is bought at a lower price during off-peak hours, stored, and consumed during peak hours to avoid paying higher energy prices during those hours

  4. Distributed and Decentralized Control of Residential Energy Systems Incorporating Battery Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,JĂĽrgen

    is increasingly being considered by utilities seeking to reinforce distribution networks and shave peak demand consists of solar PV generation, battery storage and an inelastic energy load. Each RES is connected--The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photo- voltaic (PV) installations provides many challenges

  5. Energy and first costs analysis of displacement and mixing ventilation systems for U.S. buildings and climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, ShiPing, 1970-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two decades, displacement ventilation has been increasingly used in Scandinavia and Western Europe to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. By using a detailed computer simulation method, this study ...

  6. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in the Emergency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ventilatory assis- tance to the respiratory system without an invasive artificial airway. Nonin- vasive of the tank ventilator or the ``iron lung'' was the most common form of mechanical ventilation outside showed that he could improve the survival of patients who had respiratory paralysis by using invasive

  7. Financing, Overhead, and Profit: An In-Depth Discussion of Costs Associated with Third-Party Financing of Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.; Friedman, B.; Margolis, R.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work quantifying the non-hardware balance-of-system costs -- or soft costs -- associated with building a residential or commercial photovoltaic (PV) system has left a significant portion unsegmented in an 'other soft costs' category. This report attempts to better quantify the 'other soft costs' by focusing on the financing, overhead, and profit of residential and commercial PV installations for a specific business model. This report presents results from a bottom-up data-collection and analysis of the upfront costs associated with developing, constructing, and arranging third-party-financed residential and commercial PV systems. It quantifies the indirect corporate costs required to install distributed PV systems as well as the transactional costs associated with arranging third-party financing.

  8. Residential Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998throughThousand CubicWashington Natural GasResidential Residential

  9. Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

  10. Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert 'interest' into 'action,' to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The guidebook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

  11. Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irvine, L.; Sawyer, A.; Grove, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert interest into action, to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The handbook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

  12. Effect of repository underground ventilation on emplacement drift temperature control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, H.; Sun, Y.; McKenzie, D.G.; Bhattacharyya, K.K. [Morrison Knudson Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The repository advanced conceptual design (ACD) is being conducted by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Management & Operating Contractor. Underground ventilation analyses during ACD have resulted in preliminary ventilation concepts and design methodologies. This paper discusses one of the recent evaluations -- effects of ventilation on emplacement drift temperature management.

  13. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

  15. Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York enacted legislation in July 2005 exempting the sale and installation of residential solar-energy systems from the state's sales and compensating use taxes. The exemption was extended to...

  16. Portland's Residential Solar Permitting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program guide outlines the application and review procedures for obtaining the necessary permit(s) to install a solar energy system for a new or existing residential building. The guide also...

  17. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV. We investigate the impact of a range of electricity market scenarios on retail electricity prices and rate structures, and the resulting effects on the value of bill savings from PV. The scenarios include various levels of renewable and solar energy deployment, high and low natural gas prices, the possible introduction of carbon pricing, and greater or lesser reliance on utility-scale storage and demand response. We examine the bill savings from PV with time-invariant, flat residential retail rates, as well as with time-varying retail rates, including time-of-use (TOU) rates and real-time pricing (RTP). In addition, we explore a flat rate with increasing-block pricing (IBP). We evaluate the bill savings from PV with net metering, as currently allowed in many states, as well as scenarios with hourly netting, a partial form of net metering. This scoping study is the first known effort to evaluate these types of interactions in a reasonably comprehensive fashion, though by no means have we considered every possible change to electricity market conditions, retail rate structures, or PV compensation mechanisms. It focuses solely on the private value of bill savings for residential PV and does not seek to quantify the broader social or economic cost or value of solar electricity. Our analysis applies assumptions based loosely on California’s electricity market in a future year (2030); however, it is neither intended to forecast California’s future market, nor are our conclusions intended to have implications specific only to the California market. That said, some of the findings are unique to our underlying assumptions, as described further within the main body of the report, along with other key limitations.

  18. Integrated emissions control system for residential CWS furnace. Annual status report number 1, 20 September 1989--30 September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.C.; Breault, R.W.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major obstacles to the successful development and commercialization of a coal-fired residential furnace is the need for a reliable, cost-effective emission control system. Tecogen Inc. is developing a novel, integrated emission control system to control NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. A reactor provides high sorbent particle residence time within the reactor to control SO{sub 2} emissions, while providing a means of extracting a substantial amount of the particulates present in the combustion gases. Final cleanup of any flyash exiting the reactor is completed with the use of high-efficiency bag filters. Tecogen Inc. developed a residential-scale Coal Water Slurry (CWS) combustor which makes use of centrifugal forces to separate and confine larger unburned coal particles in the furnace upper chamber. Various partitions are used to retard the axial, downward flow of these particles, and thus maximize their residence time in the hottest section of the combustor. By operating this combustor under staged conditions, the local stoichiometry in the primary zone can be controlled to minimize NO{sub x} emissions. During the first year of the program, work encompassed a literature search, developing an analytical model of the SO{sub 2} reactor, fabricating and assembling the initial prototype components, testing the prototype component, and estimating the operating and manufacturing costs.

  19. Residential Services Headlease residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Residential Services Headlease residents handbook 2013-2014 #12;Map of Brighton inside front cover packs Rent 5 Residential Advisor (RA) network 6 Senior residential advisors Residential Student Support Contents Contents Brighton 1 #12;Welcome Congratulations on securing your place at Sussex. Residential

  20. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focusing on a residence in northern California was undertaken as a demonstration of the potential of a systems approach to HVAC retrofits. The systems approach means that other retrofits that can affect the HVAC system are also considered. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC system can be used. Secondly, we wanted to examine the practical issues and interactions with contractors and code officials required to accomplish the systems approach because it represents a departure from current practice. We identified problems in the processes of communication and installation of the retrofit that led to compromises in the final energy efficiency of the HVAC system. These issues must be overcome in order for HVAC retrofits to deliver the increased performance that they promise. The experience gained in this case study was used to optimize best practices guidelines for contractors (Walker 2003) that include building diagnostics and checklists as tools to assist in ensuring the energy efficiency of ''house as a system'' HVAC retrofits. The best practices guidelines proved to be an excellent tool for evaluating the eight existing homes in this study, and we received positive feedback from many potential users who reviewed and used them. In addition, we were able to substantially improve the energy efficiency of the retrofitted case study house by adding envelope insulation, a more efficient furnace and air conditioner, an economizer and by reducing duct leakage.

  1. VFD Technology's Energy Conservation Application at Metro Ventilation Air-conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shenzhen metro has been applied the VFD control technique and close loop negative control logic to adjust and control the temperature and humidity of public area and conserve the energy on HVAC system of children palace station and Fumin station...

  2. In-depth survey report: Control technology for small business: Evaluation of a flexible duct ventilation system for radiator repair, at A-1 Radiator, Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheehy, J.W.; Cooper, T.C.; Hall, R.M.; Meier, R.M.

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering control evaluation was conducted at a radiator repair shop which operated at a very high level of production. The shop had the potential for high exposures to lead (7439921) because of the high volume of work, the number of radiator repair stations, and repairs to huge radiators for mining equipment. Local exhaust ventilation which utilized adjustable arm elephant trunk exhaust hoods had been installed 18 months prior to the visit. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system to control lead exposures during work operations. Time weighted average personal exposures for lead were at or below the OSHA permissible exposure level for ten of 15 mechanics during a high level of production. The elephant trunk ventilation system was capable of controlling lead fumes while shop doors were open, except at one tank in a corner. Work practices were found to be a source of excessive lead exposure. Emissions from a worker's own soldering and from soldering activity upwind of the worker were a major source of lead exposure. Collapse of flexible portions of ducts could reduce exhaust volume. Dampers also showed a tendency to close automatically.

  3. Meade County RECC- Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Meade County RECC offers rebates to residential members who install energy-efficient systems and equipment. New homebuilders can also access rebates for installing energy-efficient equipment...

  4. Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the diameter and depth of the wheel, face flow velocity, rotational speed and other operating conditions. Bulk et al. [11] proposed NTU correlations for design calculation of latent and total effectiveness of enthalpy wheels coated with silica gel..., Wr Te1,We1 Space Fig.2. Passive desiccant system Enthalpy wheels normally use an aluminum substrate coated with a molecular sieve material or silica gel. The effectiveness of an enthalpy wheel depends on the load of desiccant materials...

  5. Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

  6. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  7. Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Toulouse (2002) 577 Cost efficiency of ventilation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieseler, Udo D. J.

    Proceedings of the Intern. Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture (PLEA), Toulouse (2002 of a corresponding low-energy house have been per- formed for a full heating period. They reproduce measurements from, air quality, control of humidity) [1, 2]. In such houses, the ventilation and infiltration losses

  8. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  9. Building Science- Ventilation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question Ť"What are the best ventilation techniques"

  10. Lightweight ventilated facade prototype: acoustic performance evaluation when the ventilation surface of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Lightweight ventilated facade prototype: acoustic performance evaluation when the ventilation del Vall`es, 08173 Barcelona, Spain arquiniampira@yahoo.com Proceedings of the Acoustics 2012 Nantes potentially improve buildings protection against noise pollution from outside. However, in this system the air

  11. Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

  12. Why We Ventilate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logue, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    source emission rate of acrolein in residential indoor air.Exposure Acetaldehyde Acrolein Benzene Butadiene, 1,3-Acute Exposure Concerns Acrolein Chloroform Carbon Monoxide

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-TUNING RESIDENTIAL OIL/BURNER - OXYGEN SENSOR ASSESSMENT AND EARLY PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OPERATING EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD,R.J.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KRAJEWSKI,R.F.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available.

  14. Detailed residential electric determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on residential loads has been collected from four residences in real time. The data, measured at 5-second intervals for 53 days of continuous operation, were statistically characterized. An algorithm was developed and incorporated into the modeling code SOLCEL. Performance simulations with SOLCEL using these data as well as previous data collected over longer time intervals indicate that no significant errors in system value are introduced through the use of long-term average data.

  15. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear

  16. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting Agenda * Opening

  17. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting Agenda *

  18. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting Agenda *October 2,

  19. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting Agenda *October

  20. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting Agenda

  1. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting AgendaJanuary 8, 2015

  2. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting AgendaJanuary 8,

  3. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting AgendaJanuary 8,1,

  4. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting AgendaJanuary

  5. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014National Nuclear23, 2014 Meeting

  6. Design and thermal modeling of a residential building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Alice Su-Chin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent trends of green energy upgrade in commercial buildings show promise for application to residential houses as well, where there are potential energy-saving benefits of retrofitting the residential heating system from ...

  7. Residential Learning University Housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    Residential Learning & University Housing Handbook 2008 - 2009 A Guide for Residential Living on the Campus of Rowan University #12;Welcome to Residential Learning & University Housing! The primary purpose of the Office of Residential Life & University Housing is to assist and support students in the pursuit

  8. Residential Colleges NORTHWESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Residential Colleges NORTHWESTERN #12;#12;Dear Northwestern Student: I hope you will review residential colleges. A residential college is a place where you can grow emotionally and intellectually, get and residential college fellows. More than a third of the first-year students living on campus choose to live

  9. RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES NORTHWESTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    c RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES NORTHWESTERN #12;#12;Dear Northwestern Student: I hope you will review residential colleges. A residential college is a place where you can grow emotionally and intellectually, get and residential college fellows. More than a third of the first-year students living on campus choose to live

  10. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 2, ventilated concrete slab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Galal, Khaled; Athienitis, A.K. [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the second of two papers that describe the modeling and design of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) adopted in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house and their performance assessment based on monitored data. The VCS concept is based on an integrated thermal-structural design with active storage of solar thermal energy while serving as a structural component - the basement floor slab ({proportional_to}33 m{sup 2}). This paper describes the numerical modeling, design, and thermal performance assessment of the VCS. The thermal performance of the VCS during the commissioning of the unoccupied house is presented. Analysis of the monitored data shows that the VCS can store 9-12 kWh of heat from the total thermal energy collected by the BIPV/T system, on a typical clear sunny day with an outdoor temperature of about 0 C. It can also accumulate thermal energy during a series of clear sunny days without overheating the slab surface or the living space. This research shows that coupling the VCS with the BIPV/T system is a viable method to enhance the utilization of collected solar thermal energy. A method is presented for creating a simplified three-dimensional, control volume finite difference, explicit thermal model of the VCS. The model is created and validated using monitored data. The modeling method is suitable for detailed parametric study of the thermal behavior of the VCS without excessive computational effort. (author)

  11. U.S. Residential Photovoltaic (PV) System Prices, Q4 2013 Benchmarks: Cash Purchase, Fair Market Value, and Prepaid Lease Transaction Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, C.; James, T. L.; Margolis, R.; Fu, R.; Feldman, D.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The price of photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States (i.e., the cost to the system owner) has dropped precipitously in recent years, led by substantial reductions in global PV module prices. This report provides a Q4 2013 update for residential PV systems, based on an objective methodology that closely approximates the book value of a PV system. Several cases are benchmarked to represent common variation in business models, labor rates, and module choice. We estimate a weighted-average cash purchase price of $3.29/W for modeled standard-efficiency, polycrystalline-silicon residential PV systems installed in the United States. This is a 46% decline from the 2013-dollar-adjusted price reported in the Q4 2010 benchmark report. In addition, this report frames the cash purchase price in the context of key price metrics relevant to the continually evolving landscape of third-party-owned PV systems by benchmarking the minimum sustainable lease price and the fair market value of residential PV systems.

  12. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems. The Integrated Energy Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of Residential Ducting;#12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The products and outcomes presented in this report are part of the Integrated Design

  13. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  14. Genesis and legacy : a study of traditional, contemporary and proposed systems of control over residential developments in Cairo, Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Husseiny, Mohamed A. (Mohamed Ahmed)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with contemporary residential developments presently being carried out by the formal private sector in Cairo. These developments are typical of many other cities in Egypt, and indeed throughout the ...

  15. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    study to determine waste of water and energy in residential30 percent. The average waste of energy in the hot water ispaper examines the waste of water and energy associated with

  16. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  17. Residential Energy Audits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of events coupled with the last five years experience performing Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audits have resulted in renewed efforts by utilities to evaluate the role of residential energy audits. There are utilities where...

  18. Duquesne Light Company- Residential Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying...

  19. Advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration systems—An overview: Part I: Hard control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, and refrigeration (HVAC&R) is presented in this article. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and on the fusion or hybrid of hard- and soft-control techniques. Thus, it is to be noted that the terminology “hard” and “soft” computing/control has nothing to do with the “hardware” and “software” that is being generally used. Part I of a two-part series focuses on hard-control strategies, and Part II focuses on softand fusion-control in addition to some future directions in HVAC&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omission of other works is purely unintentional.

  20. Modeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis -Western Cooling Efficiency Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    buildings have fallen between commercial and residential jurisdictions and, as a result, they have beenModeling Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings John Markley, University of California, Davis component of multifamily building design due to its effects on occupant health and comfort. Though

  1. Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress Guide for Benchmarking Residential...

  2. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Better Buildings Residential Program Solution...

  3. Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Presentation: Better Buildings Residential...

  4. Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential Network...

  5. Housing and Residential Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    1 Housing and Residential Life Guidebook 2014-2015 LivingCampus #12;2 fau.edu/housing Welcome! The Housing & Residential Life staff is excited that you've moved home! Florida Atlantic University residence halls and apartments are your home for the 2014-2015 school year. The Housing & Residential Life staff

  6. PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROPOSED RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVE CALCULATION MANUAL (ACM) APPROVAL METHOD for the 2013 2012 CEC400201200715DAY #12;201308 Residential ACM Approval Manual 2-2 1. Overview Minimum Modeling Capabilities 1. Overview This Manual explains the requirements for approval of residential Alternative

  7. AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    AREA COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL EDUCATION VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE The Office of Housing and Residential Education at Vanderbilt University is seeking applicants for an Area Coordinator. The Area Coordinator is responsible for assisting in the management and operation of a residential area

  8. Methodology for the evaluation of natural ventilation in buildings using a reduced-scale air model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Christine E. (Christine Elaine)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial office buildings predominantly are designed to be ventilated and cooled using mechanical systems. In temperate climates, passive ventilation and cooling techniques can be utilized to reduce energy consumption ...

  9. Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

  10. Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

  11. Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

  12. Natural Ventilation in Buildings: Measurement in a Wind Tunnel and Numerical Simulation with Large Eddy Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    save energy compared to mechanical ventilation systems. In building design the prediction save energy consumed by the heating, ventilating, and air- conditioning systems in a building. In a naturally ventilated building, air is driven in and out due to pressure differences produced by wind

  13. Measure Guideline: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was written as a resource for professionals involved in multifamily audits, retrofit delivery, and program design, as well as for building owners and contractors. It is intended to serve as a guide for those looking to evaluate and improve the efficiency and operation of one-pipe steam heating systems. In centrally heated multifamily buildings with steam or hydronic systems, the cost of heat for tenants is typically absorbed into the owner's operating costs. Highly variable and rising energy costs have placed a heavy burden on landlords. In the absence of well-designed and relevant efficiency efforts, increased operating costs would be passed on to tenants who often cannot afford those increases. Misinvestment is a common problem with older heating systems -- multiple contractors may inadequately or inappropriately upgrade parts of systems and reduce system functionality and efficiency, or the system has not been properly maintained.

  14. Natural ventilation generates building form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shaw-Bing

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

  15. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    schemes on power prices: The case of wind electricity inand Wind Penetration. IEEE Transactions on Power Systems 27,of wind (50%), PV (35%), and concentrating solar power (CSP,

  16. An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CPUC) (2010) CPUC California Solar Initiative: 2009 ImpactCPUC). (2011) California Solar Statistics. http://systems through the California Solar Initiative program.

  17. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remoteand cooling systems. Future thermostats may reside in PCs, digital picture frames, or other kinds of remote

  18. Summary of Workshop: Barriers to Energy Efficient Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation b y Steve Emmerich Presentation by Bob H e n dworkshop John Talbott Steve Emmerich Bob Hendron SrikanthREVIEW Presentation by Steve Emmerich A S H R A E S T A N D

  19. Evaluation of Existing Technologies for Meeting Residential Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................... 5 Heating and Cooling Equipment) ........................................................................... 9 5. Central Fan Integrated (CFI) Supply with air inlet in return and continuously operating exhaust ........................................................................................................ 9 6. Continuous Supply

  20. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-62700 Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different Mechanical Ventilation Systems Max H Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Air Distribution depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants

  1. Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    This paper explores the potential of using natural ventilation as a passive cooling system for new house windows in suburban houses can be opened. Passive cooling design elements are mostly ignored in modern1 Natural Ventilation Design for Houses in Thailand Chalermwat Tantasavasdia , Jelena Srebricb

  2. An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of homes with existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold in the U.S., yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on the sales price. A clearer understanding of these effects might influence the decisions of homeowners, home buyers and PV home builders. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. Across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests, the analysis finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without. The effects range, on average, from approximately $3.9 to $6.4 per installed watt (DC), with most models coalescing near $5.5/watt, which corresponds to a premium of approximately $17,000 for a 3,100 watt system. The research also shows that, as PV systems age, the premium enjoyed at the time of home sale decreases. Additionally, existing homes with PV systems are found to have commanded a larger sales price premium than new homes with similarly sized PV systems. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted in this area as well as a number of other areas that are highlighted.

  3. DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missouri-Rolla, University of

    1 Appendix A DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENTIAL LIFE Residential Life Staff Manual. Residential Life Program Listing #12;2 MISSOURI S&T RESIDENTIAL LIFE DEPARTMENT Staff Resource Manual 2010--2012 Department of Residential Life Mission: To create educational environments emphasizing learning and development. Service

  4. Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Pete; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that provides estimates of the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. We find strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, from roughly $4 to $6.4/watt across the full dataset, to approximately $2.3/watt for new homes, to more than $6/watt for existing homes. A number of ideas for further research are suggested.

  5. Project Profile: Development of a Low-Cost Residential Plug-and-Play Photovoltaic System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina State University FREEDM Systems Engineering Center and its partners, under the Plug-and-Play Photovoltaics FOA, are performing analysis, design, and innovation to address each stage...

  6. An investigation of a residential solar system coupled to a radiant panel ceiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Pate, M.; Nelson, R.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study of a solar-radiant heating system was performed at Iowa State University's Energy Research House (ERH). The ERH was constructed with copper tubes embedded in the plaster ceilings, thus providing a unique radiant heating system. In addition, 24 water-glycol, flat-plate solar collectors were mounted on the south side of the residence. The present study uses the solar collectors to heat a storage tank via a submerged copper tube oil. Hot water from the storage tank is then circulated through a heat exchanger, which heats the water flowing through the radiant ceiling. This paper contains a description of the solar-radiant system and an interpretation of the data that were measured during a series of transient experiments. In addition, the performance of the flat-plate solar collectors and the water storage tank were evaluated. The characteristics of a solar-to-radiant heat exchanger were also investigated. The thermal behavior of the radiant ceiling and the room enclosures were observed, and the heat transfer from the ceiling by radiation and convection was estimated. The overall heating system was also evaluated using the thermal performances of the individual components. The results of this study verify that it is feasible to use a solar system coupled to a low-temperature radiant-panel heating system for space heating. A sample performance evaluation is also presented.

  7. Austin Energy- Residential Solar PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy's Solar Rebate Program offers a $1.50 per watt incentive to eligible residential who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per home...

  8. LBNL -47412 Residential Commissioning to Assess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL - 47412 Residential Commissioning to Assess Envelope and HVAC System Performance1 Craig P Scientist and Group Leader at LBNL in its Energy Performance of Buildings Group. #12;i TABLE OF CONTENTS

  9. SMUD- PV Residential Retrofit Buy-Down

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SMUD offers an incentive of $0.20 per watt (W) AC to residential customers who install grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. Customers do not have to contract directly with SMUD-approved...

  10. Kentucky Power- Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Power's High Efficiency Heat Pump Program offers a $400 rebate to residential customers living in existing (site-built) homes who upgrade electric resistance heating systems with a new,...

  11. Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, K. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant...

  12. Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

  13. Solar Energy Option Requirement for Residential Developments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2009 New Jersey enacted legislation ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2008/Bills/PL09/33_.PDF A.B. 1558]) designed to support the integration of solar energy systems into new residential...

  14. Austin Energy- Residential Solar Loan Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy offers two types of loans for residential customers to finance solar water heater and and solar PV systems in eligible homes. [http://www.austinenergy.com/Energy%20Efficiency/Programs...

  15. Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domanski, P. A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented for rating the performance of mixed, split residential air conditioners. The method accounts for the impact on system performance of the indoor evaporator, expansion device and fan; three major components that are likely...

  16. The impact of filter loading on residential hvac performance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruger, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Buildings are the primary user of energy in the USA. Within homes, the heating, ventilation, and air condition (HVAC) system is the largest energy consumer.… (more)

  17. Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A recent assessment indicates that if 20% of US homes replaced their existing space-conditioning and water-heating systems with properly designed, installed and operated state-of-the-art GSHP systems, it would yield significant benefits each year. These include 0.8 quad British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy savings, 54.3 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} emission reductions, $10.4 billion in energy cost savings and 43.2 gigawatts of reduction in summer peak electrical demand.

  18. An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. A clearer understanding of these possible impacts might influence the decisions of homeowners considering the installation of a PV system, homebuyers considering the purchase of a home with PV already installed, and new home builders considering including PV as an optional or standard product on their homes. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. It finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, on average, from roughly $4 to $5.5/watt across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests. When expressed as a ratio of the sales price premium of PV to estimated annual energy cost savings associated with PV, an average ratio of 14:1 to 19:1 can be calculated; these results are consistent with those of the more-extensive existing literature on the impact of energy efficiency on sales prices. When the data are split among new and existing homes, however, PV system premiums are markedly affected. New homes with PV show premiums of $2.3-2.6/watt, while existing homes with PV show premiums of more than $6/watt. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted. A number of other areas where future research would be useful are also highlighted.

  19. The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning...

  20. SciTech Connect: Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) CuFuture U.S. Corn andLorenz:Micro-CHP Systems

  1. SOLARIZE RALEIGH PILOT PROGRAM DRAFT Request for Proposals from Installers of Residential Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photovoltaic Systems Proposed Posting Date: February 4, 2014 I. OPPORTUNITY SUMMARY: The North Carolina Solar in conjunction with the Solarize Raleigh Program in Raleigh, North Carolina. Solarize Raleigh marketing in areas subject to the City's extra-territorial jurisdiction) are eligible to participate. The Solarize

  2. Condensing heat exchanger systems for residential/commercial furnaces and boilers. Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razgaitis, R.; Payer, J.H.; Talbert, S.G.; Hindin, B.; White, E.L.; Locklin, D.W.; Cudnik, R.A.; Stickford, G.H.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of condensing heat exchanger systems is studied. In the work reported here, the focus is on the corrosion resistance of materials to condensate produced by gas-fired heating equipment, and the characterization of the spatial variation of condensation corrosivity in condensing heat exchangers.

  3. Duct System Flammability and Air Sealing Fire Separation Assemblies in the International Residential Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudd, A.; Prahl, D.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS identified two barriers that limit the ability of builders to cost-effectively achieve higher energy efficiency levels in housing. These are (1) the use of duct system materials that inherently achieve airtightness and are appropriately sized for low-load houses and (2) the ability to air seal fire separation assemblies. The issues identified fall into a gray area of the codes.

  4. Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

  5. Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commission (CPUC) "CPUC California Solar Initiative: 2009California has been and continues to be the country’s largest market for photovoltaic solar (solar PV is expanding rapidly in the U.S. Almost 100,000 PV systems have been installed in California

  6. A natural-gas fuel processor for a residential fuel cell system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adachi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Lee, S. H. D.; Papadias, D.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Bendert, J. C.; Kanner, S. A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Japan Institute of Energy

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system model was used to develop an autothermal reforming fuel processor to meet the targets of 80% efficiency (higher heating value) and start-up energy consumption of less than 500 kJ when operated as part of a 1-kWe natural-gas fueled fuel cell system for cogeneration of heat and power. The key catalytic reactors of the fuel processor--namely the autothermal reformer, a two-stage water gas shift reactor and a preferential oxidation reactor--were configured and tested in a breadboard apparatus. Experimental results demonstrated a reformate containing {approx} 48% hydrogen (on a dry basis and with pure methane as fuel) and less than 5 ppm CO. The effects of steam-to-carbon and part load operations were explored.

  7. Energy Implications of Residential Particle Control Technologies Jeffrey A. Siegel1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    heating and cooling systems with a MERV 11 filter, followed by a rangehood ventilation fan, with central

  8. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation analyzes the energy consumption behavior of residential adopters of solar photovoltaic systems (solar-PV). Based on large data sets from the San Diego region… (more)

  9. Empire District Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire District Electric Company (EDEC) offers rebates to residential customers for energy audits, weatherization measures, central air conditioning systems, and energy efficient home appliances....

  10. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coggeshall. 2008. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: DeploymentEconomics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California.Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and

  11. Xcel Energy- Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel's Residential Program provides incentives to install energy efficiency measures in homes and small businesses in Xcel service territory. Rebates are available for evaporative cooling systems,...

  12. CenterPoint Energy- Residential Gas Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage...

  13. Xcel Energy (Gas and Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to home energy audits, Xcel Energy offers rebates to Minnesota residential customers for the purchase of energy efficient HVAC systems, insulation, appliances and lighting equipment....

  14. Prince George's County- Solar and Geothermal Residential Property Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2008 Prince George's County enacted legislation offering a property tax credit on residential structures equipped with solar and geothermal systems. As originally devised, the credit could only...

  15. FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) offers incentives to Maryland residential customers who are interested in upgrading to more energy efficient appliances and HVAC systems. Rebates are available on...

  16. Orlando Utilities Commission- Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) offers residential electric customers a point-of-sale rebate of $1,000 for new solar water heating systems.

  17. Dayton Power and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dayton Power and Light offers rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient products for the home. Eligible systems and measures include heat pumps, air conditioning...

  18. Independence Power and Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Independence Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing new, energy efficient appliances. Rebates are available on central air conditioning systems, heat pumps,...

  19. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Condensing boiler technology has been around for many years and has proven to be a durable, reliable method of heating. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. For example, in order to protect their equipment in the field, manufacturers of low-mass condensing boilers typically recommend design strategies and components that ensure steady, high flow rates through the heat exchangers, such as primary-secondary piping, which ultimately result in decreased efficiency.

  20. Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Lu [Oklahoma State University; Cullin, James [Oklahoma State University; Spitler, Jeffery [Oklahoma State University; Im, Piljae [ORNL; Fisher, Daniel [Oklahoma State University

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

  1. An Occupant-Based Dynamic Simulation Tool for Predicting Residential Power Demand and Quantifying the Impact of Residential Demand Response.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Brandon Jeffrey

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? With their large impact on the power system and widespread distribution, residential loads provide vast resources that if utilized correctly have the potential to… (more)

  2. Hysteresis effects in hybrid building ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, Morris R.

    of substandard quality · Poor IAQ is often due to external pollution e.g. industrial/automotive exhaust · However chloride, etc. Developing world: By-products of cooking or heating fires Ghiaus & Allard (2005) · Exposure of poor IAQ · In contrast to traditional HVAC systems, natural ventilation relies on freely

  3. RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakley, Jeremy

    RESIDENTIAL SERVICES STUDENT CHARTER Introduction This Charter sets out the standards of provision. Residential Services are committed to encouraging diversity and inclusiveness within University residences via the Residential Services Annual Report and the internet. Consultation This Charter was developed

  4. CONSULTANT REPORT 2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSULTANT REPORT 2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE SATURATION STUDY funded and administered a Residential Appliance Saturation Study that serves as an update to the 2003 electric and 10 natural gas residential enduses and appliance saturations for households

  5. Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

  6. Essays on residential desegregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Maisy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many ethnically diverse countries have policies that encourage integration across ethnic groups. This dissertation investigates the impact and welfare implications of a residential desegregation policy in Singapore, the ...

  7. Residential Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, New Jersey enacted legislation preventing homeowners associations from prohibiting the installation of solar collectors on certain types of residential properties. The term "solar...

  8. Residential Rewards Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Focus on Energy Program offers a Residential Rewards Program to eligible residents for purchasing and installing furnaces, boilers, heat pumps, air sealing, attic insulation, and water heaters....

  9. Citizens Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to its residential customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebates are generally available for residential homes...

  10. Efficiency Maine Residential Lighting Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Maine's Residential Lighting Program works directly with retailers and manufacturers to encourage residential customers to purchase energy-efficient lighting. Rebate amounts average $1...

  11. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

  12. AIR FLOW DISTRIBUTION IN A HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL Helmut E. Feustel and Richard C. Diamond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Richard

    AIR FLOW DISTRIBUTION IN A HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDING Helmut E. Feustel and Richard C. Diamond Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA ABSTRACT The provision of ventilation air for high-rise multifamily housing has plagued retrofit practitioners and researchers alike. We have been studying the air

  13. Bryant Residential Tutorship BRYANT RESIDENTIAL TUTORSHIP REGULATIONS FOR 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Bryant Residential Tutorship 1 BRYANT RESIDENTIAL TUTORSHIP REGULATIONS FOR 2013 BACKGROUND The D, Bryant Hall has provided a supportive residential environment for first-year students and has also in the Waikato region continues in the form of the Bryant Residential Tutorships. These Tutorships were offered

  14. Residential Transactive Control Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

  15. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

  16. RECOMMENDED VENTILATION STRATEGIES FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTION HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -port exhaust ventilation fan, and that builders offer balanced heat- recovery ventilation to buyers

  17. Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies Photo of a dark brown perforated metal wall is pictured on the side of an...

  18. Reverse ventilation--perfusion mismatch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmaz, J.C.; Barnett, C.A.; Reich, S.B.; Krumpe, P.E.; Farrer, P.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patients having lobar airway obstruction or consolidation usually have decreases of both ventilation and perfusion on lung scans. We report three patients in whom hypoxic vasoconstriction was apparently incomplete, resulting in a ''reversed'' ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Perfusion of the hypoxic lobe on the radionuclide scan was associated with metabolic alkalosis, pulmonary venous and pulmonary arterial hypertension in these patients.

  19. Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

  20. Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects...

  1. Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of...

  2. Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide Overview Transcript.doc Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide...

  3. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  4. Value impact analysis of Generic Issue 143, Availability of Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) and Chilled Water Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daling, P.M.; Marler, J.E.; Vo, T.V.; Phan, H.; Friley, J.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the values (benefits) and impacts (costs) associated with potential resolutions to Generic Issue 143, ``Availability of HVAC and Chilled Water Systems.`` The study identifies vulnerabilities related to failures of HVAC, chilled water, and room cooling systems; develops estimates of room heatup rates and safety-related equipment vulnerabilities following losses of HVAC/room cooler systems; develops estimates of the core damage frequencies and public risks associated with failures of these systems; develops three proposed resolution strategies to this generic issue; and performs a value/impact analysis of the proposed resolutions. Existing probabilistic risk assessments for four representative plants, including one plant from each vendor, form the basis for the core damage frequency and public risk calculations. Both internal and external events were considered. It was concluded that all three proposed resolution strategies exceed the $1,000/person-rem cost-effectiveness ratio. Additional evaluations were performed to develop ``generic`` insights on potential design-related and configuration-related vulnerabilities and potential high-frequency ({approximately}1E-04/RY) accident sequences that involve failures of HVAC/room cooling functions. It was concluded that, although high-frequency accident sequences may exist at some plants, these high-frequency sequences are plant-specific in nature or have been resolved through hardware and/or operational changes. The plant-specific Individual Plant Examinations are an effective vehicle for identification and resolution of these plant-specific anomalies and hardware configurations.

  5. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    117 4.3.4 33% Renewable energy mixlevels. 33% Renewable energy mix scenario The 33% RE mixUnder the 33% renewable energy mix scenario, the residential

  6. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  7. Residential Energy Disclosure (Hawaii)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A residential property owner is required to disclose electricity costs for the most recent three-month period in which the property was occupied as a condition of selling it. No proof or copies of...

  8. Residential Solar Tax Credit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enacted in August 1997, this personal income tax credit originally applied to expenditures on solar-electric (PV) equipment used on residential property. The credit, equal to 25% percent of the...

  9. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, C.W. III [Hospital of the Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. Anesthesia; Hoffman, E.A. [Univ. of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States). Div. of Physiologic Imaging

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  10. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system

  11. Air exchange effectiveness of conventional and task ventilation for offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.; Prill, R.J.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air quality and comfort complaints within large buildings are often attributed to air distribution problems. We define three air exchange effectiveness parameters related to air distribution. The first two indicate the indoor air flow pattern (i.e., the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement flow) for an entire building or region. The third parameter is most useful for assessments of the spatial variability of ventilation. We also define the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern within specific rooms or sections of buildings. The results of measurements of these parameters in US office buildings by the authors and other researchers are reviewed. Almost all measurements indicate very limited short circuiting or displacement flow between locations of air supply and removal. However, a moderate degree of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. The results of laboratory-based measurements by the authors are consistent with the field data. Our measurements in office buildings do indicate that ventilation rates can vary substantially between indoor locations, probably due to variation in air supply rates between locations rather than variation in the indoor air flow patterns. One possible method of improving air distribution is to employ task ventilation with air supplied closer to the occupant`s breathing zone. We have evaluated two task ventilation systems in a laboratory setting. During most operating conditions, these systems did not provide a region of substantially increased ventilation where occupants breath. However, both systems are capable of providing substantially enhanced ventilation at the breathing zone under some operating conditions. Therefore, task ventilation is a potential option for using ventilation air more effectively.

  12. Air exchange effectiveness of conventional and task ventilation for offices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.; Prill, R.J.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air quality and comfort complaints within large buildings are often attributed to air distribution problems. We define three air exchange effectiveness parameters related to air distribution. The first two indicate the indoor air flow pattern (i.e., the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement flow) for an entire building or region. The third parameter is most useful for assessments of the spatial variability of ventilation. We also define the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern within specific rooms or sections of buildings. The results of measurements of these parameters in US office buildings by the authors and other researchers are reviewed. Almost all measurements indicate very limited short circuiting or displacement flow between locations of air supply and removal. However, a moderate degree of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. The results of laboratory-based measurements by the authors are consistent with the field data. Our measurements in office buildings do indicate that ventilation rates can vary substantially between indoor locations, probably due to variation in air supply rates between locations rather than variation in the indoor air flow patterns. One possible method of improving air distribution is to employ task ventilation with air supplied closer to the occupant's breathing zone. We have evaluated two task ventilation systems in a laboratory setting. During most operating conditions, these systems did not provide a region of substantially increased ventilation where occupants breath. However, both systems are capable of providing substantially enhanced ventilation at the breathing zone under some operating conditions. Therefore, task ventilation is a potential option for using ventilation air more effectively.

  13. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Webinar Slides Presentation slides for the Building Technologies...

  14. Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled Building America Webinar: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Unveiled This webinar presented an overview...

  15. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript The Better Buildings Residential...

  16. Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Conference Agenda: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions 2012 Presents conference agenda including a general...

  17. Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy Efficiency Programs (2009 CIEE Report) Behavioral Assumptions Underlying California Residential Sector Energy...

  18. Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Demonstration webinar slides...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - air treatment system Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - air handling systems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 41702 Summary: , including refrigeration, air conditioning, heating systems, ventilating fans, roof ventilators, exhaust fans... , water treatment equipment,...

  1. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  2. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  3. Capture and Use of Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deborah Kosmack

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSOL Energy Inc., in conjunction with MEGTEC Systems, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, designed, built, and operated a commercial-size thermal flow reversal reactor (TFRR) to evaluate its suitability to oxidize coal mine ventilation air methane (VAM). Coal mining, and particularly coal mine ventilation air, is a major source of anthropogenic methane emissions, a greenhouse gas. Ventilation air volumes are large and the concentration of methane in the ventilation air is low; thus making it difficult to use or abate these emissions. This test program was conducted with simulated coal mine VAM in advance of deploying the technology on active coal mine ventilation fans. The demonstration project team installed and operated a 30,000 cfm MEGTEC VOCSIDIZER oxidation system on an inactive coal mine in West Liberty, WV. The performance of the unit was monitored and evaluated during months of unmanned operation at mostly constant conditions. The operating and maintenance history and how it impacts the implementation of the technology on mine fans were investigated. Emission tests showed very low levels of all criteria pollutants at the stack. Parametric studies showed that the equipment can successfully operate at the design specification limits. The results verified the ability of the TFRR to oxidize {ge}95% of the low and variable concentration of methane in the ventilation air. This technology provides new opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by the reduction of methane emissions from coal mine ventilation air. A large commercial-size installation (180,000 cfm) on a single typical mine ventilation bleeder fan would reduce methane emissions by 11,000 to 22,100 short tons per year (the equivalent of 183,000 to 366,000 metric tonnes carbon dioxide).

  4. Efficient Engine-Driven Heat Pump for the Residential Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on previous work on an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump, this project will develop hardware and software for engine and system controls for a residential gas heat pump system that...

  5. CenterPoint Energy (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers residential high-efficiency heating system and water heater rebates to Minnesota customers. These systems can greatly enhance savings and performance in residences which...

  6. Property Tax Exclusion for Residential Renewable Energy Property (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida provides a property tax exemption for residential photovoltaic systems, wind energy systems, solar water heaters, and geothermal heat pumps installed on or after January 1, 2013. For the...

  7. IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS 1 Optimal Dispatch of Residential Photovoltaic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    IEEE JOURNAL OF PHOTOVOLTAICS 1 Optimal Dispatch of Residential Photovoltaic Inverters Under of existing low- voltage distribution systems with high photovoltaic (PV) gen- eration have focused relaxation techniques. Index Terms--Distribution networks, microgrids, photovoltaic systems, inverter control

  8. Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

  9. Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

  10. RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM FOR LANGUAGE LEARNING Live on-campus in 2014-15 and participate in a unique as part of a residential community in Arroyo Vista! Open to all undergraduate students with 2-3 years

  11. The WIPP Underground Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe MolecularPlaceThe publication of the Office,

  12. Industrial Ventilation Statistics Confirm Energy Savings Opportunity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litomisky, A.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is based on installed on-demand ventilation systems, where sensors and PLC are installed with each system, so data is easily collected. Another critical factor for effective dust collecting is proper air velocities in duct system. Having measured air... of the cutting tool is active or not. Information from the sensor is transmitted to the Omron PLC. The Omron PLC saves data in binary form every 5 minutes (24/7) to the CompactFlash card (a similar card is used in digital cameras) along with the time...

  13. Sample Residential Program Term Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Goal DRAFT U.S. DOE Sample Residential Program Term Sheet - DRAFT Introduction is seeking to develop an energy...

  14. Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets SERC Photovoltaics for Residential Buildings Webinar...

  15. Residential & Business Services Director's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Residential & Business Services Director's Office Butts Wynd, North Street, St Andrews, Fife, KY16 by students for students are an integral part of student life and intrinsic to the student residential the residential environment. However, experience tells us that events require careful planning and organisation

  16. STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING CEC-CF-6R-LTG-01 (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-LTG-01 Residential Lighting (Page 1 of 6) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: 2008 Residential Compliance Forms August 2009 1. Kitchen Lighting Does project

  17. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  18. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation andV8doc.sas.com/sashtml. Classroom HVAC: Improving VentilationBerkeley, CA 94720. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation

  19. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, J.; Cory, K.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the commercial sector. Together, these mechanisms are critical for making the economic case for a residential PV installation, given its high upfront costs. Unfortunately, these programs are presently limited to select locations around the country. By calling attention to these innovative initiatives, this report aims to help policy makers consider greater adoption of these models to benefit homeowners interested installing a residential PV system.

  20. Residential GSHPs: Efficiency With Short Payback Periods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) for residential application as an alternative to conventional HVAC systems. A listing of current space heating energy sources are presented which are then followed by a technology overview as advances have made GSHPs more efficient. The article concludes with potential energy savings offered by GSHPs and a brief market overview.

  1. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of the equipment was not correct for that type of operation. To correct this problem an ECN was generated against the design documents, the equipment modified accordingly, and the ATP re-performed. The last type of problem was where the equipment operated per the direct ions in the ATP, agreed with the design documents, yet violated requirements of the Basis of Interim Operation (BIO). In this instance a Non Conformance Report (NCR) was generated. To correct problems documented on an NCR, an ECN was generated to modify the design and field work performed, followed by retesting to verify modifications corrected noted deficiencies. To expedite the completion of testing and maintain project schedules, testing was performed concurrent with construct on, calibrations and the performance of other ATP`s.

  2. Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine particulate matter, and elemental carbon using questionnaire and geographic information system based data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paciorek, Chris

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Predicting residential indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, fine collected indoor and outdoor 3-4 day samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and fine particulate matter (PM2

  3. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

  4. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  5. Residential Mechanical Precooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    German, A.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

  6. Residential Furnace Blower Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditioner performance1 , standby power, as well as igniter and combustion air blower power. Energy savings for a typical three-and-a-half ton air conditioner with typical California ducts are 45 kWh. Peak demand combinations of blowers and residential furnaces were tested for air moving performance. The laboratory test

  7. Modeling, design and thermal performance of a BIPV/T system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab in a low energy solar house: Part 1, BIPV/T system and house energy concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Athienitis, A.K.; Galal, Khaled [Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 De Maisonneuve West, EV6.139, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the first of two papers that describe the modeling, design, and performance assessment based on monitored data of a building-integrated photovoltaic-thermal (BIPV/T) system thermally coupled with a ventilated concrete slab (VCS) in a prefabricated, two-storey detached, low energy solar house. This house, with a design goal of near net-zero annual energy consumption, was constructed in 2007 in Eastman, Quebec, Canada - a cold climate area. Several novel solar technologies are integrated into the house and with passive solar design to reach this goal. An air-based open-loop BIPV/T system produces electricity and collects heat simultaneously. Building-integrated thermal mass is utilized both in passive and active forms. Distributed thermal mass in the direct gain area and relatively large south facing triple-glazed windows (about 9% of floor area) are employed to collect and store passive solar gains. An active thermal energy storage system (TES) stores part of the collected thermal energy from the BIPV/T system, thus reducing the energy consumption of the house ground source heat pump heating system. This paper focuses on the BIPV/T system and the integrated energy concept of the house. Monitored data indicate that the BIPV/T system has a typical efficiency of about 20% for thermal energy collection, and the annual space heating energy consumption of the house is about 5% of the national average. A thermal model of the BIPV/T system suitable for preliminary design and control of the airflow is developed and verified with monitored data. (author)

  8. Progress Energy Carolinas- SunSense Residential PV Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: This program is budgeted to support a total of 1 MW of residential systems per year. The program is now fully subscribed for 2013. New applications will be accepted starting January 1,...

  9. Kansas City Power and Light- Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers to help offset the cost of replacing inefficient central AC and heat pump systems with newer, more efficient models....

  10. LADWP- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Angeles Department of Water and Power offers prescriptive and custom incentives to non-residential customers for the installation of energy saving measures, equipment, or systems that exceed...

  11. Use of composite environmental indicators in residential construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Terianne C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the damage caused by hurricane Katrina in August 2005, fifty percent of New Orleans residential housing was destroyed or severely damaged. A systems model is being developed at MIT for promoting resource ...

  12. College Station Utilities- Residential Energy Back II Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    College Station Utilities offers an incentive for residential customers to install energy efficient HVAC equipment through the Energy Back II Program. To qualify for the rebate, the A/C system...

  13. Columbia Water and Light- Residential HVAC Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Water and Light (CWL) provides an HVAC incentive for residential customers that are replacing an older heating and cooling system. Customers should submit the mechanical permit from a...

  14. Butler Rural Electric Cooperative- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Butler Rural Electric Cooperative provides rebates for geothermal heat pumps, dual fuel heating systems, and water heaters. A $1,200 rebate is available to residential members that install a new...

  15. Waverly Light and Power- Residential Solar Thermal Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waverly Light and Power (WL&P) offers rebates for solar hot water heating systems to its residential customers. All purchases must be pre-approved through WL&P's solar water heater...

  16. Central Electric Cooperative- Non-Residential Lighting Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Central Electric Cooperative offers a commercial lighting system improvement incentive for any customer not on a residential utility rate. To use the program and learn how much the rebates can...

  17. Austin Energy- Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers the Value of Solar rate for residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The Value of Solar tariff, designed by Austin Energy and...

  18. Four-County EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Four-County EMC offers the Comfort Loan Program to residential customers. This program offers financing for insulation upgrades, the replacement of an existing heating/cooling system with an...

  19. Lake Worth Utilities- Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Lake Worth Utilities (CLWU), in conjunction with Florida Municipal Power Agency, offers rebates to customers who purchase and install a solar water heating system for residential use. A...

  20. Requirements for Determining Refrigerant Charge Residential Air Conditioning Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Requirements for Determining Refrigerant Charge Residential Air Conditioning Measures Improved Refrigerant Charge Purpose Component packages require in some climate zones that split system air refrigerant charge. For the performance method, the proposed design is modeled with less efficiency

  1. Clallam County PUD- Residential and Small Business Solar Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In conjunction with First Federal Savings and Loan, Clallam County PUD offers residential and small commercial customers a low-interest loan program for the purchase of solar photovoltaic systems....

  2. New Braunfels Utilities- Residential Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Braunfels Utilities offers a rebate for residential customers who purchase and install solar water heating systems on eligible homes. A rebate of the equivalent of $0.265 per kWh is available...

  3. STATE OF CALIFORNIA INDOOR AIR QUALITY AND MECHANICAL VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for selection of the whole-building ventilation fan and for the duct design for the whole-building ventilation

  4. DAYLIGHTING METRICS FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    It is now widely accepted that the standard method for daylighting evaluation- the daylight factor- is due for replacement with metrics founded on absolute values for luminous quantities predicted over the course of a full year using sun and sky conditions derived from standardised climate files. The move to more realistic measures of daylighting introduces significant levels of additional complexity in both the simulation of the luminous quantities and the reduction of the simulation data to readily intelligible metrics. The simulation component, at least for buildings with standard glazing materials, is reasonably well understood. There is no consensus however on the composition of the metrics, and their formulation is an ongoing area of active research. Additionally, non-domestic and residential buildings present very different evaluation scenarios and it is not yet clear if a single metric would be applicable to both. This study uses a domestic dwelling as the setting to investigate and explore the applicability of daylighting metrics for residential buildings. In addition to daylighting provision for task and disclosing the potential for reducing electric lighting usage, we also investigate the formulation of metrics for non-visual effects such as entrainment of the circadian system.

  5. Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 ...................................................................................3-5 #12;Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-2 A without compromising safety or system integrity. The following should be included unless alternate design

  6. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    will build on system concepts and technical solutions developed for an 11-ton packaged natural gas heat pump. Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump More Documents &...

  7. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willem, Henry; Singer, Brett

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

  8. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Jane S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices. ”residential energy consumption, load shifting, consumption feedback

  9. Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBL-34046 UC-350 Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-use forecasting of appliance energy use in the U.S. residential sector. Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the Appliance Model in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which

  10. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  11. Residential Absorption Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR HIGH SCHOOL| DepartmentResidential

  12. Residential Buildings Integration (RBI)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR HIGH SCHOOL| DepartmentResidential|

  13. Lehigh University Office of Residential Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Lehigh University Office of Residential Services Resident Check-Out Form Students are expected and furniture of all personal property. Residential Services is not responsible for any personal items left and residential administration staff for billing purposes. Signature

  14. Vanderbilt University Office of Housing & Residential Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Vanderbilt University Office of Housing & Residential Education RESIDENTADVISERRECRUITMENT2015 Adviser (RA) is a paraprofessional student staff member for the Office of Housing and Residential Coordinators, Head Residents, and faculty to create a premiere residential experience where students can learn

  15. 2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE SATURATION STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE SATURATION STUDY Volume 1 and administered a Residential Appliance Saturation Study that serves as an update to the 2003 RASS, with the same residential enduses and appliance saturations for households. These consumption estimates were developed

  16. 2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE SATURATION STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 CALIFORNIA RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCE SATURATION STUDY Executive and administered a Residential Appliance Saturation Study that serves as an update to the 2003 RASS, with the same residential enduses and appliance saturations for households. These consumption estimates were developed

  17. Your Resource Guide to WVU's Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Your Resource Guide to WVU's Residential Learning Communities Eyes&'Eers 2014­ 2015 Academic throughout the summer. welcomeweek.wvu.edu Residential Education Programming Opportunities Volleypalooza Scarehouse Rich's Fright Farm (Haunted House) Kennywood Fright Night Residential Education Octoberfest

  18. http://warren.ucsd.edu 1 Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    http://warren.ucsd.edu 1 Warren Resources Residential Life Student Conduct University Resources Off and Employment 10 Section II: Residential Life Introduction 11 Residential Life Policies 13 Section III: Student

  19. RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY DATE: November 25, 2014 INCIDENT / LOCATION: Residential Burglary in Vista Del 22, 2014, at approximately 11:07 pm, the UCI Police Department received a report of a residential

  20. The impact of different climates on window and skylight design for daylighting and passive cooling and heating in residential buildings: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Sallal, K.A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study aims to explore the effect of different climates on window and skylight design in residential buildings. The study house is evaluated against climates that have design opportunities for passive systems, with emphasis on passive cooling. The study applies a variety of methods to evaluate the design. It has found that earth sheltering and night ventilation have the potential to provide 12--29% and 25--77% of the cooling requirements respectively for the study house in the selected climates. The reduction of the glazing area from 174 ft{sup 2} to 115 ft{sup 2} has different impacts on the cooling energy cost in the different climates. In climates such Fresno and Tucson, one should put the cooling energy savings as a priority for window design, particularly when determining the window size. In other climates such as Albuquerque, the priority of window design should be first given to heating savings requirements.

  1. CAN J ANESTH 55: 9 www.cja-jca.org September, 2008 Purpose: Variable ventilation is superior to control mode venti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    no differences between groups, at any time peri- od, for PaO2 , PaCO2 , and static or dynamic respiratory system, and mechanically ventilated. Oleic acid was infused to introduce lung injury. The animals were ventilated, chosen to drive the variable ventilator, had no effect on indices of gas exchange or respiratory

  2. Unitil- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Unitil offers New Hampshire residential customers a number of programs to encourage more energy efficient homes. The Energy Star Appliance Program provides rebates for clothes washers, air...

  3. NYSEG (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NYSEG is offering residential natural gas customers rebates for installing energy efficient equipment. Customers can complete one rebate application for multiple pieces of equipment as long as...

  4. A simplified model for estimating population-scale energy impacts of building envelope air-tightening and mechanical ventilation retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, J. M.; Turner, W. J.N.; Walker, I. S.; Singer, B. C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing the air exchange rate of a home (the sum of the infiltration and mechanical ventilation airflow rates) affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to air exchange rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the residential sector's energy consumption. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models is a barrier to the accurate quantification of the impact of policy changes on a state or national level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study combines the output of simple air exchange models with a limited set of housing characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modellers to use existing databases of housing characteristics to determine the impact of ventilation policy change on a population scale. The IVE model estimates of energy change when applied to US homes with limited parameterisation are shown to be comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model.

  5. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Residential Integrated Space/Water Heat Systems, Illinois and New York (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-unit field demonstration of combined space and water heating (combi) systems was conducted to help document combi system installation and performance issues that needed to be addressed through research. The objective of the project was to put commercialized forced-air tankless combi units into the field through local contractors that were trained by manufacturers and GTI staff under the auspices of utility-implemented Emerging Technology Programs. With support from PARR, NYSERDA and other partners, the project documented system performance and installations in Chicago and New York. Combi systems were found to save nearly 200 therms in cold climates at efficiencies between about 80% and 94%. Combi systems using third-party air handler units specially designed for condensing combi system operation performed better than the packaged integrated combi systems available for the project. Moreover, combi systems tended to perform poorly when the tankless water heaters operating at high turn-down ratios. Field tests for this study exposed installation deficiencies due to contractor unfamiliarity with the products and the complexity of field engineering and system tweaking to achieve high efficiencies. Widespread contractor education must be a key component to market expansion of combi systems. Installed costs for combi systems need to come down about 5% to 10% to satisfy total resource calculations for utility-administered energy efficiency programs. Greater sales volumes and contractor familiarity can drive costs down. More research is needed to determine how well heating systems such as traditional furnace/water heater, combis, and heat pumps compare in similar as-installed scenarios, but under controlled conditions.

  6. Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuduk, Svetlana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case… (more)

  7. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    46 Table 22. Lead-acid battery models used in residential PVSolar [51] Because PV systems with battery backup includeno Battery Backup Typical Operation: Residential PV systems

  8. A Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution Systems Bass Abushakra Iain S. Walker Max H. Sherman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P ­ Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC on the power consumption and the overall performance of the HVAC system. To satisfy the ARI 210 in the air-distribution system is critical. Proctor and Parker (2000) noted that the measured external static

  9. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Judy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai, Nicholas DeForest,residential electricity tariffs Judy Lai – Senior Researchfrom the current 5-tiered tariff to time variable pricing,

  10. Tacoma Power- Residential Weatherization Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tacoma Power helps residential customers increase the energy efficiency of homes through the utility's residential weatherization program. Weatherization upgrades to windows are eligible for an...

  11. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Planning meeting in October 2011, held in Washington, D.C. Residential Energy Efficiency Planning Meeting Summary Report More Documents & Publications Residential Energy...

  12. Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call Residential Energy Efficiency Customer Service Best Practices Peer Exchange Call January 22, 2015...

  13. Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 On this page, you may link...

  14. Residential Tax Credits Boost Maryland Geothermal Business |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Tax Credits Boost Maryland Geothermal Business Residential Tax Credits Boost Maryland Geothermal Business June 18, 2010 - 12:09pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications...

  15. Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S. Department of...

  16. RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011 Index to Sections Section Page I. GENERAL............................................................................................35 #12;1 I. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS 1. These specifications apply to existing residential (retro

  17. Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar September 11, 2014 7:00PM to 8:3...

  18. Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

  19. Quality Assurance for Residential Retrofit Programs | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Quality Assurance for Residential Retrofit Programs Quality Assurance for Residential Retrofit Programs Blue version of the EERE PowerPoint template, for use with PowerPoint 2007....

  20. Residential Waste Do not mix in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakamura, Iku

    Residential Waste Do not mix in Newspaper Cardboard Paper ScrapsMagazines and Miscellaneous Paper Experiment-Relatedand ResidentialWastebyType #12;

  1. Residential solar home resale analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, S.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the determinants of the market acceptance of solar technologies in the residential housing sector is the value placed upon the solar property at the time of resale. The resale factor is shown to be an important economic parameter when net benefits of the solar design are considered over a typical ownership cycle rather than the life cycle of the system. Although a study of solar resale in Davis, Ca, indicates that those particular homes have been appreciating in value faster than nonsolar market comparables, no study has been made that would confirm this conclusion for markets in other geograhical locations with supporting tests of statistical significance. The data to undertake such an analysis is available through numerous local sources; however, case by case data collection is prohibitively expensive. A recommended alternative approach is to make use of real estate market data firms who compile large data bases and provide multi-variate statistical analysis packages.

  2. AIR FLOW MODELING IN DEEP WELLS: APPLICATION TO MINING VENTILATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    consumption and increase of electricity prices in a context of worldwide competition also mo- tivate system control and energy consumption op- timization. Two different levels of complexity are pro- posed]. This short historical overview also illustrates the parallel evolution of magnetic ventilation modeling

  3. Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

  4. Appendix F Field Verification of Zonally Controlled Systems Page F-1 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shown that zonally controlled cooling systems that utilize bypass ducts or that substantially reduce in the supply ducts to send supply air from a single air handler to different zones, as needed, rather than fan when one or more of the zone dampers close and restrict airflow to just a portion of the supply

  5. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Installations of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems in the United States have increased dramatically in recent years, growing from less than 20 MW in 2000 to nearly 500 MW at the end of 2007, a compound average annual growth rate of 59%. Of particular note is the increasing contribution of 'non-residential' grid-connected PV systems--defined here as those systems installed on the customer (rather than utility) side of the meter at commercial, institutional, non-profit, or governmental properties--to the overall growth trend. Although there is some uncertainty in the numbers, non-residential PV capacity grew from less than half of aggregate annual capacity installations in 2000-2002 to nearly two-thirds in 2007. This relative growth trend is expected to have continued through 2008. The non-residential sector's commanding lead in terms of installed capacity in recent years primarily reflects two important differences between the non-residential and residential markets: (1) the greater federal 'Tax Benefits'--including the 30% investment tax credit (ITC) and accelerated tax depreciation--provided to commercial (relative to residential) PV systems, at least historically (this relative tax advantage has largely disappeared starting in 2009) and (2) larger non-residential project size. These two attributes have attracted to the market a number of institutional investors (referred to in this report as 'Tax Investors') seeking to invest in PV projects primarily to capture their Tax Benefits. The presence of these Tax Investors, in turn, has fostered a variety of innovative approaches to financing non-residential PV systems. This financial innovation--which is the topic of this report--has helped to overcome some of the largest barriers to the adoption of non-residential PV, and is therefore partly responsible (along with the policy changes that have driven this innovation) for the rapid growth in the market seen in recent years.ii Specifically, due to financial innovation, non-residential entities interested in PV no longer face prohibitively high up-front costs, no longer need to be able to absorb Tax Benefits in order to make the economics pencil out, no longer need to be able to operate and maintain the system, and no longer need to accept the risk that the system does not perform as expected.

  6. Residential appliances technology atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential appliance technology and efficiency opportunities for refrigerators and freezers, cooking appliances, clothes washers and dryers, dishwashers, and some often-ignored household devices such as spas, pool pumps, waterbed heaters, televisions, and home computers are thoroughly covered in this Atlas. The US appliance market, fuel shares, efficiency standards, labeling, and advances in home automation, design for recycling, and CFC issues are also discussed. The resource section contains lists of appliance manufacturers and distributors, and trade, professional, and governmental organizations, a summary of key resources for further information, and an index.

  7. Residential propane price decreases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A Bheatingpropane6, 2014 Residential

  8. Residential propane price decreases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories »Submitter A Bheatingpropane6, 2014 Residential05,

  9. RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Alan K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heating, cooling and ventilating controls are more sophisticated than commonly available in North America 29 . Remote

  10. Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Judy; DeForest, Nicholas; Kiliccote, Sila; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Donadee, Jon

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential customers in California's Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) territory have seen several electricity rate structure changes in the past decade. A relatively simple two-tiered pricing system (charges by usage under/over baseline for the home's climate zone) was replaced in the summer of 2001 by a more complicated five-tiered system (usage below baseline and up to 30percent, 100percent, 200percent, and 300percent+ over baseline). In 2009, PG&E began the process of upgrading its residential customers to Smart Meters and laying the groundwork for time of use pricing, due to start in 2011. This paper examines the history of the tiered pricing system, discusses the problems the utility encountered with its Smart Meter roll out, and evaluates the proposed dynamic pricing incentive structures. Scenario analyses of example PG&E customer bills will also be presented. What would these residential customers pay if they were still operating under a tiered structure, and/or if they participated in peak hour reductions?

  11. CALIFORNIA ENERGY Residential Duct Placement Field Test and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency is improved through the integrated design, construction, and operation of building systems of Small Commercial HVAC Systems Integrated Design of Commercial Building Ceiling Systems Integrated Design of the Integrated Design of Residential Ducting & Air Flow Systems research project. The reports are a result

  12. Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014738 Published: J. M. Pearce, "Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic + Combined Heat.08.012 Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic and power (CHP) systems has provided the opportunity for inhouse power backup of residentialscale

  13. SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Michael J. Carl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    SOFC Modeling for the Simulation of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B of Residential Cogeneration Systems by Michael J. Carl B.Sc., University of Guelph, 2005 Supervisory Committee Dr made to the fuel cell power module (FCPM) within the SOFC cogeneration simulation code developed under

  14. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGLIN, E J

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

  15. Energy Optimization (Electric)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Optimization Programs, administered by WECC, provides residential electric incentives for the following Michigan utilities:

  16. Solar Ventilation Preheating Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of solar ventilation preheating (SVP) technologies supplemented by specific information to apply SVP within the Federal sector.

  17. Net Zero Residential Test Facility Gaithersburg, MD Solar Photovoltaic Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Heating System Preheat - Solar thermal 80-gal tank, electric auxiliary heating Active, indirect forced-gal tank, electric auxiliary heating Multiple operating modes: heat pump, hybrid and standard and Ventilation Systems Advanced Air-to-Air Heat Pump Systems Suitable for Low Energy Homes Geothermal Heat Pump

  18. New Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Clothes Washers...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 2011 - Residential furnaces and residential central air conditioners and heat pumps September 2011 - Residential refrigerators, freezers, and refrigerator-freezers...

  19. Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects: Options and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of panel titled “Financing Residential and Small CommercialL ABORATORY Financing Non-Residential Photovoltaic Projects:1 2. Policy Support for Non-Residential PV

  20. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

  1. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Standards in the Residential Electricity Sector.France. USDOE (2001). Residential Energy Consumption Survey,long-term response of residential cooling energy demand to

  2. Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Guide to Benchmarking Residential Program Progress Webcast Slides Slides from "Guide to Benchmarking Residential...

  3. Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Highly Insulating Residential Windows Using Smart Automated Shading Addthis 1 of 3 Residential Smart Window with...

  4. Focus Series: Maine-Residential Direct Install Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maine-Residential Direct Install Program Focus Series: Maine-Residential Direct Install Program Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Focus Series: MAINE-Residential Direct Install...

  5. Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential...

  6. About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    About the Better Buildings Residential Network About the Better Buildings Residential Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and...

  7. Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview Residential Retrofit Design Guide Overview Webinar. Res Retro Design Guide Webinar 5-3-11...

  8. Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Space Conditioning Energy and Moisture Levels in the Hot-Humid Climate, Cocoa, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air infiltration and ventilation in residential buildings is a very large part of the heating loads, but empirical data regarding the impact on space cooling has been lacking. Moreover, there has been little data on how building tightness might relate to building interior moisture levels in homes in a hot and humid climate. To address this need, BA-PIRC has conducted research to assess the moisture and cooling load impacts of airtightness and mechanical ventilation in two identical laboratory homes in the hot-humid climate over the cooling season. ?

  9. Jasper County REMC- Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jasper County REMC, in conjunction with Wabash Valley Power Association's Power Moves programs, offers a range of rebates to its residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy...

  10. The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

  11. Hottest spot temperatures in ventilated dry type transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, L.W. (General Electric Co., Rome, GA (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hottest spot temperature allowance to be used for the different insulation system temperature classes is a major unknown facing IEEE Working Groups developing standards and loading guides for ventilated dry type transformers. In 1944, the hottest spot temperature allowance for ventilated dry type transformers was established as 30 C for 80 C average winding temperature rise. Since 1944, insulation temperature classes have increased to 220 C but IEEE standards continue to use a constant 30 C hottest spot temperature allowance. IEC standards use a variable hottest spot temperature allowance from 5 to 30 C. Six full size test windings were manufactured with imbedded thermocouples and 133 test runs performed to obtain temperature rise data. The test data indicated that the hottest spot temperature allowance used in IEEE standards for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA is too low. This is due to the large thermal gradient from the bottom to the top of the windings caused by natural convection air flow through the cooling ducts. A constant ratio of hottest spot winding temperature rise to average winding temperature rise should be used in product standards for all insulation temperature classes. A ratio of 1.5 is suggested for ventilated dry type transformers above 500 kVA. This would increase the hottest spot temperature allowance from 30 C to 60 C and decrease the permissible average winding temperature rise from 150 C to 120 C for the 220 C insulation temperature class.

  12. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE: INDICATORS OF RESIDENTIAL ENERGY USE AND EFFICIENCY PART ONE: THE DATA BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Analysis of Swedish Residential Energy Use Data 1960-80.1980. International Residential Energy Use and ConservationInternational Comparison of Residential Energy ! Js~. Report

  13. Austin Energy's Residential Solar Rate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leslie Libby Austin Energy Project Manager 2020 Utility Scale Solar Goal 175 MW 30 MW PPA at Webberville 2020 Distributed Solar Goal 25 MW Residential - 7.0 MW Commercial - 1.4 MW...

  14. BUILDING VENTILATION AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and in new "energy-efficient design" hospitals. Developmentenergy-efficient ventilation standards and ventilation designs

  15. Summer Infiltration/Ventilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory Summer InfiltrationVentilation Test Results from the FRTF Laboratory This presentation was delivered at the...

  16. PROGRESS IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference, "New Energy Conservation Technologies", Berlin,IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRYIN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY

  17. Are Ventilation Filters Degrading Indoor Air Quality in California Classrooms?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Destaillats, H.; Apte, M.G.; Destaillats,, Hugo; Fisk, Michael G. Apte and William J.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating, ventilating, and cooling classrooms in California consume substantial electrical energy. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in classrooms affects studenthealth and performance. In addition to airborne pollutants that are emitted directly by indoor sources and those generated outdoors, secondary pollutants can be formed indoors by chemical reaction of ozone with other chemicals and materials. Filters are used in nearly all classroom heating, ventilation and air?conditioning (HVAC) systems to maintain energy-efficient HVAC performance and improve indoor air quality; however, recent evidence indicates that ozone reactions with filters may, in fact, be a source of secondary pollutants. This project quantitatively evaluated ozone deposition in HVAC filters and byproduct formation, and provided a preliminary assessment of the extent towhich filter systems are degrading indoor air quality. The preliminary information obtained will contribute to the design of subsequent research efforts and the identification of energy efficient solutions that improve indoor air quality in classrooms and the health and performance of students.

  18. Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

  19. FirstEnergy (West Penn Power)- Residential Solar Water Heating Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    West Penn Power, a First Energy utility, provides rebates to residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a rebate of up...

  20. Global residential appliance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Lebot, B. (Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l'Energie, Valbonne (France))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.