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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification Title Measuring Residential Ventilation System...

3

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems Title Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation...

5

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

6

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Title Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6142E Year of Publication 2013 Authors J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Keywords ASHRAE 62.2, commissioning, procedures, residential, standards, ventilation Abstract Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

7

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Title Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5969E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., Jennifer M. Logue, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 07/2012 Keywords commissioning, energy, health, indoor air quality, residential, valuation, ventilation Abstract Due to changes in building codes, whole-house mechanical ventilation systems are being installed in new California homes. Few measurements are available, but the limited data suggest that these systems don't always perform as code and forecasts predict. Such deficiencies occur because systems are usually field assembled without design specifications, and there is no consistent process to identify and correct problems. The value of such activities in terms of reducing energy use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and IAQ.

8

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased cost per unit of energy at times of peak demandminimizing energy costs and operation during peak timesenergy and cost impacts of ventilation vary with weather and time

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values William J.N. Turner, Jennifer M. Logue, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012 LBNL-5969E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

10

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

11

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

13

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

14

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Related  to  Residential  Ventilation  Requirements”.  Rudd,  A.   2005.   “Review  of  Residential  Ventilation and  Matson  N.E. ,  “Residential  Ventilation  and  Energy 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

16

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

17

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Passive ventilation for residential air quality control  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

Axley, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements”.A. 2005. “Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies”,M.H. and Matson N.E. , “Residential Ventilation and Energy

Sherman, Max H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditioning Engineers. 2001. ASHRAE, “Indoor Air QualityABOUT/IAQ_papr01.htm ASHRAE. “Standard 62.2-2003:Ventilation Requirements. ” ASHRAE Journal, pp. 51- 55, June

Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

measured. The local exhaust flows can be measured or can meet prescriptive ducting and fan labeling requirements that use ratings provided by the Home Ventilating Institute (HVI,...

23

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective? Maxmanufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitutethe University of California. Does Mixing Make Residential

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

May 1999 LBNL -42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1999 LBNL - 42975 ASHRAE'S RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STANDARD: EXEGESIS OF PROPOSED STANDARD 62 Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 April 1999 In January 1999 ASHRAE's Standard Project, approved ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review

25

Residential ventilation standards scoping study  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this scoping study are to identify research needed to develop improved ventilation standards for California's Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The 2008 Title 24 Standards are the primary target for the outcome of this research, but this scoping study is not limited to that timeframe. We prepared this scoping study to provide the California Energy Commission with broad and flexible options for developing a research plan to advance the standards. This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the ventilation needs of California residences, determining the bases for setting residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and corresponding levels of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Moisture and combustion products  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, moisture and combustion pollutants, are examined. A companion paper examines volatile organic compounds and radon. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. Moisture control puts significant restrictions on a ventilation system. The system should function continuously (averaged over days) and distribute ventilation throughout the habitable space. Combustion sources require task ventilation that functions reliably.

Hadlich, D.E.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Title Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5889E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., and Max H. Sherman Journal Building and Environment Volume 59 Start Page 456 Pagination 456-465 Date Published 01/2013 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, filtration, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, ozone, simulation Abstract Elevated outdoor ozone levels are associated with adverse health effects. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone of outdoor origin would lower population exposures and might also lead to a reduction in ozone---associated adverse health effects. In most buildings, indoor ozone levels are diminished with respect to outdoor levels to an extent that depends on surface reactions and on the degree to which ozone penetrates the building envelope. Ozone enters buildings from outdoors together with the airflows that are driven by natural and mechanical means, including deliberate ventilation used to reduce concentrations of indoor---generated pollutants. When assessing the effect of deliberate ventilation on occupant health one should consider not only the positive effects on removing pollutants of indoor origin but also the possibility that enhanced ventilation might increase indoor levels of pollutants originating outdoors. This study considers how changes in residential ventilation that are designed to comply with ASHRAE Standard 62.2 might influence indoor levels of ozone. Simulation results show that the building envelope can contribute significantly to filtration of ozone. Consequently, the use of exhaust ventilation systems is predicted to produce lower indoor ozone concentrations than would occur with balanced ventilation systems operating at the same air---exchange rate. We also investigated a strategy for reducing exposure to ozone that would deliberately reduce ventilation rates during times of high outdoor ozone concentration while still meeting daily average ventilation requirements.

28

Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION AND ENERGY CHARACTERISTICS*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

while still providing ventilation for adequate indoor air quality. Various ASHRAE Standards (e.g., 62 to the ASHRAE Standard 119 levels while still providing adequate ventilation through infiltration or mechanical alternatives. Various ASHRAE Standards are used to assist us. ASHRAE Standard 119-19885 classifies the envelope

31

Residential ventilation standards scoping study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new residences. The Hawaii Model Energy Code (HMEC) is aHawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Residential Energy Code

McKone, Thomas E.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings....

35

Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulator achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Wilkes, K.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing a database of residential air leakage in theTechnical Note AIVC 57: Residential Ventilation. Brussels,in personal samples and residential indoor, outdoor and

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses. ”Passive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical existing house. Designed passive ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."House Ventilation Rates Local Exhaust Rates Air Distribution and Duct Leakage Infiltration Windows and Passive

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but also because passive, whole-house ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses",

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andleakage. The ASHRAE Handbook of fundamentals (ASHRAE 2009),

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL REPORT NUMBER 53776; OCTOBER 2003 ASHRAE &Residential Ventilation Max Sherman Energy Performance of Buildings Group IED/EETD Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory1 MHSherman@lbl.gov ASHRAE, the American of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R). ASHRAE has recently released a new

42

Does Mixing Make Residential Ventilation More Effective?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. References ASHRAE.2009. ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals, Ventilation andChapter. Atlanta GA: ASHRAE. ASHRAE. 2007. “Ventilation and

Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant could be exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago. The vast majority of homes in the United States and indeed the world are ventilated through natural means such as infiltration caused by air leakage. Newer homes in the western world are tight and require mechanical ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate norunder-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 specifies how much mechanical ventilation is considered necessary to provide acceptable indoor air quality, but that standard is weak on how infiltration can contribute towards meeting the total requirement. In the past ASHRAE Standard 136 was used to do this, but new theoretical approaches and expanded weather data have made that standard out of date. This article will describe how to properly treat infiltration as an equivalent ventilation approach and then use new data and these new approaches to demonstrate how these calculations might be done both in general and to update Standard 136.

Sherman, Max

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Whole Building Ventilation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-Building Whole-Building Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Home Performance / Weatherization  Addressing ventilation is the exception  Max tightness, e.g. BPI's "Building Airflow Standard" (BAS)  References ASHRAE 62-89  BAS = Max [0.35 ACH, 15 CFM/person], CFM50 eq.  If BD tests show natural infiltration below BAS...  Ventilation must be recommended or installed.  SO DON'T AIR SEAL TO MUCH! © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. © 2011 Steven Winter Associates, Inc. All rights reserved. Ventilation Requirements Ventilation systems for existing homes that are:

46

Modeling study of ventilation, IAQ and energy impacts of residential mechanical ventilation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simulation study of indoor air quality, ventilation and energy impacts of several mechanical ventilation approaches in a single-family residential building. The study focused on a fictitious two-story house in Spokane, Washington and employed the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal model CONTAM. The model of the house included a number of factors related to airflow including exhaust fan and forced-air system operation, duct leakage and weather effects, as well as factors related to contaminant dispersal including adsorption/desorption of water vapor and volatile organic compounds, surface losses of particles and nitrogen dioxide, outdoor contaminant concentrations, and occupant activities. The contaminants studied include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, fine and coarse particles, and volatile organic compounds. One-year simulations were performed for four different ventilation approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in combination with exhaust fan operation, an outdoor intake duct connected to the forced-air system return balanced by exhaust fan operation, and a continuously-operated exhaust fan. Results discussed include whole building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and cooling loads, contaminants concentrations, and occupant exposure to contaminants.

Persily, A.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.of Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is CERN up to Date With

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-264 ­ 1.278. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington, DC. 14. Gusdorf, J., Swinton, MLBNL 62341 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2007 This work was supported

49

Residential Attic Ventilation In A Hot And Humid Climate: Effects Of Increased Ventilation On Thermal Performance And Moisture Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The reality of the effect of natural ventilation in a residential attic cavity has been the topic of many debates and scholarly reports since… (more)

Atherton, Stanley Arthur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation Standards in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Book of ASTM Standards. Vol. 04.11. American SocietyCalifornia's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential andSystems" Canadian Standards Association, Mississauga,

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliam, Jennifer A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

Barley, D.

2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessments on Noise. ” Energy and Buildings. Vol. 27. pp.Distribution Systems. ” Energy and Buildings. Vol. 20. pp.W.J. Fisk. 1994. Energy and Buildings vol. 21 (1). pp.15-22.

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Residential Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residential HVAC load contributes $23 billion to electric utility energy sales and significantly to peak demands. Participants at this 1986 workshop identified fifteen areas of research needed to improve HVAC components, systems, and applications.

1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

57

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

Eric Loros

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preoperational test report, vent building ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This represents a preoperational test report for Vent Building Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) for the W-030 Ventilation Building. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents an interactive on-line package for calculation of energy and cost demands for residential infiltration and ventilation, with input and output data entry through a web browser. This is a unique tool. It represents a new kind of approach to developing software employing user (client) and server (package provider) computers. The main program, servicing {open_quotes}intelligent{close_quotes} CGI (Common Gateway Interface) calls, resides on the server and dynamically handles the whole package performance and the procedure of calculations. The {open_quotes}computing engine{close_quotes} consists of two parts: RESVENT - the previously existing program for ventilation calculations and ECONOMICS - for heating and cooling system energy and cost calculations. The user interface is designed in such a way, that it allows simultaneous access by many users from all over the world.

Forowicz, T.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

On The Valuation of Infiltration towards Meeting Residential Ventilation Needs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. It can be provided by mechanical or natural means. In most homes, especially existing homes, infiltration provides the dominant fraction of the ventilation. As we seek to provide acceptable indoor air quality at minimum energy cost, it is important to neither over-ventilate nor under-ventilate. Thus, it becomes critically important to correctly evaluate the contribution infiltration makes to both energy consumption and equivalent ventilation. ASHRAE Standards including standards 62, 119, and 136 have all considered the contribution of infiltration in various ways, using methods and data from 20 years ago.

Sherman, Max H.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

63

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

64

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

65

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

66

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of the total space conditioning) and the intermittentsupply lead to greater space conditioning energy use. AnnualkWh Distribution Ventilation Space Conditioning Leaky House

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating, and Air -Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GRefrigerat ing, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, Gof Ventilation and Air Conditioning: Is C E R N up to Date

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standard: Exegesis of Proposed Standard 62.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In February 2000, ASHRAE's Standard Project Committee on "Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings", SPC 62.2P7 recommended ASHRAE's first complete standard on residential ventilation for public review. The standard is an attempt by the Society to address concerns over indoor air quality in dwellings and to set minimum standards that would allow for energy efficiency measures to be evaluated. The standard has requirements for whole-house ventilation, local exhaust ventilation, and source control. In addition to code-intended requirements, the standard also contains guidance information for the designer and/or user of the standard. This report summarizes the draft standard and attempts to address questions and concerns that those potentially affected by the standard might have. This report may also be of use to those considering public review comments on the draft standard.

Sherman, M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.for Residential Winter and Summer Air Conditioning.Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Washington, DC. 10.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluation of Existing Technologies for Meeting Residential Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ........................................................................... 9 5. Central Fan Integrated (CFI) Supply with air inlet in return and continuously operating exhaust................................................................................................ 10 7. CFI with 7% Outside Air (OA), without continuous exhaust ­ not 62.2 compliant Ventilation from ACM........................................................................ 11

71

Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large numbers of houses using passive monitoring techniques.rates by passive techniques in 61 occupied houses, half ofhouses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive

Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Different MechanicalVentilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of dilution depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on work being done to both model the impact of different systems and measurements using a new multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The ultimate objective of this project is to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

MICRO-CHP System for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of progress under Phase I of a project to develop and commercialize a micro-CHP system for residential applications that provides electrical power, heating, and cooling for the home. This is the first phase of a three-phase effort in which the residential micro-CHP system will be designed (Phase I), developed and tested in the laboratory (Phase II); and further developed and field tested (Phase III). The project team consists of Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (AMTI), responsible for system design and integration; Marathon Engine Systems, Inc. (MES), responsible for design of the engine-generator subsystem; AO Smith, responsible for design of the thermal storage and water heating subsystems; Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, responsible for design of the HVAC subsystem; and AirXchange, Inc., responsible for design of the mechanical ventilation and dehumidification subsystem.

Joseph Gerstmann

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation system  

SciTech Connect

This represents a preoperational test report for Primary Ventilation Systems, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system provides vapor space filtered venting of tanks AY101, AY102, AZ101, AZ102. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

76

Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential and Commercial Integration Energy systems integration R&D at the small-scale, residential and commercial integration level encompasses diverse technologies such as...

78

Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor Air Quality  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing by 18-44% the energy spent on ventilation. The system, the Residential Integrated ...

79

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System by being located within the WHB and by maintaining specific pressures, temperatures, and humidity within the building. The system also depends on the WHB for water supply. The system interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air; the Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System for detection of fire and smoke; the Waste Handling Building Electrical System for normal, emergency, and standby power; and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of the system.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

WASTE TREATMENT BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Treatment Building (WTB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for personnel comfort and equipment operation, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WTB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement area ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination with the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WTB. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits, The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) principles to maintain personnel radiation doses to all occupational workers below regulatory limits and as low as is reasonably achievable. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Waste Treatment Building System by being located in the WTB, and by maintaining specific pressure, temperature, and humidity environments within the building. The system also depends on the WTB for normal electric power supply and the required supply of water for heating, cooling, and humidification. Interface with the Waste Treatment Building System includes the WTB fire protection subsystem for detection of fire and smoke. The Waste Treatment Building Ventilation System interfaces with the Site Radiological Monitoring System for continuous monitoring of the exhaust air and key areas within the WTB, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control of system operations, and the Site Generated Radiological Waste Handling System and Site Generated Hazardous, Non-Hazardous & Sanitary Waste Disposal System for routing of pretreated toxic, corrosive, and radiologically contaminated effluent from process equipment to the HEPA filter exhaust ductwork and air-cleaning unit.

P.A. Kumar

2000-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Residential Space Conditioning  Systems.   Canadian in residential space conditioning systems”.   Keywords: in residential space conditioning systems”. This standard

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Residential Geothermal Systems Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A resident individual taxpayer of Montana who installs a geothermal heating or cooling system in their principal dwelling can claim a tax credit based on the installation costs of the system, not...

83

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Metering Secondary Water in Residential Irrigation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of residential secondary or dual water systems for irrigation purposes is common in the western United States where water supplies are scarce. While… (more)

Richards, Gregory L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- Sustainable Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. The program includes rebates for insulation...

86

SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

87

Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update to "Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets" (EPRIsolutions report 1000772). That previous report dealt with fuel cells, stirling engine generators, and reciprocating engine generators; this current report focuses on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems fueled with natural gas or propane and sized for residential loads.

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

88

Troubleshooting the residential air conditioning system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to effectively diagnose problems in a residential air conditioning system, the technician should develop and follow a logical step-by-step troubleshooting procedure. A list of problems, along with possible causes and solutions, that a technician may encounter when servicing a residential air conditioner is presented.

Puzio, H. [Sussex County Vocational Technical School, Sparta, NJ (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices Title Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices...

90

ELECTRIC POWER AND VENTILATION SYSTEM OF SILOE  

SciTech Connect

The 15-kv electric power of Siloe is supplied from a central substation, which serves all the laboratories in the Center. The substation transforms primary 3-phase power from 15 kv to 380 to 220 v. Control installations are supplied from sets of rectifiers and batteries with 127 and 48 v direct current. If the normal electric power supply fails, a 12000 kva diesel driven generator is automatically started and in a very short time supplies power. The ventilation system supplies the whole building with conditioned air, holds the shell in negative pressure, and exhausts radioactive effluents. (auth)

Mitault, G.; Faudou, J.-C.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Experimental Evaluation of Ventilation Systems in a Single-Family Dwelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The French regulation on residential building ventilation relies on an overall and continuous air renewal. The fresh air should enter the building through the "habitable rooms" while the polluted air is extracted in the service rooms. In this way, internal air is drained from the lowest polluted rooms to the highest polluted ones. However, internal pressure equilibrium and air movements in buildings result from the combined effects ventilation system and parameters such as wind, temperature difference or doors opening. This paper aims to analyse the influence of these parameters on pollutant transfer within buildings. In so doing, experiments are carried out using tracer gas release for representing pollution sources in an experimental house. Mechanical exhaust, balanced and natural ventilation systems are thus tested. Results show the followings: - For all cases, internal doors' opening causes the most important pollutant spread. - When doors are closed, the best performances are obtained with balanced venti...

Koffi, Juslin; Akoua, Jean-Jacques

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings  

Ventilation and Solar Heat Storage System Offers Big Energy Savings ... Heat is either reflected away from the building with radiant barriers, or heat is absorbed

93

Characterization of air recirculation in multiple fan ventilation systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Booster fans, large underground fans, can increase the volumetric efficiency of ventilation systems by helping to balance the pressure and quantity distribution throughout a mine,… (more)

Wempen, Jessica Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Property Tax Exemption for Residential Solar Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

[http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0233.pdf HB 233 of 2010] exempted residential solar energy systems from property tax assessments. According to state law, for the purposes of...

95

Ventilation Systems Operating Experience Review for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for air ventilation systems in nuclear facilities. These experiences are applicable for magnetic and inertial fusion facilities since air ventilation systems are support systems that can be considered generic to nuclear facilities. The report contains descriptions of ventilation system components, operating experiences with these systems, component failure rates, and component repair times. Since ventilation systems have a role in mitigating accident releases in nuclear facilities, these data are useful in safety analysis and risk assessment of public safety. An effort has also been given to identifying any safety issues with personnel operating or maintaining ventilation systems. Finally, the recommended failure data were compared to an independent data set to determine the accuracy of individual values. This comparison is useful for the International Energy Agency task on fusion component failure rate data collection.

L. C. Cadwallader

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

1980-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermal Comfort Study in a Naturally Ventilated Residential Building in a Tropical Hot-Humid Climate Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermal comfort study in a naturally ventilated residential building located in a tropical hot-humid climate region. The specific objective of this study is to investigate whether thermal comfort in this house can be achieved through a passive system only. The methods used in this study included conducting hourly monitoring of the temperature and relative humidity; measuring the air velocities; and assessing occupants' thermal sensations through questionnaires and interview. The data from the questionnaires were matched to the monitored data to assess the acceptable range of comfortable condition. Then using an hourly simulation program, some components of the building were also "modified" to investigate whether the building can be made "more comfortable". This study shows that it is possible to provide a thermally comfortable space in this region without using mechanical air-conditioning systems. The occupants' acceptable range of comfortable condition is different than that of people in the northern latitudes. The occupants sensed "neutrality" when the operative temperature in the house was about 27 degree Celsius (80°F). The occupants could also tolerate slightly warm conditions, that is up to 29 degree Celsius (84OF), and still never wanted to install any air-conditioning systems. The simulation showed that using light wall materials would result in cooler indoor temperature at night but warmer during the day. If all windows were opened (25% the total floor area) the house could be more comfortable at night but less comfortable during the day. Findings of this study are important for architects and engineers in designing comfortable living spaces in these regions.

Soebarto, V. I.; Handjarinto, S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Absolute Glovebox Ventilation Filtration System with Unique Filter Replacement Feature  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox ventilation system was designed for a new plutonium-238 processing facility that provided 1) downdraft ventilation, 2) a leak tight seal around the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, and 3) a method for changing the filters internally without risk of contaminating the laboratory.

Freeman, S. S.; Slusher, W. A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect

During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the aerogel duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluating Ventilation Systems for Existing Homes  

SciTech Connect

During the course of this project, an affordable and high performance ductwork system to directly address the problems of thermal losses, poor efficiency, and air leakage was designed. To save space and enable direct connections between different floors of the building, the ductwork system was designed in such a way that it occupied interior or exterior frame wall cavities. The ductwork system satisfied building regulations for structural support when bridging multiple floors, the spread of fire and smoke, and insulation to reduce the heat flow into or out of the building. Retrofits of urban residential buildings will be the main focus for the application of this ductwork system. Highly reflective foils and insulating materials were used to aid in the increase of the overall R-value of the ductwork itself and the wall assembly. It is expected that the proposed system will increase the efficiency of the HVAC system and the thermal resistance of the building envelope. The performance of the proposed ductwork design was numerically evaluated in a number of different ways. Our results indicate that the duct method is a very cost attractive alternative to the conventional method.

Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Intelligent Control of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposed a simulation-optimization energy saving strategy for heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems' condenser water loop through intelligent control of single speed cooling towers' components. An analysis of system components ...

Patrick Low Kie; Lau Bee Theng

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Floor-supply displacement ventilation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research on indoor environments has received more attention recently because reports of symptoms and other health complaints related to indoor environments have been increasing. Heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning ...

Kobayashi, Nobukazu, 1967-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Quantitative troubleshooting of industrial exhaust ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

This article proposes two troubleshooting tools that may allow precise and accurate assessment of changes to ventilation systems of any type. Both are useful in discovering and quantifying most modifications that affect the distribution of airflows among the branches and static pressures throughout the system. The approaches are derived from energy balance considerations, using power loss coefficients (X) computed for any contiguous section of the system from the duct velocities and static pressures measured at that section`s inlets and outlets. The value of X for a given portion of the system should be nearly constant with changes in airflow and with modifications to other portions of the system. Responsiveness to local modifications and insensitivity to changes elsewhere in the system - including gross changes in fan performance - make X coefficients a valuable troubleshooting tool. Static pressure ratios within a given branch are functionally related to ratios of X coefficients. Therefore, they vary with modifications to the branch and are highly insensitive to changes outside that branch. Unlike X coefficients, determination of static pressure ratios does not require velocity traverses, making them faster and easier to determine than X values. On the other hand, values of X are more universally applicable and have direct physical significance. Use of both static pressure ratios and X coefficients are described in a suggested troubleshooting procedure. Systematic measurement errors have surprisingly little impact on the usefulness of values of X or static pressure ratios. The major impediment to using either tool is the necessity for {open_quotes}baseline{close_quotes} measurements, which are often unavailable. On the other hand, a baseline for future comparisons can be created piecemeal, beginning at any time and extending over any period of time. 11 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Guffey, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scaling the passive stack diameter with house size (floora single-story house ventilated by a passive stack with andTable 1: Passive stack diameters scaling with house size

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is made of several outstanding issues concerning the commercial development of environmental control systems for electric vehicles (EVs). Engineering design constraints such as federal regulations and consumer requirements are first identified. Next, heating and cooling loads in a sample automobile are calculated using a computer model available from the literature. The heating and cooling loads are then used as a basis for estimating the electrical consumption that is to be expected for heat pumps installed in EVs. The heat pump performance is evaluated using an automobile heat pump computer model which has been developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The heat pump design used as input to the model consists of typical finned-tube heat exchangers and a hermetic compressor driven by a variable-speed brushless dc motor. The simulations suggest that to attain reasonable system efficiencies, the interior heat exchangers that are currently installed as automobile air conditioning will need to be enlarged. Regarding the thermal envelope of the automobile itself, calculations are made which show that considerable energy savings will result if steps are taken to reduce {open_quote}hot soak{close_quote} temperatures and if the outdoor air ventilation rate is well controlled. When these changes are made, heating and cooling should consume less than 10% of the total stored electrical energy for steady driving in most U.S. climates. However, this result depends strongly upon the type of driving: The fraction of total power for heating and cooling ({open_quote}range penalty{close_quote}) increases sharply for driving scenarios having low average propulsion power, such as stop-and-go driving.

Kyle, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, R.A. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Buildings: A Review." ASHRAE Transactions 107(Pt. 2).Laboratory Sherman, M. H. (2004). "ASHRAE’s New ResidentialStandard (LBNL 53776) " ASHRAE J. 46(1): S149-156. Sherman,

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Shared inverter residential photovoltaic system concept  

SciTech Connect

A residential photovoltaic system concept involving a number of separate roof-mounted arrays all connected to a single utility-interactive inverter is proposed and analyzed in comparison to systems employing one inverter for each array. The conclusion of significance is that such shared inverter systems offer a costs savings of approximately 10 percent. It is observed that other substantial benefits might derive from a reduction in the number of tie-in points between distributed generators and the electric utility grid.

Kern, E.C.; Solman, F.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication examines the solar lease option for residential PV systems and describes two solar lease programs already in place.

Not Available

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect air-quality in rooms of multi-polluting heat sources. Results show that it is very important to determine the suitable air-intemperature , air-inflow, and heat source quantity and dispersion, to obtain better displacement ventilation results.

Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Residential energy gateway system in smart grid.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project discusses about the residential energy gateway in the Smart Grid. A residential energy gateway is a critical component in the Home Energy Management… (more)

Thirumurthy, Vinod Govindswamy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Assessment of Residential GSHP System  

SciTech Connect

This report first briefly reviews geothermal heat pump (GHP) technology and the current status of the GHP industry in the United States. Then it assesses the potential national benefits, in terms of energy savings, reduced summer peak electrical demand, consumer energy cost savings, and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions from retrofitting the space heating, space cooling, and water heating systems in existing U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems. The investment for retrofitting typical U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems is also analyzed using the metrics of net present value and levelized cost.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and statewide average residential electricity rates below $Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenFor Residential Wind Systems state electricity rates, which

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Passive Ventilation to Complement HVAC Systems in Enclosed Buildings Tom Rogg REU Student to assist HVAC has the potential to significantly reduce life cycle cost and energy consumption and electrical system that will tie thermostats to controlled valves in the actual HVAC system. Based on results

Mountziaris, T. J.

116

Home Energy Article: A Systems Approach to Retrofitting Residential HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Retrofitting a Residential HVAC System, Lawrence Berkeleyducts. New downsized ducts and HVAC equipment. The ducts areto Retrofitting Residential HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and

McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

when electricity demand is low. Utility companies in the US are beginning to offer tariff-based incentives to consumers to help reduce peak energy demand and hence cost. An...

119

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and operations and maintenance documentation. 28. Baker, R.C. 2000. "Flow Measurement Handbook: Industrial Designs, Operating Principles, Performance, and Applications". New...

120

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 - Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-5983E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Stratton, J. Chris, William J. N. Turner, Craig P. Wray, and Iain S. Walker Date Published 112012 Keywords ashrae 62,2, flow hood,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Water spray ventilator system for continuous mining machines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a water spray ventilator system mounted on a continuous mining machine to streamline airflow and provide effective face ventilation of both respirable dust and methane in underground coal mines. This system has two side spray nozzles mounted one on each side of the mining machine and six spray nozzles disposed on a manifold mounted to the underside of the machine boom. The six spray nozzles are angularly and laterally oriented on the manifold so as to provide non-overlapping spray patterns along the length of the cutter drum.

Page, Steven J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Mal, Thomas (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Making the most of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Making the Most of Residential Photovoltaic Systems, was recently produced by NREL Communications and Public Affairs. It showcases a demonstration project in Florida that produced some remarkable results by incorporating both energy efficiency and photovoltaic systems into newly built housing. The brochure points up the benefits of making wise personal choices about energy use, and how large-scale use of advanced energy technologies can benefit the nation. This is one of a series of brochures that presents stimulating information about photovoltaics, with a goal of helping to push this technology into the power-generation mix in different utilities, communities, and states.

Moon, S.; Parker, D.; Hayter, S.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Infiltration and Natural Ventilation Model for Whole-Building Energy Simulation of Residential Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The infiltration term in the building energy balance equation is one of the least understood and most difficult to model. For many residential buildings, which have an energy performance dominated by the envelope, it can be one of the most important terms. There are numerous airflow models; however, these are not combined with whole-building energy simulation programs that are in common use in North America. This paper describes a simple multizone nodal airflow model integrated with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program.

Deru, M.; Burns, P.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practices for Residential HVAC Systems”. Boston, MA. Jump,techniques for measuring HVAC grille air flows". ASHRAEPractices Guide for Residential HVAC Retrofits. LBNL 53592.

Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Building Science Corporation (BSC) to provide high performance affordable housing for 10 families in the retrofit of an existing mass masonry building (a former convent). The original ventilation design for the project was provided by a local engineer and consisted of a single large heat recovery ventilator (HRV) located in a mechanical room in the basement with a centralized duct system providing supply air to the main living space and exhausting stale air from the single bathroom in each apartment. This design was deemed to be far too costly to install and operate for several reasons: the large central HRV was oversized and the specified flows to each apartment were much higher than the ASHRAE 62.2 rate; an extensive system of ductwork, smoke and fire dampers, and duct chases were specified; ductwork required a significant area of dropped ceilings; and the system lacked individual ventilation control in the apartments

Metzger, C.; Ueno, K.; Kerrigan, P.; Wytrykowska, H.; Van Straaten, R.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Operational test report integrated system test (ventilation upgrade)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operational Final Test Report for Integrated Systems, Project W-030 (Phase 2 test, RECIRC and HIGH-HEAT Modes). Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks, including upgraded vapor space cooling and filtered venting of tanks AY101, Ay102, AZ101, AZ102.

HARTY, W.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Residential Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. NEMS Residential Module Equipment Summary Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Characteristics of Selected Equipment Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from

130

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on HomeEffects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homewith existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold in

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems: Roundtable Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Springer, Davis Energy Group Bion D. Howard, Building Environmental Science & Technology ABSTRACT Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy...

132

Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500 per individual taxpayer; up to $1,000 per household Program Info Start Date 1/1/2002 Expiration Date none State Montana Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 100% Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality Residential taxpayers who install an energy system using a recognized non-fossil form of energy on their home after December 31, 2001 are eligible for a tax credit equal to the amount of the cost of the system and

133

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Proposed Design for a Coupled Ground-Source Heat Pump/Energy Recovery Ventilator System to Reduce Building Energy Demand.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis focuses on reducing the energy demand of a residential building by using a coupled ground-source heat pump/energy recovery ventilation… (more)

McDaniel, Matthew Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtablesession  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the lossesof energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. Theselosses include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters, thewaste of water (and energy) while waiting for hot water to get to thepoint of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distributionsystem after a draw; heat losses from recirculation systems and thediscarded warmth of waste water as it runs down the drain. Severaltechnologies are available that save energy (and water) by reducing theselosses or by passively recovering heat from wastewater streams and othersources. Energy savings from some individual technologies are reported tobe as much as 30 percent. Savings calculations of prototype systemsincluding bundles of technologies have been reported above 50 percent.This roundtable session will describe the current practices, summarizethe results of past and ongoing studies, discuss ways to think about hotwater system efficiency, and point to areas of future study. We will alsorecommend further steps to reduce unnecessary losses from hot waterdistribution systems.

Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Simulation of residential HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this paper were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic--which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance.

Walker, I.S.; Siegel, J.A.; Degenetais, G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: Themarginal impacts of photovoltaic (PV) energy systems on home

Hoen, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Residential solar photovoltaic systems: Final report for the Northeast Residential Experiment Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers research and development work conducted by the MIT Energy Lab. from July 1982 through June 1986. This Energy Lab. work in the field of solar photovoltaic systems followed six years of similar work at the MIT Lincoln Lab. under the same contract with the US DOE. The final report from the Lincoln Lab. period was published by Lincoln Lab. in 1983. During the period of Energy Lab. involvement, the project focused on the refinement of residential scale, roof-mounted photovoltaic systems for application in the northeastern US. Concurrent with the conclusion of MIT`s involvement, the New England Electric Co. is building a major field test of residential photovoltaics in Gardner, Massachusetts to determine experimentally the effects of photovoltaics on electric power company operations. Using systems designs and technology developed at MIT, the long-term performance of these thirty residential systems in Gardner will provide a measure of our success.

Kern, E.C. Jr.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon emerge on the U.S

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon em

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

145

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

147

Whole-House Ventilation Systems: Improved Control of Air Quality  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to employ spot ventilation in the home for comfort and safety.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

149

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the...

150

Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis sets forth a novel intelligent residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that provides optimal thermal comfort and electricity cost trade-offs for a household resident… (more)

Thomas, Auswin George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Experiences and Lessons Learned With Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents experiences with 86-grid-connected residential photovoltaic (PV) systems located at three sites. This information is valuable to utilities in planning their use of distributed PV generation.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research and development (R&D) investments in fuel cell technology have led to functioning prototypes of residential fuel power systems operating on natural gas. Efforts by at least four leading companies are expected to lead to early field trials of residential power systems in 2000 and early 2001, followed by pre-commercial prototypes during 2001-2002, and commercial introduction in the 2002-2005 time frame. Other technology companies are expected to follow suit.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Design of a ventilation system for carbon dioxide reduction in two gym rooms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This project is mainly focused on the improving and design of the ventilation system of two rooms at different levels of a gym (Friskis… (more)

Barroeta, Ander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

157

CFD Simulation of Airflow in Ventilated Wall System Report #9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to examine air movements in vinyl and brick ventilation cavities in detail, using a state of the art CFD commercial modeling tool. The CFD activity was planned to proceed the other activities in order to develop insight on the important magnitudes of scales occurring during ventilation air flow. This information generated by the CFD model was to be used to modify (if necessary) and to validate the air flow dynamics already imbedded in the hygrothermal model for the computer-based air flow simulation procedures. A comprehensive program of advanced, state-of-the-art hygrothermal modeling was then envisaged mainly to extend the knowledge to other wall systems and at least six representative climatic areas. These data were then to be used to provide the basis for the development of design guidelines. CFD results provided timely and much needed answers to many of the concerns and questions related to ventilation flows due to thermal buoyancy and wind-driven flow scenarios. The relative strength between these two mechanisms. Simple correlations were developed and are presented in the report providing the overall pressure drop, and flow through various cavities under different exterior solar and temperature scenarios. Brick Rainscreen Wall: It was initially expected that a 50 mm cavity would offer reduced pressure drops and increased air flow compared to a 19 mm cavity. However, these models showed that the size of the ventilation slots through the wall are the limiting factor rather than the cavity depth. Of course, once the slots are enlarged beyond a certain point, this could change. The effects of natural convection within the air cavities, driven by the temperature difference across the cavity, were shown to be less important than the external wind speed (for a wind direction normal to the wall surface), when wind action is present. Vinyl Rainscreen Wall: The CFD model of the vinyl rainscreen wall was simpler than that for the brick wall. Constant wall temperatures were used rather than conjugate heat transfer. Although this is appropriate for a thin surface with little heat capacity, it does mean that an empirical correlation between solar radiation (and perhaps wind speed) and vinyl temperature is required to use these results appropriately. The results developed from this CFD model were correlated to weather parameters and construction details so that they can be incorporated into ORNL s advanced hygrothermal models MOISTURE- EXPERT.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Karagiozis, Achilles N [ORNL

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: $4,000 Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Clothes Washer: $30 Refrigerator: $30 Room Air Conditioner: $20 Room Purifier: $15 CFLs: In-store discounts Provider Unitil Energy Systems

159

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology for prescriptive measures and whether the applicant is seeking ENERGY STAR Certification or Home Energy Rating System (HERS)

160

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the TA-55, Building PF-4 ventilation system is provided in the following sections. Included are descriptions of the zone configurations, equipment-performance criteria, ventilation support systems, and the ventilation-system evaluation criteria. Section 4.2.1.1 provides a brief discussion of the ventilation system function. Section 4.2.1.2 provides details on the overall system configuration. Details of system interfaces and support systems are provided in Section 4.2.1.3. Section 4.2.1.4 describes instrumentation and control needed to operate the ventilation system. Finally, Sections 4.2.1.5 and 4.2.1.6 describe system surveillance/maintenance and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) Limitations, respectively. Note that the numerical parameters included in this description are considered nominal; set points and other specifications actually fall within operational bands.

NONE

1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cost Estimates of Electricity from a TPV Residential Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system was built using a 12 to 20 kWth methane burner which should be integrated into a conventional residential heating system. The TPV system is cylindrical in shape and consists of a selective Yb2O3 emitter

Günther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean?Claude Mayor; Detlev Grützmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

System integration issues of residential solar photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic effects of residential solar PV systems on the utility's revenue, capacity, and energy requirements from the electric utility's perspective and to estimate the price that it might pay for surplus energy compared to what it would charge for deficits. The power and energy generated by the solar PV systems reduce the capital and operating costs that would otherwise be incurred by the utility. These avoided costs suggest what the utility might pay for surplus solar PV energy. The avoided costs are evaluated under three integration hypotheses, namely: (1) the utility has no system storage, (2) the utility has system storage, and (3) the solar PV systems are supported by dedicated storage devices, the purpose of which is to minimize sales to and purchases from the utility. Findings are reported in detail. (WHK)

Yamayee, Z.A.; Peschon, J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA.   CEC (2008b).  Residential Alternative Calculation Standard for Air Handlers in Residential Space Conditioning of Standards Options for Residential Air Handler Fans.   

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description RiverHeath will be a new neighborhood, with residences, shops, restaurants, and offices. The design incorporates walking trails, community gardens, green roofs, and innovative stormwater controls. A major component of the project is our reliance on renewable energy. One legacy of the land's industrial past is an onsite hydro-electric facility which formerly powered the paper factories. The onsite hydro is being refurbished and will furnish 100% of the project's electricity demand.

165

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Personal) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Personal) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $12,500 per installed system; 1 installed system per residence Program Info Start Date 1/1/2008 Expiration Date 12/31/2017 State Louisiana Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 50% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Leased systems installed after December 31, 2013: 38% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Provider LA Department of Revenue '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible,

167

Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Corporate) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $12,500 per installed system; 1 installed system per residence Program Info Start Date 1/1/2008 Expiration Date 12/31/2017 State Louisiana Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 50% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Leased systems installed after December 31, 2013: 38% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Provider LA Department of Revenue '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible,

168

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. Controlled ventilation keeps energy-efficient homes healthy and comfortable. Learn more about ventilation. When creating an energy-efficient, airtight home through air sealing, it's very important to consider ventilation. Unless properly ventilated, an airtight home can seal in indoor air pollutants. Ventilation also helps control moisture-another important consideration for a healthy, energy-efficient home. Featured Whole-House Ventilation A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. Tight, energy-efficient homes require mechanical -- usually whole-house --

169

Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Program Info State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $300 or $400 Duct Sealing: $200 Tune-ups: $100 Installation Rebates: Contact BGE The Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE) offers the Smart Energy Savers Program for residential natural gas customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Rebates are available for furnaces, HVAC system tune-ups, and insulation measures. All equipment and installation

170

Retrofit Installation of a Residential Photovoltaic Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems offer great potential for utility customers to supplement centrally supplied power. However, because these systems are still quite novel, the process of gaining approval for and installing them is unfamiliar and not standardized at most utility companies. Therefore, it can prove sufficiently challenging that it presents a barrier to would-be PV owners. This report looks at that process as it applied to a residential system in Phoenix, Arizona, and proposes ways that the process ...

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Ventilating system for reprocessing of nuclear fuel rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a nuclear facility such as a reprocessing plant for nuclear fuel rods, the central air cleaner discharging ventilating gas to the atmosphere must meet preselected standards not only as to the momentary concentration of radioactive components, but also as to total quantity per year. In order to comply more satisfactorily with such standards, reprocessing steps are conducted by remote control in a plurality of separate compartments. The air flow for each compartment is regulated so that the air inventory for each compartment has a slow turnover rate of more than a day but less than a year, which slow rate is conveniently designated as quasihermetic sealing. The air inventory in each such compartment is recirculated through a specialized processing unit adapted to cool and/or filter and/or otherwise process the gas. Stale air is withdrawn from such recirculating inventory and fresh air is injected (eg., By the less than perfect sealing of a compartment) into such recirculating inventory so that the air turnover rate is more than a day but less than a year. The amount of air directed through the manifold and duct system from the reprocessing units to the central air cleaner is less than in reprocessing plants of conventional design.

Szulinski, M.J.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy and cost analysis of residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Several energy-saving design changes in residential space-heating systems were examined to determine their energy-conservation potential and cost effectiveness. Changes in conventional and advanced systems (such as the gas heat pump) were considered. The energy and cost estimates were developed from current literature, conversations with heating and equipment manufacturers and dealers, and discussions with individuals doing research and testing on residential space-heating equipment. Energy savings as large as 26, 20, 57% were estimated for design changes in conventional gas, oil, and electric space-heating systems, respectively. These changes increased capital cost of the three systems by 27, 16, and 26%, respectively. For advanced gas and electric systems, energy savings up to 45 and 67%, respectively, were calculated. The design changes needed to produce these energy savings increased capital costs 80 and 35%. The energy use and cost relationships developed for the space heating systems were used as input to the ORNL residential energy-use simulation model to evaluate the effect of space-heating improvements on national energy use to the year 2000. Results indicated a large reduction in national energy use if improved conventional and advanced systems were made available to consumers and if consumers minimized life-cycle costs when purchasing these systems.

O' Neal, D.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study using computer simulations to determine the physical and economic performance of combined photovoltaic/thermal collector heat-pump solar systems for a single-family residence are presented. Economic analyses are based upon projected costs for a 1986 system installation. The results show that PV/T collector systems can be economically competitive for a cold climate residence, that systems employing on-site electrical storage batteries are not economically competitive with utility-interactive systems, and that an ambient-air-source heat-pump system has a lower life-cycle cost than a solar-source heat-pump system.

Russell, M.C.

1979-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

176

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Title Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5796E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., William J. N. Turner, Iain S. Walker, and Brett C. Singer Date Published 06/2012 Abstract Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy.Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a well-validated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

177

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the installation of a data monitoring system to analyze the efficiency and performance of a large solar ventilation preheat (SVP) system. The system was installed at a Federal installation to reduce energy consumption and costs and to help meet Federal energy goals and mandates. SVP systems draw ventilation air in through a perforated metal solar collector with a dark color on the south side of a build-

178

VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

C.R. Gorrell

1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

180

Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECT RESIDENTIAL SELLINGopportunity employer. DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECThave sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at

Hoen, Ben

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homewith existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold ingrid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems were

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtable session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters,System Efficiency Losses Standby Loss Combustion LossBecause of their very low standby losses they can achieve

Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Assessment of Pollutant Spread from a Building Basement with three Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ventilation aims at providing a sufficient air renewal for ensuring a good indoor air quality (IAQ), yet building energy policies are leading to adapting various ventilation strategies minimising energy losses through air renewal. A recent IAQ evaluation campaign in French dwellings shows important pollution of living spaces by VOCs such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde or hexanal, particularly in buildings equipped with a garage. Besides, radon emission from soil is a subject of concern in many countries. Several studies are done to understand its release mode and deal with the spread of this carcinogen gas. This paper aims to experimentally assess a contaminant spread from a house basement using mechanical exhaust and balanced ventilation systems, and natural ventilation.

Koffi, Juslin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a metropolitan city, Belgrade is a dwelling place for about 25% of total citizen number of Republic of Serbia, and at the same time regional cultural, educational, scientific and business center with its own energy production. Belgrade represents a significant consumer of final energy to support the living standard of the occupants. Energy production is based on domestic coal and imported fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas resulting in a high impact to the environment by emission of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings is based on geographic position and type of heating. This paper presents the sustainable assessment of energy system for residential building sector in Belgrade. In order to present the energy system options for residential building sector, three sets of energy indicators: economical, social and environmental are taken into consideration.

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

Winkler, J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Mobile zone, spray booth ventilation system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This concept endeavors to reduce the volume of air (to be treated) from spray paint booths, thereby increasing efficiency and improving air pollution abatement (VOC emissions especially). Most of the ventilation air is recycled through the booth to maintain laminar flow; the machinery is located on the supply side of the booth rather than on the exhaust side. 60 to 95% reduction in spray booth exhaust rate should result. Although engineering and production prototypes have been made, demand is low.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

189

Xcel Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Xcel Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Evaporative Cooling: $1000 High Efficiency A/C: $1000 Insulation: $300 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $50 A/C and Heat Pumps: $500-$1100 Evaporative Cooling (Standard System): $100-$250/unit Evaporative Cooling (Premium System): $500-$600/unit

190

AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®''' Central AC Replacements: $125 - $800/system Heat Pump Replacements: $125 - $825/system Insulation: $0.12-$0.25/sq. ft. Duct Sealing/Replacement: $175 - $300/home Duct Insulation: $0.50/ln. ft. AC Tune-up: $80 Air Infiltration: $100 - $150

191

Residential Loan Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Residential Loan Fund Residential Loan Fund < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Bioenergy Solar Maximum Rebate $20,000 Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge (SBC) Start Date 11/10/2009 (current offering) State New York Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority '''''The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has extended the Participation Agreements of the Assisted Home Performance

192

Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (Not Optional)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kitchen Ventilation Kitchen Ventilation Should be High Performance (not Optional) Brett C. Singer Residential Building Systems & Indoor Environment Groups Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Building America Technical Update Denver, CO April 30, 2013 Acknowledgements PROGRAM SUPPORT *U.S. Department of Energy - Building America Program *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Indoor Environments Division *U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development - Office of Healthy Homes & Lead Hazard Control *California Energy Commission - Public Interest Energy Research Program TECHNICAL CONTRIBUTIONS *Woody Delp, Tosh Hotchi, Melissa Lunden, Nasim Mullen, Chris Stratton, Doug Sullivan, Iain Walker Kitchen Ventilation Simplified PROBLEM: * Cooking burners & cooking produce odors, moisture

193

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches Title Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3978E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sherman, Max H., Jennifer M. Logue, and Brett C. Singer Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 17 Issue 2 Pagination 159 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords resave Abstract The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

194

Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $175 incentive toward the cost of a high-performance AC tune-up of a system size 5 tons or less $200 incentive toward the cost of a high-performance AC tune-up of a system size over 5 tons Tier 1 Home Energy Survey --- Survey $75 discount

195

Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $15 Freezer: $15 CFL Fixtures: $10 Electric Water Heater: $25 Drain Water Heat Recovery System: $220 Air Sealing: $160 to installer PTCS Duct-Sealing (Manufactured Home): $350 - $500 to installer PTCS Duct-Sealing (Site-Built Home): $500 to installer

196

Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Attic Insulation: $500 Wall Insulation: $500 Air Sealing: $300 Program Info Start Date 7/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star New Home: Contact Black Hills Energy Air-Source Heat Pump Split System: $400 Central A/C: $500-$700 Ground Source Heat Pumps: $1,200

197

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat...

198

Performance control strategies for oil-fired residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported of a study of control system options which can be used to improve the combustion performance of residential, oil-fired heating equipment. Two basic control modes were considered in this program. The first is service required'' signals in which an indication is provided when the flame quality or heat exchanger cleanliness have degraded to the point that a service call is required. The second control mode is excess-air trim'' in which the burner would essentially tune itself continuously for maximum efficiency. 35 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

Butcher, T.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential ACM Manual, Section  3.12.5 Duct/Air Handler Residential ACM Manual, Section 3.12.5 Duct/Air  Handler leakage of air handlers for the purposes of the ACM.  Based 

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Controllability and invariance of monotone systems for robust ventilation automation in buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[2] and control [3] of Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems leads to an improved on these matters [4]. Various paths have already been explored for the control of HVAC systems in intelligent and energy saving [7], a model-predictive strategy [8], or a fuzzy logic controller [9]. The notion of Robust

202

Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Authors Fisk, William J., Mark J. Mendell, Molly Davies, Ekaterina Eliseeva, David Faulkner, Tienzen Hong, and Douglas P. Sullivan Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords absence, building s, carbon dioxide, demand - controlled ventilation, energy, indoor air quality, schools, ventilation Abstract This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included:  The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).  Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.

203

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Value of Residential Solar PV. Journal of SustainableConclusions The market for solar PV is expanding rapidly ingrid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems were

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Compact Fluorescent Bulbs: Free While Supplies Last Insulation: $0.50/sq ft Heat Pump Water Heater: Up to $500 HVAC Controls: $250/unit Single Package/Split System Unitary AC: $250/ton Air-Source Heat Pump: $250/ton Water-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Home Energy Savings Program: Free for Electric Customers

206

TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User`s Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications.

Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Home Energy Survey: Free A/C and Heat Pump: $140 - $1930, depending on system size and efficiency rating Reflective Roof (Metal or Tile): $325 Duct Test: Discounted Single Family Duct System Repair: up to $154 Multi-family and Manufactured Home Duct System Repair: $60/account Ceiling and Roof Insulation: varies based upon existing insulation levels

208

Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht Cheryn.engebrecht@nrel.gov Building Technologies Program Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Reduce energy use in new and existing residential buildings * Promote building science and systems engineering / integration approach * "Do no harm": Ensure safety, health and durability are maintained or improved * Accelerate adoption of high performance technologies

209

A study of pressure losses in residential air distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop characteristics of residential duct system components that are either not available or not thoroughly (sometimes incorrectly) described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P--''Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings''. The flexible duct study covered compressibility and bending effects on the total pressure drop, and the results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression in flexible ducts that can increase pressure drops by up to a factor of nine. The supply boots were tested under different configurations including a setup where a flexible duct elbow connection was considered as an integral part of the supply boot. The supply boots results showed that diffusers can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of two in exit fittings, and the installation configuration can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of five. The results showed that it is crucial for designers and contractors to be aware of the compressibility effects of the flexible duct, and the installation of supply boots and diffusers.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Residential end-use energy planning system (REEPS). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described. REEPS forecasts a moderate rise in electricity consumption per household and significant drops in other fuels. These are caused in part by high market penetrations of electric appliances which themselves reflect major shifts in relative energy prices.

Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

213

Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Ventilation Ventilation May 7, 2012 - 2:49pm Addthis This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. This ventilation system in a tight, energy-efficient home ensures good indoor air quality. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/brebca. What does this mean for me? After you've reduced air leakage in your home, adequate ventilation is critical for health and comfort. Depending on your climate, there are a number of strategies to ventilate your home. Ventilation is very important in an energy-efficient home. Air sealing techniques can reduce air leakage to the point that contaminants with known health effects such as formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and radon

214

Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

Bolinger, Mark A

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

215

Reliability assessment of active residential solar energy systems, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Experiences with active solar energy systems in the last few years have, in many cases, been less than encouraging. A quantification of the problem areas discovered in a sampling of the active residential solar energy systems in the state of Colorado is presented. While many problems were found, the potential for easy solution of the problems by design or installation refinement is great. Reported is a summary of the findings of the mechanical inspections of twelve systems during the 1978-79 winter. Only one system operated at its expected mechanical, thermal and economic performance level. Four other systems performed well mechanically, but only one of these had thermal performance meeting design expectations. The remaining seven systems did not work well mechanically or thermally. One significantly raised the utility bill of the residence on which it was installed. Poor system design was found to be the major cause of low performance. Also, installation quality was low and installation errors were frequent. Qualified solar system service was virtually unavailable. Nearly all the problems found were solvable using present technology. The greatest immediate need is for training of designers, installers and service people and support of off-market development of total systems.

Sharp, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Ventilation rates calculated from hydrogen release data in tanks equipped with standard hydrogen monitoring systems (SHMS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a method for estimating the ventilation rates of the high-level radioactive waste tank headspaces at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. The method, using hydrogen concentration data, is applied to all passively ventilated and selected mechanically ventilated tanks equipped with Standard Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS) and covers the time period from when the SHMS were installed through July 12, 1998. Results of the analyses are tabulated and compared with results from tracer gas studies and similar analyses of SHMS data. The method relies on instances of above-normal hydrogen releases and assumes the rate at which hydrogen is released by the waste is otherwise approximately constant. It also assumes that hydrogen is uniformly distributed in the tank headspace, so that at any given time the concentration of hydrogen in the effluent is approximately equal to the average headspace concentration and that measured by the SHMS. In general, the greatest single source of error in the method is the determination of the baseline hydrogen concentration, which in this study has been estimated by visual inspection of plotted data. Uncertainties in the calculated ventilation rates due to inaccurate baseline measurements are examined by performing a sensitivity analysis with upper and lower bounding values for the baseline concentration (in addition to the best estimate). A table lists the tanks considered in this report and the range of estimated ventilation rates obtained for each tank. When multiple events of above-normal hydrogen releases were observed, the range of estimated ventilation rates is given. Resulting values and their variability are consistent with those determined using tracer gases.

Sklarew, D.S.; Huckaby, J.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In the past year, the residential solar lease has received In the past year, the residential solar lease has received significant attention in the solar marketplace, primarily for its ability to leverage two key commercial tax credits for the individual homeowner. However, on January 1, 2009, the $2,000 cap on the residential investment tax credit (ITC) was lifted. As a result, the expansion of the solar lease model across the United States may be slower than antici-

218

Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality Auswin George residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that has smart grid functionality. The qualifier, conditional on anticipated retail energy prices. The term "smart- grid functionality" means that retail energy

Tesfatsion, Leigh

219

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Review of Residential Low-Load HVAC Systems  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building America Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an investigation to inventory commercially available HVAC technologies that are being installed in low-load homes. The first step in this investigation was to conduct a review of published literature to identify low-load HVAC technologies available in the United States and abroad, and document the findings of existing case studies that have evaluated the performance of the identified technologies. This report presents the findings of the literature review, identifies gaps in the literature or technical understanding that must be addressed before low-load HVAC technologies can be fully evaluated, and introduces PNNL’s planned research and analysis for this project to address identified gaps and potential future work on residential low-load HVAC systems.

Brown, Scott A.; Thornton, Brian; Widder, Sarah H.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Indoor Humidity Analysis of an Integrated Radiant Cooling and Desiccant Ventilation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiant cooling is credited with improving energy efficiency and enhancing the comfort level as an alternative method of space cooling in mild and dry climates, according to recent research. Since radiant cooling panels lack the capability to remove latent heat, they normally are used in conjunction with an independent ventilation system, which is capable of decoupling the space sensible and latent loads. Condensation concerns limit the application of radiant cooling. This paper studies the dehumidification processes of solid desiccant systems and investigates the factors that affect the humidity levels of a radiantly cooled space. Hourly indoor humidity is simulated at eight different operating conditions in a radiantly cooled test-bed office. The simulation results show that infiltration and ventilation flow rates are the main factors affecting indoor humidity level and energy consumption in a radiantly cooled space with relatively constant occupancy. It is found that condensation is hard to control in a leaky office operated with the required ventilation rate. Slightly pressurizing the space is recommended for radiant cooling. The energy consumption simulation shows that a passive desiccant wheel can recover about 50% of the ventilation load.

Gong, X.; Claridge, D. E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

RESIDENTIAL ON SITE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS: A PROJECT EVALUATION USING THE CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of an On Site Solar Heating System. CML w c6782 Residential On"Site Solar Heating Systems: A ·p-r~jectof an On Site Solar Heating System. Representation of

Schutz, Stephen Richard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cost goals for a residential photovoltaicthermal liquid collector system set in three northern locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares the allowable costs for a residential PV/T liquid collector system with those of both PV-only and side-by-side PV and thermal collector systems. Four types of conventional energy systems provide backup: ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-34045 UC-1600 Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting-uses include Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC). Our analysis uses the modeling framework provided by the HVAC module in the Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS), which was developed

225

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

226

Definition and means of maintaining the ventilation system confinement portion of the PFP safety envelope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant Heating Ventilation and Cooling system provides for the confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and provides for the confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. This document identifies the components and procedures necessary to ensure the HVAC system provides these functions. Appendices E through J provide a snapshot of non-safety class HVAC equipment and need not be updated when the remainder of the document and Appendices A through D are updated.

Dick, J.D.; Grover, G.A.; O`Brien, P.M., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Automated CO2 and VOC-Based Control of Ventilation Systems Under Real-Time Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for shedding or shifting building electric loads in response to real-time prices (RTP) can be significant. Such a strategy provides cost reduction opportunities for commercial building customers as well as load reduction opportunities for electric utilities. This report describes the successful demonstration of an integrated RTP sensor/control system designed to increase the energy efficiency of building ventilation systems, while maintaining indoor air quality via CO2 and volatile organic ...

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based systems research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analytical approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-saving goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Residential Dehumidification Systems Research for Hot-Humid Climates: September 1, 2001 -- December 30, 2003  

SciTech Connect

Twenty homes were tested and monitored in the hot-humid climate of Houston, Texas, U.S.A., to evaluate the humidity control performance and operating cost of six different integrated dehumidification and ventilation systems that could be applied by production homebuilders. Temperature and relative humidity were monitored at four living-space locations and in the conditioned attic where the space-conditioning equipment and air-distribution ducts were located. Equipment operational time was monitored for heating, cooling, dehumidification, and ventilation. Results showed that energy efficiency measures, combined with controlled mechanical ventilation, change the sensible and latent cooling load fractions such that dehumidification separate from the cooling system is required to maintain indoor relative humidity below 60% throughout the year. The system providing the best overall value, including humidity control, first cost, and operating cost, involved a standard dehumidifier located in a hall closet with a louvered door and central-fan-integrated supply ventilation with fan cycling.

Rudd, A. F.; Lstiburek, J. W.; Eng, P.; Ueno, K.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Application of system dynamics, GIS and 3D visualization in a study of residential sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructing and improving urban residential areas is an eternal critical subject in the process of the whole urban development which is connected with a series of challenges and problems. In this paper, firstly DPSIR (Driving Forces-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) ... Keywords: 3D visualization, GIS, cityengine, density map, residential areas, sustainability, system dynamics model

Zhao Xu; Volker Coors

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a comfortable and energy-efficient air conditioning system, the application of floor radiant heating system is used increasingly greatly in the north of China. As a result, the feasibility of floor radiant cooling has gained more attention. To examine the thermodynamic performance of the floor radiant cooling system, we measured the operational conditions including the minimum floor surface temperature, the cooling capacity, and the indoor temperature field distribution under different outdoor temperatures in Beijing. Because the ground temperature changes with the mean temperature of the supplied and returned water and room temperature, the mean temperature of the supplied and retuned water was obtained. Finally, we analyzed the phenomenon of dewing and developed measures for preventing it. The dry air layer near the floor formed by a displacement ventilation system can effectively prevent dews on the surface of the floor in the wet and hot days in summer. In addition, for the sake of the displacement ventilation system, the heat transfer effect between floor and space is enhanced. Our analysis pointed out that floor radiant cooling system combined with displacement ventilation ensures good comfort and energy efficiency.

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL CLIMATES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL on the energy needs of HVAC system. We'll apply the method on the tropical Reunion Island. The methodological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

A genetic rule weighting and selection process for fuzzy control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the use of weighted linguistic fuzzy rules in combination with a rule selection process to develop accurate fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the intelligent control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems concerning ... Keywords: BEMS, building energy management system, FLC, fuzzy logic controller, Fuzzy logic controllers, GA, genetic algorithm, Genetic algorithms, HVAC systems, HVAC, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning, KB, knowledge base, PMV, predicted mean vote index for thermal comfort, Rule selection, Weighted fuzzy rules

Rafael Alcalá; Jorge Casillas; Oscar Cordón; Antonio González; Francisco Herrera

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

Effects of Radiant Barrier Systems on Ventilated Attics in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of side-by-side radiant barrier experiments using two identical 144 ft2 (nominal) test houses are presented. The test houses responded very similarly to weather variations prior to the retrofit. The temperatures of the test houses were controlled to within 0.3°F. Ceiling heat fluxes were within 2 percent for each house. The results showed that a critical attic ventilation flow rate (0.25 CFM/ft2 ) existed after which the percentage reduction produced by the radiant barrier systems was not sensitive to increased airflows. The ceiling heat flux reductions produced by the radiant barrier systems were between 25 and 34 percent, with 28 percent being the reduction observed most often in the presence of attic ventilation. All results presented in this paper were for attics with R-19 unfaced fiberglass insulation and for a perforated radiant barrier with low emissivities on both sides.

Medina, M. A.; O'Neal, D. L.; Turner, W. D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Maintenance and storage of fuel oil for residential heating systems: A guide for residential heating system maintenance personnel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of No. 2 fuel affects the performance of the heating system and is an important parameter in the proper and efficient operation of an oil-burning system. The physical and chemical characteristics of the fuel can affect the flow, atomization and combustion processes, all of which help to define and limit the overall performance of the heating system. The use of chemical additives by fuel oil marketershas become more common as a method of improving the quality of the fuel, especially for handling and storage. Numerous types of additives are available, but reliable information on their effectiveness and proper use is limited. This makes selecting an additive difficult in many situations. Common types of problems that contribute to poor fuel quality and how they affect residential heating equipment are identified inof this booklet. It covers the key items that are needed in an effective fuel quality monitoring program, such as what to look for when evaluating the quality of fuel as it is received from a supplier, or how to assess fuel problems associated with poor storage conditions. References to standard procedures and brief descriptions of the procedures also are given. Approaches for correcting a fuel-related problem, including the potential uses of chemical additives are discussed. Different types of additives are described to help users understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Tips on how to select andeffectively use additives also are included. Finally, the importance of preventative maintenance in any fuel monitoring program is emphasized.

Litzke, Wai-Lin

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

air quality. There are four basic mechanical whole-house ventilation systems -- exhaust, supply, balanced, and energy recovery. Comparison of Whole-House Ventilation Systems...

239

Transition dynamics between the multiple steady states in natural ventilation systems : from theories to applications in optimal controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the multiple steady state behavior, an important observation in numerical and experimental studies in natural ventilation systems. The-oretical models are developed and their applications in ...

Yuan, Jinchao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A systems approach to retrofitting residential HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC System. LBNL 53444. Wendt, R.L. , Ternes, M.P. , O’realized. Other guides (e.g. , Wendt et al. (1997)) are more

McWilliams, J.A.; Walker, I.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in residential selling prices as PV systems increase inhas an effect on the sale price of PV homes (i.e. , a fixedcomparable” homes, sales prices of PV homes are “compared”

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For Residential Wind Systems USDA Farm Bill Grant TheA-20. Taxable USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-A-21. Tax-Exempt USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

''Rancho Hydro'': a low-head, high volume residential hydroelectric power system, Anahola, Kauai, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site is a 1.75 acre residential site with two households. The Anahola stream intersects the property line. Design of the proposed hydroelectric system is described, along with the permit process. Construction is in progress. (DLC)

Harder, J.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

LBNL-54331 1 ASHRAE'S FIRST RESIDENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-54331 1 ASHRAE'S FIRST RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STANDARD1 M. H. Sherman2 , Ph.D. Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT ASHRAE has recently published its first residential ventilation standard, Standard 62 in the report. ASHRAE is continuing to develop and enhance these efforts by using a continuous maintenance

246

Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 1,000 maximum credit per residence, regardless of number of energy devices installed Program Info Start Date 1/1/1995 State Arizona Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 25% Provider Arizona Department of Revenue Arizona's Solar Energy Credit is available to individual taxpayers who install a solar or wind energy device at the taxpayer's Arizona residence. The credit is allowed against the taxpayer's personal income tax in the

247

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $15,000 Fort Collins offers its residential customers low-interest loans that may be used to finance a variety of projects including adding insulation, replacing a furnace, upgrading water and space heating systems, and

248

Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies  

SciTech Connect

In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Study of photovoltaic cost elements. Volume 4. Installation cost model for residential PV systems: users manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative methodology is presented for estimating installation costs of residential photovoltaic systems. The Installation Cost Model for Residential PV Systems is comprised of 144 estimating equations selectively exercised, based on user definition of the system. At the input stage, Residential PV systems can be fully described by 9 design option categories and 9 system specification categories. All assumptions have been validated with installers of solar thermal systems and with TB and A's Architects and Engineers Division. A discussion of the model is included as well as an example of its use with an 8 KW PV system for a Southwest All-Electric Residential design.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A database of PFT ventilation measurements  

SciTech Connect

About five years ago, a method for measuring the ventilation flows of a building was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This method is based on the use of a family of compounds known as perfluorocarbon tracers or PFTs. Since 1982, BNL has measured ventilation in more than 4000 homes, comprising about 100 separate research projects throughout the world. This measurement set is unique in that it is the only set of ventilation measurements that acknowledge and measure the multizone characteristics of residences. Other large measurement sets assume that a home can be treated as a single well-mixed zone. This report describes the creation of a database of approximately half of the PFT ventilation measurements made by BNL over the last five years. The PFT database is currently available for use on any IBM PC or Apple Macintosh based personal computer system. In addition to its utility in modeling indoor pollutant dispersion, this database may also be useful to those people studying energy conservation, thermal comfort and heating system design in residential buildings. 2 refs.

D' Ottavio, T.W.; Goodrich, R.W.; Spandau, D.J.; Dietz, R.N.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fuzzy rule-based methodology for residential load behaviour forecasting during power systems restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inadequate load pickup during power system restoration can lead to overload and underfrequency conditions, and even restart the blackout process, due to thermal energy losses. Thus, load behaviour estimation during restoration is desirable to avoid inadequate ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, energy management systems, fuzzy logic, load behaviour estimation, power system distribution, power system restoration, residential load forecasting, thermostatically controlled loads

Lia Toledo Moreira Mota; Alexandre Assis Mota; Andre Luiz Morelato Franca

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

All Green Residential Solar Energy to Heat Absorption Cooling / Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all-green residential solar to heat absorption cooling / heating system system is designed. It describes the components of the system and working principle, and analyze the prospects of the system and academic value. Finally, To Changsha, for example, ... Keywords: solar, ground-source heat pump, absorption, heat tube

Xu Feng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems for the PS accelerator infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for dismantling, removal and packaging of the existing Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems in the PS tunnel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system--Rankine air conditioner redesign  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single-family heating and cooling system. The objectives discussed are the interim design and schedule status of the Residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetrations on residential retail electricity rates andpresent the residential electricity retail rates resultingelectricity rates. Since G h,resPV , the residential PV

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Multifamily Ventilation - Best Practice? Dianne Griffiths April 29, 2013 Presentation Outline * Basic Objectives * Exhaust Systems * Make-up Air Systems Two Primary Ventilation Objectives 1) Providing Fresh Air - Whole-House 2) Removing Pollutants - Local Exhaust Our goal is to find the simplest solution that satisfies both objectives while minimizing cost and energy impacts. Common Solution: Align local exhaust with fresh air requirements (Ex: 25 Bath + 25 Kitchen) Exhaust-Driven Fresh Air Design * Exhaust slightly depressurizes the units * Outside air enters through leaks, cracks, or planned inlets * Widely used in the North Multifamily Ventilation Best Practice * Step 1: Understand ventilation requirements * Step 2: Select the simplest design that can

259

A multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for an effective tuning of fuzzy logic controllers in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the use of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms to develop smartly tuned fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, energy performance, stability and indoor comfort ... Keywords: Fuzzy logic controllers, Genetic tuning, HVAC systems, Heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, Linguistic 2-tuples representation, Multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, Rule selection

María José Gacto; Rafael Alcalá; Francisco Herrera

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the individual movements towards Net Zero Energy Homes (NZEH) and the SmartGrid converge on residential buildings, three major challenges need to be addressed: Flatten the highly peaked electric load profile of low energy homes Provide easy integration of energy efficiency into existing homes Provide builders and consumers with visibility into building operation, and ease of management. A Home Energy Management System (HEMS) owned by the consumer, capable of two way communications with Utility DR/SmartGrid/AMI is required to resolve these challenges. The HEMS will need to increase energy efficiency of building operations, provide consumers feedback and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torchiere Space heating Air conditioning Electric motorsCommercial Space heating Air conditioning Ventilation GasResidential End Use: Air conditioning Product: Room air

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the electricity price is low and supply energy for usage when the electricity price is high [6], and thereby energy buffering. Figure 3 shows the structure of a typical grid-connected HEES system. Without loss the proposed energy management system is targeting residential usage, we must limit its overall form factor

Pedram, Massoud

263

Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

Lutz, James D.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%–60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

268

Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: $30 - $70 Refrigerator/Freezer: $15 Decommissioned Refrigerator/Freezer: $30 Storage Water Heater: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 - $500 PTSC Duct Sealing: $400 - $500 Insulation: Varies based on R-Value increase and location Air Source Heat Pump (conversion): $1,400 - $1,900 Ductless Heat Pump System: $1,500

269

Independent Oversight Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades, November 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope and Approach .............................................................................................................................. 2

270

Research on Automatically Identification of Diagonal Air-flow Branches of Complex Ventilation System of Coal Mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

air-flow branches identification and stability analysis is one of the core contents of stability and reliability theory of mine ventilation system. This current paper takes deeply research on diagonal air-flow branches. Limitations of the path method ... Keywords: diagonal air-flow branch, path collection, path method, node-position method

Feng Cai, Zegong Liu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Liquid ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For 350 million years, fish have breathed liquid through gills. Mammals evolved lungs to breathe air. Rarely, circumstances can occur when a mammal needs to `turn back the clock' to breathe through a special liquid medium. This is particularly true if surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the lung is increased, as in acute lung injury. In this condition, surface tension increases because the pulmonary surfactant system is damaged, causing alveolar collapse, atelectasis, increased right-to-left shunt and hypoxaemia. 69 The aims of treatment are: (i) to offset increased forces causing lung collapse by applying mechanical ventilation with PEEP; (ii) to decrease alveolar surface tension with exogenous surfactant; (iii) to eliminate the air-liquid interface by filling the lung with a fluid in

U. Kaisers; K. P. Kelly; T. Busch

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of Residential Combined Heat and Power Systems: Application Benefits and Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the benefits of installing a residential combined heat and power (RCHP) plant in several U.S. geographies and under a number of dispatch scenarios. The report also provides an assessment of 14 companies developing or selling RCHP systems in North American, Europe, and Japan.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning units in residential buildings, and are using the central air-conditioning system in residential buildings. To determine the best air conditioning mode, a residential tower building with 22 layers was chosen for analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the central air-conditioning system and the residential multi-unit air-conditioning equipment system and the LiBr absorption chiller were compared based on calculating the first-cost and the annual cost (according to providing cooling 90 days annually). The predicted results show the economical feasibility of using the refrigerating units in air-conditioning systems in Beijing region, and point out the developing directions for the future.

Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California  

SciTech Connect

An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

Dennehy, G

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based system research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analysis approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-savings goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Modelica Library for Building Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a freely available Modelica library for building heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The library is based on the Modelica.Fluid library. It has been developed to support research and development of integrated building energy and control systems. The primary applications are controls design, energy analysis and model-based operation. The library contains dynamic and steady-state component models that are applicable for analyzing fast transients when designing control algorithms and for conducting annual simulations when assessing energy performance. For most models, dimensional analysis is used to compute the performance for operating points that differ from nominal conditions. This allows parameterizing models in the absence of detailed geometrical information which is often impractical to obtain during the conceptual design phase of building systems. In the first part of this paper, the library architecture and the main classes are described. In the second part, an example is presented in which we implemented a model of a hydronic heating system with thermostatic radiator valves and thermal energy storage.

Wetter, Michael

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Assessment of Advanced Air Purification Technologies: Filtration and Hybrid Systems for Residential and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air contaminants, such as microorganisms, allergens, environmental tobacco smoke, and volatile organic compounds, can cause health- and productivity-related problems for the occupants of the indoor space. Children, elderly adults, and people with deficient immune systems are especially likely to be affected by contaminated air. There are three primary measures to control indoor air contamination. The first is to eliminate the contaminant source. The second is to control ventilation within the spac...

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

The use of linear systems analysis to identify the residential/utility relationship  

SciTech Connect

There is little doubt that there will be significant changes to future residential electric loads and these changes will have a significant impact on the efficiency with which a utility meets its overall load demand. Changes to the residential load will come about, in part, due to residential growth and increased market penetration of alternate energy sources such as solar space heating. In view of these inevitable changes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools to assess their impact. To date, effective analytical tools include computer simulations and load duration analysis. Computer simulation methods are generally very powerful but require substantial computer, personnel, and financial resources which may put this method of analysis out of the reach of many utilities and systems analysts. In addition, detailed computer simulations have a tendency to obscure insight into the problem. Load duration analysis does provide good insight into the problem, but oftentimes must resort to simulation results if correlations exist between utility load curves and the modified residential curve. One analytical method which has not been exploited to its fullest potential is the use of linear systems analysis to solve this type of problem.

Baer, C.A.; Winn, C.B.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Consumers Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Consumers Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Home Performance Comprehensive Assessment and Installations: $3500 Insulation: $1,025 Windows: $250 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting: Retailer Instant Discount Programmable Thermostat: $10 Central A/C and Heat Pumps: $150 - $250 Central A/C Tune up: $50 Ground Source Heat Pump: $200-$300

284

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Test and Evaluation of a High Efficiency Residential Fuel Cell System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers, including the availability of low-cost natural gas, is creating new market opportunities for natural gas-based distributed generation. Solid oxide fuel cell systems (SOFC) are a potentially attractive option because of their high electrical efficiency (50–60% lower heating value (LHV)). This report documents two years of testing and evaluation of a 1.5 kW SOFC residential system provided by Ceramics Fuel Cell Limited. Tests were conducted in collaboration with ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Numerical Simulation of a Displacement Ventilation System with Multi-heat Sources and Analysis of Influential Factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation (DV) is a promising ventilation concept due to its high ventilation efficiency. In this paper, the application of the CFD method, the velocity and temperature fields of three-dimensional displacement ventilation systems with double heat sources are numerically simulated. The model is verified by experimental data. The results of the study show that thermal stratification characteristics exist in indoor temperature fields. The paper also analyzes the influence of different influential factors, e.g., the distance between heat sources, temperature of heat source, heat characteristics of the wall and outdoor temperature. It was found that the human requirement for comfort is satisfied easily when the distance between heat sources is long. Under the conditions simulated in this paper, when the distance was more than 0.8m, the temperature distribution tended to be average and steady, and it did not change as the distance changed. Second, the temperature change of the thermal current has a large influence on the indoor temperature. The rise in thermal current temperature makes the vertical temperature gradient in the room increase. The upper temperature of the room becomes higher, as does the height of the high temperature air level that lies in the upper part of the room. Finally, both the heat loss of the surrounding structure and the change in outdoor temperature have a large influence on indoor temperature. However, it does not influence the thermal stratification characteristics of DV. The only thing that has changed is the thermal stratification height.

Wu, X.; Gao, J.; Wu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

IMPACTS OF REFRIGERANTLINE LENGTH ON SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IN RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS USING REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on system efficiency of excess refrigerant line length are calculated for an idealized residential heating and cooling system. By excess line length is meant refrigerant tubing in excess of the 25 R provided for in standard equipment efficiency test methods. The purpose of the calculation is to provide input for a proposed method for evaluating refrigerant distribution system efficiency. A refrigerant distribution system uses refrigerant (instead of ducts or pipes) to carry heat and/or cooling effect from the equipment to the spaces in the building in which it is used. Such systems would include so-called mini-splits as well as more conventional split systems that for one reason or another have the indoor and outdoor coils separated by more than 25 ft. This report performs first-order calculations of the effects on system efficiency, in both the heating and cooling modes, of pressure drops within the refrigerant lines and of heat transfer between the refrigerant lines and the space surrounding them.

ANDREWS, J.W.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

289

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $250 - Residential; $750 (Commercial) Insulation: up to $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Water Heater Blanket: $20 per unit Radiant/Thermal Barrier Material: $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Duct Repair/Replacement: $500

290

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For detached residential buildings located in the tropics, it is more challenging and difficult to deal with the space cooling load due to hot and humid climates. In this paper, daily and monthly computer simulations of solar heat gain and cooling load for a detached residential building are carried out using Design Builder software. Different glazing systems ranging from single glazed clear glass to double glaze with electro chromic reflective colored have been analyzed in terms of their impact on solar heat gain and cooling load. The simulation results show reductions in solar heat gain, cooling load and better thermal comfort can be achieved using proper glazing systems for a specific orientation of the building. The significance of these results stems from the fact that they are obtained under local weather conditions, a matter of importance to building architects, designers, contractors, and builders as well as air conditioning equipment manufacturers.

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:  

SciTech Connect

A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; McDowell, T. P. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Pahud, D. [University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland; Hellstrom, G. [Lund University

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

294

Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualitatively during air-sealing work to assess progresssealing or for separation of the supply and return systems at the airby poor sealing or seal failure during the test. Air leakage

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Waste tank 241-SY-101 dome airspace and ventilation system response to a flammable gas plume burn  

SciTech Connect

A series of flammable gas plume burn and transient pressure analyses have been completed for a nuclear waste tank (241-SY-101) and associated tank farm ventilation system at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford facility. The subject analyses were performed to address issues concerning the effects of transient pressures resulting from igniting a small volume of concentrated flammable gas just released from the surface of the waste as a plume and before the flammable gas concentration could be reduced by mixing with the dome airspace by local convection and turbulent diffusion. Such a condition may exist as part of an in progress episode gas release (EGR) or gas plume event. The analysis goal was to determine the volume of flammable gas that if burned within the dome airspace would result in a differential pressure, after propagating through the ventilation system, greater than the current High Efficiency Particulate Filter (HEPA) limit of 2.49 KPa (10 inches of water or 0. 36 psi). Such a pressure wave could rupture the tank ventilation system inlet and outlet HEPA filters leading to a potential release of contaminants to the environment

Heard, F.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Optimal Dispatch of Photovoltaic Inverters in Residential Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- fined limit. The premise for these active power curtailment (APC) strategies is that the resistance method for determining the active- and reactive-power set points for PV inverters in resi- dential. Index Terms--Distribution networks, inverter control, photo- voltaic systems, optimal power flow

Giannakis, Georgios

300

Measured Performance of California Buydown Program Residential PV Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, on average, 62 percent of nominal DC module size. For non-tracking systems, average annual energy production annual energy production per unit of nominal DC module size is approximately 1,100 kWh/year. Both Economic Research, Inc. Sanford Miller, California Energy Commission ABSTRACT More than two thousand small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Utilities offer photovoltaic systems to remote residential customers  

SciTech Connect

From Idaho to Arizona and Nevada to Colorado, utilities across the U.S. are beginning to offer remote homeowners an option that may seem unusual today, but might be commonplace in the future. Would-be customers who do not live close to the electric grid may choose the option of photovoltaic (PV) systems to supply their electricity as an alternative to expensive line extension. These customers typically live and/or farm in rural sections of the country. Others own vacation homes far from towns or cities. Solar-powered energy systems have already proven successful for powering pumps to water livestock, and for lights and communications devices in locations far from established sources of electricity. Rather than receiving the customary electric bill for metered service, customers will pay a set rate to use the PV system, which the utility will own and maintain. The initial cost of purchasing the system can be much lower than extending the utility line (which can cost $20,000 a mile). From the utility's standpoint, it saves on investing in lines that stand to generate small profits because of the small load and resultant energy sales.

Van Arsdall, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Method and system for regulating peak residential power demand  

SciTech Connect

A temperature monitoring system that monitors temperature outside the residence and a supply system responsive to the monitoring system that controls the supply of electrical power to major home appliances such as air conditioning devices, food preparation devices, clothes drying devices, and water heating devices is described. The major home appliances are arranged in pairs and connected to a main power distribution system in these pair arrangements through a load dispatcher including continuity sensitive switches. The appliances are continuously connected to the electrical power distribution system when the outdoor temperature is below a predetermined value. However, when the outdoor temperature exceeds the predetermined value, the continuity switches then control the supply of power to the appliances by supplying power to one of the appliances to the exclusion of the other in each pair arrangement. Whenever electrical power is not being supplied to one of the appliances in the pair arrangement requiring power, the other of the appliances is supplied with electrical power. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the outdoor temperature is monitored and controls the operation of an air conditioning unit. When the outdoor temperature exceeds a predetermined value, the air conditioner is cycled between on and off conditions on a timed, periodic basis without regard to the temperature inside the residence at least until the temperature outside the residence drops below the predetermined value. The air conditioner may be cycled between on and off conditions on the periodic basis until the outdoor temperature drops a predetermined amount below the predetermined value, for example, drops at least 5/sup 0/ or 6/sup 0/ below the predetermined value. 12 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures.

Dixon, W.A.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

303

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VENTILATION (HVAC) FAILURE (BUILDING WIDE) A failure or shutdown of the ventilation system will be signaled by cessation of the audible background "rumbling" sound of the building's HVAC system. As building durations. NOTE: Due to unpredictable pressure differentials in and around the labs during an HVAC failure

Strynadka, Natalie

304

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

305

Inverter control systems in the residential heat pump air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A compressor capacity control with an inverter has been considered from the viewpoint of high energy saving in a refrigerating cycle. However, the system has not been put into practical use because of high initial cost, technical problems of electronic parts, and complexity of system control. In this connection, we developed the new inverter-controlled heat-pump air conditioner by using the latest electronics and refrigeration technology. This paper discusses the trend of energy saving in air conditioners in Japan and the objectives of developing the inverter controlled air conditioner. It also discusses the following items with respect to the inverter controlled air conditioner and the effects of employing an inverter: 1. Inverter for air conditioning; 2. Refrigeration cycle; 3. Air conditioner control with inverter.

Shimma, Y.; Tateuchi, T.; Suglura, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Descriptions and diagrams of the primary and annulus ventilation systems of the double-shell tank farms as of January 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of information describing the ventilation systems of the Double-Shell Tank farms (214-AN, -AP, -AW, -AW, -AY, -AZ, and -SY). A general description of the primary tank and annulus ventilation systems is given along with specific information on the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, condensers, preheaters, exhaust fans, and piping. This information is considered to be current as of January 1988. 38 refs, 20 figs, 30 tabs.

Blackman, A.E.; Waters, E.D.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Liberty Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: $4000 Program Info Funding Source NH Saves State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®: up to $4,000 for improvements ENERGY STAR® Homes Qualification: custom incentives and technical support

309

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Home Performance Retrofit: 400 ENERGY STAR Qualified Home Designation: 800 Air Conditioner: 400 - 500; varies depending on SEER rating Provider Empire District Electric Company The Empire District Electric Company offers rebates for customers who

310

Innovative Energy Efficient Industrial Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper was written to describe an innovative “on-demand” industrial ventilation system for woodworking, metalworking, food processing, pharmaceutical, chemical, and other industries. Having analyzed existing industrial ventilation in 130 factories, we found striking dichotomy between the classical “static” design of ventilation systems and constantly changing workflow and business demands. Using data from real factories, we are able to prove that classical industrial ventilation design consumes 70 % more energy than necessary. Total potential electricity saving achieved by using on-demand systems instead of classically designed industrial ventilation in the U.S. could be 26 billion kWh. At the average electricity cost of 7 cents per kWh, this would represent $1.875 billion. Eighty such systems are already installed in the USA and European Union.

Litomisky, A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

313

Whole-House Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation Whole-House Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 2:37pm Addthis A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. A whole-house ventilation system with dedicated ducting in a new energy-efficient home. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/brebca. What does this mean for me? Whole-house ventilation is critical in an energy-efficient home to maintain adequate indoor air quality and comfort. The whole-house ventilation system you choose will depend upon your climate, budget, and the availability of experienced contractors in your area. Energy-efficient homes -- both new and existing -- require mechanical ventilation to maintain indoor air quality. There are four basic mechanical

314

Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries-$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeo wners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions-primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders-if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries-$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeo wners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions-primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders-if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

A Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Executive Summary of a report that presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries--$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeowners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions--primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders--if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

System Performance Measurement Supports Design Recommendations for Solar Ventilation Preheat System (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical briefing to report the outcomes of a data monitoring effort to determine the nature of solar vent preheat system performance problems at a U.S. military installation. The analysis reports up-to-date research and findings regarding system design, helping to clarify the issue as a factor of system design, rather than a shortcoming of SVP systems.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Evaluation of aerial thermography to discriminate loft insulation in residential housing .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the use of aerial thermography data to discriminate loft (attic) insulation levels in residential housing, with ventilated pitched roofs, in the UK.… (more)

Allinson, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ductwork: not specified Thermostats: not specified Ductless Heat Pump: $4,000 Air Source Heat Pump: $7,000 Geothermal Heat Pump: $8,000 Air Sealing: up to $800 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Windows and Insulation: not specified Ductwork: not specified

320

El Paso Electric Company - Residential Solutions Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solutions Program Residential Solutions Program El Paso Electric Company - Residential Solutions Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Solutions Program: $425/kW saved Low-Income Solutions Program: $576/kW saved Provider El Paso Electric Company '''The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program funding has been expended in Texas for 2012. New funding will be available January 1, 2013. ''' The El Paso Electric Residential Solutions Program offers El Paso Electric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Electric Water Heater: $25 - $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $25 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 - $1,500 Air Source Heat Pump: $1,000

322

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) Texas-New Mexico Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate 20% of TNMP's annual Residential Standard Offer Program incentive budget Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Rated Home Builders: Custom Residential Large and Small Projects: $260; $0.08/kWh reduction

323

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Title An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hoen, Ben, Ryan H. Wiser, Peter Cappers, and Mark Thayer Pagination 60 Date Published 04/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, property values, public acceptance Abstract The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of the literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of the contribution of six renewable energy (RE) sources to the mitigation of climate change. It is intended to provide policy relevant information to governments, intergovernmental processes and other interested parties. This Summary for Policymakers provides an overview of the SRREN, summarizing the essential findings. The SRREN consists of 11 chapters. Chapter 1 sets the context for RE and climate change; Chapters 2 through 7 provide information on six RE technologies, and Chapters 8 through 11 address integrative issues. References to chapters and sections are indicated with corresponding chapter and section numbers in square brackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used in this SPM can be found in the glossary of the SRREN (Annex I).Conventions and methodologies for determining costs, primary energy and other topics of analysis can be found in Annex II and Annex III. This report communicates uncertainty where relevant.

325

Energy Efficient Ventilation for Maintaining Indoor Air Quality in Large Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper was presented at the 3rd International Conference on Cold Climate Heating, Ventilating and Air-conditioning, Sapporo, Japan, November 2000 C. Y. Shaw Rsum Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council Canada Achieving good indoor air quality in large residential and commercial buildings continues to be a top priority for owners, designers, building managers and occupants alike. Large buildings present a greater challenge in this regard than do smaller buildings and houses. The challenge is greater today because there are many new materials, furnishings, products and processes used in these buildings that are potential sources of air contaminants. There are three strategies for achieving acceptable indoor air quality: ventilation (dilution), source control and air cleaning/filtration. Of the three, the most frequently used strategy, and in most cases the only one available to building operators, is ventilation. Ventilation is the process of supplying outdoor air to an enclosed space and removing stale air from this space. It can control the indoor air quality by both diluting the indoor air with less contaminated outdoor air and removing the indoor contaminants with the exhaust air. Ventilation costs money because the outdoor air needs to be heated in winter and cooled in summer. To conserve energy, care must be taken to maximize the efficiency of the ventilation system. In this regard, a number of factors come into play

C. Y. Shaw; C. Y. Shaw Résumé

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Markets and Policy Group * Energy Analysis Department Energy Markets and Policy Group * Energy Analysis Department An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Ben Hoen, Peter Cappers, Mark Thayer, Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL Webinar June 9 th , 2011 This work was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under Contract No. DEK-8883050, and by the Clean Energy States Alliance.

327

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineers, Atlanta, GA.  (1993)  ASTM, Standard E1827?96, “Standard Test Methods for Determining Airtightness of Door”,  ASTM  Book  of  Standards,  American  Society  of 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals.    (While we could References  ASHRAE  Handbook  of  Fundamentals,  Ch  27, 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

together with measured solar radiation in the weather data.simulations were as follows: Direct solar radiation (W/ m )Total horizontal solar radiation (W/m 2 ) Outdoor air dry-

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Indoor Air Quality, ASHRAE Trans.   97(2), pp896?Indoor Air Quality”  ASHRAE Trans.  pp 93?101 Vol.  111 (I) Energy  Characteristics”,  ASHRAE  Transactions, Vol.103 (

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although geographically in Climate Zone 3, the weather inMoraga is more like Climate Zone 12 – so the CZ 12 weatherin three California climate zones. Climate The study focuses

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air heat transmission due to thermal conductance and the difference in indoor and outdoor temperatures) was taken from ACM

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Residential- Integrated- Ventilation- Controller-(RIVEC)-  

individual-home,-taking-into-account-size,-number-of-rooms-and- climate.-Field- tests- have- demonstrated- that- RIVEC- can-

334

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weightavg_rates.html California Energy Commission. 2005. “of Regulations: California's Energy Efficiency Standards forBuildings. ” California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA.

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Assessment of Energy Savings Potential from the Use of Demand Control Ventilation Systems in General Office Spaces in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonresidential ACM Manual 2.0.3 Outdoor Air Ventilation ACM Manual 3   Table 4 – Minimum Outdoor Air

Hong, Tianzhen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Integrated emissions control system for residential CWS furnace. Final report, September 20, 1989--March 20, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to the successful development and commercialization of a coal-fired residential furnace is the need for a reliable, cost-effective emission control system. Tecogen is developing a novel, integrated control system to control NO{sub x}SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. At the heart of this system is a unique emissions control reactor for the control of SO{sub 2}. This reactor provides high sorbent particle residence time within the reactor while doing so in a very compact geometry. Final cleanup of any fine particulates exiting the reactor including respirable-sized particulates, is completed with the use of high efficiency bag filters. Under a previous contract with PETC (Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79650), Tecogen developed a residential-scale Coal Water Slurry (CWS) combustor to control NO{sub x}emission. This combustor makes use of centrifugal forces, set up by a predominantly tangential flow field, to separate and confine larger unburned coal particles in the furnace upper chamber. Various partitions are used to retard the axial, downward flow of these particles, and thus maximize their residence time in the hottest section of the combustor. By operating this combustor under staged conditions, the local stoichiometry in the primary zone can be controlled in such a manner as to minimize NO{sub x} emission.

Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro–cogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fuelled by Diesel and Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the performance of a residential micro–cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine and fuelled by diesel and ethanol. An extensive number of… (more)

Farra, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ventilating En- Air Conditioning Comfort: Behavioral andRefrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Jul 2001.Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning [29] R. Howell, H. Sauer,

Jang, Jaehwi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot WaterDistribution Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential single family building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include; the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy needed to reheat water that was already heated once before. Average losses of water are estimated to be 6.35 gallons (24.0 L) per day. (This is water that is rundown the drain without being used while waiting for hot water.) The amount of wasted hot water has been calculated to be 10.9 gallons (41.3L) per day. (This is water that was heated, but either is not used or issued after it has cooled off.) A check on the reasonableness of this estimate is made by showing that total residential hot water use averages about 52.6 gallons (199 L) per day. This indicates about 20 percent of average daily hot water is wasted.

Lutz, James

2005-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Summary of human responses to ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coils of commercial air-conditioning systems. Proceedings ofrefrigerating and air-conditioning engineers, inc. pp 601-for ventilation and air-conditioning systems - offices and

Seppanen, Olli A.; Fisk, William J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Performance of a grid connected residential photovoltaic system with energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995, Salt River Project (SRP), a public power utility located in Phoenix, Arizona, collaborated with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to initiate a photovoltaic (PV) power system with battery energy storage to match PV output with residential customer peak energy demand periods. The PV power system, a 2.4kW PV array with 25.2kWh of energy storage, was designed and installed by Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI) at an SRP-owned facility, known as the Chandler Research House during August 1995. This paper presents an overview of the system design, operation and performance. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Palomino, G.E. [SRP, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wiles, J. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goodman, F. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Overview of existing residential energy-efficiency rating systems and measuring tools  

SciTech Connect

Three categories of rating systems/tools were identified: prescriptive, calculational, and performance. Prescriptive systems include rating systems that assign points to various conservation features. Most systems that have been implemented to date have been prescriptive systems. The vast majority of these are investor-owned utility programs affiliated with the National Energy Watch program of the Edison Electric Institute. The calculational category includes computational tools that can be used to estimate energy consumption. This estimate could then be transformed, probably by indexing, into a rating. The available computational tools range from very simple to complex tools requiring use of a main-frame computer. Performance systems refer to residential energy-efficiency ratings that are based on past fuel consumption of a home. There are few of these systems. For each identified system/tool, the name, address, and telephone number of the developer is included. In addition, relevant publications discussing the system/tool are cited. The extent of field validation/verification of individual systems and tools is discussed. In general, there has been little validation/verification done. A bibliography of literature relevant to the use and implementation of a home energy rating system is also included.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Utility-impacts assessment of residential passive-solar systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a project undertaken to provide the electric-utility industry with a tool to use in analyzing the advantages and disadvantages for themselves and their customers of passive-solar residential construction within their service areas. A methodology to accomplish this was created and then tested in cooperation with seven participating utilities. Results indicate that passive solar homes and well-insulated homes are more economic to both utilities and homeowners than conventional homes insulated to ASHRAE 90-75 standards, still the norm for building construction in many parts of the country. Further indications are that passive-solar homes may have lower life-cycle costs for heating and cooling than well-insulated homes in areas of the country where the annual heating load predominates over the annual cooling load, and where there is an adequate amount of sunshine during the heating season. The methodology developed also has the capability of simulating and comparing the performance of a wide variety of non-solar electrical heating and cooling systems. As a result, it can be adapted by utilities for a broad range of residential energy analyses.

Wood, R.A.; Siegel, M.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Lighting: Purchases limited to 20 CFLs per customer per year Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $70 (limit of 2 per customer per program year) Program Info Funding Source Illinois Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Builder Incentives: Contact ComEd Lighting: In-store discount

346

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Georgia Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Oglethorpe Power Corporation: $5,500 Electric Cities of Georgia: up to $5,000 Municipal Gas Authority of Georgia: up to $5,000 Estes Heating and Air (Statewide): $10,000 The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) encourages Georgians to

347

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Public Response to Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: A Qualitative Market Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The early adopters of residential grid-tied photovoltaics (PV) have complex motivations to pay today's costs, including altruistic, environmental, and financial reasons. Focused interviews were conducted with a self-selected purposive sample interested in purchasing 2-kW or 3-kW PV systems with an installed cost of $8,000 to $12,000. The sample tended to be men or married couples ranging in age from their early thirties to their mid-eighties; professionals, managers, or small business owners; relatively financially secure, with experience with energy efficiency and renewable energy. Product attributes they preferred were net metering, warranties, guarantees, utility financing, maintenance, an option to own or lease, a battery option, and an aesthetically pleasing system. Potential PV customers needed more information before making a purchase decision.

Farhar, B. C.; Buhrmann, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

350

Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators/Freezers: $25 Electric Water Heaters: $25 Clothes Washers: $30 - $80 Recycle Refrigerator/Freezer: $25 Duct Sealing/Testing: $150 - $400 Heat Pump: $500 Ductless Heat Pump: $1,000 Insulation: 50% (100% for qualified low income customers) Provider Springfield Utility Board

351

Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Duct Repair: $300 Ceiling Fan: 3 fans Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room A/C: $50 Central A/C: $100/ton High Performance windows: $1/sq ft Air Duct Repair: 50% of repair cost Ceiling Fan: $20 Whole House Fan: $100

352

Flint Energies - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flint Energies - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Flint Energies - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Flint Energies - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heating Heat Pumps Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate $7,500 Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $7,500 Flint Energies has partnered with Robins Federal Credit Union to offer affordable financing options to residential customers who wish to upgrade the energy efficiency of homes and residential equipment. Loans of $1,000

353

Kissimmee Utility Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kissimmee Utility Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate One piece of equipment or measure per customer, per year Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct Leak Repair: $75 HVAC Maintenance: $50 HVAC Replacement: $225 Insulation: $100 CFL/LED Lamp: $15/lamp Provider Senior Energy Conservation Specialist Kissimmee Utility Authority (KUA) offers several rebates to residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Residential customers can

354

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization - Single Family: 75% of cost Weatherization - Multi-Family: 50% of cost Weatherization - Low-Income: 100% of cost Furnaces: $500 - $800 Boilers: $1,000 - $1,500 Combined Boiler/Water Heater: $1,200

355

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at wholesale prices), the residential PV generation2: Wholesale prices and TOU periods for 15% PV scenario (seeerodes wholesale prices at times when PV generates

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from ResidentialPENETRATIONS ON ELECTRICITY BILL SAVINGS FROM RESIDENTIALBill Savings In this paper, we have chosen two compensation mechanisms for electricity

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Home Energy SavingsCentral Program offers customers rebates of up to $700 on energy efficient equipment and measures for residential gas customers who upgrade heating, cooling or ventilation...

358

Residential Sector End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1: Summary Input Assumptions and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Koomey. 1994. Residential Appliance Data, Assumptions andunits) Table A 3 : Number of Appliances in Existing Homes (sector, including appliances and heating, ventilation, and

Koomey, Jonathan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4476E 4476E An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Ben Hoen, Ryan Wiser, Peter Cappers and Mark Thayer Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2011 Download from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-4476e.pdf This work was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under Contract No. DEK-8883050, and by the Clean Energy States Alliance. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government.

360

Meeting Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment Expert Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Final Report on the Expert Meeting for DIAGNOSTIC AND PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK FOR RESIDENTIAL SPACE CONDITIONING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT Building Science Corporation Industry Team 15 July 2010 Work Performed Under Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FC26-08NT00601 Submitted By: Building Science Corporation 30 Forest Street Somerville, MA 02143 Principal Investigators: Joseph W. Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng. ASHRAE Fellow Betsy Pettit, FAIA Phone Number: 978-589-5100 Fax Number: 978-589-5103 E-Mail: joe@buildingscience.com E-Mail: betsy@buildingscience.com Submitted To: U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PM: Rob Martinez E-Mail: Rob.Martinez@NETL.DOE.GOV EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Title: Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for

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361

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

364

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Available Technologies: Ventilation Controller for Improved Indoor ...  

Iain Walker and colleagues at Berkeley Lab have developed a dynamic control system for whole-house ventilation fans that provides maximal air quality while reducing ...

366

Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

Johnston, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

369

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP System for Residential Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECR International and its joint venture company, Climate Energy, are at the forefront of the effort to deliver residential-scale combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) products to the USA market. Part of this substantial program is focused on the development of a new class of steam expanders that offers the potential for significantly lower costs for small-scale power generation technology. The heart of this technology is the scroll expander, a machine that has revolutionized the HVAC refrigerant compressor industry in the last 15 years. The liquid injected cogeneration (LIC) technology is at the core of the efforts described in this report, and remains an excellent option for low cost Micro-CHP systems. ECR has demonstrated in several prototype appliances that the concept for LIC can be made into a practical product. The continuing challenge is to identify economical scroll machine designs that will meet the performance and endurance requirements needed for a long life appliance application. This report describes the numerous advances made in this endeavor by ECR International. Several important advances are described in this report. Section 4 describes a marketing and economics study that integrates the technical performance of the LIC system with real-world climatic data and economic analysis to assess the practical impact that different factors have on the economic application of Micro-CHP in residential applications. Advances in the development of a working scroll steam expander are discussed in Section 5. A rigorous analytical assessment of the performance of scroll expanders, including the difficult to characterize impact of pocket to pocket flank leakage, is presented in Section 5.1. This is followed with an FEA study of the thermal and pressure induced deflections that would result from the normal operation of an advanced scroll expander. Section 6 describes the different scroll expanders and test fixtures developed during this effort. Another key technical challenge to the development of a long life LIC system is the development of a reliable and efficient steam generator. The steam generator and support equipment development is described in Section 7. Just one year ago, ECR International announced through its joint venture company, Climate Energy, that it was introducing to the USA market a new class of Micro-CHP product using the state-of-the-art Honda MCHP gas fired internal combustion (IC) engine platform. We now have installed Climate Energy Micro-CHP systems in 20 pilot demonstration sites for the 2005/2006 heating season. This breakthrough success with IC engine based systems paves the way for future advanced steam cycle Micro-CHP systems to be introduced.

Karl Mayer

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

371

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering will be available in the U.S. is unclear. Third, these products are typically not designed for use in households having forced hot-air heating, which is the dominant heating system in the U.S. The U.S. market will also require a major manufacturer that has the reputation and brand recognition, low-cost manufacturing capability, distribution, sales, and service infrastructure, and marketing power to achieve significant market size with a previously unknown and unproven product. History has proven time and time again that small-to-medium-size manufacturers do not have the resources and capabilities to achieve significant markets with such products. During the Phase I effort, the Team developed a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system that addresses key DOE and U.S. market needs: (1) Provides emergency power adequate for critical household loads, with none of the key drawbacks associated with typical, low-cost emergency generators, such as liquid fuel storage, inability to power ''hard-wired'' loads, need to run temporary extension cords for plug loads, manual set up required, susceptibility to overload, and risk of failure due to lack of maintenance and infrequent operation; (2) Requires no special skills to install--plumbers, electricians and HVAC technicians will typically have all necessary skills; (3) Can be used with the major residential fuels in the U.S., including natural gas and propane, and can be easily adapted to fuel oil as well as emerging fuels as they become available; and (4) Significantly reduces household energy consumption and energy costs.

Robert A. Zogg

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

An assessment of a partial pit ventilation system to reduce emission under slatted floor - Part 1: Scale model study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of ammonia and greenhouse gases from naturally ventilated livestock houses cause contamination of the surrounding atmospheric environment. Requests to reduce ammonia emissions from livestock farms are growing in Denmark. It is assumed that ... Keywords: Livestock, Pit ventilation, Scale model, Slatted floor, Tracer gas, Wind tunnel

Wentao Wu; Peter Kai; Guoqiang Zhang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Residential Humidity Control Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Humidity Control Strategies Residential Humidity Control Strategies Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control goals  Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality  Control indoor humidity year-around, just like we do temperature  Durability and customer satisfaction  Reduce builder risk and warranty/service costs 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control challenges 1. In humid cooling climates, there will always be times of the year when there is little sensible cooling load to create thermostat demand but humidity remains high * Cooling systems that modify fan speed and temperature set point based on humidity can help but are still limited

374

Residential on site solar heating systems: a project evaluation using the capital asset pricing model  

SciTech Connect

An energy source ready for immediate use on a commercial scale is solar energy in the form of On Site Solar Heating (OSSH) systems. These systems collect solar energy with rooftop panels, store excess energy in water storage tanks and can, in certain circumstances, provide 100% of the space heating and hot water required by the occupants of the residential or commercial structure on which the system is located. Such systems would take advantage of a free and inexhaustible energy source--sunlight. The principal drawback of such systems is the high initial capital cost. The solution would normally be a carefully worked out corporate financing plan. However, at the moment it is individual homeowners and not corporations who are attempting to finance these systems. As a result, the terms of finance are excessively stringent and constitute the main obstacle to the large scale market penetration of OSSH. This study analyzes the feasibility of OSSH as a private utility investment. Such systems would be installed and owned by private utilities and would displace other investment projects, principally electric generating plants. The return on OSSH is calculated on the basis of the cost to the consumer of the equivalent amount of electrical energy that is displaced by the OSSH system. The hurdle rate for investment in OSSH is calculated using the Sharpe--Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model. The results of this study indicate that OSSH is a low risk investment having an appropriate hurdle rate of 7.9%. At this rate, OSSH investment appears marginally acceptable in northern California and unambiguously acceptable in southern California. The results also suggest that utility investment in OSSH should lead to a higher degree of financial leverage for utility companies without a concurrent deterioration in the risk class of utility equity.

Schutz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ventilation Model and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

V. Chipman

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Design of a tube bank waste heat reclaimer for residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Forced convection tube bank heat reclaimers are analyzed in detail for residential natural gas and oil-fired furnaces that are controlled by natural draft. Optimum reclaimer designs are obtained based on improved system efficiency, and considerations regarding manufacturing costs. Each reclaimer meets safety restrictions regarding allowable system pressure losses and minimum chimney gas temperatures. Reclaimer size and overall weight are also considered. Computer-generated solutions aid in determining heat recovery as a function of furnace fuel, furnace efficiency, ambient temperature, flue pipe size, and chimney height. The analysis considers a range of furnace efficiencies from 50 to 80%, and ambient temperatures from 0 to 60/sup 0/F, which are values considered typical for most domestic combustion heating equipment. Flue pipe sizes range from 4 to 6 inches in diameter and are 2 to 4 feet long. Chimney sizes range from 5 to 7 inches in equivalent diameter and include draft heights from 15 to 35 feet. The piping sizes correspond to furnace input capacities ranging from 50,000 to 170,000 Btu/h. For many domestic heating systems, the potential exists to recover the lost heat by as much as 30%, and to reduce fuel costs by as much as 15% by installing a flue pipe heat reclaimer.

Gretsinger, K.M.; Elias, T.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the Topical Report documenting the first year of work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under US Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project is being conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser Company, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August, 2002 through October, 2003. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that will monitor long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. In the first year WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, and installed instrumentation in the test walls. By the end of the contract period described in this document, WSU was recording data from the test wall specimens. The experiment described in this report will continue through December, 2005. Each year a number of reports will be published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results will be made available to the building industry by industry partners and the University cooperators.

Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2  

SciTech Connect

The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

382

An economic analysis of grid-connected residential solar photovoltaic power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of the utility grid-connected residential market for photovoltaics is examined from a user-ownership perspective. The price is calculated at which the user would be economically indifferent between

Carpenter, Paul R.

383

Delivering tons to the register: Energy efficient design and operation of residential cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sealing the attic. Introduction Residential central airsealing, refrigerant charge addition, and correction of reduced airsealing the attic and insulating the roof) is a practical way to improve air

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in thePV from residential Other RE CSP + storage PV Wind Referencesolar PV, wind, and solar CSP, respectively (all costs are

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Policy Office of Drinking Water Title: Two-connection Residential Water System Number: P A.13 – Administration References: WAC 246-291-030(3) Supersedes: P A.13 Two Connection Residential Public Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Drinking Water policies are written descriptions of the approach taken by the Office to implement a statute, regulation, court order, or other agency order, and may include the Office’s current practice, procedure, or method of action based on that approach. Any generally applicable directives or criteria that provide the basis for imposing penalties or sanctions, or for granting or denying Office approvals, must either be in statute or established in a rule. PURPOSE The Office of Drinking Water will waive all water system requirements for water systems with only two-residential connections, where each connection is a single family home. NOTE: This policy does not prevent a local health jurisdiction from regulating two-connection residential water systems. DIRECTION When individuals propose a water system with only two residential connections, where each connection is only a single family home, the Office of Drinking Water will provide a copy of this policy and notice which states the Office of Drinking Water has waived the requirements of chapter 246-291 WAC. The Office of Drinking Water will direct individuals to check with their local

Contact Karen Valenzuela; Denise A. Clifford; Office Of Drinking Water

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transpired Collectors (Solar Preheaters for Outdoor Ventilation Air)--023385m FTA collectors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Federal Technology Alert describes transpired collectors or solar preheaters for outdoor ventilation air. The President's Million Solar Roofs Initiative aims to install 1 million solar energy systems on residential, commercial, and public-sector buildings by 2010. In support of the Initiative, and as part of a continual effort to ensure U.S. buildings are energy efficient and environmentally sustainable, the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) will help install those solar systems targeted for the federal sector.

387

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E NERGY Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implicationsthe Revised Residential Credit ..ITC (capped at $2,000) for residential solar systems. Both

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ng/J) distributions from residential natural gas appliances.ng/J) distribution from residential natural gas appliances.Pollutant Emissions from Residential Heating Systems, EPA-

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tampa Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tampa Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Tampa Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Tampa Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New Construction Ductwork: $100 Ceiling Insulation: $150 HVAC: $275 per unit Windows: $400 Water Heating: $150 Energy Star Homes Certification: $100 Existing Homes In-Home Energy Audit: Free HVAC Maintenance: $75 HVAC ECM Motor Replacement: $135 Heat Pump: $275 - $400 Ceiling Insulation: $200 - $350 Wall Insulation: $0.31 per square foot

392

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Appliance Recycling: 2 rebates per residential account, per appliance type annually Ceiling Fan Light Kits: $20 per light kit; 6 per account per year Central A/C: $400 Air Source Heat Pump: $600 Attic/Ceiling Insulation: $1,000 Air Sealing/Caulking/Weather Stripping: $200 CFL: 50% of cost, up to $5 (10 per customer per year)

393

New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Furnace: $300 - $450 Boilers: $1000 - $1500 Combined High Efficiency Boiler/Water Heater: $1,200 Heat Recovery Ventilator: $500 High Efficiency Indirect Water Heater: $400 Condensing Gas Water Heater: $500 High Efficiency On-Demand, Tankless Water Heater: $500 - $800

394

PEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate CFL Bulbs: 25 per customer Room A/C:$125 (5 rebates) Program Info Funding Source Maryland Energy Administration State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: $1.50/single and $3/multipack Clothes Washer: $50 - $100 Freezers: $75 Refrigerator: $100 - $150 Room A/C: $25 Dehumidifiers: $25 Tank Water Heater: $25

395

Brownsville Public Utilities Board - Green Living Residential Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brownsville Public Utilities Board - Green Living Residential Brownsville Public Utilities Board - Green Living Residential Rebate Program Brownsville Public Utilities Board - Green Living Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Brownsville Public Utilities Board Brownsville Public Utilities Board offers residential customers rebates for installation of energy efficient measures. Through the Green Living Rebate program, customers can apply for rebates for installation of energy efficient HVAC, improved duct flow performance, Energy Star Windows, Energy

396

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $140 - $420 Water Boiler: $350 or $700 Steam Boiler: $350 Boiler Reset Control: $70 Indirect Water Heater: $210 Programmable Thermostat: $18 Duct and Air Sealing: up to $420 Provider Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers

397

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate ENERGY Star Light Fixtures: Not to exceed 50% of the fixture cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $60 Freezers: $60 Clothes Washers: $60

398

Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Windows: $350 Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Not specified Provider Alabama Power Alabama Power offers low-interest loans to residential customers to purchase and install new heat pumps and a variety of weatherization measures. The loans require no money down and can be used to finance an air

399

Lower Valley Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lower Valley Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lower Valley Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lower Valley Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Discounted Cost Weatherization Measures: Varies Marathon Water Heater: $25 Water Heater: $15 - $25 Clothes Washer: $25 - $50 Refrigerator: $15 Refrigerator Recycling: $75 Energy Star Manufactured Home: $1,000 Geothermal Heat Pumps: Up to $2,100 Provider Lower Valley Energy Lower Valley Energy offers numerous rebates for residential customers who

400

Tillamook County PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tillamook County PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Tillamook County PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date Rebate program is a limited time offer based on availability of funds and is subject to change without notice. State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heaters (minimum of a ten-year warranty): $25 Clothes Washers: $70 Refrigerators/Freezers: $15 Dishwashers: $25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Xcel Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $80-$120 Boilers: $100 Storage Water Heater: $25-$90 Tankless Water Heater: $100 Attic/Wall Insulation, Sealing and Weatherstripping: 20% of cost Energy Audits: $60-$120 Home Performance with ENERGY STAR: average rebate amount is $710 Provider Xcel Energy Xcel Energy residential customers in Colorado can qualify for cash

402

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation Weatherization: 75% of project cost Energy Star homes: $350 - $8,000, varies by number of units and efficiency Warm Air Furnace: $500 - $800 Gas Boiler: $1,000 - $1,500 Integrated Water Heater/Boiler: $1,200

403

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $150 - $275 Boiler: $300 Storage Water Heater: $125 Tankless Water Heater: $150 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Attic Insulation: Up to $600 Wall Insulation: Up to $700 Air Sealing: Up to $250 Provider Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio Vectren Energy Delivery offers residential natural gas customers in Ohio

404

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Contact DTE Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: up to $150 Floor Insulation: $50 - $100 Bandjoist Insulation: $50 - $100 Wall Insulation: Up to $250 Ceiling Insulation: Up to $250 Window Replacement: $30 (window); $60 (picture window/sliding glass door)

405

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Salt River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology Provider Salt River Electric Cooperative Salt River Electric serves as the rural electric provider in Kentucky's Bullitt, Nelson, Spencer, and Washington counties. Residential customers are eligible for a variety of cash incentives for energy efficiency. The Touchstone Energy Home Program provides a rebate of up to $250 to customers

406

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Energy Select Programmable Thermostat and Time of Use Control: Free HVAC Maintenance: $215 Duct Repair and Air Sealing: $150 - $300 Fan Motor Retrofit: $150 Heat Pump: $100 - $1000; varies by size and efficiency

407

Development of A Fully Integrated PV System for Residential Applications: PVMaT5a Final Report, 18 December 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes both the Utility Power Group (UPG), a wholly owned subsidiary of Kyocera Solar, Inc., and Xantrex Technology Inc., have designed, assembled, and tested a new photovoltaic (PV) power system for residential rooftops to meet the goal of a readily manufacturable product that will increase US domestic PV power system production and installed capacity, by reducing the total installed cost and increasing the reliability of residential rooftop mounted PV power systems. A new factory pre-fabricated PV array system was developed, and 80 have been installed on the residential rooftops using standard metal parts. The direct material and labor cost of the array installation has been reduced to $3.79 per square foot for a 2400W installation. A modular, maintenance free, battery-based Power Unit and Energy Storage Unit (power conditioning and control) have also been developed. The design, fabrication, and testing have been completed for two prototypes of this system. These products have been evaluated for their structural integrity, electrical performance, reliability, cost, and manufacturability. The direct material and labor cost of the Power Unit has been reduced to $0.34 per watt. The 13 kW-hr Energy Storage Unit (ESU) has been UL listed.

Oatman, J.; West, R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenElectricity price escalation rates for the residentialelectricity rate that is 20% higher than the average statewide residential

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis of Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation of Hydrogen from Buildings (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of work for this project includes safe building design, vehicle leak in residential garage, continual slow leak, passive, buoyancy-driven ventilation (versus mechanical), and steady-state concentration of hydrogen versus vent size.

Barley, C. D.; Gawlik, K.; Ohi, J.; Hewett, R.

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Integrated window systems: An advanced energy-efficient residential fenestration product  

SciTech Connect

The last several years have produced a wide variety of new window products aimed at reducing the energy impacts associated with residential windows. Improvements have focused on reducing the rate at which heat flows through the total window product by conduction/convection and thermal radiation (quantified by the U-factor) as well as in controlling solar heat gain (measured by the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) or Shading Coefficient (SC)). Significant improvements in window performance have been made with low-E coated glazings, gas fills in multiple pane windows and with changes in spacer and frame materials and designs. These improvements have been changes to existing design concepts. They have pushed the limits of the individual features and revealed weaknesses. The next generation of windows will have to incorporate new materials and ideas, like recessed night insulation, seasonal sun shades and structural window frames, into the design, manufacturing and construction process, to produce an integrated window system that will be an energy and comfort asset.

Arasteh, D.; Griffith, B.; LaBerge, P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The future market for residential photovoltaic systems: New perspectives on the rooftop resource base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resource base of one-family houses with roofs suitable for photovoltaic applications can be estimated using a new and efficient sampling strategy combined with a statistical model. Levels of residential housing density are good predictors of rooftop suitability and can be used to make out-of-sample forecasts for a variety of geographic areas. The model is particularly useful for making forecasts for census tracts within large metropolitan areas. A large-scale field survey of rooftops in southeastern Pennsylvania indicates that a much higher proportion of roofs are suitable for rooftop systems than previously thought (in the Northeast). The survey suggests important differences from previous assumptions for such roof characteristics as area, slope, aspect, and the frequency of roof obstructions. Overall, the rooftop resource base; this paradigm rests on the dramatic difference between the central city and the suburbs in the proportion of houses with suitable roofs. The survey also demonstrates the critical role played by landscaping practices within a single urban area.

Miller, K.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy and first costs analysis of displacement and mixing ventilation systems for U.S. buildings and climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past two decades, displacement ventilation has been increasingly used in Scandinavia and Western Europe to improve indoor air quality and to save energy. By using a detailed computer simulation method, this study ...

Hu, ShiPing, 1970-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

416

SY Tank Farm ventilation isolation option risk assessment report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety of the 241-SY Tank Farm ventilation system has been under extensive scrutiny due to safety concerns associated with tank 101-SY. Hydrogen and other gases are generated and trapped in the waste below the liquid surface. Periodically, these gases are released into the dome space and vented through the exhaust system. This attention to the ventilation system has resulted in the development of several alternative ventilation system designs. The ventilation system provides the primary means of mitigation of accidents associated with flammable gases. This report provides an assessment of various alternatives ventilation system designs.

Powers, T.B.; Morales, S.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Modeling buoyancy-driven airflow in ventilation shafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally ventilated buildings can significantly reduce the required energy for cooling and ventilating buildings by drawing in outdoor air using non-mechanical forces. Buoyancy-driven systems are common in naturally ...

Ray, Stephen D. (Stephen Douglas)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Ventilated Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adiabatic theories of ocean circulation and density structure have a long tradition, from the concept of the ventilated thermocline to the notion that deep ocean ventilation is controlled by westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. This study ...

Patrick Haertel; Alexey Fedorov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

VENTILATION MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

V. Chipman

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ventilation planning at Energy West's Deer Creek mine  

SciTech Connect

In 2004 ventilation planning was initiated to exploit a remote area of Deer Creek mine's reserve (near Huntington, Utah), the Mill Fork Area, located under a mountain. A push-pull ventilation system was selected. This article details the design process of the ventilation system upgrade, the procurement process for the new fans, and the new fan startup testing. 5 figs., 1 photo.

Tonc, L.; Prosser, B.; Gamble, G. [Pacific Corp., Huntington, UT (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

EVALUATION OF TRANSITIONS FOR TESTING AGRICULTURAL VENTILATION FANS WITH THE FAN ASSESSMENT NUMERATION SYSTEM (FANS).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Fan Assessment Numeration System (FANS) is an improved air velocity traverse method for measuring in situ fan performance. The FANS has been widely used,… (more)

Lopes, Igor Moreira

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems, Lawrence, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multifamily Individual Heating Multifamily Individual Heating and Ventilation Systems Lawrence, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Multifamily, affordable Builder: Merrimack Valley Habitat for Humanity (MVHfH) www.merrimackvalleyhabitat.org Size: 840 to 1,170 ft 2 units Price Range: $125,000-$130,000 Date completed: Slated for 2014 Climate Zone: Cold (5A) PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index Range: 48 to 63 Projected annual energy cost savings: $1,797 Incremental cost of energy efficiency measures: $3,747 Incremental annual mortgage: $346 Annual cash flow: $1,451 Billing data: Not available The conversion of an older Massachusetts building into condominiums illustrates a safe, durable, and cost-effective solution for heating and ventilation systems that can potentially benefit millions of multifamily buildings. Merrimack Valley

424

Physical features of small disperse coal dust fraction transportation and structurization processes in iodine air filters of absorption type in ventilation systems at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research on the physical features of transportation and structurization processes by the air-dust aerosol in the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal adsorbent granules in an air filter of the adsorption type in the heating ventilation and cooling (HVAC) system at the nuclear power plant is completed. The physical origins of the coal dust masses distribution along the absorber with the granular filtering medium with the cylindrical coal granules during the air-dust aerosol intake process in the near the surface layer of absorber are researched. The quantitative technical characteristics of air filtering elements, which have to be considered during the optimization of air filters designs for the application in the ventilation systems at the nuclear power plants, are obtained.

Ledenyov, Oleg P; Poltinin, P Ya; Fedorova, L I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Technology assessment of solar energy systems: residential use of fuelwood in the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The evidence of impacts associated with the use of fuelwood for residential space heating in the region including the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is identified and evaluated. The use of fuelwood for space heating was projected into the future, and then the potential size of the impacts that had been identified and estimated was evaluated. These projections are provided in five year increments beginning in 1980 and proceeding to the year 2000. Policy options are suggested which may mitigate the adverse impacts identified, while preserving the positive effect of reducing residential demand for energy derived from nonrenewable sources.

Petty, P.N.; Hopp, W.J.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ventilation measurements in large office buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation rates were measured in nine office buildings using an automated tracer gas measuring system. The buildings range in size from a two-story federal building with a floor area of about 20,000 ft/sup 2/ (1900 m/sup 2/) to a 26-story office building with a floor area of 700,000 ft/sup 2/ (65,000 m/sup 2/). The ventilation rates were measured for about 100 hours in each building over a range of weather conditions. The results are presented and examined for variation with time and weather. In most cases, the ventilation rate of a building is similar for hot and cold weather. In mild weather, outdoor air is used to cool the building and the ventilation rate increases. In the buildings where infiltration is a significant portion of the total ventilation rate, this total rate exhibits a dependence on weather conditions. The measured ventilation rates are discussed in relation to the outdoor air intake strategy in each building. The ventilation rates are also compared to the design rates in the buildings and ventilation rates based on the ASHRAE Standard 62-81. Some of the buildings are at times operated at lower ventilation rates than recommended in Standard 62-81.

Persily, A.K.; Grot, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Assessment of the project W-030 ventilation system following a hypothetical gas release event  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is an executive summary of the testing, adjusting and balancing completed for Project W-112 for the HVAC systems. The actual results are document in the Acceptance Test Report.

Ogden, D.M., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

428

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system for the computer room of the CERN Control Centre

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system for the HIE-ISOLDE infrastructure

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy Efficient Building Ventilation Systems: Innovative Building-Integrated Enthalpy Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: A2 is developing a building moisture and heat exchange technology that leverages a new material and design to create healthy buildings with lower energy use. Commercial building owners/operators are demanding buildings with greater energy efficiency and healthier indoor environments. A2 is developing a membrane-based heat and moisture exchanger that controls humidity by transferring the water vapor in the incoming fresh air to the drier air leaving the building. Unlike conventional systems, A2 locates the heat and moisture exchanger within the depths of the building’s wall to slow down the air flow and increase the surface area that captures humidity, but with less fan power. The system’s integration into the wall reduces the size and demand on the air conditioning equipment and increases liable floor area flexibility.

None

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Sustainable management fund system for high rise residential management, Kuala Lumpur Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanisation begin in early 60's in Kuala Lumpur, city centre of Malaysia. More job opportunities increase employee and indicate the needs of living. Since population parallel with job opportunities, implies to escalate land area. The escalating of land ... Keywords: facilities management, high-rise residential, management corporation, self funded, sustainable

N. M. Tawil; A. I. Che-Ani; N. A. G. Abdullah; A. Zaharim; I. M. S. Usman

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Black Hills Power - Residential Customer Rebate Program (South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Geothermal Heat Pumps,...

433

Black Hills Power - Residential Customer Rebate Program (Wyoming...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Geothermal Heat Pumps,...

434

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Title Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events:...

435

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Breathing HRV by the Concept of AC Ventilation Speaker(s): Hwataik Han Date: July 10, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone Heat recovery ventilators are frequently used to save heating/cooling loads of buildings for ventilation. There are several types of HRV's, including a parallel plate type, a rotary type, a capillary type, and a heat pipe type. The breathing HRV is a heat recovery ventilator of a new kind using the concept of alternating-current ventilation. The AC ventilation is the ventilation with the airflow directions reversed periodically. It has an advantage of using a single duct system, for both supply and exhaust purposes. In order to develop a breathing HRV system, the thermal recovery performance should be investigated depending on many parameters, such as

436

Modeling of Residential Attics with Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a summary of the efforts at ORNL in modeling residential attics with radiant barriers. Analytical models based on a system of macroscopic heat balances have been developed. Separate models have been developed for horizontal radiant barriers laid on top of the insulation, and for radiant barriers attached to the bottom of the top chords of the attic trusses. The models include features such as a radiation interchange analysis within the attic space, convective coupling with the ventilation air, and sorption/desorption of moisture at surfaces facing the attic enclosure. The paper gives details of the models and the engineering assumptions that were made in their development. The paper also reports on the status of efforts that are underway to verify the models by comparing their predictions with the results of laboratory and field tests on residential attics and test cells, both with and without radiant barriers. Comparisons are given for a number of selected sets of experimental data. Suggestions are given for needed model refinements and additional experimental data. Plans for utilization of the models for extrapolation to seasonal and annual performance in a variety of climatic conditions are also described.

Wilkes, K. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residential passive solar systems: regional sensitivity to system performance costs, and alternative prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic potential of two passive space heating configurations are analyzed. These are a masonry thermal storage wall (Trombe) and a direct gain system - both with night insulation. A standard tract home design for each of the two passive systems is being used throughout the analysis to allow interregional comparisons. The economic performance of these two systems is evaluated on a regional basis (223 locations) throughout the United States. For each of the two conventional energy types considered (electricity and natural gas), sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the impact of alternative fuel price escalation rates and solar costs upon feasibility of the two solar systems. Cost goals for solar system prices are established under one set of future fuel prices and stated economic conditions. (MOW)

Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S.; Roach, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Ventilation problems in heritage buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of indoor conditions in heritage buildings, such as castles or museums, is of paramount importance for the proper preservation of the artworks kept in. As heritage buildings are often not equipped with HVAC systems, it is necessary to provide ... Keywords: CO2 concentration, IAQ, heritage buildings, ventilation

S. Costanzo; A. Cusumano; C. Giaconia; S. Mazzacane

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Large Projects: 12.5% of total budget; or $237,500 (Residential); $162,500 for Hard-To-Reach A/C and Heat Pump Program: $40,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Standard Offer: $250/kW + $0.081/kWh Hard To Reach Standard Offer Program (all measures except CFL): $440/kW +

440

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $400 or $600 Central Air Source Heat Pump: $400 or $600 Electric Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Energy Star Thermostats: up to $25 Duct Sealing: $100/hr Air Sealing: $75/hr Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Con Edison is offering the Residential HVAC Electric Rebate Program.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential ventilation systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Genetic lateral and amplitude tuning with rule selection for fuzzy control of heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we propose the use of a new post-processing method for the lateral and amplitude tuning of membership functions combined with a rule selection to develop accurate fuzzy logic controllers dedicated to the control of heating, ventilating ...

R. Alcalá; J. Alcalá-Fdez; F. J. Berlanga; M. J. Gacto; F. Herrera

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

NorthWestern Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NorthWestern Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NorthWestern Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NorthWestern Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Lighting: Maximum of fifteen CFLs and five lighting fixtures per calendar year Programmable Thermostat: Two units per household Program Info Funding Source Montana natural gas and electric supply rates Start Date 1/1/2009 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program

443

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct sealing and replacement: 50% of cost, up to $190 Air sealing and upgrading insulation: $0.375/Sq Ft, up to $500 Heat Pump Water Heater: $350 HVAC Audit: $100 Central Air Conditioner/Heat Pump: $300 Geothermal Replacement: $300 Room Air Conditioners: $25

444

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Energy Efficient Home Improvement Rebate Program: Maximum total rebate in a 12-month period is $500 per customer service address, PLUS, an additional $250 allowance for air duct repair, or an additional $800 allowance for air duct replacement, if eligible. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Air Duct Testing: $125

445

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $600 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Air-source Heat Pumps: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Furnace Fans: $200 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $400 Programmable Thermostats: $25

446

Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance - Residential Loan Program (Ohio) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance - Residential Loan Program Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance - Residential Loan Program (Ohio) Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance - Residential Loan Program (Ohio) < Back Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Program Info State Ohio Program Type Local Loan Program The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To qualify for loans, homeowners must receive a [http://www.greatercea.org/residential-energy-efficiency Home Performance

447

Black Hills Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Black Hills Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Black Hills Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Black Hills Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate All Incentives: $750/customer Ceiling/Wall/Foundation Insulation: $500 Infiltration Control/Caulking/Weather Stripping: $200 Duct Insulation: $150 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Qualified New Homes (Builders): Contact Black Hills Energy Evaluations: Free or reduced cost Storage Water Heater: $75 or $300 Tankless Water Heater: $300 Furnace/Boiler Maintenance: $30 or $100