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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Characteristics of Residential Housing Units by Ceiling Fans, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A reporting of the number of housing units using ceiling fans in U.S. households as reported in the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

2

" Million Housing Units, Preliminary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables" "Table...

3

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

4

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

5

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

6

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

7

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New York Florida Texas California Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics U.S. Housing Units...

8

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

9

Million U.S. Housing Units Total............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Status of PC When Not in Use Left On..............................................................

10

U.S. Residential Housing Primary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 7c Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Primary Page Last Revised: July 2009

11

U.S. Residential Housing Weather Adjusted Site Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Housing Energy Intensities > Table 1b Glossary U.S. Residential Housing Weather Adjusted ...

12

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4

13

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South...

14

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle...

15

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the 2009 Poverty Guidelines for families published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 3Use of heating equipment for another housing unit also includes the use...

16

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 3Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

17

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

that do not contain a storage tank. The water is only heated as it passes through the heat exchanger. 4Use of a water heater for another housing unit also includes the use of...

18

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

19

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

20

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential energy consumption survey: housing characteristics 1984  

SciTech Connect

Data collected in the 1984 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the sixth national survey of households and their fuel suppliers, provides baseline information on how households use energy. Households living in all types of housing units - single-family homes (including townhouses), apartments, and mobile homes - were chosen to participate. Data from the surveys are available to the public. The housing characteristics this report describes include fuels and the uses they are put to in the home; appliances; square footage of floorspace; heating (and cooling) equipment; thermal characteristics of housing structures; conservation features and measures taken; the consumption of wood; temperatures indoors; and regional weather. These data are tabulated in sets, first showing counts of households and then showing percentages. Results showed: Fewer households are changing their main heating fuel. More households are air conditioned than before. Some 50% of air-conditioned homes now use central systems. The three appliances considered essential are the refrigerator, the range, and the television set. At least 98% of US homes have at least one television set; but automatic dishwashers are still not prevalent. Few households use the budget plans tht are available from their utility companies to ease the payment burden of seasonal surges in fuel bills. The most common type of heating equipment in the United States is the natural-gas forced-air furnace. About 40% ofthose furnaces are at least 15 years old. The oldest water heaters are those that use fuel oil. The most common conservation feature in 1984 is ceiling or attic insulation - 80% of homes report having this item. Relatively few households claimed tax credits in 1984 for energy-conservation improvements.

Not Available

1986-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

22

1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-6b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-7b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4

23

U.S. Residential Housing Primary Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Housing Energy Intensities > Table 1c Glossary U.S. Resident ...

24

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in...

25

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit"...

26

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Attached 2 to 4 Units Table HC2.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Type of Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)...

27

Total U.S. Housing Units.................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Space Heating Usage Indicators Million U.S. Housing Units Detached Attached Energy Information...

28

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.5 Household Demographics of U.S....

29

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.8 Household Demographics of Homes...

30

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.1 Household Demographics of U.S....

31

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.7 Household Demographics of U.S....

32

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.6 Household Demographics of U.S....

33

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.3 Household Demographics of U.S....

34

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.4 Household Demographics of U.S....

35

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.11 Household Demographics of Homes...

36

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.10 Household Demographics of Homes...

37

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.9 Household Demographics of Homes...

38

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.2 Household Demographics of U.S....

39

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption Survey. " " Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables" "Table HC8.4 Space Heating...

40

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). 5Rented includes households that occupy their primary housing unit without payment of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.10 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

42

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.11 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

43

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

44

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

45

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

46

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

47

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

48

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

49

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

50

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

51

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: housing characteristics, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, wood consumption, indoor temperatures, and weather. The 1982 survey included a number of questions on the reasons households make energy conservation improvements to their homes. Results of these questions are presented. Discussion also highlights data pertaining to: trends in home heating fuels, trends in conservation improvements, and characteristics of households whose energy costs are included in their rent.

Thompson, W.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

tni tni Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics, 1981 Energy Information Administration Washington. D.C August 1983 T86T -UJ9AO9 aiji uuojj pasenojnd uaaq (OdO) i|oii)/v\ suoijdijosqns o; Ajdde jou saop aoiiou :e|ON asBa|d 'pjBo^sod at|j noA j| 3Sj| Suiije'Lu vi3 3M1 uo ;u!Buuaj o^sn o} }i ujnja> isnoi nox 'pJBOisod iuB»jodoi! UB aABL) pjnons hoA '}s\\ BujUBUJ VI3 9L|} uo ajB noA|| 'MaiAaj jsij SUJMBUJ suouBOjiqnd |BnuuBS}j BUJ -jonpuoo Sj (vi3) uoijej^siujuupv UOIJBLUJOIUI Afijau^ agj 'uoiieinBaj iuaoiujaAOQ Aq pajmbaj sv 30HON 02-13 maoj aapao ay 05. pa^oajjp aq pus siuamnooa jo 0088-353 (303) S8SOZ "D'Q 'uoiSu-pqsBtt T rao°H 50 UOT^BOLIOJUI

53

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2...

54

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2...

55

Evaluation of High Performance Residential Housing Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy consumption of residential buildings in Canada accounts for 17% of national energy use (Trudeau, 2005). Production homes represent a considerable portion of new (more)

Grin, Aaron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Home Electronics Usage Indicators Detached Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy...

58

Residential Housing Characteristics Survey 1997 - Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Laundry Equipment; Residential Home Page. File Last Modified: June 21, 1999 Contact: Robert.Latta@eia.doe.gov Robert B. Latta Phone: 202.586.1385 Fax Number: 202 ...

59

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table HC14.3 Household Characteristics by West Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"West Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division"...

60

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table HC10.3 Household Characteristics by U.S. Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","U.S. Census Region" "Household Characteristics",,"No...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Impact of Urban Form and Housing Characteristics on Residential Energy Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities and their characteristics of energy use play an important role in climate change. While there is abundant research about the impact of energy use on transportation the impact of urban form and housing characteristics on residential energy use has not been considered widely. There is certainly a need to take a closer look about the residential energy use and housing relationships to identify planning implications. This study examines the relationship between various urban form, housing characteristics and the energy use that result from residential electricity and fuel use. Ordinary least squares regression methods are used to measure the correlations between energy consumption and variables describing housing and urban form characteristics in the metropolitan statistical areas in the United States. After controlling for differences in energy price and income, a positive relationship between residential energy consumption and a history of greater rates of land conversion was found. This study also finds significantly higher energy use associated with a greater incidence of detached single-family housing when compared against high-rise buildings. A correlation between increased rate of row housing and lower energy use was found as well. This study can contribute to a literature that can help planners to create more environmentally- friendly cities by contributing to the understanding of the impacts that certain energy- related housing characteristics have on the sustainability of a city. The literature regarding smart growth and new urbanism should explore potential impacts on household energy consumption in its discussion of urban planning along with considering impacts on transportation related energy use.

Kim, Jong Yon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of...

63

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY DATA Housing Unit and Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Households (million) Households With Fans (million) Percent of Households With Fans Number of...

64

Residential Blink Charging Units Reporting Data in The EV Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

125 250 375 500 62.5 Miles Idaho National Laboratory 10162012 INLMIS-12-26074 All EV Project residential charging units are AC Level 2. Residential Blink Charging Units...

65

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,"5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,62.3,6.4,8.7,18.3,6.5 "1.",100.8,61,6.4,8.6,18.3,6.5 "2 or More",1.5,1.3,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,9.5,0.3,0.3,0.8,0.4

66

U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities >Table 6b U.S. Residential Housing Weather-Adjusted Site Energy Intensity

67

Evaluation of aerial thermography to discriminate loft insulation in residential housing .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the use of aerial thermography data to discriminate loft (attic) insulation levels in residential housing, with ventilated pitched roofs, in the UK. (more)

Allinson, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.8,0.1,0.2,0.6,0.1 1,108.1,67.5,6.5,8.8,18.5,6.8 "2 or More",2.7,2.5,0.1,"Q","Q","Q" "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,69.5,6.5,8.9,18.6,6.8 1,3.1,2.2,0.2,0.2,0.5,"Q"

69

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,70.5,6.5,8.7,17.7,6.7 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.8,0.2,0.2,1,0.1 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q",0.1,0.4,"Q"

70

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,61.1,5.6,6.3,15.2,5.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,2.6,0.2,0.7,0.9,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,8.1,0.9,2.1,3,0.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

71

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,14.4,2.1,3.4,9.6,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,24.2,1.9,2.5,5,2.1 "3 Persons",18.1,12.1,1.2,1.3,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.7,11.5,1,1,1.5,0.8 "5 Persons",7.7,5.8,0.3,0.5,0.6,0.5

72

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Natural Gas",69.2,45.6,4.7,6.1,11,1.8 "Propane/LPG",48.9,39.6,2.4,1.7,2,3.2 "Wood",13.1,11.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,5.1,0.4,0.7,1.3,0.1

73

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

74

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Appliances",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both"

75

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" "Household Demographics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Household Members"

76

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions"

77

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air Conditioning",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

78

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Space Heating Equipment"

79

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"...

80

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the Time... 2.8 0.6 Q Q Q Q N Table HC4.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Renter- Occupied...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

before the United States House of before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development to appear before you today to discuss the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget request for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). Statement of Patricia Hoffman before the United States House of Representatives House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development More Documents & Publications

82

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.1,0.2,0.6,"Q" 1,24.2,11,1.2,3,7.3,1.7 2,37.5,21.4,2.4,3.3,7.7,2.7 3,26.6,18.4,2,1.8,2.8,1.6 4,14.2,11.6,0.7,0.6,0.5,0.7 "5 or More",9.7,8.8,0.4,0.2,"Q",0.2 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size"

83

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,13.3,1.6,3.1,6.2,3.2 1,46.9,29,3,3.9,8.4,2.6 2,24.3,17.4,1.2,1.5,3.4,0.8 3,9.5,7.5,0.6,0.4,0.8,0.2 4,3.6,3,0.2,0.1,0.2,"Q" "5 or More",2,1.7,0.1,"Q",0.1,"Q"

84

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Fuels Used for Any Use"

85

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters"

86

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

87

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4

88

"Table HC4.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.2,0.8,0.9,1.6,3.8,"Q" "New England",5.5,1.7,0.2,"Q",0.6,0.9,"Q" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,5.5,0.7,0.9,1,2.9,"Q"

89

"Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,13.4,10.4,1.4,1,0.3,0.4 "New England",5.5,3.8,3.1,"Q",0.3,"Q","Q" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,9.6,7.3,1.3,0.6,"Q","Q"

90

EnergyUnited - Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnergyUnited - Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Rebate EnergyUnited - Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Rebate Program EnergyUnited - Residential Energy Efficient Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate 2 per dwelling Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pumps (14 SEER): $150 Heat Pumps (15 SEER +): $300 Provider EnergyUnited EnergyUnited offers rebates to residential customers who upgrade to high efficiency heat pumps. Rebates range from $150 - $300, varying by efficiency. The rebate form can be found on the program website and must be completed by the installing HVAC contractor. Each unit will require a separate form in order to qualify for rebates. Systems must be

91

1997 Residential Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Household ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Return to: Residential Home Page . Changes in the 1997 RECS: Housing Unit Type Per Household Member Per Building Increase. Residential Energy Consumption ...

92

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Total U.S. Housing Units.................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.4 5.9 9.6 10.1 8.9 4.5 Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 42.8 3.9 2.2 4.0 4.4 6.5...

94

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,54.7,33,4.2,4.2,9.9,3.4 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,29.8,2.3,2.8,6,1.9 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,29.9,3.6,2.8,7...

95

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.4,5.9,9.6,10.1,8.9,4.5 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,3.9,2.2,4,4.4,6.5,7.4,8.8,5.7 "Adequately...

96

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.7,17.1,16.1,9.4,7.9,4.1 "Housing Unit Characteristics Affecting Usage" "Adequacy of Insulation" "Well Insulated",42.8,11.4,14.6,6.9,5.9,4 "Adequately Insulated",46.3,12.3,14.8,7.4...

97

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,11.2,2.3,2.5,4.2,0.4 "New England",5.5,3.2,0.2,0.9,1,0.2 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,7.9,2.1,1.6,3.2,0.3 "Midwest",25.6,18.7,1.5,1.5,3.1,0.8 "East North Central",17.7,12.9,1.2,1.2,2.1,0.4

98

Residential energy-consumption survey: housing characteristics, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Data in this report cover fuels and their use in the home, appliances, square footage of floor space, heating equipment, thermal characteristics of the housing unit, conservation activities, and consumption of wood. Collected for the first time are data related to indoor temperatures and the use of air conditioning. A unique feature of the 1981 survey is an increased sampling of low-income households funded by the Social Security Administration to provide them information for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Discussion highlights data pertaining to these topics: changes in home heating fuel, secondary heating, indoor temperatures, features of new homes, use of air conditioning, use of solar collectors, and wood consumption.

Thompson, W.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Appliances in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Appliances",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption This datasetis the 2011 United...

102

Residential Blink Charging Units Reporting Data in The EV Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 Knoxville 95 Washington D.C. 102 0 125 62.5 250 375 500 Miles Legend Project Regions All EV Project residential charging units are AC Level 2. Idaho National Laboratory 815...

103

Residential Blink Charging Units Reporting Data in The EV Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 Knoxville 87 Washington D.C. 83 0 125 62.5 250 375 500 Miles Legend Project Regions All EV Project residential charging units are AC Level 2. Idaho National Laboratory 66...

104

Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PNNL-88603 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012...

105

Housing Characteristics Detailed Tables - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration. United States Department of Energy 1997 RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS DETAILED DATA TABLES (FINAL)

106

United Cooperative Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » United Cooperative Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program United Cooperative Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Insulation Rebate: paid only up to maximum depth of 12 inches Total Rebates: 1,200 maximum per home Program Info Expiration Date All rebate forms and accompanying documentation must be submitted within 60 days of the completion of construction and/or installation. State Texas Program Type

107

Annual housing survey: 1978. United States and regions. Part F. Energy-related housing characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This report presents statistics on energy - related housing characteristics from the 1978 Annual Housing Survey for the United States by inside and outside standard metropolitan statistical areas. Tables provide data on fuel, fuel cost, heating, air conditioning, insulation, and transportation characteristics. In addition, they present figures on the income of families and individuals by energy - related housing characteristics; the value of owner - occupied housing units and the gross rent of renter - occupied housing units by energy - related housing characteristics; the monthly and yearly costs paid for utilities; and the number of rooms per housing unit by energy - related housing characteristics. Data on energy - related housing characteristics are also given for Black and Spanish heads of households. Appendices describe the geographic area classifications; provide definitions and explanations of the subjects covered in the report; and present information on sample design, estimation, and accuracy of the data. Area maps are included.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

109

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.4,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,71.7,7.5,7.6,16.3,6.8 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,71.5,7.4,7.4,16,6.7 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

110

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.4,1.6,1,1.9,6.6,0.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8,1.9,0.8,1.5,3.5,0.3 "3 Persons",18.4,5.6,1.5,0.7,1.2,1.9,0.2 "4 Persons",15.9,4.3,1.3,0.6,0.7,1.6,"Q"

111

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,68.7,7.4,7.6,15.9,6.7 "2 or More",3.7,3.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater"

112

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" ,,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

113

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX"

114

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Televisions in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Televisions",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

115

EIA Data: 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Sector Key Indicators and Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011 United States Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption, part of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. Source EIA Date Released December 16th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords consumption EIA energy residential sector key indicators Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption (xls, 62.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment http://www.eia.gov/abouteia/copyrights_reuse.cfm

116

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,22.2,25.8,19.4,13,8.1,4.9,8.8,15.9 "1.",100.8,22,25.6,19.2,12.8,8,4.7,8.5,15.8

117

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Home Appliances",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,19.2,5.2,2.3,2.8,14.1,6.8,4.6,2.7

118

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Appliances",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,35.8,32.4,11.6,17.3,5.2 "1.",100.8,35.1,31.9,11.5,17.1,5.1 "2 or More",1.5,0.7,0.5,0.1,0.2,"Q" "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,3,3,2.5,1.8,1.1 "Most-Used Stove Fuel"

119

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Appliances" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,13.2,4.9,12.3,11.2,16.5,15.6,14.9,13.7 "1.",100.8,13,4.8,12.2,10.9,16.3,15.4,14.7,13.5 "2 or More",1.5,0.2,0.1,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.2

120

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Appliances",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Stoves (Units With Both" "an Oven and a Cooktop)" "Use a Stove",102.3,28.8,31.7,16.3,14,11.5 "1.",100.8,28.5,31.2,16,13.9,11.2 "2 or More",1.5,0.3,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.3 "Do Not Use a Stove",11.3,2.5,4.1,1.8,1.7,1.2 "Most-Used Stove Fuel" "Electric",61.9,18.3,19.7,9.7,8.2,6.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,17.8,3.1,3.7,7.3,3.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,54.2,4.5,4,9.4,3.4 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,42.9,3.3,3,6.6,2.9

122

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) ","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,4.8,0.5,0.7,1.4,0.8 "2 Times A Day",24.6,15.6,1.8,2,3.6,1.6 "Once a Day",42.3,28.8,2.7,2.8,5.4,2.6 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,17.8,2,1.7,4.1,1.5

123

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Household Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.8,2.4,2.6,7.9,2.4 "2 Persons",34.8,24.8,2.1,2,4.2,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,12.3,1.2,1.6,2.2,1.2 "4 Persons",15.9,11.1,1.2,0.9,1.6,1 "5 Persons",7.9,6.2,0.5,0.4,0.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,2.9,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.3

124

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.4,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,71.7,7.5,7.6,16.3,6.8 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,71.5,7.4,7.4,16,6.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

125

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,0.4,"Q",0.6,1.7,0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,4.8,1.4,4.2,10.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,10.6,1.8,1.8,4,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,12.4,1.5,0.5,0.5,0.4

126

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Type of Housing Unit" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,72.1,7.6,7.8,16.7,6.9 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,10.9,1.5,1.5,2.8,1.2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,61.2,6.1,6.3,13.9,5.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,60.3,6,6.1,13.5,5.5 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,"Q",0.2,0.4,"Q"

127

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Water Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

128

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,22.4,40.5,14.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.4,1.2,0.9,1.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,2.8,2.3,0.7,8.9 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment " "Used (more than one may apply)" "Use Central Air Conditioning Equipment",69.7,7.2,17.1,34.6,10.8

129

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

130

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air Conditioning",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But"

131

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Appliances",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

132

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,24.6,30.2,15.1,13.5,10.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.7,1.5,0.7,0.6,0.5 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,5,4.1,2.3,1.7,1.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

133

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" ,,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,19.9,14.6,4.1,2.9,1.8,5.8,5.3,1.6,2.4,1.4

134

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,18.3,22.3,17.9,11.9,8.1,5.1,10.4,12.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.5,1.3,0.9,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.3,1

135

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

136

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Televisions in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Televisions",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

137

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Household Demographics",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

138

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,19.9,28.6,21.5 "Rural",25.5,2.8,6,13.4,3.3 "Metropolitan and Micropolitan" "Statistical Area" "In metropolitan statistical area",94,18.6,19.4,33.4,22.7 "In micropolitan statistical area",12.4,1.5,4.7,4.7,1.5 "Not in metropolitan or micropolitan"

139

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Appliances in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Appliances",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7 "Cooking Appliances"

140

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" ,,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Household Demographics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

142

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,,,"5 or More Members" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,6,6.3,3.3,3.1,2.1 "New England",5.5,1.5,1.8,1,0.7,0.5 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,4.5,4.5,2.3,2.4,1.6 "Midwest",25.9,7.4,8.5,3.9,3.5,2.6 "East North Central",17.9,5.1,5.6,2.7,2.5,1.9

143

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Household Demographics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,7.4,5.1,1.4,1,0.6,2.1,2.3,0.6,1.1,0.6

144

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,2.9,1.7,1.1,10.9,5.7,2.3,2.8

145

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

146

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,1,0.5,0.5,3.7,1.7,1.4,0.5 1,46.9,8.7,2.3,1,1.3,6.4,3.2,2,1.2 2,24.3,4.3,1.2,0.5,0.7,3.1,1.4,0.9,0.8

147

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,,,,,"Pacific Census Division" ,,,,"Mountain North Sub-Division",,,"Mountain South Sub-Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Total Mountain North",,,"Total Mountain South" ,,"Total West","Total Mountain",,,"ID, MT, UT, WY",,,,"Total Pacific",,"AK, HI, OR, WA" "Space Heating",,,,,"CO",,,"AZ","NM, NV",,"CA" "Total Homes",113.6,24.8,7.9,3.9,1.9,2,4,2.3,1.7,16.9,12.2,4.7

148

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,25.8,41.1,22.4 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","Q",0.7,1.6 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q",0.3,0.8 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,10.8,17.9,13.3,13.6 "Central Warm-Air Furnace",44.3,6.1,15.9,11.3,11

149

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.4,0.7,0.5 1,108.1,19.3,25,40.2,23.6 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,0.5,1.2,0.7 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,19.4,25.6,41.2,24.2 1,3.1,1.4,0.3,0.8,0.6 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","N","Q","Q" "Main Water Heater" "Main Water Heater Type" "Storage Tank",110.6,19.4,25.5,41.3,24.3

150

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Space Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,30.3,35,17.6,15.2,12 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.6,0.3,0.4,0.4 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,0.2,0.1,0.3 "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment2" "Natural Gas",55.6,14.1,17.9,9.4,7.9,6.3

151

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,22.8,26.5,20.5,13.8,9.1,5.6,11.8,16.1 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.6,0.7,0.5,0.2,0.2,0.1,0.1,0.5

152

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Televisions in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Televisions",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.1,"Q",0.2,"Q","Q","Q" 1,24.2,4.6,1.2,0.6,0.6,3.5,2,1,0.4

153

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Air Conditioning",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

154

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Computers and Other Electronics",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,6.7,4.7,1.1,1.1,0.6,2,2,0.6,1,0.5

155

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Water Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

156

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Space Heating",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do "

157

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Household Demographics",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11,9.7,3.3,5.4,1.9 "2 Persons",35.8,12.4,11.2,4.4,5.9,1.8 "3 Persons",18.1,6,5.7,2.2,3.1,1.1 "4 Persons",15.7,5.3,4.9,2,2.6,0.9 "5 Persons",7.7,2.6,2.4,1.1,1.2,0.4 "6 or More Persons",5,1.5,1.5,1,0.8,0.2

158

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

159

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" HC4.9 Televisions in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Televisions",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.3,0.2,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

160

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Household Demographics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Household Demographics",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,1.5,0.7,0.8,4.5,2.1,1.6,0.8 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,1.8,0.8,1,4.5,2,1.5,0.9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,,,,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Water Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI","IN, OH",,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.4,0.3,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q"

162

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air Conditioning",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7

163

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Space Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,38.7,35.4,12.5,17.6,6 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,"Q","N",1.3,0.7,0.3 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q",0.3,0.8,"Q" "Main Heating Fuel and Equipment3"

164

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Space Heating",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

165

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Space Heating",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,25.8,17.8,4.7,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8

166

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" ,,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Urban and Rural2" "Urban",88.1,18,4.4,2.2,2.2,13.6,6.6,3.9,3.1 "Rural",25.5,2.8,1.1,0.3,0.8,1.7,0.6,1,"Q"

167

Annual housing survey: 1979. United States and regions. part f: energy-related housing characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents statistics on energy - related housing characteristics from the 1979 Annual Housing Survey for the United States by inside and outside standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSA's) and each of the four geographic regions. The statistics are based on information from a sample of housing units. The information was collected by personal interview from September 1979 to December 1979. For the United States as a whole and for the separate regions (North Central, Northeast, South, and West), data are presented on fuel, fuel cost, heating, air conditioning, insulation, and transportation characteristics in relation to the following information: income of families and primary individuals, value of owner - occupied housing units, gross rent of renter - occupied housing units, housing units in structure, number of rooms per housing unit, year structure built, monthly cost paid for electricity, and others. Also shown are the yearly cost paid for fuel oil, coal, etc. and household head's principal means of transportation to work, by distance and travel time to work in 1979. Data are classified according to all races, black - housing units with black household head, and Spanish - housing units with household head of Spanish origin. Maps and a table - finding guide are provided. Appendices describe the geographic area classifications; define subjects covered in the report; and present information on sample design, estimation, and data accuracy.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

169

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

170

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

171

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

172

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

173

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

174

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

175

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

176

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

177

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

178

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

179

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

180

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

182

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

183

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

184

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

185

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

186

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

187

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

188

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

189

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

190

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

191

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

192

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

193

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

194

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

195

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-264 ­ 1.278. American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington, DC. 14. Gusdorf, J., Swinton, MLBNL 62341 Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States Max H. Sherman and Iain S. Walker Environmental Energy Technologies Division February 2007 This work was supported

196

Economical operation of thermal generating units integrated with smart houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an economic optimal operation strategy for thermal power generation units integrated with smart houses. With the increased competition in retail and power sector reasoned by the deregulation and liberalization of power market make ... Keywords: particle swarm optimization, renewable energy sources, smart grid, smart house, thermal unit commitment

Shantanu Chakraborty; Takayuki Ito; Tomonobu Senjyu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,28.8,33.4,17.4,15.3,11.4 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,1.1,0.8,0.5,0.6 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,25.3,31.8,16.6,14.6,11.3 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,4.2,2.7,1.6,1.2,0.6

198

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Water Heating Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,45.5,18.2,21.6,21 "2 or More",3.7,1,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,39.4,17.4,21,21.8 "Two or More Housing Units",10.3,7.1,1.4,1.5,"Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,"Q","Q","Q"

199

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,1.9,9.8,8.9,"N","N" "New England",5.5,1.3,4.1,"Q","N","N" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,"Q",5.7,8.8,"N","N"

200

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,4.8,1.5,3.9,3.9,5,5,3.9,3.3 "2 Persons",35.8,4.5,1.6,4.1,4.3,6.2,5.2,5.2,4.6 "3 Persons",18.1,2,0.9,2.3,2.1,2.8,2.9,2.7,2.4 "4 Persons",15.7,1.8,0.6,1.8,1.6,2.2,2.1,2.6,3.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.7,0.5,0.3,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.5,0.5 1,108.1,22.9,26.7,20.4,13.4,8.7,5.3,10.6,16.3 "2 or More",2.7,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.4,0.3,0.2,0.9,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3"

202

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Natural Gas",69.2,27.4,19.8,11.3,6.7,4 "Propane/LPG",48.9,19.6,14.6,5.5,6.8,2.5 "Wood",13.1,5,4,1.5,1.4,1.2 "Fuel Oil",7.7,4.6,2.9,"Q","Q","Q" "Kerosene",1.7,0.8,0.7,0.1,"Q","Q"

203

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,"Q",0.2,0.1,0.3,0.2,0.1,0.1 1,24.2,4.2,1.2,3.1,3,3.8,3.7,2.9,2.3 2,37.5,4.7,1.9,4.3,4.5,6.4,6.2,5,4.4 3,26.6,2.9,1,3.1,3,4.4,3.7,4.1,4.4 4,14.2,1.4,0.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,1.9,2.3,2.7 "5 or More",9.7,0.9,0.4,1.2,1,1.3,1.3,1.9,1.7

204

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Fuels Used and End Uses",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Natural Gas",69.2,18,21.6,11.5,9.8,8.2 "Propane/LPG",48.9,8.3,17.6,8.4,8.3,6.3 "Wood",13.1,2.3,4.8,2.3,2,1.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,2.2,2.4,1.1,1.1,0.9 "Kerosene",1.7,0.4,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.3

205

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,10.5,4,10.6,10.5,15.1,14.1,14.7,14.4 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,0.9,0.2,0.8,0.6,0.8,0.9,0.3,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,3,0.9,2.2,2.2,2.4,2,1.3,0.8

206

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.5,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q","Q",0.1,0.3 1,24.2,8,6.4,4.2,2.5,1.1,0.7,1.2,4.8 2,37.5,8.7,10.3,6.7,4.6,2.7,1.4,3.1,5.9 3,26.6,4.2,6.3,5.4,3.6,2.6,1.6,2.9,3.5

207

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Water Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.5,0.2,0.3,0.3,0.5,0.3,0.3,0.5 1,108.1,13.7,4.9,13,12.8,17.5,16.3,15.6,14.4 "2 or More",2.7,0.3,"Q",0.3,0.2,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.6 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,14,5,13.2,13,17.9,16.6,16,14.9

208

" Million Housing Units, Preliminary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, By Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Preliminary" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Computers and Other Electronics",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.9,7.6,3,1.8,2.1 1,46.9,14.5,15.5,6.7,5.7,4.5 2,24.3,3.1,9.3,4.6,4.2,3.1 3,9.5,0.5,2.6,2.5,2.3,1.7 4,3.6,0.2,0.6,0.9,1.2,0.7 "5 or More",2,0.1,0.3,0.4,0.5,0.7 "Most-Used Computer" "Computer Type" "Desktop",48.3,10.5,16.2,7.9,7.4,6.3

209

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Household Demographics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,11.3,9.4,5,2.8,1.2,0.5,1,5 "2 Persons",35.8,5.7,8.3,7,5.3,3.1,2,4.3,3.9 "3 Persons",18.1,2.9,3.9,3.5,2.3,1.9,1.1,2.4,2.9

210

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Number of Household Members" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Number of Household Members" "1 Person",31.3,6,7.4,11.5,6.3 "2 Persons",35.8,6.3,8.5,13.4,7.6 "3 Persons",18.1,3.3,3.9,6.8,4.1 "4 Persons",15.7,3.1,3.5,5.8,3.3 "5 Persons",7.7,1.3,1.7,2.8,2 "6 or More Persons",5,0.8,0.9,1.8,1.5 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,4,5.5,10,4.3 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,4.3,6.5,10.7,6

211

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Natural Gas",69.2,13.8,19.4,17.7,18.3 "Propane/LPG",48.9,9.4,12.1,16.5,11 "Wood",13.1,2.5,2.9,4,3.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,6.3,0.5,0.7,0.2 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.4,0.6,0.2 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.5 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)"

212

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Fuels Used and End Uses" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Fuels Used for Any Use" "Electricity",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Natural Gas",69.2,10.9,3.8,10,9.1,10.1,8.2,8.6,8.4 "Propane/LPG",48.9,5.9,1.9,5.7,4.9,7.6,6.9,8.1,7.9 "Wood",13.1,1.4,0.5,1.5,1.5,2.5,2.7,1.9,1.1

213

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,5.6,1.3,3.4,2.6,2.6,2.2,1.5,1.6 "New England",5.5,1.8,0.3,0.7,0.6,0.7,0.8,0.3,0.4 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,3.8,1.1,2.7,2,1.9,1.4,1.1,1.2

214

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Water Heating",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,0.9,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.3 1,108.1,30.2,33.9,17.3,14.9,11.9 "2 or More",2.7,0.2,1.1,0.4,0.4,0.5 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters2" 0,110.4,30.6,34.8,17.5,15.2,12.3 1,3.1,0.7,1,0.5,0.5,0.4 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

215

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,12.4,9,3.6,1.5,0.4,0.1,0.3,8.4 1,46.9,8.2,13,10.6,6.7,3.7,1.8,2.8,5.8 2,24.3,2.2,4.1,4.6,3.7,2.9,2.2,4.6,1.8 3,9.5,0.6,1,1.6,1.5,1.6,1,2.3,0.5

216

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Televisions",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.6,0.4,0.2,0.2,0.2 1,24.2,8.5,6.9,2.7,4.1,2 2,37.5,12.4,11.6,5.1,6.2,2.1 3,26.6,8.9,8.5,3.2,4.7,1.2 4,14.2,4.8,4.7,1.8,2.4,0.6 "5 or More",9.7,3.6,3.3,1,1.5,0.3 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,4.4,4,1.3,2.1,0.6

217

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,4.7,6.7,11.1,4.8 1,46.9,8.7,10.6,17.2,10.3 2,24.3,4.3,5.5,8.7,5.8 3,9.5,2.1,1.9,3.1,2.4 4,3.6,0.7,0.8,1.4,0.8 "5 or More",2,0.4,0.3,0.6,0.7 "Most-Used Computer" "Computer Type" "Desktop",48.3,9.1,11,16.8,11.4 "Flat-Panel LCD Monitor",38.3,7.3,8.4,13.4,9.3 "Standard Monitor",10,1.9,2.6,3.4,2.1

218

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Televisions",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,1,0.3,"Q","Q",0.1 1,24.2,12.9,6.7,2.2,1.3,1.1 2,37.5,11.6,13.6,5.4,4,2.8 3,26.6,4,9.1,5.7,4.5,3.3 4,14.2,1.2,3.9,2.9,3.3,2.8 "5 or More",9.7,0.6,2.1,1.7,2.6,2.7 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,4.9,3.9,1.4,1.1,1.2

219

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Number of Household Members",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "2009 Annual Household Income" "Less than $20,000",23.7,11.3,5.7,2.9,2,1.9 "$20,000 to $39,999",27.5,9.4,8.3,3.9,3,2.9 "$40,000 to $59,000",21.2,5,7,3.5,3,2.6 "$60,000 to $79,999",14.2,2.8,5.3,2.3,2.2,1.6 "$80,000 to $99,999",9.3,1.2,3.1,1.9,1.7,1.3 "$100,000 to $119,999",5.7,0.5,2,1.1,1.4,0.7

220

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" 6 Water Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold/","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry/" "Water Heating",,"Cold",,"Hot-Dry","Hot-Humid","Marine" "Total Homes",113.6,38.8,35.4,14.1,19.1,6.3 "Number of Storage Tank Water Heaters" 0,2.9,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.4,0.1 1,108.1,36.8,33.9,13.3,18,6 "2 or More",2.7,0.7,0.8,0.4,0.7,0.1 "Number of Tankless Water Heaters3" 0,110.4,37.4,34.6,13.7,18.5,6.1 1,3.1,1.3,0.8,0.4,0.5,0.1 "2 or More",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Computers and Other Electronics in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Computers and Other Electronics" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Computers" "Number of Computers" 0,27.4,3.8,1.7,3.8,3.9,4.6,4.4,3.1,2.1 1,46.9,6,2.1,5.3,5.4,7.8,7,6.5,6.7 2,24.3,3,0.9,2.8,2.5,3.7,3.3,4.1,4 3,9.5,1.1,0.3,1.1,1,1.4,1.4,1.7,1.6 4,3.6,0.4,0.1,0.4,0.3,0.6,0.5,0.6,0.8

222

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Space Heating" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Space Heating Equipment" "Use Space Heating Equipment",110.1,14.2,5,13.1,12.7,17.5,16.4,16,15.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment But Do " "Not Use It",2.4,0.2,"Q",0.3,0.3,0.5,0.4,0.3,0.3 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.1,0.1,0.1,0.2,0.3,0.1,0.1,"Q"

223

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Televisions in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Televisions" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Televisions" "Number of Televisions" 0,1.5,0.4,0.3,0.5,0.4 1,24.2,4.6,5.4,8.1,6.1 2,37.5,7,8,13.8,8.5 3,26.6,4.5,6.1,10.5,5.3 4,14.2,2.2,3.4,5.7,2.9 "5 or More",9.7,1.9,2.7,3.4,1.5 "Most-Used Television" "Display Size" "Less than 21 Inches",12.5,2.3,3,4.7,2.5 "21 to 36 Inches",53.6,10.5,12.8,19.5,10.9 "37 Inches or More",46,7.6,9.8,17.4,11.1

224

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.8 66.1 142.2 130 60 102.3 37 1,309 0.61 1,033 377 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.0 12.5 34.4 175 64 121.7 44 1,942 0.71 1,353 490 New England 4.2 3.0 9.1 173 56 121.9 43 1,991 0.65 1,402 498 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.5 25.2 175 66 121.7 44 1,926 0.73 1,338 487

225

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,038 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,028 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,041 0.70 1,491 555

226

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

227

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 107.0 85.2 211.3 116 47 92.2 36 1,875 0.76 1,493 583 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 153 49 106.6 44 2,501 0.81 1,741 715 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 152 47 115.3 48 2,403 0.75 1,825 768 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 154 50 103.4 42 2,541 0.83 1,710 696

228

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.5 181.2 131 55 103.6 40 1,620 0.68 1,282 491 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 173 60 122.4 47 2,157 0.74 1,526 583 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 168 59 123.1 48 2,094 0.73 1,532 598 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 175 60 122.1 46 2,180 0.75 1,523 578

229

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 86.3 67.5 144.4 134 63 104.7 39 1,437 0.67 1,123 417 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 176 65 125.2 46 2,033 0.75 1,443 533 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 174 61 127.6 46 2,010 0.70 1,471 527 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 177 67 124.5 46 2,040 0.77 1,435 535

230

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 90.5 70.4 156.8 130 58 100.8 39 1,388 0.62 1,080 416 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 179 64 124.4 48 1,836 0.66 1,276 494 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 174 61 121.0 47 1,753 0.62 1,222 475 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.3 28.4 181 65 125.4 48 1,860 0.67 1,292 499

231

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (millionBtu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.1 66.1 144.2 141 64 111.7 40 1,256 0.58 998 356 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 194 67 131.6 46 2,016 0.70 1,365 475 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 181 63 123.9 44 2,018 0.71 1,384 492 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 199 68 134.0 46 2,016 0.69 1,359 470

232

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.3 34.8 199 70 138.3 49 1,874 0.66 1,301 459 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 197 65 134.4 47 1,964 0.65 1,341 466 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 200 72 139.5 49 1,846 0.66 1,288 456

233

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,034 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,023 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,037 0.70 1,491 555

234

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

235

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S. Housing Units........................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units........................................ Housing Units........................................ 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Heating Equipment........................... 1.2 Q Q N 0.3 0.8 Have Space Heating Equipment............................. 109.8 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.7 22.0 Use Space Heating Equipment.............................. 109.1 10.9 26.0 27.3 23.2 21.7 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.......................... 0.8 N N Q 0.5 Q Space Heating Usage During 2005 Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None.................................................................. 3.6 Q 0.5 Q 1.4 1.4 1 to 499............................................................. 6.1 0.2 1.2 1.5 1.9 1.2 500 to 999.......................................................... 27.7 2.3 6.9 6.5 6.5 5.6 1,000 to 1,499....................................................

236

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

237

On-site Housing Unit Types | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On-site Housing Unit Types On-site Housing Unit Types Registration is required for all computers, wireless notebooks or other network devices used on the BNL Network. Devices that are not registered will be disconnected from the network. Apartments Apartments are available in 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms. They are fully furnished and supplied with linens, kitchen utensils and cookware. Utilities are included in the rental price. *Note: These units do NOT have air conditioning. Each unit is equipped with DSL connection, satellite television and a microwave. Cisco Wireless Access Points (WAPs) connections are also available in Buildings 2-10. More Photos (PDF) Cavendish House The Cavendish house is a male dormitory consisting of 83 private single occupancy rooms equipped with air conditioning, Ethernet connection and

238

Table HC1-8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC1-8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor:

239

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone1

240

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Boulder, Colorados SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Policy Brief is an excerpt from the report: "Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households." For the full report and other resources visit: http://middleincome.lbl.gov March 20, 2012 Boulder, Colorado's SmartRegs: Minimum Performance Standards for Residential Rental Housing The Case for Performance Standards The City of Boulder's Climate Action Plan calls for greenhouse gas emissions reductions across all sectors of the community (e.g., buildings, transportation and industry). Energy conservation in new and existing buildings plays a key role in the plan's ambitious goals. In 2006, Boulder residents overwhelmingly approved a Climate Action Tax to fund Climate Action Plan efforts. For more than a decade the city has been incrementally strengthening minimum energy efficiency standards for residential

244

Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation  

SciTech Connect

In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

245

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,5.6,1.8,3.3,2.4,2.7,2.3,1.5,0.9 "New England",5.5,1.9,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.6,0.6,0.4,0.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.8,1.4,2.6,1.9,2.1,1.7,1.1,0.6 "Midwest",25.6,4.1,2.3,3.2,3.2,4,2.8,4.1,1.8

246

Housing, Credit Constraints, and Macro Stability: The Secondary Mortgage Market and Reduced Cyclicality of Residential Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the volatility of residential investment shrank relativethe volatility of residential investment, the secondaryand Reduced Cyclicality of Residential Investment Joe Peek

Peek, Joe; Wilcox, James A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States? A Scoping ­ Project development time ­ Economies of scale in residential system size ­ Chinese module market share · Summary · Bibliography 3 #12;Motivation, Scope, and Limitations · The installed price of residential PV

248

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,12,6.2,10,10.3,15.3,15.9,14.5,7.6 "1.",28.6,3.5,2.1,3.8,3.3,5.2,5,3.6,2.2 "2.",29.5,4.2,2.2,3.5,3.3,4.9,5,4.5,2

249

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q","Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,14.7,7.4,12.4,12.2,18.5,18.3,17.1,9.2 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,14.6,7.3,12.4,12.2,18.2,18.2,17.1,9.1

250

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have But Do Not Use Equipment",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

251

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,30,"N","N","N","N" "2 Persons",34.8,"N",34.8,"N","N","N" "3 Persons",18.4,"N","N",18.4,"N","N" "4 Persons",15.9,"N","N","N",15.9,"N"

252

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2010 Five Largest Residential Homebuilders Homebuilder PulteGroup 5.3% D.R. Horton 5.9% NVR 3.1% Lennar Corporation 3.4% KB Home 2.3% Top Five Total 19.9% Habitat for Humanity (3) 0.1% Note(s): Source(s): 6,032 402 1) 2010 total U.S. new home closings were 323,000 (only single-family). 2) Total share of closings of top 20 builders was 35%. Total share of the top 100 builders was 54%. 3) Habitat for Humanity built more than 400 homes during the week of May 31, 2007; Habitat for Humanity has built over 1,000 homes in the New Orleans area since Hurricane Katrina. Habitat for Humanity's 2,100 worldwide affiliates have completed more than 200,000 homes since 1976, providing more than 1,000,000 with housing. Housing Giants Magazine, May 2011, Professional Builder's 2011 Housing Giants Rankings.

255

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2010 Breather-less Electronic Control Unit (ECU) Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control Unit (ECU) Housing Overview Mando's current ECU housing design has a breather-hole to balance the variation in temperature found inside and outside of the housing unit. Mando's customers are concerned that debris and contaminates are entering the housing unit and damaging the ECU, so they would like to remove

Demirel, Melik C.

256

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,10.3,25.2,26.2,23,21.7 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,0.7,0.6,0.9,1.1 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,0.2,0.5,"Q","Q" "Housing Units Served by Main Water Heater" "One Housing Unit",99.7,10.1,22.9,23,22,21.7

257

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units................................................. 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.................................................................

258

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.... .... 111.1 10.9 26.1 27.3 24.0 22.8 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 3.2 4.7 3.6 5.5 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 7.7 21.4 23.7 18.5 21.9 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 7.6 21.0 23.4 17.9 21.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 Q 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.3 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 2, 3 Central System..................................................... 65.9 4.8 12.3 15.1 14.9 18.7 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 4.7 11.5 11.6 12.3 13.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 Q 0.9 3.5 2.7 5.2 Window/Wall Units.............................................. 28.9 3.1 9.3 8.8 4.0 3.7 1 Unit.................................................................

259

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment........................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment........................................ 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment......................................... 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it........................ 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System...................................................... 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump......................................... 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump.............................................. 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units................................................. 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.................................................................

260

Table HC2.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings Housing With--Units (millions) Energy Information Administration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Million U.S. Housing Units Total.....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment....................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................... 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment..................................... 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................... 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System................................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................... 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump......................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units............................................ 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit.............................................................

262

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Evaluation of a Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado Jesse Dean and Otto VanGeet National Renewable Energy Laboratory Scott Simkus Boulder County Housing Authority Mark Eastment Mountain Energy Partnership Technical Report NREL/TP-7A40-51450 March 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette,

263

Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the 111.1 million housing units in the United States. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the data.

...

264

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

265

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,5.7,3.3,4.6,4.7,5.8,5.7,4,1.7 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9,4.1,7.9,7.8,13.1,12.9,13.3,7.5 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC"

266

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Coolling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2 " "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

267

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" Space Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","Q","Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,14.7,7.4,12.4,12.2,18.5,18.3,17.1,9.2 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,14.6,7.3,12.4,12.2,18.2,18.2,17.1,9.1

268

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Household Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,7.3,5,2.3 "2 Persons",34.8,8.4,5.7,2.7 "3 Persons",18.4,4.1,3,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3.2,2.2,1 "5 Persons",7.9,1.8,1.4,0.4 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.4,0.3 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,2.3,1.8,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,2,1.4,0.6

269

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.3,0.3,"Q",0.2,0.2 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,29.7,34.5,18.2,15.6,11.8 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,29.5,34.4,18.1,15.5,11.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

270

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,5.7,3.3,4.6,4.7,5.8,5.7,4,1.7 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,9,4.1,7.9,7.8,13.1,12.9,13.3,7.5 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,5.8,2.8,6.1,5.1,9.3,8.7,7.8,4.8

271

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Household Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,11.5,6.2,2.1,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,12.5,6.5,2.1,3.9 "3 Persons",18.4,7,4,1.1,1.8 "4 Persons",15.9,5.6,2.9,1.2,1.5 "5 Persons",7.9,2.9,1.5,0.3,1.1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.2,0.5,"Q",0.6 "2005 Annual Household Income Category"

272

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.2,4.7,3.6,5.5,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,7.7,21.4,23.7,18.5,21.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,7.6,21,23.4,17.9,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q",0.4,0.4,0.6,0.3

273

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Northeast" "Household Characteristics",,,"Middle Atlantic","New England" "Total",111.1,20.6,15.1,5.5 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,5.5,3.8,1.7 "2 Persons",34.8,6.5,4.8,1.7 "3 Persons",18.4,3.4,2.4,1.1 "4 Persons",15.9,3,2.4,0.7 "5 Persons",7.9,1.4,1.2,0.2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.7,0.6,0.1 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,1.9,1.4,0.5 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,1.8,1.4,0.4

274

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1,0.8,1,1.2,1.4,1.2,1,0.6 "2 Times A Day",24.6,3.6,1.7,2.3,2.9,4.6,3.8,3.9,1.9 "Once a Day",42.3,5.4,2.5,4.7,4.5,7,7.9,6.6,3.8

275

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.9,6.5,4.6,7.6 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,30.3,12.5,18.1,14.7 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,21.1,8.3,10.7,10.1 "2.",16.2,6.2,2.8,4.1,3 "3 or More",9,2.9,1.4,3.2,1.6 "Number of Laptop PCs" "1.",22.5,9.1,3.6,6,3.8 "2.",4,1.5,0.6,1.3,0.7

276

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,5.4,5.3,2.7,2.5,2 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,24.6,29.6,15.7,13.4,10 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,24,29.1,15.5,13.2,9.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,0.6,0.5,"Q",0.2,0.4 "Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment1, 2" "Central System",65.9,15.3,22.6,10.7,9.9,7.3

277

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" HC8.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total U.S.",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,46.2,18.8,22.5,22.1 "1.",103.3,44.1,17.8,21.2,20.2 "2 or More",6.2,2.1,1,1.3,1.9 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,1,"Q",0.2,"Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,26.8,11.5,14.4,15.1 "Natural Gas",36.4,19.2,6.9,7.6,2.7

278

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Most-Used Personal Computer" "Type of PC" "Desk-top Model",58.6,10,20,11.2,10.1,7.3 "Laptop Model",16.9,3.7,5.4,3.2,3.1,1.5 "Hours Turned on Per Week"

279

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,1.4,1.9,1.4,1,2.4 "2 Times A Day",24.6,4.3,7.6,4.3,4.8,3.7 "Once a Day",42.3,9.9,14.4,7.4,6.7,4 "A Few Times Each Week",27.2,8.9,9.1,4.6,3.1,1.5 "About Once a Week",3.9,2.2,1,0.5,"Q","Q"

280

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" HC5.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,14.4,7.2,12.4,12.4,18.6,18.3,17.2,9.1 "1.",103.3,13.5,6.8,11.8,11.5,17.7,17.5,16.1,8.4 "2 or More",6.2,1,0.4,0.6,0.8,0.9,0.8,1.1,0.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Electronics Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,16.3,9.4,4,2.7,3.2 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,13.8,25.4,14.4,13.2,8.8 "Number of Desktop PCs" "1.",50.3,11.9,17.4,8.5,7.3,5.2 "2.",16.2,1.5,5.8,3.8,3.3,1.9 "3 or More",9,0.4,2.2,2.1,2.7,1.7 "Number of Laptop PCs"

282

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,29.5,34.4,18.2,15.7,11.8 "1.",103.3,28.4,32,17.3,14.7,11 "2 or More",6.2,1.1,2.5,1,0.9,0.8 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,0.6,0.4,"Q","Q","Q" "Most-Used Oven Fuel" "Electric",67.9,18.2,22.5,11.2,9.5,6.5

283

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,14,7.2,12.2,12,18.4,17.7,16.1,8.8 "2 or More",3.7,0.6,"Q","Q",0.3,0.3,0.7,1.1,0.4 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q","Q"

284

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Space Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"Q","Q","N",0.3,0.8 "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,10.9,26,27.3,23.7,22 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,10.9,26,27.3,23.2,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use It",0.8,"N","N","Q",0.5,"Q"

285

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.for Residential Winter and Summer Air Conditioning.Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Washington, DC. 10.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,38.6,15.3,19.5,18.3 "1.",28.6,14.3,4.6,4.8,5 "2.",29.5,12.1,4.9,6.2,6.3 "3.",14.7,5.7,2.6,3.4,2.9 "4.",9.3,3.3,1.5,2.2,2.3 "5 or More",9.7,3.3,1.7,2.9,1.8 "Energy-Efficient Bulbs Used",31.1,13.6,5.1,6.8,5.5

287

In search of an affordable housing system for Shanghai, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1998, the Chinese government abandoned the danwei ("work-unit") housing allocation system and fully privatized the housing market. Since then, the residential price has never stopped increasing despite the past financial ...

Sun, Linyun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Year of Construction Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,4.6,2.5,3.7,3.2,5.4,5.5,3.7,1.6 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,1.9,4.4,4.1,5.9,5.3,5.5,3.4 "3 Persons",18.4,2.5,1.3,1.7,1.9,2.9,3.5,2.8,1.6 "4 Persons",15.9,1.9,0.8,1.5,1.6,3,2.5,3.1,1.4

291

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "West Divisions and States" "Mountain",7.9,1928,1695,1105,723,635,415 "Mountain North",3.9,2107,1858,912,776,684,336 "Colorado",1.9,2082,1832,722,896,788,311 "Idaho, Montana, Utah, Wyoming",2,2130,1883,1093,691,610,354

292

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "Midwest Divisions and States" "East North Central",17.9,2251,1869,1281,892,741,508 "Illinois",4.8,2186,1911,1451,860,752,571 "Michigan",3.8,1954,1559,962,729,582,359 "Wisconsin",2.3,2605,2091,1258,1105,887,534

293

ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand model (ORNL-RRHED). Volume 4. Case studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use and structure of the ORNL Residential Reference House Energy Demand Model (RRHED). RRHED is a computer-based engineering-economic end-use simulation model which forecasts energy demand based on a detailed evaluation of how households use energy for particular appliances. The report is organized into four volumes. The first volume provides an overview of the modeling approach and gives a short summary of the material presented in the other three volumes. The second volume is a user reference guide which provides the details necessary for users of the model to run the code and make changes to fit their particular application. Volume 3 presents the basic theoretical rationale for the RRHED model structure. The last volume reports on the application of the model to the analysis of two different kinds of issues: one is the examination of conservation policy impacts and the other is the forecasting of electricity demand in a need for power assessment. The report has two major objectives. The first is to provide a reader with little background in end-use modeling with an introduction to how the RRHED model works. The second is to provide the details needed by a user of the model to understand not only the theory behind the model specification, but also the structure of the code. This information will allow for the modification of subroutines to fit particular applications.

Hamblin, D.M.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Maddigan, R.J.; Forman, C.W. Jr.; Bibo, L.J.; McKeehan, K.M.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abbreviated report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project.

Dean, J.; Van Geet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL CLIMATES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL on the energy needs of HVAC system. We'll apply the method on the tropical Reunion Island. The methodological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

296

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5% of the total space conditioning) and the intermittentsupply lead to greater space conditioning energy use. AnnualkWh Distribution Ventilation Space Conditioning Leaky House

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United Why Are Residential PV Prices in Germany So Much Lower Than in the United States? Speaker(s): Joachim Seel Date: April 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ryan Wiser The installed price of residential PV is significantly lower in Germany than in the United States - in Q3 2012 German systems were priced on average at $2.50/W while U.S. systems were priced nearly twice as high around $5.20/W. These pricing differences accumulate to about $13,500 for a 5kW residential system and stem primarily from differences in "soft" costs, but little detail is known about how soft cost components differ between the two countries, or why. In order to better characterize the nature of these differences, LBNL fielded surveys of German PV installers,

298

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,8.2,22.3,23.1,19.7,18.4 "1.",28.6,2.3,7.1,6.7,6.4,6.2 "2.",29.5,2.6,6.9,7.7,6.6,5.7 "3.",14.7,1.3,4.1,3.4,2.9,3

299

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace2" "Fewer than 500",3.2,"Q",0.8,0.9,0.8,0.5 "500 to 999",23.8,1.5,5.4,5.5,6.1,5.3 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,1.4,4,5.2,5,5.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,1.4,3.1,3.5,3.6,3.8

300

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members","5 or More Members" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,30,34.8,18.4,15.9,12 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.7,0.8,0.4,0.3,"Q" "500 to 999",23.8,10.2,6.4,3.4,2.3,1.5 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.5,6.3,3,3.3,2.6 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,3.8,4.7,2.9,2.2,1.9 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,2.6,4,2.5,2,1.3 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,1.9,4.1,1.7,1.3,1.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Living Space Characteristics",,"City","Town","Suburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,2.1,0.6,"Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,13.6,3.7,3.2,3.2 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,9.5,3.7,3.4,4.2 "1,500 to 1,999",15.4,6.6,2.7,2.5,3.6 "2,000 to 2,499",12.2,5,2.1,2.8,2.4 "2,500 to 2,999",10.3,3.7,1.8,2.8,2.1 "3,000 to 3,499",6.7,2,1.4,1.7,1.6

302

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2005" "Air Conditioning Characteristics" "Total",111.1,14.7,7.4,12.5,12.5,18.9,18.6,17.3,9.2 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.9,1.8,2.2,2.1,3.1,2.6,1.7,0.4 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,10.8,5.6,10.3,10.4,15.8,16,15.6,8.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,10.6,5.5,10.3,10.3,15.3,15.7,15.3,8.6 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.6,0.4,0.3,"Q"

303

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" "Household Characteristics",,"City","Town","Surburbs","Rural" "Total",111.1,47.1,19,22.7,22.3 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,14.7,5.1,5.1,5.1 "2 Persons",34.8,12.8,6.1,7.5,8.5 "3 Persons",18.4,7.6,3,3.8,3.9 "4 Persons",15.9,6.8,2.6,3.3,3.1 "5 Persons",7.9,3.3,1.5,2.1,1 "6 or More Persons",4.1,1.9,0.7,0.8,0.7 "2005 Annual Household Income Category" "Less than $9,999",9.9,5.2,1.6,1.2,1.9 "$10,000 to $14,999",8.5,4.5,1.6,0.8,1.6

304

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,3.2,4.7,3.6,5.5,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,7.7,21.4,23.7,18.5,21.9 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,7.6,21,23.4,17.9,21.7 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,"Q",0.4,0.4,0.6,0.3

305

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,2.6,7.9,7.3,6.5,5.8 "2 Persons",34.8,4.3,7.7,8.2,7.1,7.5 "3 Persons",18.4,1.8,4.2,4.8,3.9,3.7 "4 Persons",15.9,1.2,3.7,4,3.9,2.9 "5 Persons",7.9,0.7,1.8,2,1.4,2 "6 or More Persons",4.1,0.3,0.8,1,1.1,0.8

306

" Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" 9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Climate Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Climate Zone1" ,,"Less than 2,000 CDD and --",,,,"2,000 CDD or More and Less than 4,000 HDD" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Greater than 7,000 HDD","5,500 to 7,000 HDD","4,000 to 5,499 HDD","Less than 4,000 HDD" "Home Appliances Characteristics" "Total U.S.",111.1,10.9,26.1,27.3,24,22.8 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,10.9,25.7,27.1,23.4,22.4 "1.",103.3,10.2,24.3,25.3,22.2,21.3 "2 or More",6.2,0.6,1.5,1.8,1.2,1.1 "Do Not Use an Oven",1.5,"Q",0.3,"Q",0.6,0.4

307

Examination of Housing Price Impacts on Residential Properties Before and After Superfund Remediation Using Spatial Hedonic Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although recent brownfields redevelopment research using theories of real estate valuation and neighborhood change have indicated negative effects on surrounding residential housing, little evidence exists to show price impacts and sociodemographic change after remediation. This study examines the extent and size of the economic impact of Superfund sites on surrounding single-family residential properties before and after remediation in Miami-Dade County and examines trends for contemporaneous sociodemographic changes. The study combines the economic impact from changes in environmental quality with contemporaneous sociodemographic changes within the purview of environmental and social justice. This study uses spatial hedonic price modeling on a comprehensive dataset of property-level data, with corresponding sales prices of housing transactions while controlling for other structural, neighborhood, and submarkets characteristics for assessing economic impact. Findings revealed that housing sales prices for single-family residential properties significantly increases as distance to the nearest contaminated Superfund increases. Following remediation, this negative impact declined and housing values increased significantly in neighborhoods with remedied Superfund sites albeit more so in low housing submarkets than premium submarkets. Spatial hedonic models outperformed traditional OLS models in presenting unbiased efficient parameter estimates, correcting for spatial dependence. Although no evidence for gentrification was observed, there existed significant differences between certain sociodemographic characteristics of neighborhoods around contaminated Superfund sites and those of properties located elsewhere leading to concerns of environmental and social justice. Findings suggest that low-income minority populations are more likely to be living in neighborhoods around contaminated Superfund sites and experience a greater negative effect on housing sales prices; these sites are also less likely to be remedied as compared to sites located elsewhere. The findings highlight not only the revealed preferences of homeowners with respect to environmental disamenities, but also help inform policymakers and researchers of the impact of brownfields redevelopment on economic and sociodemographic characteristics of a growing urban region with evolving cultural and social diversity. Incorporating influences of housing submarkets, neighborhood amenities, and spatial dependence help provide a holistic and comprehensive model for examining environmental disamenities and provide a better understanding for neighborhood change.

Mhatre, Pratik Chandrashekhar

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

309

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and

310

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

" Million U.S. Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million U.S. Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,4,4.3,3.5,2.8,1.9,1.5,2.8,2.9 "New England",5.5,1.1,1,1,0.8,0.5,0.4,0.8,0.8

312

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region" "Northeast",0.5,1030,968,711,524,492,362 "Midwest",1.1,1090,1069,595,400,392,218 "South",3.9,1128,1008,894,423,378,335 "West",1.4,995,867,466,369,322,173 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",3.5,1002,919,684,396,364,271

313

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region" "Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",88.1,1857,1546,1148,728,607,450

314

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "South Divisions and States" "South Atlantic",22.2,1944,1687,1596,771,668,633 "Virginia",3,2227,1977,1802,855,759,692 "Georgia",3.5,2304,1983,1906,855,736,707 "Florida",7,1668,1432,1509,690,593,625 "DC, DE, MD, WV",3.4,2218,1831,1440,864,713,561

315

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census Region" "Northeast",12.7,2843,2150,1237,1009,763,439 "Midwest",19.2,2721,2249,1664,1019,842,624 "South",29.7,2232,1945,1843,828,722,684 "West",16.9,2100,1712,1009,725,591,348 "Urban and Rural3"

316

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Northeast Divisions and States" "New England",5.5,2232,1680,625,903,680,253 "Massachusetts",2.5,2076,1556,676,850,637,277 "CT, ME, NH, RI, VT",3,2360,1781,583,946,714,234 "Mid-Atlantic",15.3,2080,1657,1028,813,647,402

317

,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" 5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region" "Northeast",7.6,991,897,408,471,426,194 "Midwest",5.6,957,857,518,521,466,282 "South",8.4,924,846,819,462,423,410 "West",6.5,843,606,329,374,269,146 "Urban and Rural3" "Urban",26.9,927,803,531,450,390,258

318

"Table HC12.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total Midwest" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"East North Central","West North Central" "Total",111.1,25.6,17.7,7.9 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,9.7,7.3,2.4 "Town",19,5,2.9,2.1 "Suburbs",22.7,5.7,4.3,1.4 "Rural",22.3,5.2,3.3,1.9 "Climate Zone1" "Less than 2,000 CDD and--" "Greater than 7,000 HDD",10.9,6.9,4.9,"Q" "5,500 to 7,000 HDD",26.1,12.3,9.9,"Q"

319

"Table HC13.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"South Census Region" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Census Division" ,,"Total South" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"South Atlantic","East South Central","West South Central" "Total",111.1,40.7,21.7,6.9,12.1 "Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported)" "City",47.1,17.8,10.5,2.2,5.1 "Town",19,4.9,2.2,0.7,2 "Suburbs",22.7,7.6,4.1,1.1,2.4 "Rural",22.3,10.4,4.9,2.9,2.6 "Climate Zone1" "Less than 2,000 CDD and--" "Greater than 7,000 HDD",10.9,"N","N","N","N"

320

Residential Blink Charging Units Reporting Data in The EV Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blink Charging Units Reporting Data in The EV Project Project to Date through December 2012 Chicago 88 Atlanta 118 Philadelphia 37 Washington State 934 Oregon 632 San Francisco...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Econometric analysis of residential demand for fuelwood in the United States, 1980-1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an econometric study of residential fuelwood demand in the United States. It is based on a residential energy consumption survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy in 1980-1981. Estimates are derived of the probability that a particular household will burn wood and of the wood that will be burned. Aggregate fuelwood demand is predicted for five census regions and for the contiguous United States. The predicted average probability of burning wood is 0.32, and the average predicted quantity burned is 1.57 cords. Residential fuelwood demand is found to be quite responsive to changes in the price of nonwood heating fuel. 16 references.

Hardie, I.W.; Hanssan, A.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

1996-2004 Trends in the Single-Family Housing Market: Spatial Analysis of the Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed geographic analysis of two specific topics affecting the residential sector. First, we performed an analysis of new construction market trends using annual building permit data. We report summarized tables and national maps to help illustrate market conditions. Second, we performed a detailed geographic analysis of the housing finance market. We analyzed mortgage application data to provide citable statistics and detailed geographic summarization of the residential housing picture in the US for each year in the 1996-2004 period. The databases were linked to geographic information system tools to provide various map series detailing the results geographically. Looking at these results geographically may suggest potential new markets for TD programs addressing the residential sector that have not been considered previously. For example, we show which lenders affect which regions and which income or mortgage product classes. These results also highlight the issue of housing affordability. Energy efficiency R&D programs focused on developing new technology for the residential sector must be conscious of the costs of products resulting from research that will eventually impact the home owner or new home buyer. Results indicate that home values as a proportion of median family income in Building America communities are closely aligned with the national average of home value as a proportion of median income. Other key findings: The share of home building and home buying activity continues to rise steadily in the Hot-Dry and Hot-Humid climate zones, while the Mixed-Humid and Cold climate zone shares continue to decline. Other zones remain relatively stable in terms of share of housing activity. The proportion of home buyers having three times the median family income for their geography has been steadily increasing during the study period. Growth in the Hispanic/Latino population and to a lesser degree in the Asian population has translated into proportional increases in share of home purchasing by both groups. White home buyers continue to decline as a proportion all home buyers. Low interest rate climate resulted in lenders moving back to conventional financing, as opposed to government-backed financing, for cases that would be harder to financing in higher rate environments. Government loan products are one mechanism for affecting energy efficiency gains in the residential sector. The rate environment and concurrent deregulation of the finance industry resulted unprecedented merger and acquisition activity among financial institutions during the study period. This study conducted a thorough accounting of this merger activity to inform the market share analysis provided. The home finance industry quartiles feature 5 lenders making up the first quartile of home purchase loans, 18 lenders making up the second quartile, 111 lenders making up the third quartile, and the remaining nearly 8,000 lenders make up the fourth quartile.

Anderson, Dave M.; Elliott, Douglas B.

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Maximizing Residential Energy Savings: Net Zero Energy House (ZEH) Technology Pathways  

SciTech Connect

To meet current U.S. Department of Energy zero-energy home performance goals, new technologies and solutions must increase whole-house efficiency savings by an additional 40% relative to those provided by best available components and systems.

Anderson, R.; Roberts, D.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Table HC1.1.4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" 4 Housing Unit Characteristics by Average Floorspace--Apartments, 2005" ,,,"Average Square Feet per Apartment in a --" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"2 to 4 Unit Building",,,"5 or More Unit Building" ,,"Apartments (millions)" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Total","Heated","Cooled","Total","Heated","Cooled" "Total",111.1,24.5,1090,902,341,872,780,441 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,6.7,1247,1032,"Q",811,788,147 "New England",5.5,1.9,1365,1127,"Q",814,748,107 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,4.8,1182,978,"Q",810,800,159 "Midwest",25.6,4.6,1349,1133,506,895,810,346

325

"Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,65,54.3,3.3,1.5,1.6,4.4 "1.",28.6,17.9,14,0.9,0.6,0.7,1.7

326

"Table HC4.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,"Q","Q","Q",0.3,"Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,32.3,8,3.3,5.8,14.1,1.1

327

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

328

Impacts of alternative residential energy standards - Rural Housing Amendments Study, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

This report has examined the role of manufactured housing in the housing market, the energy impacts of three manufactured housing standards and three site-built standards in 13 cities, and the economic impacts of those standards in 6 cities. The three standards applied to manufactured housing are the HUD Title VI standard (Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, or MHCSS), the Hud Title II-E standard, and the existing FmHA Title V standard. Those applied to site-built homes are the HUD Minimum Property Standards (MPS), the ASHRAE 90A-80 standard, and the FmHA Title V standard. Based on energy consumption alone, these analyses show that the FmHA Title V standard is the most stringent standard for both housing types (a single-section menufactured home and a single-story detached ''ranch house''). The HUD Title VI standard is the least stringent for manufactured homes, while the HUD Minimum Property Standards are the least stringent for site-built homes. Cost-effectiveness comparisons required by the Act were made for the two prototypical homes. Results of this preliminary economic analysis indicate that none of the site-built standards reflect minimum life-cycle cost as a basic criterion of their development. For manufactured homes, both the FmHA standard and the HUD Title II-E standard reduce life-cycle cost and effect positive first-year cash flows in all cities analyzed when electric resistance heating is assumed. When natural gas heating is used, both standards pass the life-cycle cost test in all cities, but the FmHA standard fails the cash flow test in all but one city. However, in the worst case, net monthly expenditures in the first year are increased by less than $9.

Balistocky, S.; Bohn, A.A.; Heidell, J.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lee, A.D.; Pratt, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

2001 Housing Characteristics Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey-Housing Characteristics, 2001 Detailed Tables, Energy Information Administration

330

Table HC1-11a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, 1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- -- NF East North Central .....................................

331

Table HC1-12a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.1 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF West North Central ....................................

332

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 09 December 2009 Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Paul Denholm, Robert M. Margolis, Sean Ong, and Billy Roberts National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46909 December 2009 Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Paul Denholm, Robert M. Margolis, Sean Ong, and Billy Roberts Prepared under Task No. PVD9.1210 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

333

New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States energy grid Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 16 August, 2013 - 12:21 energy grid OpenEI President Smart Grid United States White House On Monday, the White House released a new report that identifies the one of the biggest problems facing today's power grid. As prepared by the President's Council of Economic Advisers, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability and the White House Office of Science and Technology, the report, entitled "Economic Benefits of Increasing Electric Grid Resilience to Weather Outages," states that the grid is extremely vulnerable to power outages due

334

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Table 2.7 Type of Heating in Occupied Housing Units, 1950-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood: Solar: Other 2: None 3: Total : Number of Occupied Housing Units; 1950. 14,483,420: 9,460,560 [4] 975,435: 11,121,860: 276,240: 4,171,690: NA: ...

336

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock,

337

EIA Energy Efficiency-Residential Sector Energy Intensities, 1978-2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Sector Energy Intensities Residential Sector Energy Intensities RESIDENTIAL SECTOR ENERGY INTENSITIES: 1978-2005 Released Date: August 2004 Page Last Modified:June 2009 These tables provide estimates of residential sector energy consumption and energy intensities for 1978 -1984, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1997, 2001 and 2005 based on the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Total Site Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) Html Excel PDF By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1a) html Table 1a excel table 1a. excel table 1a. Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1b) html table 1b excel table 1b excel table 1b Total Primary Energy Consumption (U.S. and Census Region) By Type of Housing Unit (Table 1c) html Table 1c excel table 1c excel table 1c Weather-Adjusted by Type of Housing Unit (Table 1d)

338

"Table HC15.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,7.1,"N","N","N" "New England",5.5,"N","N","N","N" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,7.1,"N","N","N" "Midwest",25.6,"N","N","N","N" "East North Central",17.7,"N","N","N","N"

339

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

340

Preliminary economic assessment or residential passive solar cooling potential in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many areas of the continental United States, residential cooling loads are equal to or greater than energy used for residential space heating. Offsetting part of the cooling load could yield considerable dollar savings to the consumer as well as total energy savings. The physical performances of three passive cooling designs are used to estimate the dollar value of first-year fuel savings (excluding heating benefits) and a maximum affordable design cost. The designs include natural ventilation, forced ventilation, and evaoprative cooling concepts. Because economic performance is primarily governed by the level of electricity prices, dollars savings are greatest in regions that show both good physical performance of the cooling design and high electricity prices. Physical and economic performance summaries are presented in mapped form for 220 solar regions within the continental United States.

Kirschner, C.; Mangeng, C.; Yemans, M.; Roach, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Housing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST is located in Gaithersburg, Maryland, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) from the center of Washington, DC Housing arrangements have been ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Breakeven Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities (Report Summary) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

"Break-even cost" for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this presentation, we introduce an analysis of PV break-even costs for residential customers in the United States, including an evaluation of some of the key drivers of PV breakeven both regionally and over time. This presentation includes our methodology and presents results for both near-term residential breakeven costs(2009) and future market sensitivities of break-even costs (2015). See also the the report "Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities". Presentation for NREL/TP-6A2-45991.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

"Table HC4.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,15.3,3,1.9,3.1,6.4,0.8 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,17.7,5,1.6,2.8,8,0.4 "Number of Desktop PCs"

344

"Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

345

"Table HC4.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked" "3 or More Times A Day",8.2,3.4,1,0.4,0.6,1.2,"Q" "2 Times A Day",24.6,8.6,2.3,1,1.6,3.5,0.2

346

"Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

347

"Table HC4.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,31.9,7.9,3.4,5.8,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",3.7,0.4,"Q","Q","Q","Q","N" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.7,"Q","Q","Q",0.6,"Q"

348

"Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

349

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

350

"Table HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" HC4.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Renter-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,33,8,3.4,5.9,14.4,1.2 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,32.3,7.9,3.3,5.9,14.1,1.1 "1.",103.3,31.4,7.6,3.3,5.7,13.7,1.1 "2 or More",6.2,0.9,0.3,"Q","Q",0.4,"Q"

351

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

352

"Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,20.3,14.8,1.2,0.6,0.9,2.8 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,57.8,49.2,2.9,1.2,1.4,3 "Number of Desktop PCs"

353

"Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,77.3,63.4,4.1,1.8,2.3,5.6 "1.",103.3,71.9,58.6,3.9,1.6,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",6.2,5.4,4.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q"

354

"Table HC3.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

355

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Hot-Dry/Mixed-Dry Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Mixed-Humid Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Mixed-Humid Climate Region on a cost-neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Development of an ASHRAE 152-2004 Duct Model for the Single-Family Residential House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the development of the duct model based on ASHRAE standard 152-2004 (ASHRAE, 2004) using the DOE-2.1e building energy simulation program. To accomplish this, FUNCTION commands for DOE-2 were used to develop the duct model and provide the improved predictions of the duct heat loss or gain from the unconditioned space as well as supply or return duct leakage. After applying the duct model to the DOE-2 base-case simulation model, simulation results were compared with the measurement from the case-study house for verification.

Kim, S.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Exploiting renewable energy resources for residential applications in coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electricity needs of a township or village situated in a coastal area can be satisfied partially by installing proposed residential electricity generating unit and solar heat extractor in houses. The rest of the electricity demands of the residential ... Keywords: PV panel, renewable energy, solar heater, solar tracker, wind mill

A. Cellatoglu; K. Balasubramanian

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Yearly Average Historic Mortgage Rates 30-Year Fixed 15-Year Fixed 1-Year ARM (1) 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Note(s): Source(s): 1) To calculate adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) rates, Freddie Mac indexes the products to US Treasury yields and asks lenders for both the initial coupon rate as well as the margin on the ARM products. US Department of Housing and Urban Development, US Housing Market Conditions: 3rd Quarter 2011, November 2011, Exhibit 14. Mortgage Interest Rates, Average Commitment Rates, and Points: 1973-Present. 5.04 4.57 4.70 4.69 4.10 3.78 6.34 6.03 5.56 6.03 5.62 5.17 5.87 5.42 4.49 6.41 6.07 5.54 5.83 5.17 3.76 5.84 5.21 3.90 6.97 6.50

360

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Annual Home Improvement Loan Origination Volumes and Values, by Housing Vintage of Loan Applicant Housing Vintage 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 1990-2000 N/A N/A N/A N/A 49 74 93 95 74 36 23 20 1980-1989 105 103 95 86 117 190 224 235 196 113 75 65 1970-1979 242 231 214 186 144 270 306 320 277 173 123 107 1960-1969 178 165 153 134 97 172 191 200 168 102 70 62 1950-1959 135 123 113 96 147 249 268 279 234 139 93 81 1949 or earlier 126 113 100 84 (1) Total Volume 786 735 675 586 553 955 1,083 1,128 949 563 383 335 Housing Vintage 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 1990-2000 N/A N/A N/A N/A 2.5 7.6 11.8 10.6 7.3 3.1 2.4 1.8 1980-1989 3.5 3.7 3.7 4.0 5.5 16.2 23.2 22.1 16.9 8.1 6.5 4.9 1970-1979 7.0 7.2 7.5 7.7 6.7 21.4 28.9 27.9 21.9 11.3 9.3 7.3 1960-1969 5.3 5.4 5.7 5.9 4.7 15.4 20.3 19.6 15.0 7.3 6.0 4.9 1950-1959 4.0 4.0 4.3 4.3 6.9 22.3 28.0 27.2 21.4 10.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2009 Sales Price and Construction Cost Breakdown of an Average New Single-Family Home ($2010) (1) Function Finished Lot 20% Construction Cost 59% Financing 2% Overhead & General Expenses 5% Marketing 1% Sales Commission 3% Profit 9% Total 100% Function Building Permit Fees 2% Impact Fees 1% Water and Sewer Inspection 2% Excavation, Foundation, & Backfill 7% Steel 1% Framing and Trusses 16% Sheathing 2% Windows 3% Exterior Doors 1% Interior Doors & Hardware 2% Stairs 1% Roof Shingles 4% Siding 6% Gutters & Downspouts 0% Plumbing 5% Electrical Wiring 4% Lighting Fixtures 1% HVAC 4% Insulation 2% Drywall 5% Painting 3% Cabinets, Countertops 6% Appliances 2% Tiles & Carpet 5% Trim Material 3% Landscaping & Sodding 3% Wood Deck/Patio 1% Asphalt Driveway 1% Other 9% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): NAHB, Breaking Down House Price and Construction Costs, 2010, Table 1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price

362

Investigation on the Standard for Energy and Environmental Designof Residential House in China  

SciTech Connect

In this research, the authors have carried out the researchto investigate the characteristics of building energy standards of theresidential building in China. Efforts have also been made to promote abetter understanding of the energy policy and relevant standard forarchitects and building designers to achieve optimal energy efficientbuilding design in China. The results can mainly summarized as follows:(1) As for the thermal environment design, the climate of China has beenclassified five zones. (2) The sunlight, lighting, ventilationenvironment of residential building have been specified in the newstandards. (3) Prescribed the building design elements, such as layout,orientation, shape, color, plan and the type of window. In particular,the thermal insulation measures for heating system has been added in hotsummer and cold winter region, which was not described in old standard.(4) It is admitted that there is still a difference compared with thestandard of many foreign countries, and the improvement in the furtherheat insulation performance and positive execution of the standardcontinue to be expected.

Yumiko, Ogawa; Weijun, Gao; Nan, Zhou; Toshiyuki, Watanabe; Hiroshi,Yoshino; Toshio, Ojima

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 41.8 35.3 2.8 1.2 1.0 1.6 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 34.8 29.7 2.3 0.7 0.6 1.4 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 34.3 29.5 2.3 0.6 0.6 1.4 For Two Housing Units..........................

364

Table HC4.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 Q Q Q 0.3 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 32.3 8.0 3.3 5.8 14.1 1.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 31.8 8.0 3.2 5.6 13.9 1.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.5 N Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 16.4 4.5 2.1 3.2 6.2 0.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 10.0 3.3 1.4 1.6 3.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 8.6 3.3 1.2 1.4 2.4 0.3 For Two Housing Units..........................

365

Table HC1-10a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, 0a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 -- -- -- NF New England ............................................. 5.4 -- -- -- NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 -- -- -- NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 24.5 17.1 7.4 NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 17.1

366

Table HC1-9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 9a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 20.3 14.8 5.4 NF New England ............................................. 5.4 5.4 Q 5.4 NF Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 14.8 14.8 Q NF Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 -- -- -- NF East North Central ..................................... 17.1 -- -- -- NF

367

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 Annual Sales of Existing Homes, by Region (thousands) North- Mid- east west South West 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source(s): HUD, US Housing Market Conditions: 3rd Quarter 2011, Nov. 2011, Exhibit 7: Existing Home Sales 1969-Present, p. 73. 868 1,163 1,914 1,211 5,156 817 1,076 1,860 1,154 4,907 1,006 1,327 2,235 1,084 5,652 849 1,129 1,865 1,070 4,913 1,169 1,588 2,702 1,617 7,076 1,086 1,483 2,563 1,346 6,478 1,019 1,468 2,283 1,405 6,175 1,113 1,550 2,540 1,575 6,778 912 1,271 1,967 1,184 5,334 952 1,346 2,064 1,269 5,631 910 1,246 1,850 1,177 5,183 911 1,222 1,866 1,174 5,173 812 1,088 1,474 997 4,371 898 1,228 1,724 1,115 4,965 717 1,010 1,315 810 3,852 772 1,060 1,394 941 4,167 709 1,027 1,262

368

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

369

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5). The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment and their installed costs over the projection horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the projection horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

370

Residential Energy Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Expenditures for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average household expenditures on energy for water heating in the United States in 2005. The data was collected as part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the United States. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the data. Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (6 years ago) Keywords Energy Expenditures Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Total.Expenditures.for_.Water_.Heating_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 70.1 KiB)

371

Residential HVAC Data, Assumptions and Methodology for End-Use Forecasting with EPRI-REEPS 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis: Studies in Residential Energy Demand. AcademicHousing Characteristics 1987, Residential Energy ConsumptionHousing Characteristics 1990, Residential Energy Consumption

Johnson, F.X.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

373

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

0 0 Home Price Index (HPI), All-Transactions, by Census Region (1)(2) New Mid. S. E-S W-S E-N W-N United Eng. Atl. Atl. Centrl Centrl Centrl Centrl MT Pacific States 1975 63.1 71.8 68.5 68.8 56.0 63.5 62.1 56.5 46.2 61.3 1976 69.2 73.9 71.5 71.7 62.8 68.7 68.1 61.6 54.7 66.6 1977 73.1 78.0 76.0 79.8 69.0 76.8 77.0 70.8 68.4 74.3 1978 86.3 82.7 85.6 90.7 81.6 89.5 88.4 83.9 80.1 85.3 1979 97.9 94.4 94.6 99.3 95.4 99.0 98.7 96.7 93.9 96.4 1980 106.6 106.4 104.1 103.9 104.0 102.3 104.0 105.3 105.8 104.4 1981 114.8 109.9 109.7 109.2 113.9 104.7 101.5 113.8 112.2 109.3 1982 119.6 114.5 113.8 107.9 120.7 100.3 103.2 115.7 113.7 111.0 1983 133.8 123.9 120.4 113.8 124.3 104.2 109.5 118.9 115.8 116.5 1984 155.9 139.0 124.9 116.9 125.0 106.1 114.4 121.7 119.4 121.7 1985 184.0 157.4 131.0 124.0 124.1 110.6 117.4 124.0 125.2 128.3 1986 223.2 182.6 138.9 130.1 124.1 117.9 122.1 127.3 132.0 136.9 1987 265.1

374

Table HC7-6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, 6a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 3.0 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 28.7 9.2 6.5 12.1 0.9 7.5 Personal Computers 1 ................... 14.3 5.3 2.9 5.9 0.3 10.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 11.0 4.0 2.4 4.4 0.3 11.4 2 or more .................................... 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.7 Q 30.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

375

Arctic house  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently available housing in the Arctic is limited to solutions that have been adapted from designs for less severe climates. This thesis has developed a new manner of residential construction designed specifically for ...

Turkel, Joel A. (Joel Abram), 1969-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

IID Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program IID Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Central AC/Heat Pumps (Early Retirement/Replacement): $2,500 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation (in pre-1978 houses): $0.60/sq ft Attic Insulation (in post-1978 houses): $0.15/sq ft Electric Attic Fan: $50 Solar Attic Fan: $125 Refrigerator: $50/unit Room Air Conditioner: $50/unit Dual Pane Windows: $2.00/sq ft Variable Speed Pool Pumps: $200 - $350/unit Central AC/Heat Pumps: $100 - $145/unit

377

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

378

Internet use and the duration of buying and selling in the residential housing market, economic incentives and voting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study we examine the impact of internet use on the duration of non-sequential search in the housing market. We develop a model of partial equilibrium in the housing market which suggests an ambiguous effect on the ...

D'Urso, Victoria Tanusheva, 1975-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EIA-Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" by appliance (or UEC-in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new

380

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of low-income households in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this study is to compare poor and non-poor households with respect to energy consumption and expenditures, housing characteristics, and energy-related behavior. We based our study on an analysis of a national data base created by the US Department of Energy, the 1982-1983 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). RECS includes detailed information on individual households: demographic characteristics, energy-related features of the structure, heating equipment and appliances, recent conservation actions taken by the household, and fuel consumption and costs for April 1982-March 1983. We found a number of statistically significant (at the 0.05 level) differences between the two income groups in terms of demographics, heating/cooling/water heating systems, appliance saturation, the thermal integrity of their home, energy conservation behavior, energy consumption, energy expenditures, and the percentage of income spent on energy costs. For example, the non-poor used 22% more energy and paid 25% more money on utilities than the poor; however, the poor spent 20% more energy per square foot than the non-poor and spent about 25% of their income on energy expenditures, compared to 7% for the non-poor. These differences suggest different approaches that might be taken for targeting energy conservation programs to low-income households. Since the poor's ''energy burden'' is large, informational, technical, and financial assistance to low-income households remains an urgent, national priority. 13 refs., 26 tabs.

Vine, E.L.; Reyes, I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential.gif (5487 bytes) residential.gif (5487 bytes) The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

383

Residential Housing Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PCs, Modems and Laser Printers: Main Heating Fuels: Household PC Usage : Use of Central Heating Systems: Stoves, Ovens and Microwaves: Main Central ...

384

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Break-even Cost for Residential Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-48986 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Break-even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities Hannah Cassard, Paul Denholm, and Sean Ong Prepared under Task No. SS10.2110 Technical Report

385

Technology transfer for residential energy programs in new construction and existing housing: A joint venture between the City of St. Louis and Hennepin County  

SciTech Connect

The St. Louis Year VII project built on previous work conducted in St. Louis to demonstrate the technology and financing of superinsulated housing, to implement a full-scale, energy efficient housing program in St. Louis. The project also involved the transfer of elements of the St. Louis program to assist Hennepin County in establishing a program to promote energy efficient new residential construction in Minnesota. During the project, Hennepin County (Minneapolis, Minnesota) presented the results of a performance contracting program implemented in Years V and VI to provide energy retrofit for existing homeowners in Minneapolis. This program has special appeal in St. Louis because of the difficulty in motivating middle-income homeowners to invest in conservation options.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluation of high performance evacuated tubular collectors in a residential heating and cooling system: Colorado State University Solar House I. Report for October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CSU Solar House I is configured with a prototype Corning evacuated tubular collector and a new Arkla lithium bromide water chiller designed for solar operation. Data have been collected for this configuration since January 1977. Prior to that time and since mid-1974, Solar House I has operated with a flat-plate collector and a previous Arkla LiBr air conditioner modified to operate in the lower solar temperature ranges. Project objectives were to develop an operating and control system for the new configuration and to compare the performance of the new residential solar heating, cooling, and hot water system with performance of the previous system. Many problems were encountered in the evolution of the operating and control systems due to the different operating characteristics of evacuated tubular collectors, such as their rapid thermal response and the possibility of much higher temperatures as compared to a flat-plate collector.

Duff, W.S.; Conway, T.M.; Loef, G.O.G.; Meredith, D.B.; Pratt, R.B.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Table HC11.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 1.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Total......................................................................... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Urban/Rural Location (as Self-Reported) City....................................................................... 47.1 6.9 4.7 2.2 Town..................................................................... 19.0 6.0 4.2 1.9 Suburbs................................................................ 22.7 4.4 4.0 0.5 Rural..................................................................... 22.3 3.2 2.3 0.9 Climate Zone 1 Less than 2,000 CDD and-- Greater than 7,000 HDD.................................... 10.9 1.9 Q 1.3 5,500 to 7,000 HDD........................................... 26.1 9.8 5.7 4.1 4,000 to 5,499 HDD...........................................

388

Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.6 1.3 1.1 1.0 0.9 1.4 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 33.8 3.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 3.3 4.2 4.9 7.8 2.6 6.8 6.4 New England .............................. 5.4 0.8 1.1 1.3 2.3 0.6 1.6 9.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 2.6 3.2 3.5 5.6 2.0 5.2 7.7 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 3.7 5.2 6.8 8.9 2.8 7.4 5.8 East North Central ......................

389

Table HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, 2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.1 1.1 0.8 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.5 2.4 2.1 2.8 3.0 8.5 8.8 New England .............................. 5.4 0.4 0.7 0.4 0.8 0.9 2.3 11.3 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 1.1 1.7 1.7 2.0 2.2 6.2 11.2 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 2.8 3.7 3.6 2.9 3.5 8.1 10.2 East North Central ...................... 17.1 2.0 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.6 5.5 11.9

390

Table HC1-8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, 8a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.3 1.3 1.4 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.2 Census Region and Division Northeast ..................................................... 20.3 7.7 4.5 4.7 3.4 7.4 New England ............................................. 5.4 2.1 1.6 0.7 1.1 13.4 Middle Atlantic ........................................... 14.8 5.6 2.9 4.0 2.3 8.5 Midwest ....................................................... 24.5 11.1 4.9 4.8 3.7 10.1 East North Central ..................................... 17.1 8.3 3.0 3.4 2.5

391

Table HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.8 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.0 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 20.3 1.9 10.0 8.4 Q Q 6.8 New England .............................. 5.4 1.4 4.0 Q Q Q 18.4 Middle Atlantic ............................ 14.8 0.5 6.0 8.4 Q Q 4.6 Midwest ......................................... 24.5 5.4 14.8 4.3 Q Q 19.0 East North Central ...................... 17.1

392

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1978. [CSU Solar House 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar House I, the first residential solar system test facility at the Colorado State University, is described. Provision was made for the removal and replacement of the various subsystems so that the facility could be utilized to evaluate other residential size solar components and systems. Two evacuated tube collectors and one flat plate collector were evaluated. The operations history, system performance, performance assessment, and comparison with model are included. (MHR)

Loef, G.O.G.; Duff, W.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Energy Savings and Breakeven Cost for Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) have recently reemerged in the U.S. residential water heating market and have the potential to provide homeowners with significant energy savings. However, there are questions as to the actual performance and energy savings potential of these units, in particular in regards to the heat pump's performance in unconditioned space and the impact of the heat pump on space heating and cooling loads when it is located in conditioned space. To help answer these questions, simulations were performed of a HPWH in both conditioned and unconditioned space at over 900 locations across the continental United States and Hawaii. Simulations included a Building America benchmark home so that any interaction between the HPWH and the home's HVAC equipment could be captured. Comparisons were performed to typical gas and electric water heaters to determine the energy savings potential and cost effectiveness of a HPWH relative to these technologies. HPWHs were found to have a significant source energy savings potential when replacing typical electric water heaters, but only saved source energy relative to gas water heater in the most favorable installation locations in the southern US. When replacing an electric water heater, the HPWH is likely to break even in California, the southern US, and parts of the northeast in most situations. However, the HPWH will only break even when replacing a gas water heater in a few southern states.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.; Merrigan, T.; Ong, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

395

LADWP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program LADWP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $65 Recycling Old Refrigerator/Freezer: $50 Clothes Washer: $300 Energy Star Windows: $2.00 per sq ft Cool Roofs: $0.30/sq. ft. Room Air Conditioner: $50 per unit Central Air Conditioner: $100 -$120/ton Heat Pump: $100/ton Whole House Fan $200 Variable/Multi-Speed Pool Pump and Motor: $500/unit Whole House Retrofits: up to $8,000

396

Break-Even Cost for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Grid parity--or break-even cost--for photovoltaic (PV) technology is defined as the point where the cost of PV-generated electricity equals the cost of electricity purchased from the grid. Break-even cost is expressed in $/W of an installed system. Achieving break-even cost is a function of many variables. Consequently, break-even costs vary by location and time for a country, such as the United States, with a diverse set of resources, electricity prices, and other variables. In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that local incentives rather than ?technical? parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R. M.; Ong, S.; Roberts, B.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the UnitedStates  

SciTech Connect

The first and only national norm for residential ventilation in the United States is Standard 62.2-2004 published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). This standard does not by itself have the force of regulation, but is being considered for adoption by various jurisdictions within the U.S. as well as by various voluntary programs. The adoption of 62.2 would require mechanical ventilation systems to be installed in virtually all new homes, but allows for a wide variety of design solutions. These solutions, however, may have a different energy costs and non-energy benefits. This report uses a detailed simulation model to evaluate the energy impacts of currently popular and proposed mechanical ventilation approaches that are 62.2 compliant for a variety of climates. These results separate the energy needed to ventilate from the energy needed to condition the ventilation air, from the energy needed to distribute and/or temper the ventilation air. The results show that exhaust systems are generally the most energy efficient method of meeting the proposed requirements. Balanced and supply systems have more ventilation resulting in greater energy and their associated distribution energy use can be significant.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1989. Residential End-Use Energy Consumption: A Survey ofCathy R. Zoi. 1986. Unit Energy Consumption of ResidentialResidential Unit Energy Consumption Coefficients, Palo Alto,

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Feasibility of Small-Scale Residential DC Distributionof a DC microgrid for residential houses. In Transmission &energy storage with PV for residential and commercial use.

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect

The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

About Residential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » About Residential Residential Buildings » About Residential About Residential The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with home builders, energy professionals, state and local governments, utilities, product manufacturers, educators, and researchers to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. Residential Sector Activities Include: Demonstrating to builders and remodelers how to build and renovate for high performance through best practice guides and case studies and continuing to developing innovative whole-house energy efficiency solutions through Building America research projects. We also provide guidelines and tools for researchers conducting building related research projects. Promoting a trusted, whole-house process for upgrading existing homes with

402

Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 - $400 Central Air Conditioner: $200 - $300 Air-source Heat Pump: $300 - $1,000 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $300 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 ETS Room Unit: $30/kW ETS Whole House Unit: $300 - $400 Provider Dubois REC Dubois REC offers a variety of rebates for residential customers to save energy in new or existing homes. Rebates are offered for geothermal and air-source heat pumps, central air conditioners, electric water heaters,

403

Relations between Temperature and Residential Natural Gas Consumption in the Central and Eastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased U.S. natural gas price volatility since the mid-to-late-1980s deregulation generally is attributed to the deregulated market being more sensitive to temperature-related residential demand. This study therefore quantifies relations ...

Reed P. Timmer; Peter J. Lamb

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Table 2. Number of U.S. Housing Units by Census Region and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Residential Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2. Number of U.S. ...

405

EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY ON FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS IN TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of temperature and humidity on formaldehyde emissions from samples collected from temporary housing units (THUs) was studied. The THUs were supplied by the U.S Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) to families that lost their homes in Louisiana and Mississippi during the Hurricane Katrina and Rita disasters. Based on a previous study 1, 2, four of the composite wood surface materials that dominated contributions to indoor formaldehyde were selected to analyze the effects of temperature and humidity on the emission factors. Humidity equilibration experiments were carried out on two of the samples to determine how long the samples take to equilibrate with the surrounding environmental conditions. Small chamber experiments were then conducted to measure emission factors for the four surface materials at various temperature and humidity conditions. The samples were analyzed for formaldehyde via high performance liquid chromatography. The experiments showed that increases in temperature or humidity contributed to an increase in emission factors. A linear regression model was built using natural log of percentage relative humidity (RH) and inverse of temperature (in K) as predictor variables, and natural log of emission factors as the target variable. The coefficients of both inverse temperature and log relative humidity with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. This study should assist to retrospectively estimate indoor formaldehyde exposures of occupants of temporary housing units (THUs).

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The smartest house in Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Smartest House In Los Alamos The Smartest House In Los Alamos Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit The smartest house in Los Alamos The first project in the United States to demonstrate how "smart grid" technology could provide residential customers with a significant amount of their electricity from renewable resources is open and getting ready for visitors. October 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email The first project in the United States to demonstrate how "smart grid" technology could provide residential customers with a significant amount of their electricity from renewable resources is open and getting ready for

407

Preliminary market potential indexing study of the United States for direct gain in new single-family residential construction  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of the market potential for passive solar designs in residential new construction offers an attractive counterpart to the numerous market penetration assessments that have been performed over the last four years. Market penetration analyses have generally concerned themselves with the long run adoption of solar energy technologies, while Market Potential Indexing (MPI) addressed here examines the near-term attractiveness of solar. The MPI method is briefly reviewed, followed by specification of six attributes that may characterize the residential single-family new construction market. Raw attribute data for each of the six is presented for 220 regions within the United States. Attribute weighting functions are constructed from the perspective of consumers, producers or home builders, and the federal government. Preliminary results from these three perspectives are portrayed for a fixed sized direct gain design.

Robson, W.M.; Roach, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimates of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type (single-family, multifamily and mobile homes) and Census Division and prices for each energy source for each of the nine Census Divisions. The Residential Demand Module also requires projections of available equipment over the forecast horizon. Over time, equipment efficiency tends to increase because of general technological advances and also because of Federal and/or state efficiency standards. As energy prices and available equipment changes over the forecast horizon, the module includes projected changes to the type and efficiency of equipment purchased as well as projected changes in the usage intensity of the equipment stock.

409

Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Maximum allowable rebate for appliances is $500 per customer, per year Central AC/Heat Pumps: $1,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Whole House Program: Up to $7,000 per 12 month period Refrigerators: $100 ($200 w/recycling of old unit) Room Air Conditioner: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Clothes Washer: $75 - $155

410

Residential energy consumption and expenditure patterns of black and nonblack households in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential energy consumption and expenditures by black and nonblack households are presented by Census region and for the nation based on the Energy Information Administration's 1982-83 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Black households were found to have significantly lower levels of electricity consumption at both the national and regional level. Natural gas is the dominant space heating fuel used by black households. Natural gas consumption was typically higher for black households. However, when considering natural gas consumption conditional on natural gas space heating no significant differences were found. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Vyas, A.D.; Poyer, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenElectricity price escalation rates for the residentialelectricity rate that is 20% higher than the average statewide residential

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Performance of residential solar heating and cooling system with flat-plate and evacuated tubular collectors: CSU Solar House I  

SciTech Connect

Measurements in Solar House I at Colorado State University have provided comparison data on space heating, water heating, and cooling by systems in which flat-plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors were used. Data were procured on 47 days during operation of the flat-plate collector and on 112 days when the house was heated or cooled by the evacuated tube collector system. It was concluded that the system comprising an evacuated tubular collector, lithium bromide absorption water chiller, and associated equipment is highly effective in providing solar heating and cooling to a small building, that it can supply up to twice the space heating and several times the cooling obtainable from an equal occupied area of good quality flat-plate collectors, and that a greater fraction of the domestic hot water can be obtained by supplying its heat from main storage. The cost-effectiveness of the system, in comparison with one employing a good flat-plate collector, can be determined when commercial pricing data are made available.

Duff, W.S.; Conway, T.M.; Loef, G.O.G.; Meredith, D.B.; Pratt, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Performance of residential solar heating and cooling system with flat-plate and evacuated tubular collectors: CSU Solar House I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements in Solar House I at Colorado State University have provided comparison data on space heating, water heating, and cooling by systems in which flat-plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors were used. Data were procured on 47 days during operation of the flat-plate collector and on 112 days when the house was heated or cooled by the evacuated tube collector system. It was concluded that the system comprising an evacuated tubular collector, lithium bromide absorption water chiller, and associated equipment is highly effective in providing space heating and cooling to a small building, that it can supply up to twice the space heating and several times the cooling obtainable from an equal occupied area of good quality flat-plate collectors, and that a greater fraction of the domestic hot water can be obtained by supplying its heat from main storage. The cost-effectiveness of the system, in comparison with one employing a good flat-plate collector, can be determined when commercial pricing data are made available. A summary of monthly and annual energy use for space heating, domestic hot water (DHW) heating, and space cooling is presented. The collector performance is presented. The first two months of data were obtained with the system employing flat-plate collectors, whereas heating and cooling during the following nine months were supplied by the evacuated tube collector system.

Duff, W.S.; Conway, T.M.; Loef, G.O.G.; Meredith, D.B.; Pratt, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Hourly load profiles are available for over all TMY3 locations in the United States here. Browse files in this dataset, accessible as individual files and as commercial and residential downloadable ZIP files. This dataset is approximately 4.8GiB compressed or 19GiB uncompressed. July 2nd, 2013 update: Residential High and Low load files have been updated from 366 days in a year for leap years to the more general 365 days in a normal year.

416

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

417

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

418

Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the break-even cost for residential rooftop solar water heating (SWH) technology, defined as the point where the cost of the energy saved with a SWH system equals the cost of a conventional heating fuel purchased from the grid (either electricity or natural gas). We examine the break-even cost for the largest 1,000 electric and natural gas utilities serving residential customers in the United States as of 2008. Currently, the break-even cost of SWH in the United States varies by more than a factor of five for both electricity and natural gas, despite a much smaller variation in the amount of energy saved by the systems (a factor of approximately one and a half). The break-even price for natural gas is lower than that for electricity due to a lower fuel cost. We also consider the relationship between SWH price and solar fraction and examine the key drivers behind break-even costs. Overall, the key drivers of the break-even cost of SWH are a combination of fuel price, local incentives, and technical factors including the solar resource location, system size, and hot water draw.

Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0 Personal Computers 1 ................... 45.7 41.1 1.3 0.9 2.4 8.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 34.1 30.5 1.0 0.7 1.9 9.7 2 or more .................................... 7.4 7.0 Q Q 0.2 18.4 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modesto Irrigation District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modesto Irrigation District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Modesto Irrigation District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Modesto Irrigation District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/15/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room AC: $50 Clothes Washer: $35 Water Heater: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $100 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35 per unit Central AC: $250 Heat Pump: $350 High Efficiency AC/Heat Pump: $500 Mini-Split AC/Heat Pump: $500 Air Duct Sealing: up to $250 max Whole House Fan: $100 per unit

422

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,4.9,5.4,3.5,2.4,4.3,3.2,8.1 "New England",5.5,1.3,1.3,1,0.6,1.2,0.7,2.3 "Middle Atlantic",15.1,3.7,4.1,2.5,1.8,3.1,2.5,5.8 "Midwest",25.6,6.5,6.6,4.7,3,4.8,3.5,9.4

423

Energy Housing Characteristics Tables RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Zone PDF. Year of Construction PDF. Household Income PDF. Type of Housing Unit PDF. Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF: Type of Rented Housing ...

424

"Table HC2.1 Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" Structural and Geographic Characteristics of U.S. Homes, By Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Structural and Geographic Characteristics",,,,"2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" ,,"Detached","Attached" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.8,10.9,1.8,3.1,4.4,0.5 "New England",5.5,3.1,0.3,1,1,0.1 "Middle Atlantic",15.3,7.8,1.5,2.1,3.4,0.4 "Midwest",25.9,18,1.2,1.9,3.7,1.1

425

Analyzing the flexibility of inclusionary zoning : should affordable units be built on-site or off-site?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inclusionarv zoning (IZ), a strategy first adopted by municipalities in the 1970S to create affordable housing, requires private developers of market-rate residential projects to set-aside a certain percentage of units as ...

Alonso, Rachel (Rachel Margaret)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Table HC2.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................... 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 17.8 3.1 3.7 7.3 3.6 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 54.2 4.5 4.0 9.4 3.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 33.9 3.1 3.0 7.6 2.7 2.............................................................. 16.2 12.7 0.9 0.7 1.4 0.5 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 0.5 0.4 0.5 Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 16.0 1.4 1.3 3.2 0.6 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.2 0.2 Q 0.4 Q 3 or More.................................................

427

Table HC2.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Million U.S. Housing Units Total U.S............................................................ 111.1 72.1 7.6 7.8 16.7 6.9 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven............................................... 109.6 71.3 7.4 7.7 16.4 6.8 1.............................................................. 103.3 66.2 7.2 7.4 15.9 6.7 2 or More................................................. 6.2 5.1 Q 0.3 0.5 Q Do Not Use an Oven................................... 1.5 0.7 Q Q 0.4 Q Most-Used Oven Fuel Electric..................................................... 67.9 45.5 4.4 3.7 10.7 3.7 Natural Gas.............................................. 36.4 22.0 3.0 3.9 5.6 1.8 Propane/LPG........................................... 5.2 3.8 Q Q Q 1.3 Self-Cleaning Oven Use a Self-Cleaning Oven........................

428

Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3. Emissions of phenol were also found to be slightly higher than values reported in earlier studies1,2,3. This study can assist in retrospective formaldehyde exposure assessments of THUs where estimates of the occupants indoor formaldehyde exposures are needed.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the United States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Regional Variation in Residential Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in the US Jeff Maguire 4/30/13 Outline * Why HPWHs? * US Water Heating Market * Overview of HPWHs * Model Description * Results o HPWH Performance o Energy Savings Potential o Breakeven Cost 2 Heat Pump Water Heaters Save $300 a year over standard electric? Save $100 a year over standard gas? Heat Pump Electric Gas 3 Questions about HPWHs * Are HPWHs a good replacement for typical gas and electric storage water heaters? o In different locations across the country? o In conditioned/unconditioned space? o Source energy savings?

430

Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

2008-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

432

Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

unit Freezer: 30unit Dishwasher: 30unit RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 50unit CFLLED Bulbs: In-store rebates Black Hills Energy (BHE) offers rebates for residential...

433

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

434

Energy Use Savings for a Typical New Residential Dwelling Unit Based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) require a substantial improvement in energy efficiency compared to the 2006 IECC. This report averages the energy use savings for a typical new residential dwelling unit based on the 2009 and 2012 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Results are reported by the eight climate zones in the IECC and for the national average.

Lucas, Robert G.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 12:03 building load building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL I am pleased to announce that simulated hourly residential and commercial building load datasets are now available on OpenEI. These datasets are available for all TMY3 locations in the United States. They contain hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). In addition to various

436

Ordinances to enable energy efficiency in rental housing in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved energy efficiency in rental housing is important from the perspectives of environmental, economic, and social policy, but upgrades to such buildings lag those of owner-occupied properties. With myriad reasons to ...

Coleman, Patrick J., M.C.P. (Patrick Joseph). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential Energy Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Financing Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Financing < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Other Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate 20,000 Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund State Connecticut Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 2,500 - 20,000 Provider Connecticut Housing Investment Fund Connecticut homeowners and customers of Connecticut Light and Power Company (CL&P), and United Illuminating Company (UI) may apply for up to 100%

438

FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Penn Power) - Residential Energy Efficiency West Penn Power) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program FirstEnergy (West Penn Power) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Room AC/Room AC Recycling: Limit 3 All Other Appliances: Limit 1 per household Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Walk-Through Audit: Reduced customer fee of $50 Whole House Audit: $300 CFL's: $1.50 Clothes Washer: $75 Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $25 Room AC: $25 Dehumidifiers: $10 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Freezer Recycling: $50 Room AC Unit Recycling: $25

439

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Affordable housing: Reducing the energy cost burden  

SciTech Connect

Residential energy expenditures are a key determinant of housing affordability, particularly for lower Income households. For years, federal, state and local governments and agencies have sought to defray energy expenses and Increase residential energy efficiency for low Income households through legislative and regulatory actions and programs. Nevertheless, household energy costs continue to place a major burden on lower Income families. This issue paper was written to help formulate national energy policy by providing the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) with Information to help define the affordable housing issue; Identify major drivers, key factors, and primary stakeholders shaping the affordable housing issue; and review how responding to this Issue may impact EE`s goals and objectives and Influence the strategic direction of the office. Typically, housing affordability is an Issue associated with lower income households. This issue paper adopts this perspective, but it is important to note that reducing energy utility costs can make {open_quotes}better{close_quote} housing affordable to any household regardless of income. As energy efficiency is improved throughout all sectors of the economy, special consideration must be given to low income households. Of all households, low income households are burdened the most by residential energy costs; their residences often are the least energy-efficient and have the greatest potential for efficiency improvements, but the occupants have the fewest resources to dedicate to conservation measures. This paper begins with a definition of {open_quotes}affordability{close_quotes} as it pertains to total housing costs and summarizes several key statistics related to housing affordability and energy use by lower income households.

Lee, A.D.; Chin, R.I.; Marden, C.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $35 Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $250 - $1,500/unit (Power Moves rebate), $200 (REMC Bill Credit) Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: $1,500/unit Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,500/unit (Power Moves rebate), $500 (REMC Bill Credit) Provider Jasper County REMC Jasper County REMC, in conjunction with Wabash Valley Power Association's Power Moves programs, offers a range of rebates to its residential

442

Street-facing Dwelling Units and Livability: The Impacts of Emerging Building Types in Vancouver's New High-density Residential Neighbourhoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s New High-density Residential Neighbourhoods Elizabeths New High-density Residential Neighbourhoods ELIZABETHbuilding new high-density residential neighbourhoods around

Macdonald, Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/4/2013 1 Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for Multi-Family Housing Tom Eckman Objectives Characterize Residential Sector Building Stock ­ Single Family (Four-plex and below) l if il ( i Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92)Survey (PNWRES92) NEEA Survey of Baseline

444

"Table HC4.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Renter-Occupied Housing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and End Use, Forms EIA-457 A, B, C of the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. " " Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing...

445

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Million U.S. Housing Units Table HC2.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units

447

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Title Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-40297 Year of Publication 1997 Authors Wenzel, Thomas P., Jonathan G. Koomey, Gregory J. Rosenquist, Marla C. Sanchez, and James W. Hanford Date Published 09/1997 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley, CA ISBN Number LBNL-40297, UC-1600 Keywords Enduse, Energy End-Use Forecasting, EUF Abstract Analysts assessing policies and programs to improve energy efficiency in the residential sector require disparate input data from a variety of sources. This sourcebook, which updates a previous report, compiles these input data into a single location. The data provided include information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment; historical and current appliance and equipment market shares; appliance and equipment efficiency and sales trends; appliance and equipment efficiency standards; cost vs. efficiency data for appliances and equipment; product lifetime estimates; thermal shell characteristics of buildings; heating and cooling loads; shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings; baseline housing stocks; forecasts of housing starts; and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. This report is the essential sourcebook for policy analysts interested in residential sector energy use. The report can be downloaded from the Web at http://enduse.lbl.gov/Projects/RED.html. Future updates to the report, errata, and related links, will also be posted at this address.

448

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of U.S. households are now equipped with AC. This growth occurred among all housing types and in every Census region. Wider use has coincided with much improved energy efficiency standards for AC equipment, a population shift to hotter and more humid regions, and a housing boom during which average housing sizes increased.

449

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

450

Use of Calibrated Simulation for the Evaluation of Residential Energy Conservation Options of Two Habitat for Humanity Houses in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a project where selected energy conservation measures in two Habitat for Humanity houses in Houston, Texas were measured using side-by- side measurements of identical houses and calibrated simulation. The measures include shell tightening, improved A/C efficiency, modifications to the DHW heater, and solar screens. To perform the analysis both houses were instrumented with hourly data loggers for more than one year to record energy use and environmental conditions and the data analyzed using several methods including an inverse fourier series method and calibrated DOE-2 simulations. The results indicate that several of the energy conservation measures performed as estimated when all confounding factors were removed using simulation. The confounding factors that needed to be normalized with the simulation included: the weather conditions, Merences in the life styles of the two houses, and omissions in the construction of the houses (Bou-Saada, et al. 1998). This paper discusses the instrumentation installed in the houses and the efforts that were undertaken to calibrate the DOE-2 simulation to the energy efficient house. The paper by Haberl et al. (1998) discusses the results of simulating the ECRMs.

Soebarto, V.; Reddy, A.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Design and thermal modeling of a residential building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent trends of green energy upgrade in commercial buildings show promise for application to residential houses as well, where there are potential energy-saving benefits of retrofitting the residential heating system from ...

Yeh, Alice Su-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Lighting Usage Indicators" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,20.8,23.6,17,11.3,19.1,13,30.7 "1.",28.6,9.4,9.1,4.5,2.4,3.2,5.7,12.6 "2.",29.5,6.8,8,5.8,3.7,5.2,4.2,10.2

453

United States | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 16 August, 2013 - 12:21 New report from White House outlines largest problems facing United States energy grid energy grid OpenEI President Smart Grid United States White House Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 12:03 Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! building load building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL Files: application/zip icon System Advisor Model Tool for Downloading Load Data Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy

454

Housing characteristics 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, Housing Characteristics 1993, presents statistics about the energy-related characteristics of US households. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) -- the ninth in a series of nationwide energy consumption surveys conducted since 1978 by the Energy Information Administration of the US Department of Energy. Over 7 thousand households were surveyed, representing 97 million households nationwide. A second report, to be released in late 1995, will present statistics on residential energy consumption and expenditures.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Water Heating (2005) for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in both physical units and Btus. The data is presented for numerous categories including: Census Region and Climate Zone; Housing Unit Characteristics (type, year of construction, size, income, race, age); and Water Heater and Water-using Appliance Characteristics (size, age, frequency of use, EnergyStar rating). Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Energy Consumption Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Consumption.for_.Water_.Heating.Phys_.Units_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 67.6 KiB)

456

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

457

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

458

EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA has recently published state fact sheets highlighting interesting aspects of residential energy consumption and housing characteristics based on data released ...

459

EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA has recently published state fact sheets highlighting interesting aspects of residential energy consumption and housing characteristics based on data released ...

460

Model Documentation Report: Residential Demand Module of the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

rebates used in demand-side management programs), can be modified at the equipment level. Housing ... Residential retired equipment efficiencies of 2005 stock

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential housing units" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Planning for a multi-generational future : policies, regulations, and designs for multi-generational housing in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-generational housing is a rising trend that is increasingly being considered as a viable housing option for the Boomerang generation, Baby Boomers and the aging population, and immigrant families. Cultural preferences, ...

Shin, Stephanie H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Housing Characteristics, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report on energy consumption in the residential sector covers the following topics: housing trends 1980--1990, new housing trends, availability and usage of natural gas by households, changes in appliance usage (refrigerators, entertainment appliances, cooking appliances, convenience appliances), age of major household appliances and equipment, household energy conservation activities, demand-side management programs, and a portrait of households using solar or wood as a source of energy.

Not Available

1992-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improved engineering-economic model of residential energy use. [1970-2000  

SciTech Connect

An improved version of the ORNL residential energy use model was developed to simulate energy use in the residential sector from 1970 through 2000. The model provides considerable detail on annual energy uses by fuel, end use, and housing type; and also estimates annual equipment installations and ownership, equipment energy requirements, structural thermal integrities, fuel expenditures, equipment costs, and costs for improving thermal integrities on new and existing housing units. Thus, the model provides considerable detail on residential energy uses and associated costs. These details are useful for evaluating alternative energy conservation policies, programs, and technologies for their energy and economic effects during the next quarter century. The present version of the model deals with four fuels, eight end uses, and three housing types. Each of these 96 fuel use components is calculated each year as a function of stocks of occupied housing units and new construction, equipment ownership by fuel and end use, thermal integrity of housing units, average unit energy requirements for each equipment type, and usage factors that reflect household behavior. Simulations of energy use from 1960 to 1975 show that the model accurately predicts historical data on aggregate energy use, energy use by fuel, energy use by end use, and equipment ownership market-shares. A reference projection developed with the model shows residential energy use growing from 17.5 GGJ (10/sup 18/ joules) in 1975 to 18.5 GGJ in 1980 and 26.6 GGJ in 2000, with an average annual growth rate of 1.7 percent. Electricity increases its share of the energy budget from 44 percent in 1975 to 67 percent in 2000. Shares provided by gas, oil, and other fuels all decline during this period.

Hirst, E.; Cope, J.; Cohn, S.; Lin, W.; Hoskins, R.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Baseline data for the residential sector and development of a residential forecasting database  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) residential forecasting database. It provides a description of the methodology used to develop the database and describes the data used for heating and cooling end-uses as well as for typical household appliances. This report provides information on end-use unit energy consumption (UEC) values of appliances and equipment historical and current appliance and equipment market shares, appliance and equipment efficiency and sales trends, cost vs efficiency data for appliances and equipment, product lifetime estimates, thermal shell characteristics of buildings, heating and cooling loads, shell measure cost data for new and retrofit buildings, baseline housing stocks, forecasts of housing starts, and forecasts of energy prices and other economic drivers. Model inputs and outputs, as well as all other information in the database, are fully documented with the source and an explanation of how they were derived.

Hanford, J.W.; Koomey, J.G.; Stewart, L.E.; Lecar, M.E.; Brown, R.E.; Johnson, F.X.; Hwang, R.J.; Price, L.K.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

467

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

468

Edition Two, October 2009 Welcome to HOUSES!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, interpretation and analysis of the residential property market: Editorial ­ page 3 We all know that house prices for potential buyers. Feature article - House price indices - page 5 In each edition we focus on a contemporary topic of relevance to the property market. In this edition we describe how the different house price

Evans, Paul

469

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

470

NREL: Technology Transfer - Apply Now for Energy-Efficient Housing ...  

Apply Now for Energy-Efficient Housing ... and NREL's Residential Buildings Research Web site to learn about systems integration and energy analysis ...

471

Integrating Photovoltaic Systems into Low-Income Housing Developments...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Financing Model and Low-Income Resident Job Training Program SEPTEMBER 2011 SOLAR ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM II Integrating PV Systems into Low-Income Housing...

472

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate energy costs and usage for heating, cooling, appliances and other end uses â€" information critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. RECS uses a multi-stage area probability design to select sample methodology figure A multi-stage area probability design ensures the selection

473

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

474

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

475

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.9,0.9,"Q","Q","Q",1.3,2.3 "500 to 999",23.8,10.5,7.3,3.3,1.4,1.2,6.6,12.9 "1,000 to 1,499",20.8,5.8,7,3.8,2.2,2,3.9,8.9

476

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 3 Household Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Household Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,13.5,8.5,4.3,2,1.8,5.9,13.1 "2 Persons",34.8,6,8.8,7.3,4.4,8.4,3.5,8.4 "3 Persons",18.4,3.1,4.7,3.4,2.5,4.6,2,5.8 "4 Persons",15.9,2.2,3.5,3.3,2.7,4.3,2.2,5.1

477

"Table HC1.3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 3 Heated Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Heated Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "No Main Space Heating Equipment",1.2,"N","N","N","N","N","N","N" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6 "Use Main Space Heating Equipment",109.1,6.1,27.7,26,17.6,10,"7 7.8",11.6

478

"Table HC1.4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" 4 Cooled Floorspace Usage Indicators, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Cooled Floorspace (square feet)" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Fewer than 500","500 to 999","1,000 to 1,499","1,500 to 1,999","2,000 to 2,499","2,500 to 2,999","3,000 or More" "Usage Indicators" "Total",111.1,49.2,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,31.3,15.1,15.6,11.1,7,5.2,8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,30.4,14.6,15.4,11.1,6.9,5.2,7.9 "Have Equipment But Do Not Use it",1.9,1,0.5,"Q","Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,17.8,"N","N","N","N","N","N"

479

" Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" "Total",111.1,26.7,28.8,20.6,13.1,22,16.6,38.6 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,25.8,28,19.6,12.7,20.2,16,37.3 "2 or More",3.7,0.3,0.5,0.9,0.4,1.7,"Q",0.5 "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.6,0.3,"Q","N","Q",0.5,0.8

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