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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

4

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

5

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

6

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

7

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

8

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

9

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

10

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

11

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window...

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

13

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

window related primary energy consumption of the US building= 1.056 EJ. “Primary” energy consumption includes a site-to-the amount of primary energy consumption required by space

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughly 2.7% of total US energy consumption. The final tworoughly 1.5% of total US energy consumption. The final twoSpace Conditioning Energy Consumption in US Buildings Annual

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

16

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

17

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

18

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

19

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

20

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

22

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

23

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

24

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

25

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

26

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

27

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

28

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

29

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

30

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

31

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

32

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

34

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

35

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development...

37

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

38

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

39

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

40

Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Residential programs  work with residential energy efficiency programs and their partners to improve homeowners' lives, the economy, and the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

20 20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 4% 25% 4% 64% | 5% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 4% 24% 4% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 4% 26% 3% 65% | 5% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 4% 25% 2% 67% | 5% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 4% 25% 2% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 4% 26% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 3% 25% 4% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 4% 25% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.4 2001 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.3 2002 4% 24% 3% 68% | 5% 25% 68% 38.4 2003

42

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet.

43

Fact Sheet- Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact Sheet - Better Buildings Residential, from U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

44

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

45

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accounting for 79% of non-biomass energy consumption inreliance on biomass for rural energy consumption shows thereliance on biomass for rural energy consumption shows the

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fraction of total energy consumption attributable toFraction of Total Energy Consumption Background Although thewindow fraction of total energy consumption. We believe that

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

49

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 1999 Single-Family Home Daily Water Consumption by End Use (Gallons per Capita) (1) Fixture/End Use Toilet 18.5 18.3% Clothes Washer 15 14.9% Shower 11.6 11.5% Faucet 10.9 10.8% Other Domestic 1.6 1.6% Bath 1.2 1.2% Dishwasher 1 1.0% Leaks 9.5 9.4% Outdoor Use (2) 31.7 31.4% Total (2) 101 100% Note(s): Source(s): Average gallons Total Use per capita per day Percent 1) Based analysis of 1,188 single-family homes at 12 study locations. 2) Total Water use derived from USGS. Outdoor use is the difference between total and indoor uses. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Residential End Uses of Water, 1999; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 2000, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1268, 2004, Table 6, p. 17; and Vickers, Amy, Handbook of Water Use and Conservation, June 2002, p. 15.

50

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

51

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

52

Forecasting energy consumption of multi-family residential buildings using support vector regression: Investigating the impact of temporal and spatial monitoring granularity on performance accuracy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings are the dominant source of energy consumption and environmental emissions in urban areas. Therefore, the ability to forecast and characterize building energy consumption is vital to implementing urban energy management and efficiency initiatives required to curb emissions. Advances in smart metering technology have enabled researchers to develop “sensor based” approaches to forecast building energy consumption that necessitate less input data than traditional methods. Sensor-based forecasting utilizes machine learning techniques to infer the complex relationships between consumption and influencing variables (e.g., weather, time of day, previous consumption). While sensor-based forecasting has been studied extensively for commercial buildings, there is a paucity of research applying this data-driven approach to the multi-family residential sector. In this paper, we build a sensor-based forecasting model using Support Vector Regression (SVR), a commonly used machine learning technique, and apply it to an empirical data-set from a multi-family residential building in New York City. We expand our study to examine the impact of temporal (i.e., daily, hourly, 10 min intervals) and spatial (i.e., whole building, by floor, by unit) granularity have on the predictive power of our single-step model. Results indicate that sensor based forecasting models can be extended to multi-family residential buildings and that the optimal monitoring granularity occurs at the by floor level in hourly intervals. In addition to implications for the development of residential energy forecasting models, our results have practical significance for the deployment and installation of advanced smart metering devices. Ultimately, accurate and cost effective wide-scale energy prediction is a vital step towards next-generation energy efficiency initiatives, which will require not only consideration of the methods, but the scales for which data can be distilled into meaningful information.

Rishee K. Jain; Kevin M. Smith; Patricia J. Culligan; John E. Taylor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S.and Renewable Energy (2005). 2005 Buildings Energy Databook,Buildings Energy Databook Table 1.2.3 (US DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

55

Residential Building Code Compliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

56

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide estimates of residential use from public supplies in 2000. This value was estimated based on the residential portion of public supply in 1995 and applied to the total public supply water use in 2000. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

57

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Capabilities Photo showing a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the...

58

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates charge a set price for each unit of water. Block rates charge a different price for each additional increment of usage. The prices for each increment is higher for increasing block rates and lower for decreasing block rates. Peak rates and seasonal rates charge higher prices when demand is highest. Flat fees charge a set price for

60

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 24% 41% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 23% 42% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 26% 39% 18% 3% | 32% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 26% 39% 17% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 25% 40% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 25% 40% 18% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 26% 40% 16% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 25% 41% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 26% 42% 15% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 25% 41% 16% 3% | 30% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 24% 43% 17% 3% | 30% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 23% 42% 18% 3% | 29% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 22% 42% 19% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 22% 43% 18% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 20% 43% 20% 3% | 27% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 21% 41% 21% 3% | 28% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 21% 40% 22% 3% | 29% 47% 3% 23.66 2001 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45% 3% 22.69 2002 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of...

62

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand BtuSF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A....

63

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% | 1.01 1.06 4.8% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.18 0.43 3.7% | 0.57 0.81 3.7% Computers 0.17 0.17 1.5% | 0.53 0.53 2.4% Other (8) 0.00 0.16 0.01 0.20 0.37 3.2% | 0.63 0.80 3.6% Adjust to SEDS (9) 0.42 0.42 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.8% Total 5.06 0.63 0.56 0.04 0.45 4.95 11.69 100% | 15.34 22.07 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.42 quad), solar water heating (0.01

64

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% | 0.95 1.01 4.3% Cooking 0.23 0.02 0.15 0.40 3.3% | 0.44 0.69 2.9% Computers 0.27 0.27 2.2% | 0.79 0.79 3.3% Other (8) 0.00 0.22 0.07 1.48 1.77 14.6% | 4.35 4.64 19.6% Total 4.76 0.35 0.51 0.03 0.55 5.94 12.14 100% | 17.50 23.69 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.44 quad), solar water heating (0.02

65

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% | 0.91 0.98 4.4% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.13 0.38 3.2% | 0.40 0.64 2.9% Computers 0.24 0.24 2.0% | 0.72 0.72 3.2% Other (8) 0.00 0.20 0.07 1.20 1.46 12.5% | 3.61 3.87 17.3% Total 4.88 0.43 0.50 0.03 1.00 5.30 11.69 100% | 16.00 22.39 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

66

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% | 0.98 1.04 5.0% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.11 0.36 3.1% | 0.34 0.59 2.8% Computers 0.19 0.19 1.7% | 0.57 0.57 2.7% Other (8) 0.00 0.17 0.05 0.94 1.17 10.2% | 2.85 3.07 14.6% Total 4.99 0.55 0.51 0.03 0.51 4.79 11.38 100% | 14.47 21.06 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

67

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Primary Energy Consumption Total Per Household 1980 79.6 N.A. 123.5 15.72 197.4 1981 82.8 N.A. 114.2 15.23 184.0 1982 83.7 N.A. 114.6 15.48 184.9 1983 84.6 N.A. 110.6 15.38 181.9 1984 86.3 N.A. 113.9 15.90 184.2 1985 87.9 N.A. 111.7 16.02 182.3 1986 89.1 N.A. 108.4 15.94 178.8 1987 90.5 N.A. 108.2 16.21 179.1 1988 92.0 N.A. 112.7 17.12 186.0 1989 93.5 N.A. 113.7 17.76 190.0 1990 94.2 N.A. 102.7 16.92 179.5 1991 95.3 N.A. 104.6 17.38 182.4 1992 96.4 N.A. 104.7 17.31 179.6 1993 97.7 N.A. 107.5 18.19 186.1 1994 98.7 N.A. 105.2 18.08 183.2 1995 100.0 N.A. 104.6 18.49 185.0 1996 101.0 N.A. 110.2 19.48 192.9 1997 102.2 N.A. 104.4 18.94 185.3 1998 103.5 N.A. 98.9 18.93 182.8 1999 104.9 N.A. 101.5 19.53 186.1 2000 105.7 N.A. 105.6 20.37 192.7 2001 107.0 1.7% 102.1 20.01 187.0 2002 105.0 3.3% 106.6 20.75 197.7 2003 105.6 5.2% 109.2 21.07 199.6 2004 106.6 7.1% 106.6 21.06 197.6 2005 108.8 9.0% 105.7 21.59

68

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

69

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

70

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

71

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar September 11, 2014 7:00PM to 8:3...

72

Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Network Membership Form Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form Membership form from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network Recommended...

73

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

74

,"New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"182015 12:45:53 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY2" "Date","New...

75

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use Pie chart of energy consumption in homes by end uses Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential...

76

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, from the U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

77

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in U.S. residential dwellings using a regional estimation framework. The framework allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications.

78

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

79

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 On this page, you may link...

82

Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

more. Residential Network Members Welcome Our Newest Members Cascadia Consulting Group Johnson Environmental The Building Performance Center, Inc. *Residential Network members that...

83

State Residential Energy Consumption Shares  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This next slide shows what fuels are used in the residential market. When a This next slide shows what fuels are used in the residential market. When a energy supply event happens, particularly severe winter weather, it is this sector that the government becomes most concerned about. As you can see, natural gas is very important to the residential sector not only in DC, MD and VA but in the United States as well. DC residents use more natural gas for home heating than do MD and VA. While residents use heating oil in all three states, this fuel plays an important role in MD and VA. Note: kerosene is included in the distillate category because it is an important fuel to rural households in MD and VA. MD and VA rely more on electricity than DC. Both MD and VA use propane as well. While there are some similarities in this chart, it is interesting to note

84

Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Forrest City Phases I and II This report analyses complete energy audit results from 28 homes within the Forest City residential complex. Relationships between temperature, humidity, comfort, and energy consumption are detailed. Recommendations

85

Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy ConsumptionResidential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy ConsumptionResidential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Manufacturing - MECS Transportation About the RECS EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage

88

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years December 20, 2013 Gas furnace efficiency has large implications for residential natural gas use December 5, 2013 EIA publishes state fact sheets on residential energy consumption and characteristics August 19, 2013 All 48 related articles › ResidentialAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. State Fact Sheets on Household Energy Use

89

Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR

90

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Delicious

91

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, April 2014.

92

Residential Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Residential Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Lee, U.S. Department of...

93

NREL Residential Buildings Group Partners - Datasets - OpenEI...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Buildings ... Dataset Activity Stream NREL Residential Buildings Group Partners This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential...

94

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY HANKIN CHAIR IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in the areas of residential building design and construction, sustainable buildings, energy issues in residential buildings, lifecycle analysis of buildings and related infrastructure, and sustainable landTHE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY HANKIN CHAIR IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION The College

Guiltinan, Mark

95

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy ConsumptionType Choice, and Fuel Usage Total annual residentialResidential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Overview of building...

97

Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

98

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

99

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

end-use Residential primary energy consumption was 6.6 EJ inof primary energy. Primary energy consumption includes final14 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel (with

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

102

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

103

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? How does EIA estimate energy consumption and end uses in U.S. homes? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA administers the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) to a nationally representative sample of housing units. Specially trained interviewers collect energy characteristics on the housing unit, usage patterns, and household demographics. This information is combined with data from energy suppliers to these homes to estimate energy costs and usage for heating, cooling, appliances and other end uses â€" information critical to meeting future energy demand and improving efficiency and building design. RECS uses a multi-stage area probability design to select sample methodology figure A multi-stage area probability design ensures the selection

104

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the MECS About the MECS Survey forms Maps MECS Terminology Archives Features First 2010 Data Press Release 2010 Data Brief Other End Use Surveys Commercial Buildings - CBECS Residential - RECS Transportation DOE Uses MECS Data Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Associated Analysis Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the downward trend in manufacturing energy use since the 1998 MECS report.

105

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation analyzes the energy consumption behavior of residential adopters of solar photovoltaic systems (solar-PV). Based on large data sets from the San Diego region… (more)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Department Announces $5 Million for Residential Building...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Research and University-Industry Partnerships Energy Department Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy...

108

Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Danielle Byrnett, U.S. Department of Energy The Better Buildings...

109

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer...

110

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

111

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

112

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption by End Use. 2011a [average residential electricity consumption by end-use inaverage residential electricity consumption by end-use in

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX WITH A LOW ENERGY CONSUMPTION AT PRATO (ITALY)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT During recent years in Italy there has been widespread experimentation with passive solar technologies, carried out for the main part on multi-storey residential buildings in highly urbanized situations. Some important findings have emerged from these; in particular bioclimatic criteria have shown the possibility of allowing 50% higher energy savings with respect to traditional buildings, while on the other hand bringing very high extra-costs (up to 40 - 50% of construction costs) in addition to considerable inconveniences for inhabitants (reduction in quality of living conditions, cooling problems in Summer). The pilot project we are presenting has come out of these reflections and is the outcome of collaboration between the Florence Autonomous Institute for Pubblic Housing and AGIP Petroli; its principal goal is the sperimentation with intermediary solutions between the traditional building model and bioclimatic prototypes constructed during the last few years, thereby examining the real feasibility of low - energy consumption building within the ambit of constraints placed upon government subsidized building. KEYWORDS Italy, housing, low energy consumption housing, bioclimatic architecture, passive solar sistems.

Francesco Pica; Gabriella Pistone; Riccardo Roda

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

115

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per- customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Questions or comments on the contents of this article should be directed to Lejla Alic at Lejla.Alic@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-0858.

116

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sheet Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the number of American homes that are energy efficient. Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR ® Sponsors have leveraged over $1 billion in federal funding and local resources to build more energy-efficient communities. DOE is now expanding this network of residential energy efficiency programs and partners to new members. Who Should Join? Network membership is open to all organizations that are committed to accelerating the pace of energy

117

Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The statistics show that this sector consumes and pollutes more than industry (22% energy) or transport sectors1 Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings in the variability of the energy consumption and environmental impact of residential buildings during their use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

119

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstration webinar slides for Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, November 19, 2014.

120

Discover the New Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A transcript of "Discover the New Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center," Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast, June 19, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residential density on vehicle usage and energy consumption.of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumptionresidential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption*

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Criteria Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential energy efficiency and the mission of the BBRN. Members are expected to be legally incorporated organizations or institutions, rather than individuals, actively engaged in the field of existing residential building energy efficiency with an ability to impact the market. Members should have the ability and capacity to carry out the requirements for membership (i.e., reporting the annual number of upgrades in their sphere of influence, and associated benefits), and actively engage as a member. Members must actively engage in significant work supporting, studying, researching, reporting, and/or

123

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

124

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

tni tni Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics, 1981 Energy Information Administration Washington. D.C August 1983 T86T -UJ9AO9 aiji uuojj pasenojnd uaaq (OdO) i|oii)/v\ suoijdijosqns o; Ajdde jou saop aoiiou :e|ON asBa|d 'pjBo^sod at|j noA j| 3Sj| Suiije'Lu vi3 3M1 uo ;u!Buuaj o^sn o} }i ujnja> isnoi nox 'pJBOisod iuB»jodoi! UB aABL) pjnons hoA '}s\\ BujUBUJ VI3 9L|} uo ajB noA|| 'MaiAaj jsij SUJMBUJ suouBOjiqnd |BnuuBS}j BUJ -jonpuoo Sj (vi3) uoijej^siujuupv UOIJBLUJOIUI Afijau^ agj 'uoiieinBaj iuaoiujaAOQ Aq pajmbaj sv 30HON 02-13 maoj aapao ay 05. pa^oajjp aq pus siuamnooa jo 0088-353 (303) S8SOZ "D'Q 'uoiSu-pqsBtt T rao°H 50 UOT^BOLIOJUI

125

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

126

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, ÂŤEnergy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsÂŽ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

127

Use-phase memory: A tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residents' usages and behavior play a determining role in the variability of the energy consumption and environmental impact of residential buildings during their use-phase. At present, however, they are inadequately documented and understood, as well as being highly variable. In this paper, we propose a use-phase memory model for residential buildings, whose aim is to store energy consumption and usage patterns. This storage can be done automatically or voluntarily. We give examples of useful information extracted from the data captured. The objective of this data analysis and synthesis is to provide building experts two specific use-cases: designing a new sustainable building, and renovating an existing one. Our model is deployed on a residential building, integrating the beneficial services for all stakeholders to demonstrate a sustainable relationship between designers, the residential building and the users.

Lucile Picon; Bernard Yannou; Toufic Zaraket; Stéphanie Minel; Gwenola Bertoluci; François Cluzel; Romain Farel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Danielle Sass Byrnett Better Buildings Residential Building Technologies Office Program Solution Center Demonstration Outline * Goals, History, Content Sources * Tour: Organization - Program Components - Handbooks * Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs & Partners * Provide an easily accessed repository for key lessons, resources, and knowledge collected from the experience of past programs. * Help programs and their partners plan, implement, manage, and evaluate better * Help stakeholders leapfrog past missteps en route to a larger and more successful industry. 4 eere.energy.gov Intended Audiences

129

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings...

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluating Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance | Building Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance The materials for this course may be used for in-person training courses, and are intended to provide the tools and specific training necessary to evaluate residential compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The course also provides useful training in general residential field inspection for energy code compliance. The recommended background for taking this course is significant experience and/or certification on the IECC in a plan review or inspection capacity. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, July 16, 2010. Course Type: Training Materials Video In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides Presentation Slides Presentation Slides and Windows Media Videos

131

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article profiles the Building America teams, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA).

132

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information about their household, the physical characteristics of their housing unit, their energy-using equipment, and their energy suppliers. Now we are requesting the energy billing records for these households from each of their energy suppliers. After all this information has been collected, the information will be used to

133

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the total annual energy consumption. The behavior patternsin total residential energy consumption per home, even whenthe variability in energy consumption can vary by factors of

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's Working What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Digg

135

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls, from the U.S. Department of Energy.

136

Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Place Norwalk, CT Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) is a company located in Norwalk, CT. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Steven_Winter_Associates_(Consortium_for_Advanced_Residential_Buildings)&oldid=379243" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

137

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

138

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

139

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

140

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

142

DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

General information about EIA data on energy consumption may be obtained from Wray Smith, Director, Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202- 252-1617); Lynda T. Carlson,...

143

Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners with a variety of organizations to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. Home builders, governments, researchers, and universities have several opportunities to work with the Building Technologies Office and other DOE projects. Home Builders Home builders who want to be recognized for building high performance homes can find out what it takes to participate in DOE's Challenge Home and sign up today. DOE Challenge Homes are verified by a qualified third-party and are at least 40%-50% more energy efficient than a typical new home. State or Local Governments, Utilities, and Other Organizations

144

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Water Heating (2005) for Water Heating (2005) Dataset Summary Description Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in both physical units and Btus. The data is presented for numerous categories including: Census Region and Climate Zone; Housing Unit Characteristics (type, year of construction, size, income, race, age); and Water Heater and Water-using Appliance Characteristics (size, age, frequency of use, EnergyStar rating). Source EIA Date Released September 01st, 2008 (6 years ago) Date Updated January 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Energy Consumption Residential Water Heating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2005_Consumption.for_.Water_.Heating.Phys_.Units_EIA.Sep_.2008.xls (xls, 67.6 KiB)

145

Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference case Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Table A4. Residential sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Key indicators and consumption Reference case Annual growth 2011-2040 (percent) 2010 2011 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Key indicators Households (millions) Single-family ....................................................... 82.85 83.56 91.25 95.37 99.34 103.03 106.77 0.8% Multifamily ........................................................... 25.78 26.07 29.82 32.05 34.54 37.05 39.53 1.4%

146

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

147

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

148

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

149

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

150

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

151

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

152

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

153

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

154

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

155

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

156

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

157

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

158

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

159

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

160

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

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161

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

162

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

163

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

164

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

165

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

166

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

167

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

168

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

169

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

170

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

171

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

172

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

173

The Temperature Sensitivity of the Residential Load and Commercial Building Load  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a building modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building heating and cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. A building simulation software are first used to quantify the hourly energy consumption of different building types by end-use and by vintage. Then, the temperature sensitivities are derived based on the climate data inputs.

Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Correia, James; Leung, Lai R.; Wong, Pak C.

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

partners to share best practices and learn from one another to increase the number of homes that are energy efficient. Better Buildings Residential programs and partners have...

175

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Where does RECS square footage data come from? Where does RECS square footage data come from? RECS 2009 - Release date: July 11, 2012 The size of a home is a fixed characteristic strongly associated with the amount of energy consumed within it, particularly for space heating, air conditioning, lighting, and other appliances. As a part of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), trained interviewers measure the square footage of each housing unit. RECS square footage data allow comparison of homes with varying characteristics. In-person measurements are vital because many alternate data sources, including property tax records, real estate listings, and, respondent estimates use varying definitions and under-estimate square footage as defined for the purposes of evaluating residential energy consumption.

176

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

177

Ranking cost effective energy conservation measures for heating in Hellenic residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residential buildings comprise the biggest segment of the European building stock and they are responsible for the majority of the building's sector energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This paper documents the potential benefits and sets the priorities of individual energy conservation measures (ECMs) to reduce heating energy consumption in Hellenic residential buildings, including space heating and domestic hot water production. The analysis is facilitated by using the available Hellenic typology for residential buildings that consists of 24 typical buildings, derived after a classification in three construction periods, two building sizes and four climate zones. The focus is mainly on the implementation of \\{ECMs\\} that have low first-cost investment and short payback period. In order to prioritize \\{ECMs\\} that would be most attractive to building owners, two ranking criteria are used, namely primary heating energy savings and payback period. Finally, the preliminary results are used to provide an insight on the potential abatement of CO2 emissions for the national residential building stock.

K.G. Droutsa; S. Kontoyiannidis; E.G. Dascalaki; C.A. Balaras

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Austin Energy '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project.

180

User-needs study for the 1993 residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1992, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) conducted a user-needs study for the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). Every 3 years, the RECS collects information on energy consumption and expenditures for various classes of households and residential buildings. The RECS is the only source of such information within EIA, and one of only a few sources of such information anywhere. EIA sent letters to more than 750 persons, received responses from 56, and held 15 meetings with users. Written responses were also solicited by notices published in the April 14, 1992 Federal Register and in several energy-related publications. To ensure that the 1993 RECS meets current information needs, EIA made a specific effort to get input from policy makers and persons needing data for forecasting efforts. These particular needs relate mainly to development of the National Energy Modeling System and new energy legislation being considered at the time of the user needs survey.

Not Available

1993-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings...

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10-15 years Provider City of Cleveland Department of Community Development The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to

183

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States EIA household energy use data now includes detail on 16 States RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 EIA is releasing new benchmark estimates for home energy use for the year 2009 that include detailed data for 16 States, 12 more than in past EIA residential energy surveys. EIA has conducted the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) since 1978 to provide data on home energy characteristics, end uses of energy, and expenses for the four Census Regions and nine Divisions. In 1997, EIA produced additional tabulations for the four most populous States (California, New York, Texas, and Florida). A threefold increase in the number of households included in the 2009 RECS offers more accuracy and coverage for understanding energy usage for all estimated States, Regions and Divisions.

184

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RECS Terminology RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," "Residential," and "Other" Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Adequacy of Insulation: The respondent's perception of the adequacy of the housing unit's insulation. Aggregate Ratio: The ratio of two population aggregates (totals). For

185

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium between predicted and actual building energy consumption can be attributed to uncertainties introduced in energy consumption due to actual weather and building operational practices, using a simulation

186

DOE/EIA-0314(82) Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4(82) 4(82) Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteri stics 1982 Published: August 1984 U-'VVv*' ^**" ^ Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. This public ation is availa ble from the Supe rinten dent of Docu ments , U.S. Gove rnme nt Printin g Office (GPO ). Order ing inform ation and purch ase of this and other Energ y Inform ation Admi nistra tion (EIA) public ations may be obtain ed from the GPO or the ElA's Natio nal Energ y Inform ation Cente r (NEIC ). Ques tions on energ y statis tics

187

Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The impact of increasing home size on energy demand The impact of increasing home size on energy demand RECS 2009 - Release date: April 19, 2012 Homes built since 1990 are on average 27% larger than homes built in earlier decades, a significant trend because most energy end-uses are correlated with the size of the home. As square footage increases, the burden on heating and cooling equipment rises, lighting requirements increase, and the likelihood that the household uses more than one refrigerator increases. Square footage typically stays fixed over the life of a home and it is a characteristic that is expensive, even impractical to alter to reduce energy consumption. According to results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the stock of homes built in the 1970s and 1980s averages less than

190

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in Share of energy used by appliances and consumer electronics increases in U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 Over the past three decades, the share of residential electricity used by appliances and electronics in U.S. homes has nearly doubled from 17 percent to 31 percent, growing from 1.77 quadrillion Btu (quads) to 3.25 quads. This rise has occurred while Federal energy efficiency standards were enacted on every major appliance, overall household energy consumption actually decreased from 10.58 quads to 10.55 quads, and energy use per household fell 31 percent. Federal energy efficiency standards have greatly reduced consumption for home heating Total energy use in all U.S. homes occupied as primary residences decreased slightly from 10.58 quads in 1978 to 10.55 quads in 2005 as reported by the

191

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The purpose of this letter is to document that the State of Connecticut has met its stautory requirement with regard to adoption of energy codes that meet or exceed the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings. Publication Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 CT Certification of Building Energy Codes.pdf Document Details Last Name: Cassidy Initials: JV Affiliation: Connecticut Department of Administrative Services, Division of Construction Services Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Adoption Building Type:

192

Audit Procedures for Improving Residential Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audit Procedures for Improving Residential Building Energy Efficiency This report analyses Sustainability Program Subtask 3.5.1: Residential Energy Efficiency Deliverable 1 Prepared by The University Delivery and Energy Reliability As part of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Under Task 3.5: Energy

193

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 107.0 85.2 211.3 116 47 92.2 36 1,875 0.76 1,493 583 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 153 49 106.6 44 2,501 0.81 1,741 715 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 152 47 115.3 48 2,403 0.75 1,825 768 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 154 50 103.4 42 2,541 0.83 1,710 696

194

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.5 181.2 131 55 103.6 40 1,620 0.68 1,282 491 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 173 60 122.4 47 2,157 0.74 1,526 583 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 168 59 123.1 48 2,094 0.73 1,532 598 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 175 60 122.1 46 2,180 0.75 1,523 578

195

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 86.3 67.5 144.4 134 63 104.7 39 1,437 0.67 1,123 417 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 176 65 125.2 46 2,033 0.75 1,443 533 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 174 61 127.6 46 2,010 0.70 1,471 527 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 177 67 124.5 46 2,040 0.77 1,435 535

196

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 90.5 70.4 156.8 130 58 100.8 39 1,388 0.62 1,080 416 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 179 64 124.4 48 1,836 0.66 1,276 494 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 174 61 121.0 47 1,753 0.62 1,222 475 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.3 28.4 181 65 125.4 48 1,860 0.67 1,292 499

197

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (millionBtu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.1 66.1 144.2 141 64 111.7 40 1,256 0.58 998 356 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 194 67 131.6 46 2,016 0.70 1,365 475 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 181 63 123.9 44 2,018 0.71 1,384 492 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 199 68 134.0 46 2,016 0.69 1,359 470

198

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.3 34.8 199 70 138.3 49 1,874 0.66 1,301 459 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 197 65 134.4 47 1,964 0.65 1,341 466 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 200 72 139.5 49 1,846 0.66 1,288 456

199

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,034 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,023 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,037 0.70 1,491 555

200

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.8 66.1 142.2 130 60 102.3 37 1,309 0.61 1,033 377 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.0 12.5 34.4 175 64 121.7 44 1,942 0.71 1,353 490 New England 4.2 3.0 9.1 173 56 121.9 43 1,991 0.65 1,402 498 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.5 25.2 175 66 121.7 44 1,926 0.73 1,338 487

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,038 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,028 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,041 0.70 1,491 555

202

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

203

Building Technologies Program: Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 and there is a limit of $1,500 for all products. Improvements made in 2008 are not eligible for a tax credit. See the ENERGY STAR® Web site for a detailed listing of eligible improvements.

204

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the buildings/commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

205

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes Air conditioning in nearly 100 million U.S. homes RECS 2009 - Release date: August 19, 2011 line chart:air conditioning in U.S. figure dataExcept in the temperate climate regions along the West coast, air conditioners (AC) are now standard equipment in most U.S. homes (Figure 1). As recently as 1993, only 68% of all occupied housing units had AC. The latest results from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) show that 87 percent of U.S. households are now equipped with AC. This growth occurred among all housing types and in every Census region. Wider use has coincided with much improved energy efficiency standards for AC equipment, a population shift to hotter and more humid regions, and a housing boom during which average housing sizes increased.

206

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's new in our home energy use? What's new in our home energy use? RECS 2009 - Release date: March 28, 2011 First results from EIA's 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) The 2009 RECS collected home energy characteristics data from over 12,000 U.S. households. This report highlights findings from the survey, with details presented in the Household Energy Characteristics tables. How we use energy in our homes has changed substantially over the past three decades. Over this period U.S. homes on average have become larger, have fewer occupants, and are more energy-efficient. In 2005, energy use per household was 95 million British thermal units (Btu) of energy compared with 138 million Btu per household in 1978, a drop of 31 percent. Did You Know? Over 50 million U.S. homes have three or more televisions.

207

Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Are You Already a DOE Partner or Sponsor? (Check if applicable) Better Buildings Alliance Member Building America Team Member Better Buildings Challenge Partner or Ally Home...

208

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

209

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1,

210

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

211

Residential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The residential sector can be divided into apartment blocks and low-rise housing. Apartment blocks have many similarities to the non-domestic sector, such as office buildings, which are covered by the range of...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

DOE/EIA-0262/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62/1 62/1 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1979-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part I: National Data (including Conservation) April 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division ' 1 7 T Z 8 0 T T 8 - 8 d * N u o f s s a o o y ' S O S ^ - m ( E O Z ) a u o q d a i a i . ' t j a o j S 9 j g ' u o - p s - p A f a s ^ o n p o a ^ a a ^ n d m o o - m o j j a j q B T T B A B ' ( a d B i J - p a a u S B K ) T O O / T 8 - J Q / 3 0 Q p j o q a s n o H r X a A j n s u o - p ^ d m n s u o o O Q ' 3 j o : m o a j a j q B j f ^ A ^ ^ ^ ^ s a a o d a a a A o q B a q ^ j o ' 8 - T Z T O O - C O O - T 9 0 ' Q N ^ 3 3 S O d O ' 9 f r Z Q - V I 3 / 3 0 Q * T 8 6 T € < 7 - 9 i T O O - e 0 0 - 1 9 0 O d O ' ^ / Z O Z O - V i a / a O Q ' 0 8 6 T a u n r * 6 ^ 6 T 3 s n 3 n y o ^ a u n f ' p j o q a s n o H j o s u a a ^ ^ B ^ u o f a d n m s u o o : X a A j n g u o f ^ d m n s u o o X

213

Enhancing Residential Building Operation through its Envelope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which support environmental and constructional matters. Also the amounts of energy consumption for these two states are compared and a substantial economy of energy consumption is presented. Eventually, results represent that 32% in heat load and 25...

Vazifeshenas, Y.; Sajjadi, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Residential Building Integration Program Overview- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: David Lee, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Residential Building Integration Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

215

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center is a robust online collection of nearly 1,000 examples, strategies, and resources from Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Sponsors, and others. This webinar presented on November 19, 2014 gives more information on the Solution Center.

216

BetterBuildings for Michigan: Residential Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

217

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

218

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

219

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

220

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. Kahn (2011). Electricity Consumption and Durable Housing:49 3.3.3. Pre-installation electricity consumption of CSIon Electricity Consumption .

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NREL Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Dataset Summary Description This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential Buildings Group has formed a partnership. The two types of partnership included in this spreadsheet are: Incubator and Test & Evaluation. This list was generated in April 2011. Source NREL Date Released April 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords incubator NREL partnerships Test & Evaluation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon members_and_partners_-_nrel_resbldgs_04072011.xlsx (xlsx, 29.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

222

Modeling of Residential Buildings and Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-zone building model is used in each case. A model of the heating system is also used for the multi-storey building. Both co-heating and tracer gas measurements are used in order to adjust the parameters of each building model. A complete monitoring...

Masy, G.; Lebrun, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

225

Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Use a whole building approach for home upgrades through ENERGY STAR. Support energy efficiency upgrade markets by providing grants to states, local governments, and...

226

Estimating response to price signals in residential electricity consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Based on a previous empirical study of the effect of a residential demand response program in Sala, Sweden, this project  investigated the economic consequences… (more)

Huang, Yizhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion, 2003,Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homeand renewable energy technologies, solar photovoltaic (PV)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

229

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 1997 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Table Titles (Released: February 2004) Entire Section Percents Tables: HC1 Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF NOTE: As of 10/31/01, numbers in the "Housing Units" TABLES section for stub item: "Number of Floors in Apartment Buildings" were REVISED. These numbers will differ from the numbers in the published report. Tables: HC2 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC3 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC4 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF Tables: HC5 Appliances, Million U.S. Households PDF PDF

230

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

231

Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24 24 Modeling Energy Consumption of Residential Furnaces and Boilers in U.S. Homes James Lutz, Camilla Dunham-Whitehead, Alex Lekov, and James McMahon Energy Analysis Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 February 2004 This work was supported by the Office of Building Technologies and Community Systems of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. ABSTRACT In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an

232

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

233

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, which contains performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 energy retrofit measures. To date, it is used in four prominent DOE software packages to help optimize energy-efficiency recommendations.

234

Energy Efficient Residential Building Code for Arab Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of building envelope and weather data in reducing electrical energy consumption. The impacts of the following parameters were studied namely; walls and roof constructions, window size and glazing type for different geographical locations in the Arab Countries...

Hanna, G. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

236

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

237

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2015 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 180.5 34.9 16.6 1.8 53.3 0.6 66.6 301.0 27.4% Space Cooling 0.0 161.1 161.1 14.7% Water Heating 69.6 5.1 3.1 8.2 75.3 153.1 13.9% Lighting 83.7 83.7 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 71.7 71.7 6.5% Electronics (6) 52.0 52.0 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.2 51.6 54.7 5.0% Cooking 11.5 1.8 1.8 17.9 31.1 2.8% Computers 30.0 30.0 2.7% Other (8) 10.6 10.6 149.3 160.0 14.6% Total 264.7 40.1 32.2 1.8 74.0 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 759.1 1,098.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

239

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2010 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 185.5 38.8 18.7 2.2 59.7 0.7 77.6 323.5 26.3% Space Cooling 0.0 210.2 210.2 17.1% Water Heating 68.7 7.1 4.6 11.7 90.4 170.8 13.9% Lighting 126.0 126.0 10.2% Electronics (5) 96.5 96.5 7.8% Refrigeration (6) 80.7 80.7 6.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 2.9 57.8 60.8 4.9% Cooking 11.4 1.9 1.9 42.6 55.9 4.5% Computers 30.5 30.5 2.5% Other (8) 10.2 10.2 36.3 46.5 3.8% Adjust to SEDS (9) 30.1 30.1 2.4% Total 268.5 45.9 35.3 2.2 83.5 0.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 878.7 1,231.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

240

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2035 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (4) 169.7 22.8 14.1 1.5 38.3 0.5 76.7 285.3 23.1% Water Heating 67.2 2.6 2.1 4.7 84.8 156.7 12.7% Space Cooling 0.0 194.5 194.5 15.7% Electronics (5) 68.1 68.1 5.5% Refrigeration (6) 81.5 81.5 6.6% Lighting 74.3 74.3 6.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.5 50.0 53.4 4.3% Cooking 12.2 1.5 1.5 23.2 37.0 3.0% Computers 41.9 41.9 3.4% Other (8) 14.1 14.1 229.6 243.7 19.7% Total 252.7 25.4 31.9 1.5 58.7 0.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): Electricity (3) 924.5 1,236.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2025 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 173.9 27.9 15.2 1.6 44.7 0.6 73.2 292.3 25.1% Space Cooling 0.0 177.2 177.2 15.2% Water Heating 70.2 3.5 2.5 6.0 83.7 159.9 13.8% Lighting 74.1 74.1 6.4% Refrigeration (5) 75.8 75.8 6.5% Electronics (6) 58.7 58.7 5.1% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.3 47.9 51.2 4.4% Cooking 11.7 1.6 1.6 20.8 34.2 2.9% Computers 37.6 37.6 3.2% Other (8) 12.4 12.4 189.1 201.5 17.3% Total 259.1 31.3 31.8 1.6 64.7 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 838.1 1,162.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

242

Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for building energy-saving. REFERENCES [1] Weiding Long. A consider on strategy of building energy-saving in China. HV&AC, 2005, (35):1-8.(In Chinese) [2] Energy Information Administration, Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. http: //www... for building energy-saving. REFERENCES [1] Weiding Long. A consider on strategy of building energy-saving in China. HV&AC, 2005, (35):1-8.(In Chinese) [2] Energy Information Administration, Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. http: //www...

Yang, X.; Tan, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate paid at the utility’s “avoided cost. ” Results of theroughly to the utility’s avoided cost of energy. Details anda reasonable value for the avoided cost of residential PV

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004) Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics ofof residential electricity consumption in rapidly developingbusiness as usual’ electricity consumption by country/region

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Minnesota  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Minnesota Minnesota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Minnesota Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Minnesota building code are based on the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) with relatively extensive modifications. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IRC. The most notable

246

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. This database: * Provides information in a standardized format. * Improves the technical consistency and accuracy of the results of software programs. * Enables experts and stakeholders to view the retrofit information and provide comments to improve data

247

Residential building solar thermal analysis| A case study on Sophia Gordon Hall.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Solar thermal technologies, such as residential hot water heating and space conditioning, have potential for reducing green house gas emissions and fossil fuel consumption.… (more)

Trethewey, Ross M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Energy Efficiency meeting in July 2011, held in Denver, Colorado.

249

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Delaware Summary Delaware recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective July 1, 2010. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

250

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Hampshire Summary New Hampshire has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective October 1, 2009. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

251

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

252

A global review of energy consumption, CO2 emissions and policy in the residential sector (with an overview of the top ten CO2 emitting countries)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Climate change and global warming as the main human societies’ threats are fundamentally associated with energy consumption and GHG emissions. The residential sector, representing 27% and 17% of global energy consumption and CO2 emissions, respectively, has a considerable role to mitigate global climate change. Ten countries, including China, the US, India, Russia, Japan, Germany, South Korea, Canada, Iran, and the UK, account for two-thirds of global CO2 emissions. Thus, these countries’ residential energy consumption and GHG emissions have direct, significant effects on the world environment. The aim of this paper is to review the status and current trends of energy consumption, CO2 emissions and energy policies in the residential sector, both globally and in those ten countries. It was found that global residential energy consumption grew by 14% from 2000 to 2011. Most of this increase has occurred in developing countries, where population, urbanization and economic growth have been the main driving factors. Among the ten studied countries, all of the developed ones have shown a promising trend of reduction in CO2 emissions, apart from the US and Japan, which showed a 4% rise. Globally, the residential energy market is dominated by traditional biomass (40% of the total) followed by electricity (21%) and natural gas (20%), but the total proportion of fossil fuels has decreased over the past decade. Energy policy plays a significant role in controlling energy consumption. Different energy policies, such as building energy codes, incentives, energy labels have been employed by countries. Those policies can be successful if they are enhanced by making them mandatory, targeting net-zero energy building, and increasing public awareness about new technologies. However, developing countries, such as China, India and Iran, still encounter with considerable growth in GHG emissions and energy consumption, which are mostly related to the absence of strong, efficient policy.

Payam Nejat; Fatemeh Jomehzadeh; Mohammad Mahdi Taheri; Mohammad Gohari; Muhd Zaimi Abd. Majid

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Value of Residential Building Improvements and Repairs, by Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Total 1980 72.2 35.2 107.4 1985 82.3 65.3 147.6 1990 91.4 85.5 176.9 1995 105.8 63.8 169.6 2000 138.2 52.7 191.0 2003 156.2 51.9 208.0 2004 169.2 57.9 227.1 2005 179.0 59.7 238.6 2006 187.4 57.2 244.6 2007 (2) 178.7 57.0 235.7 Note(s): Source(s): Improvements Maintenance and Repairs 1) Improvements includes additions, alterations, reconstruction, and major replacements. Repairs include maintenance. 2) The US Census Bureau discontinued the Survey of Residential Alterations and Repairs (SORAR) after 2007. DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Properties by Property Type: Quarterly 1962-2003 (Old structural purposes) for 1980-2000; DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Proerties by Property Type: Quarterly 2003-2007 (New structural purposes) for 1995-2007; and EIA, Annual Energy Review

254

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

255

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Wisconsin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Wisconsin Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Wisconsin building code are the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments that increase stringency. The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the Wisconsin code for the total building energy

256

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Residen- iv tial Electricity Consumption 8 Introduction 9Observed residential electricity consumption 2003 to 2006total residential electricity consumption for 2006 by five-

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings October 8, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis DOE recently updated the requirements for energy efficiency in newly constructed federal buildings. The new rule, 10 CFR 435, Subpart A: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, applies to residential buildings (one- and two-family dwellings as well as multifamily buildings three stories or less in height) for which design for construction began on or after August 10, 2012. The rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 435, Subpart A to the 2009 IECC. New federal residential buildings are required (effective August 10, 2012) to achieve the 2009 IECC level of energy efficiency or 30% greater

258

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09 IECC 09 IECC This training includes an overview of the residential requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 9 minutes Presenters: Todd Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

260

DOE/EIA-0207/3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Conservation February 1980 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Adminstration Assistant Administrater for Program Development Other NEICS Reports Preliminary Conservation Tables from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, August 1979, DOE/EIA-0193/P Characteristics of the Housing Stocks and Households: Preliminary Findings from the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey, October 1979, DOETllA-0199/P The above reports are available from the following address; U.S. Department of Energy Technical Information Center Attn:; EIA Coordinator P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37830 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Characteristics of the Housing Stock and Households, DOE/EIA-0207/2, GPO Stock No,, 061-003-00093-2; $4.25

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

263

Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers for Energy Efficiency Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tems 1 Introduction In EU countries, primary energy consumption in build- ings represents about 40Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers for Energy Efficiency Consumption in Buildings R. Alcal´a DECSAI 18071 ­ Granada, Spain e-mail: A.Gonzalez@decsai.ugr.es Abstract In EU countries, primary energy consump

Casillas Barranquero, Jorge

264

Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

265

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Rhode Island Summary Rhode Island has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

266

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Illinois  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Illinois Summary Illinois recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

267

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Michigan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Michigan Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IRC with considerable amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

268

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Missouri  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Missouri Summary Missouri currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Missouri homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $353 to $565 a year for an average

269

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Texas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Texas Texas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Texas Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2001 IECC Supplement. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. An energy analysis comparing the 2009 IECC to the state code

270

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nebraska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nebraska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $236 a year

271

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Utah  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utah Utah September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Utah Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $219 to

272

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Oklahoma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Oklahoma Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $266 to

273

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Tennessee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Tennessee Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $231 to

274

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Mississippi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mississippi Summary Mississippi currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Mississippi homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $173 to $250 a year for an average

275

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nevada  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nevada Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $205 to

276

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Virginia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Virginia Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IRC and IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of

277

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New York  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

York York September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New York Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2004 IECC Supplement with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

278

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Jersey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Jersey Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with extensive amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

279

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Alaska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaska Alaska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Alaska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A comparison of the overall impacts on energy use for these two

280

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Iowa  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Iowa Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $245 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES CHAPTER 4 RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES DIVISION 4.2 ­ ENERGY EFFFICIENCY SECTION 4 RESIDENTIAL VOLUNTARY MEASURES DIVISION A4.2 ­ ENERGY EFFFICIENCY SECTION A4.201 GENERAL A4.201.1 ScopeEnergy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL

282

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Buildingand actual building energy consumption can be attributed touncertainties in energy consumption due to actual weather

Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

285

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

286

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

287

Al Azhar International Conference, Cairo 2008 Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings: Amman as a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in residential buildings: Amman as a case study Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings in the Jordanian residential buildings, in general, and in Amman particularly, considering the healthy problems requested for a healthy environment in the modern buildings, especially regarding the natural aeration

288

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 2001 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Tables HC1: Housing Unit Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Four Most Populated States PDF Urban/Rural Location PDF Northeast Census Region PDF Midwest Census Region PDF South Census Region PDF West Census Region PDF Tables HC2: Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households PDF (all tables) Climate Zone PDF Year of Construction PDF Household Income PDF Type of Housing Unit PDF Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit PDF Type of Rented Housing Unit PDF

289

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

290

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

291

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing the types of heating fuel and equipment used for main and secondary heating purposes. PDF Tables: HC3 Air-Conditioning, Million U.S. Households Presents data describing selected household characteristics including location, number of rooms and area cooled and air-conditioning usage. PDF

292

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous 5 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Housing Characteristics Tables + EXPAND ALL Floorspace - Housing Characteristics PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.1.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.1.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.1.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.1.4) PDF XLS Usage Indicators Heated Floorspace (HC1.3) PDF XLS Cooled Floorspace (HC1.4) PDF XLS Floorspace - Living Space PDF (all tables) Total Floorspace All, Heated, and Cooled Floorspace (HC1.2.1) PDF XLS Average Floorspace All Housing Units (HC1.2.2) PDF XLS Single Family and Mobile Homes (HC1.2.3) PDF XLS Apartments (HC1.2.4) PDF XLS

293

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the RECS About the RECS RECS Survey Forms RECS Maps RECS Terminology Archived Reports State fact sheets Arizona household graph See state fact sheets › 2009 RECS Features Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use March 7, 2013 Newer U.S. homes are 30% larger but consume about as much energy as older homes February 12, 2013 Where does RECS square footage data come from? July 11, 2012 RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household June 6, 2012 The impact of increasing home size on energy demand April 19, 2012 Did you know that air conditioning is in nearly 100 million U.S. homes? August 19, 2011 See more > graph of U.S. electricity end use, as explained in the article text U.S. electricity sales have decreased in four of the past five years

294

Assessing the sustainability of the energy use of residential buildings in Belgrade through multi-criteria analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a method for selecting and calculation indicators of sustainable development, needed for determining the level of sustainable development, expressed through sustainability index of residential buildings. It is important to verify procedure for determining economic, social and environmental sub-indicators based on consumption of final energy (used to meet space heating, hot water generation and household cooking needs, as well as for operation of various household electrical appliances, indoor temperature and humidity). It was done for representative sample of Belgrade buildings stock. Different dwelling types constructed in two different periods and heated by electricity, district heating and fossil fuels were analysed. Multi-criteria analysis was used to evaluate residential buildings sustainability. The results showed that the best building options, constructed in the period 1981–2006, are: the apartment buildings and single family houses (electricity for space heating) when economy indicator has priority; the apartments connected to the district heating system when environmental indicator has priority; and single family houses connected to the district heating system when social indicator has priority. Implementation of proposed methodology is beneficial when evaluating and comparing sustainability of different residential buildings, enabling decision makers to more easily reach decisions on the issues related to energy policy and environmental protection.

Biljana Vu?i?evi?; Marina Jovanovi?; Naim Afgan; Valentina Turanjanin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL homes energy efficient through Title 24 Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Standards for Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings (AB 549 Report), the Energy Commission made a series

296

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

297

Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

Schmidt, Justin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Residential U.S. Site Res.% Res.% Fossil Electricity Total Total of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 385 525 909 4723 19% 4.9% 1981 361 518 878 4601 19% 4.8% 1982 359 511 870 4357 20% 4.8% 1983 340 525 865 4332 20% 4.7% 1984 349 535 883 4561 19% 4.6% 1985 351 549 901 4559 20% 4.6% 1986 343 551 894 4564 20% 4.5% 1987 346 574 920 4714 20% 4.5% 1988 367 603 970 4939 20% 4.6% 1989 374 606 980 4983 20% 4.6% 1990 340 624 963 5039 19% 4.5% 1991 347 633 980 4996 20% 4.6% 1992 357 624 981 5093 19% 4.6% 1993 372 667 1040 5185 20% 4.8% 1994 364 668 1032 5258 20% 4.7% 1995 361 678 1039 5314 20% 4.7% 1996 389 710 1099 5501 20% 4.9% 1997 371 719 1090 5575 20% 4.7% 1998 339 759 1097 5622 20% 4.8% 1999 360 762 1122 5682 20% 4.8% 2000 380 805 1185 5867 20% 5.0% 2001 367 805 1172 5759 20% 4.9% 2002 368 835 1204 5809 21% 4.9% 2003 383 847 1230

299

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

300

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,1762 32554,1865 32582,1639 32613,1036 32643,562

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study: Estimation Framework and Initial Estimates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Study is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Solid-State Lighting Program that aims to improve the understanding of lighting energy usage in residential dwellings. The study has developed a regional estimation framework within a national sample design that allows for the estimation of lamp usage and energy consumption 1) nationally and by region of the United States, 2) by certain household characteristics, 3) by location within the home, 4) by certain lamp characteristics, and 5) by certain categorical cross-classifications (e.g., by dwelling type AND lamp type or fixture type AND control type).

Gifford, Will R.; Goldberg, Miriam L.; Tanimoto, Paulo M.; Celnicker, Dane R.; Poplawski, Michael E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sc2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sc2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010SC2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,3768 32554,3029 32582,3327 32613,1875

303

Stochastic model for electrical loads in Mediterranean residential buildings: Validation and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A major issue in modelling the electrical load of residential building is reproducing the variability between dwellings due to the stochastic use of different electrical equipment. In that sense and with the objective to reproduce this variability, a stochastic model to obtain load profiles of household electricity is developed. The model is based on a probabilistic approach and is developed using data from the Mediterranean region of Spain. A detailed validation of the model has been done, analysing and comparing the results with Spanish and European data. The results of the validation show that the model is able to reproduce the most important features of the residential electrical consumption, especially the particularities of the Mediterranean countries. The final part of the paper is focused on the potential applications of the models, and some examples are proposed. The model is useful to simulate a cluster of buildings or individual households. The model allows obtaining synthetic profiles representing the most important characteristics of the mean dwelling, by means of a stochastic approach. The inputs of the proposed model are adapted to energy labelling information of the electric devices. An example case is presented considering a dwelling with high performance equipment.

Joana Ortiz; Francesco Guarino; Jaume Salom; Cristina Corchero; Maurizio Cellura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Total and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building HVAC Systems Using Model Predictive Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of the total energy consumption and the peakalso reduces the total energy consumption of the occupancyTotal and Peak Energy Consumption Minimization of Building

Maasoumy, Mehdi; Sangiovanni-Vincentelli, Alberto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

306

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

307

Operational energy consumption and GHG emissions in residential sector in urban China : an empirical study in Jinan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driven by rapid urbanization and increasing household incomes, residential energy consumption in urban China has been growing steadily in the past decade, posing critical energy and greenhouse gas emission challenges. ...

Zhang, Jiyang, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also uses the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location (Additional...

309

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type Fuel Type Petroleum 1.0 Natural Gas 38.8 Coal 0.0 Wood 2.6 Electricity (2) 51.6 Total 94.0 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent (1) 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009, April 2011, Table 3-10, p. 3-9 for stationary combustion emissions; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release,

310

CBECS - Buildings and Energy in the 1980's - Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and...

311

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

312

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Type Definitions Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 and 2003 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the subcategories were combined

313

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China* Nan Zhou, 1whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed

Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Energy Consumption Analyses of Frequently-used HVAC System Types in High Performance Office Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The high energy consumption of heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial buildings is a hot topic. Office buildings, a typical building set of… (more)

Yan, Liusheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

316

Building America Expert Meeting: Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment on April 26,l 2010 on the NIST campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

317

Energy Department Announces $5 Million for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Research and University-Industry Partnerships  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced a $5 million investment to develop and demonstrate new residential energy efficiency solutions, and that will support building energy efficiency research at universities and colleges.

318

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Residential Building HVAC Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report assesses 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide analysis on 19 priority technology options in various stages of development.

319

Calculation program for design of windows in residential buildings Ins Palma Santos and Svend Svendsen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable buildings at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark1 Calculation program for design of windows in residential buildings InĂŞs Palma Santos and Svend Svendsen* Department of Civil Engineering, Brovej, Building 118, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800

320

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001, DOE initiated a rulemaking process to consider whether to amend the existing energy efficiency standards for furnaces and boilers. A key factor in DOE's consideration of new standards is their cost-effectiveness to consumers. Determining cost-effectiveness requires an appropriate comparison of the additional first cost of energy efficiency design options with the savings in operating costs. This report describes calculation of equipment energy consumption (fuel and electricity) based on estimated conditions in a sample of homes that are representative of expected furnace and boiler installations. To represent actual houses with furnaces and boilers in the United States, we used a set of houses from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey of 1997 conducted by the Energy Information Administration. Our calculation methodology estimates the energy consumption of alternative (more-efficient) furnaces, if they were to be used in each house in place of the existing equipment. We developed the method of calculation described in this report for non-weatherized gas furnaces. We generalized the energy consumption calculation for this product class to the other furnace product classes. Fuel consumption calculations for boilers are similar to those for the other furnace product classes. The electricity calculations for boilers are simpler than for furnaces, because boilers do not provide thermal distribution for space cooling as furnaces often do.

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulation Models to Optimize the Energy Consumption of Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 of paper submitted to ICEBO 2008 Berlin SIMULATION MODELS TO OPTIMIZE THE ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF BUILDINGS Sebastian Burhenne Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems Freiburg, Germany Dirk Jacob Fraunhofer...-Institute for Solar Energy Systems Freiburg, Germany ABSTRACT In practice, building operation systems are only adjusted during commissioning. This is done manually and leads to failure-free but often inefficient operation. This work deals...

Burhenne, S.; Jacob, D.

322

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - West Virginia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

West Virginia West Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in West Virginia Summary West Virginia is proceeding with adoption of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) through the State Fire Commission. No energy analysis was conducted here comparing the current West Virginia code to the 2009 IECC for this reason. However, the West Virginia energy code has been one of the weaker codes in

323

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas Summary Kansas currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Kansas homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $355 to $582 a year for an average new house

324

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Mexico  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Mexico Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $216 to

325

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - South Dakota  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

South Dakota South Dakota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in South Dakota Summary South Dakota currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in South Dakota homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $383 to $427 a year for an average

326

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Arizona  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Arizona Summary Arizona is a "home rule" state with no mandatory state-wide energy efficiency code. However, many counties and cities have adopted an energy efficiency code, most often the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The

327

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Right-Suite Residential for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows logo. All-in-one HVAC software performs residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, equipment selection, cost comparison calculations, and geothermal loop design. Also allows you to design your own custom proposals. Used for system design, for sales representation, and for quotation preparations. Buy only what you need. Unused functions are shipped as demos, so the program can grow with your needs. Keywords residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, HVAC equipment selection, system design Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of general HVAC concepts. High level of computer literacy not required. Users Over 10,000 users of Right-J loads.

328

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption Aaron Garrett, PhD Joshua load and electrical data from a highly-instrumented and automated ZEBRAlliance research home consume 40% of the US primary energy (73% of the electrical energy). By 2030, it is estimated that 60

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

329

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

330

A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based on Large Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based consumption of buildings based on historical performances is an important approach to achieve energy consumption plays an important role in the total energy consumption of end use. Energy efficiency in building

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

331

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

332

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details the Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in an OIRA Comparison Document.

333

Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

334

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

335

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Computerized/Web-Based Occupant Health Survey Instrument Speaker(s): James Craner Date: September 15, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Epidemiological investigation of occupants of a residential or non-industrial workplace building (or building complex) is a well-established, public health method used to identify and measure the nature, distribution, and cause of occupational or environmental illness related to indoor air quality (IAQ) problems or concerns. Such an investigation is particularly useful where disease-exposure associations have not been clearly established and multiple environmental and human factors may be implicated or considered. --The "sick building syndrome"

336

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

337

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

An analysis of residential energy consumption and expenditures by minority households by home type and housing vintage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper a descriptive analysis of the relationship between energy consumption, patterns of energy use, and housing stock variables is presented. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover evidence of variations in energy consumption and expenditures, and patterns of energy use between majority households (defines as households with neither a black nor Hispanic head of household), black households (defined as households with a black head of household), and Hispanic households (defined as households with a Hispanic head of household) between 1980 (time of the first DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1982a) and 1987 (time of the last DOE/EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey, 1989a). The analysis is three-dimensional: energy consumption and expenditures are presented by time (1980 to 1987), housing vintage, and housing type. A comparative analysis of changes in energy variables for the three population groups -- majority, black, and Hispanic -- within and between specific housing stock categories is presented.

Poyer, D.A.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Share of Total U.S. Households, by Census Region, Division, and Vintage, as of 2005 Prior to 1950 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Region 1950 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Northeast 6.7% 5.2% 2.4% 2.1% 1.3% 0.8% 18.5% New England 2.1% 1.2% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 4.9% Middle Atlantic 4.6% 4.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.0% 0.5% 13.6% Midwest 5.7% 5.8% 3.6% 2.5% 3.7% 1.7% 23.0% East North Central 4.3% 3.9% 2.7% 1.8% 2.1% 1.1% 16.0% West North Central 1.4% 1.9% 0.9% 0.7% 1.6% 0.6% 7.1% South 4.0% 6.9% 6.4% 7.5% 7.5% 4.3% 36.6% South Atlantic 2.0% 3.4% 3.5% 4.2% 4.3% 2.2% 17.4% East South Central 0.9% 1.3% 0.9% 1.0% 1.3% 0.7% 6.2% West South Central 1.2% 2.3% 4.7% 2.2% 1.8% 1.4% 13.6% West 3.4% 4.6% 4.5% 4.6% 3.1% 1.5% 21.8% Mountain 0.7% 1.2% 1.3% 1.5% 1.3% 0.9% 6.8% Pacific 2.8% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 1.8% 0.6% 15.0% United States 19.9% 22.5% 17.0% 16.7% 15.6% 8.3% 100% Source(s): All Vintages EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC10

340

Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption of the nation's buildings is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/21/2011 Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Reducing the energy consumption: systems (supermarket refrigeration, ground-source, CHP, multi-zone HVAC, wireless and other communications of the nation's buildings is essential for achieving a sustainable clean energy future and will be an enormous

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Energy Policy Act of 2005, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Energy Management Requirements - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and requires increasing percentage reductions in energy consumption through FY 2015, with a final energy consumption reduction goal of 20 percent savings in FY 2015, as compared to the baseline energy consumption of Federal buildings in FY 2003. (These goals were superseded by Section 431 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.) [Section 102] Energy Use Measurement and Accountability - Requires that all Federal buildings be metered to measure electricity use by 2012. [Section 103] Procurement of Energy Efficient Products - Requires all Federal agencies to procure ENERGY STAR qualified products, for product

342

SPP sales flyer for residential home builders | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residential home builders residential home builders Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

343

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings Specifications for Implementation of Fifth Power Plan Model Conservation Standards for New Commercial Buildings Adapted from: Northwest Energy NWBest Project Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard

344

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Public Use Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data Public Use Files: yellow indicator arrow 2003 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1999 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1995 CBECS | yellow indicator arrow 1992 CBECS The Public Use Files are microdata files that contain more than 5,000 records, representing commercial buildings from the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Each record corresponds to a single responding, in-scope sampled building and contains information for that building about the building size, year constructed, types of energy used, energy-using equipment, conservation features, energy consumption and expenditures, and the amount of energy used for nine end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, water heating, cooking, refrigeration, office equipment, and other end uses.

345

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

346

BetterBuildings for Michigan Residential Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuilding for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program.

347

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

‹ Consumption & Efficiency ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2003 1999 1995 1992 Previous Analysis & Projections Maps U. S. Census Regions and Divisions U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? U. S. Census Regions and Divisions: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 2003 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map U. S. Climate Zones for 1979-1999 CBECS: U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Map How are U.S. Climate Zones defined? The CBECS climate zones are groups of climate divisions, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which are regions within a state that are as climatically homogeneous as possible. Each NOAA

348

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Million Barrels per Day) Buildings Residential Commercial Total Industry Transportation Total 1980 2.62 2.01 l 4.63 10.55 19.01 34.19 1981 2.26 1.73 l 3.98 9.13 18.81 31.93 1982 1.96 1.49 l 3.45 8.35 18.42 30.23 1983 1.87 1.61 l 3.48 7.97 18.60 30.05 1984 1.95 1.60 l 3.55 8.48 19.02 31.05 1985 1.92 1.40 l 3.32 8.13 19.47 30.92 1986 2.03 1.60 l 3.62 8.39 20.18 32.20 1987 2.04 1.51 l 3.54 8.50 20.82 32.86 1988 2.20 1.57 l 3.77 8.88 21.57 34.22 1989 2.23 1.56 l 3.79 8.71 21.71 34.21 1990 1.81 1.38 l 3.20 8.73 21.63 33.55 1991 1.77 1.30 l 3.07 8.40 21.38 32.85 1992 1.73 1.19 l 2.92 8.93 21.68 33.52 1993 1.81 1.16 l 2.97 8.80 22.07 33.84 1994 1.75 1.15 l 2.90 9.16 22.61 34.67 1995 1.61 1.00 l 2.62 8.87 23.07 34.56 1996 1.74 1.04 l 2.78 9.33 23.65 35.76 1997 1.71 1.04 l 2.75 9.60 23.92 36.27 1998 1.73 1.13 l 2.86 9.54 24.54 36.93 1999 1.85 1.10 l 2.96 9.78 25.22 37.96

349

Building America Expert Meeting: Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High-Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes a Building America expert meeting hosted on July 28, 2011, by the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team. The purpose of this meeting was to identify installation practices that provide the best installed efficiency for residential gas furnaces, explain how AFUE and field efficiency can differ, and investigate the impact of installation practices on the efficiency and long-term durability of the furnace.

350

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption | Building Type (thousand BtuSF) Consumption Health Care 345.9 8% | Education 159.0 11% Inpatient 438.8 6% | Service 151.6 4%...

351

Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Retrofit of Existing Residential Building: a Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was reasonable, the construction quality was not good. The air leak from the circumference of window was serious and some inner surface of external walls formed condensation of moisture. Before retrofit, the annual heating energy consumption was 9.28?108kJ.... The annual coal consumption for heating was 31.68 tons standard coal. After retrofit, the annual heat consumption was 6.73?108kJ. The annual coal consumption for heating was 22.97 tons standard coal. With the 2.55?108kJ reduction of the annual heating...

Zhao, L.; Xu, W.; Li, L.; Gao, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

354

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample". Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates should not be considered as finite point estimates, but as estimates with some associated error in each direction. The standard error is a measure of the reliability or precision of the survey statistic. The value for the standard error can be used to construct confidence intervals and to perform hypothesis tests by standard statistical methods. Relative Standard Error (RSE) is defined as the standard error (square root of the variance) of a survey estimate, divided by the survey estimate and multiplied by 100.

355

Residential Energy Simulation and Scheduling: A Case Study Approach Jagannathan Venkatesh, Baris Aksanli, Tajana Simuni Rosing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, green energy, residential energy management, smart scheduling I. INTRODUCTION Building energy nature of home energy consumption [5]. A majority of work has focused on characterizing green energyResidential Energy Simulation and Scheduling: A Case Study Approach Jagannathan Venkatesh, Baris

Simunic, Tajana

356

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CBECS Terminology CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999 and 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial," and "Residential." Suppliers' definitions of these terms vary from supplier to supplier and from the definitions used in CBECS. In addition, the same customer may be classified differently by each of its energy suppliers. Activities with Large Amounts of Hot Water: An energy-related space

357

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption. Total energy consumption (in thousand BTUs) waselectricity and total energy consumption. Because all homesin gas, electric, and total energy consumption. Removing

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Econometric model of the joint production and consumption of residential space heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study models the production and comsumption of residential space heat, a nonmarket good. Production reflects capital investment decisions of households; consumption reflects final demand decisions given the existing capital stock. In the model, the production relationship is represented by a translog cost equation and an anergy factor share equation. Consumption is represented by a log-linear demand equation. This system of three equations - cost, fuel share, and final demand - is estimated simultaneously. Results are presented for two cross-sections of households surveyed in 1973 and 1981. Estimates of own-price and cross-price elasticities of factor demand are of the correct sign, and less than one in magnitude. The price elasticity of final demand is about -0.4; the income elasticity of final demand is less than 0.1. Short-run and long-run elasticities of demand for energy are about -0.3 and -0.6, respectively. These results suggest that price-induced decreases in the use of energy for space heat are attributable equally to changes in final demand and to energy conservation, the substitution of capital for energy in the production of space heat. The model is used to simulate the behavior of poor and nonpoor households during a period of rising energy prices. This simulation illustrates the greater impact of rising prices on poor households.

Klein, Y.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

360

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. The overall analysis found that transforming the U.S. housing stock through the adoption of more energy-efficient building energy codes could create hundreds of jobs in each of several states. The following reports discuss the analysis and results for four representative states. Minnesota Nevada Rhode Island Tennessee *Please note, these reports have been formatted to facilitate double-sided printing. Contacts Web Site Policies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, Provisions Affecting Energy Consumption in Federal Buildings Source(s): Standard Relating to Solar Hot Water - Requires new Federal buildings, or Federal buildings undergoing major renovations, to meet at least 30 percent of hot water demand through the use of solar hot water heaters, if cost-effective. [Section 523] Federally-Procured Appliances with Standby Power - Requires all Federal agencies to procure appliances with standby power consumption of less than 1 watt, if available and cost-effective. [Section 524] Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, enacted December 19, 2007 Energy Reduction Goals for Federal Buildings - Amended reduction goals set by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act, and

362

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total) Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 7.42 28.2% 3.04 11.5% 0.15 0.6% 0.87 3.3% 4.35 10.47 14.82 56.4% 26.29 100% - 1981 7.11 27.5% 2.63 10.2% 0.17 0.6% 0.89 3.5% 4.50 10.54 15.03 58.2% 25.84 100% - 1982 7.32 27.8% 2.45 9.3% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.57 10.80 15.37 58.4% 26.31 100% - 1983 6.93 26.4% 2.50 9.5% 0.19 0.7% 0.99 3.8% 4.68 11.01 15.68 59.6% 26.30 100% - 1984 7.20 26.4% 2.74 10.0% 0.21 0.8% 1.00 3.7% 4.93 11.24 16.17 59.2% 27.31 100% - 1985 6.98 25.4% 2.62 9.5% 0.18 0.6% 1.03 3.8% 5.06 11.59 16.65 60.6% 27.47 100% - 1986 6.74 24.5% 2.68 9.7% 0.18 0.6% 0.95 3.4% 5.23 11.75 16.98 61.7% 27.52 100% - 1987 6.87 24.4% 2.73 9.7% 0.17 0.6% 0.88 3.1% 5.44 12.04 17.48 62.2% 28.13 100% - 1988 7.44 25.0%

363

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Technical Update meeting in August 2011, held in Denver, Colorado.

364

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Stakeholders meeting in March 2011, held in Atlanta, Georgia.

365

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting: October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Research Planning meeting in October 2011, held in Washington, D.C.

366

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

explore specific technology areas that can radically improve home performance. BARA communication projects include Building America outreach products and activities (see...

367

Improve Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption and Building Performance: Leveraging Technology to Improve All Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building owners and occupants expect more from their buildings today- both better IEQ and less energy consumption. Many facilities strive to design and commission a =smart building' - one that is healthy, environmentally conscious and operating...

Wiser, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy consumption characterization as an input to building management and performance benchmarking - a case study PPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance characterization of each of its buildings, looking specifically at the typology of canteen. Developing building energy performance benchmarking systems enables the comparison of actual consumption of individual buildings against others of the same...

Bernardo, H.; Neves, L.; Oliveira, F.; Quintal, E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Scenario analysis of retrofit strategies for reducing energy consumption in Norwegian office buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model buildings were created for simulation to describe typical office buildings from different construction periods. A simulation program was written to predict the annual energy consumption of the buildings in their ...

Engblom, Lisa A. (Lisa Allison)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EA-1463: 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final Rule with the “no-action alternative” of using the current Federal standards – 10 CFR Part 434 and 10 CFR Part 435 Subpart C (referred to as the “no-action alternative”).

371

Application and Mode Establishment of Asset-backed Securitization in Existing Large-scale Public Building Retrofit Financing in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical data for 2005 show that electrical consumption of large-scale public buildings occupying 5 percent of total residential construction area equals 50 percent of the total residential electrical consumption in Beijing. It is necessary...

Sun, J.; Wu, Y.; Dai, Z.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

373

The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings...

Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Better Buildings Residential Network: Using Loan Performance Data to Inform Program Implementation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Please join the Better Buildings Residential Network for the Financing & Revenue/Data & Evaluation co-series peer exchange call: “Using Loan Performance Data to Inform Program Implementation.” What is the relationship, if any, between loan performance and completed energy efficiency measures? How are home affordability, loan default rates, and decreasing energy costs related?

375

2008 Residential Building Efficiency Standards 1 Efficiency Ratings and Performance Modeling Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Building Efficiency Standards 2 a. Refrigerant charge and metering (Reference Appendices, RA3 Cooling · SplitHeatPump: SEER 13 · Refrigerant charge (or charge indicator light), watts/cfm and air flow.2), or presence of charge indicator display (Reference Appendices, RA3.4) b. Air system fan flow and air handler

376

Revised: March 6, 2013 2013 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards Measures Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for all residential buildings including kitchens, bathrooms, dining rooms, utility rooms, garages, hall.0(j)2Aii and Section 150.0(j)4) 5. Solar Ready Measure ­ 250 square feet of solar ready zone on single family roofs. (Section150.0(r)) Compliance Options 1. Solar Photovoltaic can be used

377

A Temporal Motif Mining Approach to Unsupervised Energy Disaggregation: Applications to Residential and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

every device in a building. The ensu- ing computational problem is to disaggregate total energy us- age disaggregation. This is the task of, non-intrusively, monitoring aggregate energy usage (electricity, waterA Temporal Motif Mining Approach to Unsupervised Energy Disaggregation: Applications to Residential

Ramakrishnan, Naren

378

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 DISCLAIMER: The results contained in this report are complete and accurate to the best of BECP's knowledge, based on information available at the time it was written. BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVEL V Table of Contents 1.0 Chapter 1 Overview of the 2009 IECC ........................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Overview of the 2009 IECC ..................................................................................................................... 1

379

Expansion of the residential conservation service program to multi-family and small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative regulatory provisions are considered which might permit achievement of the building energy conservation regulatory goals at a lower cost. Major issues, regulatory and legislative options, and cost-benefit analyses are discussed for multi-family and commercial buildings. The following are presented: related government programs, urban and community impact analysis, institutional impacts, energy cost, Residential Conservation Service coverage, methods of analysis, and regional studies. (MHR)

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsresidential vehicular energy consumption is graphed as aon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with vehicles, but

Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Residential energy consumption across different population groups : comparative analysis for latino and non-latino households in USA.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential energy cost is an important part of the household budget and could vary significantly across different population groups in many countries. In the United States, many studies have analyzed household fuel consumption by fuel type, including electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and by geographic areas. Past research has also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, our research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest growing population group, has not been explained by economic and non-economic factors in any statistical model in public domain. The purpose of this paper was to discuss energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States as a case example of analyzing residential energy consumption across different population groups in a country. The linear expenditure system model developed by Stone and Geary is the basis of the statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households. For comparison, the models are also developed for non-Latino, black, and non-black households. These models estimate energy consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. Significant variations in the patterns of these fuels consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos are highlighted. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researches, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups in their country.

Poyer, D. A.; Henderson, L.; Teotia, A. P. S.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Baltimore

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Title Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Vossos, Vagelis, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen Journal Energy and Buildings Volume Volume 68, Part A Pagination 223-231 Date Published 09/2013 Keywords Direct current (DC), energy conservation, Photovoltaics (PV), residential buildings Abstract An increasing number of energy-efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC directly from renewable energy systems, thereby avoiding the energy losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of a 'direct-DC house' compared to that of a typical net-metered house with AC distribution, assuming identical DC-internal loads. The model comparisons were run for 14 cities in the United States, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The model tested the effects of climate and battery storage. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect potential energy savings. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate.

383

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings Â… August 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings August 2010 Prepared by McGraw-Hill Construction for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy OF ENERGY Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 Chapter One DRIVERS OF ENERGY USE IN BUILDINGS 5 Chapter Two PROFILES OF BUILDING-SECTOR ENERGY USE 13 Chapter Three PATTERNS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDING PRODUCT ADOPTION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDING DESIGN 17 Chapter Four INDUSTRY RESEARCH FINDINGS DRIVING ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 25 Chapter Five ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS, CODES AND INCENTIVES 31 Chapter Six VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS AND LOCAL AND STATE POLICIES FOR GREEN AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 38 Chapter Seven RESOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION 50 Notes and definitions:

384

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

385

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

386

Emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA) of multi-unit and single-family residential buildings in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The construction and building process depends on substantial consumption of natural resources with far-reaching impacts beyond their development area. In general, a significant portion of annual resource consumption by the building and construction industry is a result of applying traditional building strategies and practices such as designing and selecting types of development (e.g. multi-unit condo and single-family house, etc.), building materials and structure, heating/cooling systems, and planning renovation and maintenance practices. On the other hand, apart from structural suitability, building developers mostly consider the basic requirements of public owners or private occupants of the buildings, where the main criteria for selecting building strategies are costs, and long-term environmental and socio-economic impacts are generally ignored. The main purpose of this paper is to develop an improved building sustainability assessment framework to measure and integrate different sustainability factors, i.e. long-term environmental upstream and downstream impacts and associated socio-economic costs, in a unified and quantitative basis. The application of the proposed framework has been explained through a case study of single-family houses and multi-unit residential buildings in Canada. A comprehensive framework based on the integration of emergy synthesis and life cycle assessment (LCA) has been developed and applied. The results of this research prove that the proposed emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA) framework offers a practical sustainability assessment tool by providing quantitative and transparent results for informed decision-making.

Bahareh Reza; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Steve Taylor Date: April 20, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Steve Taylor, the principal of Taylor Engineering, will be providing an overview of the envelope, lighting, and HVAC requirements of Standard 90.1. Mr. Taylor is a registered mechanical engineer specializing in HVAC system design, control system design, indoor air quality engineering, computerized building energy analysis, and HVAC system commissioning. He graduated from Stanford University with a BS in Physics and a MS in Mechanical Engineering and has over 20 years of commercial HVAC system design and construction experience. He was the primary author of the HVAC

388

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaps and Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies 2010 Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting Denver, Colorado - July 20 - 22, 2010 August 2010 Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

389

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Energy October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings and the Electric Grid An increasing fraction of the most efficient appliances on the market operate on direct current (DC) internally, making it possible to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoid the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back, as is current practice. Products are also emerging on the commercial market that take advantage of that possibility. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers Vagelis Vossos, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen investigated the potential savings of direct-DC power distribution in net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics

390

Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

Radhi, Hassan, E-mail: h_alradhi@yahoo.com [Global Engineering Bureau, P.O Box 33130, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); Sharples, Stephen, E-mail: steve.sharples@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Architecture, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements Studies show that duct air leakage results in major energy losses. A ll versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) require ducts, air handlers, filter boxes, and air cavities used as ducts to be sealed, and reference Chapter 16 of the International Residential Code for details on air sealing. This sealing is required on all ducts and other air distribution components regardless of whether they are located inside or outside the conditioned living space. For single-family homes and other low-rise residential buildings, the 2009 and 2012 IECC have duct insulation and sealing requirements in Section 403.2. Both codes require insulation

392

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… National Residential Efficiency Measures Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Robust cost data for energy-efficiency Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures provide an essential framework for transforming the housing industry to high-performance homes. These data allow for effective optimization capabilities to guide builders, researchers, HERS raters, contractors, and designers. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy-efficiency measures. The database, called the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, can be found at www.buildingamerica.gov. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective measures to improve the energy efficiency of new and existing residential buildings.

393

Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Usage Form Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our company. a. You may submit a single report for the entire building, or if it i s easier, a separate report for each of several accounts in the building. These will then be aggregated by the survey contractor. b. If you are concerned about your individual account information, you may choose to mark

394

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption of buildings to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption Thermal Unit (Btu). For convenience, this annual energy consumption is expressed as thousands of Btus (i of buildings to a State of Minnesota "target." This target represents the amount of energy that would

Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

395

Research & Development Needs for Building-Integrated Solar Technologie...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

piece of the comprehensive pathway to help achieve its goal of reducing energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings by 50% by the year 2030. This report helps...

396

Webinar: Energy Is Everywhere! Join the Better Buildings Challenge...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

partners are residential building owners and managers that have committed to reducing energy consumption by at least 20 percent over 10 years. This webinar will provide you...

397

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

398

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

399

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

400

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meter allows us to study the energy consumption patterns onThis allows us to study the energy consumption of individualgives us a good framework to study the energy consumption

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Developing Data-driven Models to Predict BEMS Energy Consumption for Demand Response Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption prediction for building energy management systems (BEMS) is one of the key factors in the success of energy saving measures in modern building operation, either residential buildings or comm...

Chunsheng Yang; Sylvain Létourneau; Hongyu Guo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 7% 25% 4% 64% | 10% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 7% 24% 4% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 7% 26% 3% 65% | 9% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 7% 25% 3% 65% | 9% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 6% 25% 3% 65% | 8% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 6% 25% 2% 67% | 8% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 6% 25% 2% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 6% 26% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 5% 25% 4% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 6% 25% 3% 66% | 8% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 6% 24%

404

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomason Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Thomas F. Golob

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

406

A methodology for identifying and improving occupant behavior in residential Zhun (Jerry) Yu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developing countries. For example, in the US and Japan, residential building energy consumption accounts: Occupant behavior Building energy consumption Data mining Evaluation Identification a b s t r a c significantly reducing building energy consumption. Moreover, given that the proposed method is partly based

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

407

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accounting for 79% of non-biomass energy consumption in2000 and 2020. Biomass, the leading energy source in thehigh reliance on biomass for rural energy consumption as

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Implementation of Simple Measures for Savings Water and Energy Consumption in Kuwait Government Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper gives in details the efforts made by the Public Services Department (PSD) to reduce water and energy consumptions in the Ministry of Social Affairs and Labour's (MOSAL) buildings in Kuwait. PSD manages around 125 buildings distributed...

Albaharani, H.; Al-Mulla, A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Conservation Evaluation of a Commercial Building in Shanghai  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper presents a model of a commercial building in Shanghai with energy simulation software, and after calibration, the energy consumption of this building is calculated. On the basis of the simulation and calculation, a series of energy saving...

Chen, C.; Pan, Y.; Huang, Z.; Wu, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Research on the Statistical Method of Energy Consumption for Public Buildings in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this research is to develop a national statistical system for energy consumption data for public buildings in China, in order to provide data support for building energy efficiency work. The framework for a national statistical system...

Chen, S.; Li, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Operational Energy Consumption Evaluation Index System for Large Public Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large public buildings have been the emphasis of energy conservation in China. In this paper, the design and operational energy consumption evaluation indices for large public buildings are generalized, their differences and deficiencies...

Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Links to Related Government Sites Publications list from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights Program Updated FLEX 3.0 Lighting software solution available from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs Section 3.4 on Lighting and Section 7.2 on Lighting Control can be obtained at this site U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs lights basic training will be completed in FY '98 Lighting mailing list for exchange of information on lighting issues Lights in commercial buildings in the 21st Century List of major areas of expertise at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, illustrated with specific projects

413

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

414

Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

415

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address performance issues and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

416

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

©2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in BuildingsStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Energy EfficiencyStudy on Energy Efficiency in Buildings 7. Lutzenhiser,

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Use of Water by Buildings (Million Gallons per Day) (1) Year 1985 1990 1995 2000 (2) 2005 (3) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes water from the public supply and self-supplied sources (e.g., wells) for residential and commercial sectors. 2) USGS did not estimate water use in the commercial and residential sectors for 2000. Estimates are based on available data and 1995 splits between domestic and commercial use. 3) USGS did not estimate commercial sector use for 2005. Estimated based on available data and commercial percentage in 1995. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1990, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1081, 1993; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1995, U.S. Geological

418

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assuming north?south and east?west facings of the building. For each orientation, different types of glazing (Table 4) and different glazing areas are considered. The first case(the base case) assumes a single clear glazing with a window-to-wall ratio.... Floor plan of the east-west oriented residential building taken for study (not to scale) Table 1. The zones basic characteristics Zone Area (m2) Volume (m3) Occupancy (people/m2) Venti- lation (l/s) HVAC system Bed room1 15.12 52...

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

420

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Federal Building Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year (1) Year Year FY 1985 123.0 FY 1997 111.9 FY 1986 131.3 FY 1998 107.7 FY 1987 136.9 FY 1999 106.7 FY 1988 136.3 FY 2000 104.8 FY 1989 132.6 FY 2001 105.9 FY 1990 128.6 FY 2002 104.6 FY 1991 122.9 FY 2003 105.2 FY 1992 125.5 FY 2004 104.9 FY 1993 122.3 FY 2005 98.2 FY 1994 120.2 FY 2006 (2) 113.9 FY 1995 117.3 FY 2007 (3) 112.9 FY 1996 115.0 FY 2015 (4) 89.5 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption per Gross Consumption per Gross Square Foot (10^3 Btu/SF) Square Foot (10^3 Btu/SF) 1) See Table 4.3.1 for floorspace. 2) Increase due to change in categorization of Federal buildings. 3) Adjusted for renewable energy purchases and source savings. 4) Executive Order 13423 goal. DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP FY 2007, Jan. 2010, Table 1, p. 13; DOE/FEMP, Annual Report to Congress on FEMP, Sept. 2006, Table

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Response of office building electricity consumption to urban weather in Adelaide, South Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Knowledge of climate dependency of building energy consumption is useful for predicting the impacts of climate change and urban heat island on energy demand and associated carbon emissions, and to evaluate and improve building energy performance. Climate dependent electricity consumption is examined in this study for four office buildings in Adelaide, the capital city of South Australia with a warm-summer Mediterranean climate. Influences of both outdoor temperature and specific humidity on building electricity consumption are analyzed using the multiple linear regression, based on both sub-daily and monthly electricity consumption data. The results indicate that there is a daytime mean temperature threshold of around 17 °C, above which, electricity consumption increases with air temperature. Specific humidity also contributes to interpreting the temporal variability of office hour electricity consumption. Daytime temperature and specific humidity together determine 80–90% of office hour electricity consumption variation for days with mean daytime temperature above the threshold temperature. Office building daily electricity consumption can be examined with monthly electricity consumption data of a period of three years. The results also suggest that heatwaves may increase office building electricity demand by up to 50%, and that one degree warming can increase annual office electricity consumption by 2% in Adelaide.

Huade Guan; Veronica Soebarto; John Bennett; Roger Clay; Robert Andrew; Yunhui Guo; Saeedeh Gharib; Kathryn Bellette

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Strip, Bind, and Search: A Method for Identifying Abnormal Energy Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strip, Bind, and Search: A Method for Identifying Abnormal Energy Consumption in Buildings Romain usage that leads to energy waste. The av- erage waste uncovered is as high as 2500 kWh per device; Energy Consumption; Anomaly Detection 1. INTRODUCTION Buildings are one of the prime targets to reduce

California at Berkeley, University of

423

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, ÂŤEnergy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsÂŽ and 10 CFR 435, ÂŤEnergy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

424

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, ÂŤEnergy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsÂŽ and 10 CFR 435, ÂŤEnergy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

425

Viability of exterior shading devices for high-rise residential buildings: Case study for cooling energy saving and economic feasibility analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Proper use of building shading devices can only improve the thermal comfort in indoor environment, but also reduce cooling energy consumption effectively. Researches on this topic have been mostly conducted for office buildings, but were limited for exterior shading devices of high-rise buildings, where cooling is a major energy consumer. This paper presents an integrated approach for exterior shading design analysis about energy performance and economic feasibility in a high-rise residential building (Seoul, Korea) by both numerical simulations and field mock-up test for possibility of installing. The sun-shading/daylighting performance analysis of the 48 exterior shading devices was measured with 4.0 m × 3.2 m window module size during the period of May–September. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the cooling energy saving potential of solar radiation controls was conducted with DOE-2.1E simulation program. The cooling energy saving potential was about 20%, while the reducing of solar heat gain by the two exterior shading devices (the horizontal overhang and the vertical panel) would lead to a decrease of the cooling energy demand 19.7% and 17.3%, respectively. Cost benefit and economic feasibility was also analyzed, in consideration of the OPEX and CAPEX, depending on the shading type. The significance of this study lies in providing basic information for rational exterior shading planning, when designing high-rise residential buildings.

Jinkyun Cho; Changwoo Yoo; Yundeok Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spatial effects of carbon dioxide emissions from residential energy consumption: A county-level study using enhanced nocturnal lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the world’s largest developing country and greenhouse gas emitter, China’s residential energy consumption (REC) is now responsible for over 11% of the country’s total energy consumption. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes spatially distributed information from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP–OLS) and human activity index (HAI) to test the hypothesis that counties with similar carbon dioxide emissions from REC are more spatially clustered than would be expected by chance. Our results revealed a high degree of county-level clustering in the distribution of emissions per capita. However, further analysis showed that high-emission counties tended to be surrounded by counties with relatively low per capita GDP levels. Therefore, our results contrasted with other evidence that REC emissions were closely related to GDP levels. Accordingly, we stress the need for the consideration of other factors in determining emission patterns, such as residential consumption patterns (e.g., consumer choices, behavior, knowledge, and information diffusion).

Heli Lu; Guifang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Simulation-based assessment of the energy savings benefits of integrated control in office buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andU.S. Lighting Market Characterization Volume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy ConsumptionBuilding Energy Consumption Survey. EnergyPlus (2008). U.S.

Hong, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A. 279 2.7 2000 106 N.A. 282 2.7 2001 107 2% 285 2.7 2002 105 3% 288 2.7 2003 106 5% 290 2.8 2004 107 7% 293 2.7 2005 109 9% 296 2.7 2006 110 11% 299 2.7 2007 110 12% 302 2.7 2008 111 13% 304 2.8 2009 111 13% 307 2.8 2010 114 14% 310 2.7 2011 115 14% 313 2.7 2012 116 15% 316 2.7 2013 117 16% 319 2.7 2014 118 17% 322 2.7 2015 119 18% 326 2.7 2016 120 19% 329 2.7 2017 122 21% 332 2.7 2018 123 22% 335 2.7 2019 125 23% 338 2.7 2020 126 25% 341 2.7 2021 127 26% 345

429

EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, “EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings” and 10 CFR 435, “EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE‘s Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ?Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings? and 10 CFR 435, ?Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings? Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOE‘s determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Council‘s 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

430

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Most Popular Tables PDFXLS 3.1.4 2010 Commercial Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type PDFXLS 1.1.1 U.S. Residential and Commercial Buildings Total Primary Energy Consumption PDFXLS...

431

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Energy Consumption and Energy Sources - Part 1 Part 2. Energy Intensity Data Tables Total Energy Consumption Consumption by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part 1. Energy Consumption The CBECS collects energy consumption statistics from energy suppliers for four major energy sources—electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat—and collects information from the sampled buildings on the use of the four major sources and other energy sources (e.g., district chilled water, solar, wood). Energy consumed in commercial buildings is a significant fraction of that consumed in all end-use sectors. In 2000, about 17 percent of total energy was consumed in the commercial sector. Total Energy Consumption

432

Modelling the impacts of building regulations and a property bubble on residential space and water heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper develops a bottom-up model of space and water heating energy demand for new build dwellings in the Irish residential sector. This is used to assess the impacts of measures proposed in Ireland's National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP). The impact of the housing construction boom, which resulted in 23% of occupied dwellings in 2008 having been built since 2002, and the subsequent bust, are also assessed. The model structure treats separately new dwellings added to the stock after 2007 and pre-existing occupied dwellings. The former is modelled as a set of archetype dwellings with energy end use affected by the relevant set of building regulations that apply during construction. Energy demand of existing dwellings is predicted by a simpler top down method based on historical energy use trends. The baseline scenario suggests residential energy demand will grow by 19% from 3206 ktoe in 2007 to 3810 ktoe in 2020. The results indicate that 2008 and 2010 building regulations will lead to energy savings of 305 ktoe (8.0%) in 2020. Had the 2008 building regulations been introduced in 2002, at the start of the boom, there would be additional savings of 238 ktoe (6.7%) in 2020.

D. Dineen; B.P. Ó Gallachóir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Development of a housing performance evaluation model for multi-family residential buildings in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the development and application of a housing performance evaluation model for multi-family residential buildings in Korea. This model is intended to encourage initiatives toward achieving better housing performance and to support a homebuyer's decision-making on housing comparison and selection. Forty-one objective and feasible housing performance indicators, which were selected from the review of existing evaluation models and interviews with experts, are classified into a series of categories. The weights of each category and indicator are calculated by using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) analysis, and a weight is converted into credit. Next, the performance grades are divided into four levels, and evaluation criteria are suggested based on statutory performance value or the one frequently met in practice. Finally, the evaluation program and the application procedure are established through the field case study. This model can be used for objective and practical evaluation and comparison of residential housing alternatives.

Sun-Sook Kim; In-Ho Yang; Myoung-Souk Yeo; Kwang-Woo Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring March 31, 200X i U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEW Hello, I am __________________________ from Roper Starch Worldwide Inc., a social science research firm. We are conducting a study for the U.S. Department of Energy about energy consumption in homes. Although your participation is voluntary, we hope you will participate in this important study of energy usage. Your identity and all the responses you give me will be kept strictly confidential. The survey will take about 15 minutes.

435

Assessment of Cost-optimal Energy Performance Requirements for the Italian Residential Building Stock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Directive 2010/31/EU establishes that Member States must ensure that minimum energy performance requirements for buildings are set with a view to achieve cost-optimal levels. The paper presents a methodology for identifying the cost-optimal levels for the Italian residential building stock, following the Guidelines accompanying the Commission Delegated Regulation No. 244/2012. The methodology is applied to a reference building of the IEE-TABULA project and considering different energy efficiency measures. The energy performance and the global cost calculations are performed according to UNI/TS 11300 and UNI EN 15459, respectively. A new cost optimisation procedure based on a sequential search-optimisation technique considering discrete options is applied.

Vincenzo Corrado; Ilaria Ballarini; Simona Paduos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Experimental Investigation of Direct Expansion Dynamic Ice-on-coil Storage System Used in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduction in electricity consumption of an ice-storage system in the daytime leads to financial savings for building owners and extension savings for a power plant and national economy. Great advancements have been made in domestic ice-storage...

Zheng, M.; Kong, F.; Han, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption March 2012 8.1.2 Average Energy Intensity of Public Water Supplies by Location (kWh per Million Gallons) Location United States (2) 627 437 1,363 United States (3) 65 (6) 1,649 Northern California Indoor 111 1,272 1,911 Northern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Southern California Indoor (5) 111 1,272 1,911 Southern California Outdoor 111 1,272 0 Iowa (6) 380 1,570 Massachusetts (6) (6) 1,750 Wisconsin Class AB (4) - - Wisconsin Class C (4) - - Wisconsin Class D (4) - - Wisconsin Total (4) - - Note(s): Source(s): 836 3,263 Sourcing Treatment (1) Distribution Wastewater Total 2,230 2,295 2,117 5,411 2,117 3,500 - not included 1,850 9,727 13,021 9,727 11,110 2390 4,340 1,500 3,250 - not included 1,510 1) Treatment before delivery to customer. 2) Source: Electric Policy Research Institute (EPRI) 2009. Wastewater estimated based on EPRI

438

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

439

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Title Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5193E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Garbesi, Karina, Vagelis Vossos, Alan H. Sanstad, and Gabriel Burch Document Number LBNL-5193E Pagination 59 Date Published October Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the 'direct-DC house' with respect to today's typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sector-because of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolation-this paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

440

EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

building demand | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

demand demand Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

442

building load | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

load load Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

443

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residentialways, the majority of homes use energy in unpredictable waysenergy consumption per home, even when normalizing for size

Kelsven, Phillip

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation 1980 37% 41% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 36% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 40% 39% 18% 3% | 51% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 40% 39% 17% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 39% 40% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 39% 40% 18% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 41% 40% 16% 3% | 51% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 39% 41% 17% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 40% 42% 15% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 39% 41% 16% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 36% 43% 17% 3% | 47% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 38% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 36% 42% 18% 3% | 48% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 35% 42% 19% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 37% 43% 17% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 36% 43% 18% 3% | 48% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 34% 43% 20% 3% | 47% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 35% 41% 21% 3% | 49% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 35% 40% 22% 3% | 50% 47% 3% 23.66 2001

445

Improved Building Energy Consumption with the Help of Modern ICT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kyoto process and the global combat against climate change will require more intensive energy saving efforts especially in all developed countries. Key for the success in building sector is the energy efficiency of the existing building stock...

Pietilainen, J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and  Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

447

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.1 Buildings Sector Water Consumption 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption 8.3 Commercial Sector Water Consumption 8.4 WaterSense 8.5 Federal Government Water Usage 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables This chapter includes data on water use in commercial and residential buildings and the energy needed to supply that water. The main points from this chapter are summarized below: In 2005, water use in the buildings sector was estimated at 39.6 billion gallons per day, which is nearly 10% of total water use in the United States. From 1985 to 2005, water use in the residential sector closely tracked population growth, while water use in the commercial sector grew almost twice as fast.

448

13 - Micro combined heat and power (CHP) systems for residential and small commercial buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The principal market for micro-CHP is as a replacement for gas boilers in the 18 million or so existing homes in the UK currently provided with gas-fired central heating systems. In addition there are a significant number of potential applications of micro-CHP in small commercial and residential buildings. In order to gain the optimum benefit from micro-CHP, it is essential to ensure that an appropriate technology is selected to integrate with the energy systems of the building. This chapter describes the key characteristics of the leading micro-CHP technologies, external and internal combustion engines and fuel cells, and how these align with the relevant applications.

J. Harrison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Monitoring energy reduction through applying green roofs to residential buildings in Dubai  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green roofing in a building has many advantages including absorbing rainwater, providing thermal insulation, enhancing the ecology, creating a peaceful retreat for people and animals, improving air quality and helping to offset the air temperature and heat island effect. The aim of this paper is to monitor energy saving in the residential buildings of Dubai after applying green roofing techniques. The paper also attempts to provide a thermal analysis after the application of green roofs. A villa in Dubai was chosen as a case study. With the aid of energy simulation software, namely DesignBuilder, as well as manual recording and calculations, the energy savings after applying the green roofing were detected. To that extent, the paper draws some recommendations with regard to the types of green roofing that should be used in these particular climatic conditions based on this real experiment that took place over a one year period.

Hanan Taleb

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Analysis of the Effects of the Application of Solar Water Heater in Building Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of the economy, civilian construction in the Changjiang River delta region is rapidly expanding. The boom in the construction industry definitely results in that the proportion of building energy consumption to whole energy...

Wang, J.; Li, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Life cycle energy consumption and CO2 emission of an office building in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Office buildings having some part of it or all of it used for office purposes (Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency 2004...) have one of the highest levels of energy consumption compared wi...

Huijun J. Wu; Zengwei W. Yuan; Ling Zhang…

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Indoor Conditions Study and Impact on the Energy Consumption for a Large Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that were studied using dynamic simulations. The article provides interesting insights of the building indoor conditions (summer/winter comfort), humidity, air temperature, mean operative temperature and energy consumption using hourly climate data. A...

Catalina, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption 2003 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for 2003 (Detailed Tables E1-E11 and E1A-E11A) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, personal computers, office equipment (including servers), and other uses. Although details vary by energy source (Table 1), there are four basic steps in the end-use estimation process: Regressions of monthly consumption on degree-days to establish reference temperatures for the engineering models, Engineering modeling by end use, Cross-sectional regressions to calibrate the engineering estimates and account for additional energy uses, and

455

Buildings and Energy in the 80's -- Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables Detailed Tables Total Residential and Commercial Primary Consumption by Type of Building Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. This report introduces several innovations in energy data reporting that complement the previously published triennial reports of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) and the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). (1) Both residential and commercial sector buildings data are presented together in the report. Common units of analysis, the residential or commercial building and floorspace, are used to facilitate comparison.17 (2) Unlike the triennial RECS and CBECS that

456

The effect of an enclosure retrofit on air leakage rates for a multi-unit residential case-study building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a relatively new, simple and robust, method for air leakage testing. A thirteen-story multi-unit residential building was tested for air leakage before and after an enclosure retrofit. The building suites had a pre-retrofit NLA50 average of 6.77 cm2/m2 and an average post-retrofit NLA50 of 2.82 cm2/m2—a 58% betterment. The effect of the retrofit on air leakage rates was assessed and compared to other multi-unit residential buildings across Canada and USA. The case study building was significantly tighter than other multi-unit residential buildings included in published studies. Recommendations were made for field-testing procedures in order to maximize the potential for accurate measured flow characteristics. Field-testing for air-tightness needs to be standardized in order for useful comparative results to be generated in order to inform future research and operational considerations for the multi-unit residential building stock across North America.

Robin Urquhart; Russell Richman; Graham Finch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy consumption of bioclimatic buildings in Argentina during the period 2001–2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy performance of two bioclimatic buildings located in Santa Rosa city, a temperate semi-arid agricultural region of central Argentina, is analysed. The bioclimatic design included direct solar gain, thermal inertia, natural ventilation, thermal insulation, external shading, building orientation, and dwelling grouping. Each double-story building is aligned on an East–West axis and it has a compact shape with 350 m2 of useful floor area (58 m2/apartment). The solar collection area is around 18% of the apartment's useful area on the ground floor and 14% on the upper floor. This paper describes the energy performance of the buildings during the period 2001–2008. The analysis includes: (a) the energy consumption (natural gas and electricity) during 2001–2007 (natural gas: annually, bimonthly; electricity: monthly); (b) the natural gas consumption and the thermal behaviour during the winters of year 2001 (between July 27 and August 3) and 2008 (between August 8 and 13); (c) the daily natural gas consumption and the thermal behaviour during 2001 and 2008 winters; (d) the comparison between the energy consumption for heating in bioclimatic and conventional buildings. The authors concluded that the results confirm the large potential of solar buildings design to reach significant levels of energy saving. The comparison of solar and conventional buildings in terms of natural gas consumption demonstrates the magnitude of such potential.

C. Filippín; S. Flores Larsen; M. Canori

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

460

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, researchers from Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address barriers and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Simulation and Analysis of Energy Consumption of Public Building in Chongquig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation and analysis of energy consumption must be on the base of simulation of building load. DeST is adopted to calculate dynamic cooling load of the main building in Chongqing city. Then water chilling unit's plant capability is checked...

Chen, G.; Lu, J.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vibration sensors, for inferring electrical consumption when direct measurementvibration and light sensors, we can increase our coverage, especially in places where direct electrical measurementAND MEASUREMENT Building A/C Unit ? Accelerometer ? Fig (A) accel x Building A/C Unit ? Vibration

Jiang, Xiaofan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Regression analysis of residential air-conditioning energy consumption at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy consumption of a house air conditioner located at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, is modeled as a function of weather parameters and total (global) solar radiation on a horizontal surface. The selection of effective parameters that significantly influence energy consumption is carried out using general stepping regression methods. The problem of collinearity between the regressors is also investigated. The final model involves parameters of total solar radiation on a horizontal surface, wind speed, and temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. However, the model coefficients are functions of relative humidity and/or temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. Model adequacy is examined by the residual analysis technique. Model validation is carried out by the data-splitting technique. The sensitivity of the model indicates that relative humidity and temperature difference strongly influence the cooling energy consumption. It was found that an increase in relative humidity from 20% to 100% can cause a 100% increase in cooling energy consumption during the high cooling season.

Abdel-Nabi, D.Y.; Zubair, S.M.; Abdelrahman, M.A.; Bahel, V. (Energy Systems Group, Div. of Energy Resources, Research Inst., King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Categorization of residential electricity consumption as a basis for the assessment of the impacts of demand response actions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In a smart(er) grid context, the existence of dynamic tariffs and bidirectional communications will simultaneously allow and require an active role from the end-user concerning electricity management. However, the residential end-user will not be always available to manage energy resources and decide, based on price signals and preferences/needs, the best response actions to implement or the best usage of the electricity produced locally. Therefore, energy management systems are required to monitor consumption/generation/storage and to make the best decisions according to input signals and the user's needs and preferences. The design of adequate algorithms to be implemented in those systems require the prior characterization of domestic electricity demand and categorization of loads, according to availability, typical usage patterns, working cycles and technical constraints. Automated demand response actions must be tailored and chosen according to this previous analysis of load characteristics. In this paper, a characterization of household electricity consumption is presented and an operational categorization of end-use loads is proposed. The existing potential for demand response to a diversified set of management actions is described and a tool to assess the impact of implementing several actions with different rates of penetration of energy management systems is presented. The results obtained show the potential savings for the end-user and expected changes in the load diagram with a decrease of the aggregated peak electricity demand and a smoothed valley.

Ana Soares; Álvaro Gomes; Carlos Henggeler Antunes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing and Improving the Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings B. Polly, N. Kruis, and D. Roberts July 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

468

Discussion on Energy-Efficient Technology for the Reconstruction of Residential Buildings in Cold Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to wall is 0.33 in south, 0.30 in north, 0.05 in east and 0.03 in west. The heat transfer coefficient of roof is 1.26 W/m2?K and the area is 1028.5m2. The ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5...-1 ) heat transfer coefficient of external wall is 1.57 W/m2?K and the area is 3002.67 m2. The heat transfer coefficient of external window is 6.4 W/m2?K and the area is 908.64 m2. 2.2 Design Heating Load The design heating load of residential...

Zhao, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Monitoring building energy consumption, thermal performance, and indoor air quality in a cold climate region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings are major consumers of the world's energy. Optimizing energy consumption of buildings during operation can significantly reduce their impact on the global environment. Monitoring the energy usage and performance is expected to aid in reducing the energy consumption of occupants. In this regard, this paper describes a framework for sensor-based monitoring of energy performance of buildings under occupancy. Different types of sensors are installed at different locations in 12 apartment units in a building in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada to assess occupant energy usage, thermal performance of the building envelope, and indoor air quality (IAQ). The relationship between heating energy consumption and the thermal performance of building envelope and occupant comfort level is investigated by analyzing the monitoring data. The results show that the extent of heat loss, occupant comfort level, and appliance usage patterns have significant impacts on heating energy and electricity consumption. This study also identifies the factors influencing the poor IAQ observed in some case-study units. In the long term, it is expected that the extracted information acquired from the monitoring system can be used to support intelligent decisions to save energy, and can be implemented by the building management system to achieve financial, environmental, and health benefits.

Tanzia Sharmin; Mustafa Gül; Xinming Li; Veselin Ganev; Ioanis Nikolaidis; Mohamed Al-Hussein

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Development and validation of regression models to predict monthly heating demand for residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present research work concerns development of regression models to predict the monthly heating demand for single-family residential sector in temperate climates, with the aim to be used by architects or design engineers as support tools in the very first stage of their projects in finding efficiently energetic solutions. Another interest to use such simplified models is to make it possible a very quick parametric study in order to optimize the building structure versus environmental or economic criteria. All the energy prediction models were based on an extended database obtained by dynamic simulations for 16 major cities of France. The inputs for the regression models are the building shape factor, the building envelope U-value, the window to floor area ratio, the building time constant and the climate which is defined as function of the sol-air temperature and heating set-point. If the neural network (NN) methods could give precise representations in predicting energy use, with the advantage that they are capable of adjusting themselves to unexpected pattern changes in the incoming data, the multiple regression analysis was also found to be an efficient method, nevertheless with the requirement that an extended database should be used for the regression. The validation is probably the most important level when trying to find prediction models, so 270 different scenarios are analysed in this research work for different inputs of the models. It has been established that the energy equations obtained can do predictions quite well, a maximum deviation between the predicted and the simulated is noticed to be 5.1% for Nice climate, with an average error of 2%. In this paper, we also show that is possible to predict the building heating demand even for more complex scenarios, when the construction is adjacent to non-heated spaces, basements or roof attics.

Tiberiu Catalina; Joseph Virgone; Eric Blanco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with

472

Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy models of existing buildings are unreliable unless calibrated so they correlate well with actual energy usage. Calibrating models is costly because it is currently an art which requires significant manual effort by an experienced and skilled professional. An automated methodology could significantly decrease this cost and facilitate greater adoption of energy simulation capabilities into the marketplace. The Autotune project is a novel methodology which leverages supercomputing, large databases of simulation data, and machine learning to allow automatic calibration of simulations to match measured experimental data on commodity hardware. This paper shares initial results from the automated methodology applied to the calibration of building energy models (BEM) for EnergyPlus (E+) to reproduce measured monthly electrical data.

Garrett, Aaron [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Chandler, Theodore [Jacksonville State University] [Jacksonville State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption (Percent) Total Industry Transportation Total | (quads) 1980 34% 27% | 61% 39% 0% 100% | 7.15 1981 34% 28% | 61% 38% 0% 100% | 7.33 1982 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.12 1983 35% 29% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.34 1984 34% 29% | 63% 37% 0% 100% | 7.80 1985 34% 30% | 64% 36% 0% 100% | 7.93 1986 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.08 1987 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.38 1988 35% 30% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 8.80 1989 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.03 1990 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.26 1991 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.42 1992 34% 31% | 65% 35% 0% 100% | 9.43 1993 35% 31% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 9.76 1994 34% 31% | 65% 34% 0% 100% | 10.01 1995 35% 32% | 66% 34% 0% 100% | 10.28 1996 35% 32% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.58 1997 34% 33% | 67% 33% 0% 100% | 10.73 1998 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.14 1999 35% 33% | 68% 32% 0% 100% | 11.30 2000 35% 34% | 69% 31% 0% 100% | 11.67 2001 35% 35% | 70% 29% 0% 100% | 11.58 2002 37% 35% | 71% 29% 0% 100% | 11.82

474

Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henderson, L. [Univ. of Baltimore, MD (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, conducted a study to identify best practices, costs, and savings associated with balancing steam distribution systems through increased main line air venting, radiator vent replacement, and boiler control system upgrades.

476

PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Consumption .1984. “Time-of-Day Electricity Consumption Response toon Residential Electricity Consumption: The Hydro One Pilot.

Peters, Jane S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

1995 Buildings in 80's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Energy Information Administration Home Page Residential Energy Consumption Home Page. If you need assistance in viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800 Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Energy Users > Residential Home > 1995 Buildings in 80's 1995 Building in 80's Sources: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, EIA-457 of the 1980 Residential Energy Consumption Survey and Form EIA-871 of the 1989 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Adobe Acrabat Reader NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Acrobat Reader for viewing PDF files If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report.

478

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Buildings Share of U.S. Primary Energy Consumption (Percent) Total Consumption Total Industry Transportation Total (quads) 1980(1) 20.1% 13.5% | 33.7% 41.1% 25.2% 100% | 78.1 1981 20.0% 13.9% | 33.9% 40.4% 25.6% 100% | 76.1 1982 21.2% 14.8% | 36.0% 37.9% 26.1% 100% | 73.1 1983 21.1% 15.0% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.3% 100% | 72.9 1984 20.8% 14.9% | 35.7% 38.7% 25.7% 100% | 76.6 1985 21.0% 15.0% | 35.9% 37.8% 26.3% 100% | 76.5 1986 20.8% 15.1% | 35.9% 37.0% 27.1% 100% | 76.6 1987 20.5% 15.1% | 35.6% 37.2% 27.2% 100% | 79.0 1988 20.7% 15.2% | 35.9% 37.2% 27.0% 100% | 82.8 1989 20.9% 15.5% | 36.5% 37.0% 26.5% 100% | 84.8 1990 20.0% 15.7% | 35.8% 37.7% 26.5% 100% | 84.5 1991 20.6% 16.0% | 36.5% 37.3% 26.2% 100% | 84.4 1992 20.2% 15.6% | 35.8% 38.0% 26.1% 100% | 85.8 1993 20.8% 15.8% | 36.6% 37.4% 26.0% 100% | 87.5 1994 20.3% 15.8% | 36.1% 37.7% 26.2% 100% | 89.1 1995 20.3% 16.1% | 36.4% 37.4% 26.2% 100% | 91.1 1996 20.7%

479

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Energy "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update (DOE/EA-1871) March 16, 2011 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update

480

Cost-availability curves for hierarchical implementation of residential energy-efficiency measures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Historical residential electricity data and natural gas consumption data were collected for, respectively, 1,200 and 178 residences in a small town in the USA. These data were merged with local building and weath...

R. Villoria-Siegert; P. Brodrick; K. Hallinan; R. J. Brecha

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A methodology to assess energy-demand savings and cost effectiveness of retrofitting in existing Swedish residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Swedish residential buildings are typically retrofitted on a case-by-case basis. Large numbers of building consultants are involved in the decision-making, and stakeholders find it difficult to quantify the sustainable profits from retrofits and to make an efficient selection of the optimal alternative. The present paper presents an approach to design and assess energy-demand retrofitting scenarios. This aims to contribute to retrofitting decision-making regarding the main archetypes of existing Swedish residential buildings and to the evaluation of their long-term cost effectiveness. The approach combines energy-demand modeling and retrofit option rankings with life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Four types of typical Swedish residential buildings are used to demonstrate the model. Retrofits in the archetypes are defined, analyzed and ranked to indicate the long-term energy savings and economic profits. The model indicates that the energy saving potential of retrofitting is 36–54% in the archetypes. However, retrofits with the largest energy-saving potential are not always the most cost effective. The long-term profits of retrofitting are largely dominated by the building types. The finding can contribute to the standardization of future retrofitting designs on municipality scale in Sweden.

Qian Wang; Sture Holmberg

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks DOE Commercial Building Benchmarks New Construction Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] May 5, 2009 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks 2003 CBECS Avg. Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 39 42 40 39 32 40 34 43 39 37 43 38 47 44 49 62 99 Medium Office 38 44 42 44 35 41 40 51 43 46 53 47 59 54 62 82 94 Small Office 46 48 49 46 36 44 38 53 47 47 61 52 70 62 77 110 80 Warehouse 15 15 15 16 14 16 14 18 17 16 21 20 26 23 27 43 48 Stand-alone Retail 48 46 46 41 34 41 35 45 42 40 48 45 54 51 61 88 70 Strip Mall 46 44 44 44 35 43 38 48 45 42 51 47 60 55 66 99 110 Primary School 65 71 69 69 57 65 71 78 68 65 85 74 99 88 107 147 68

483

A look at commercial buildings in 1995: Characteristics, energy consumption, and energy expenditures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of facilities that would not be considered commercial in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The target population for the 1995 CBECS consisted of all commercial buildings in the US with more than 1,000 square feet of floorspace. Decision makers, businesses, and other organizations that are concerned with the use of energy--building owners and managers, regulators, legislative bodies and executive agencies at all levels of government, utilities and other energy suppliers--are confronted with a buildings sector that is complex. Data on major characteristics (e.g., type of building, size, year constructed, location) collected from the buildings, along with the amount and types of energy the buildings consume, help answer fundamental questions about the use of energy in commercial buildings.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 U.S. Buildings Site Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) (1) Growth Rate Wood (2) Solar Thermal (3) Solar PV (3) GSHP (4) Total 2010-Year 1980 0.867 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.867 - 1981 0.894 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.894 - 1982 0.993 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.993 - 1983 0.992 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.992 - 1984 1.002 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.002 - 1985 1.034 0.000 N.A. 0.000 1.034 - 1986 0.947 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.947 - 1987 0.882 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.882 - 1988 0.942 0.000 N.A. 0.000 0.942 - 1989 1.018 0.052 N.A. 0.008 1.078 - 1990 0.675 0.056 N.A. 0.008 0.739 - 1991 0.705 0.057 N.A. 0.009 0.771 - 1992 0.744 0.059 N.A. 0.010 0.813 - 1993 0.657 0.061 N.A. 0.010 0.728 - 1994 0.626 0.063 N.A. 0.010 0.700 - 1995 0.633 0.064 N.A. 0.011 0.708 - 1996 0.669 0.065 N.A. 0.012 0.746 - 1997 0.559 0.064 N.A. 0.013 0.636 - 1998 0.498 0.064 N.A. 0.015 0.577 - 1999 0.521 0.063 N.A. 0.016 0.599 - 2000 0.549 0.060 N.A. 0.016 0.625 - 2001

485

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Hourly load profiles are available for over all TMY3 locations in the United States here. Browse files in this dataset, accessible as individual files and as commercial and residential downloadable ZIP files. This dataset is approximately 4.8GiB compressed or 19GiB uncompressed. July 2nd, 2013 update: Residential High and Low load files have been updated from 366 days in a year for leap years to the more general 365 days in a normal year.

486

Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Web-Based Method to Generate Specific Energy Consumption Data for the Evaluation and Optimization of Building Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5 University Karlsruhe (TH) - Department of Architecture Building Physics and Technical Building Services 0100200300400500600700800 ABCDEFGHI detailed analysis ACEGI benchmarkingand selection 0100200300400500600700800 12345678910 optimisation... consumption of electricity and heat arith. mean limit for heating energy demand: 95 kWh/m?y * for buildings with an average building compactness of 0,95 [building envelope/volume] * according to the German building code of 1995 University Karlsruhe (TH...

Wagner, A.; Wambsgan, M.; Froehlich, S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plausible future penetration rates for residential PVefficiencies and penetration rates. A subset of outputs areof localized high penetration rates, but the lack of a sound

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Autonomous Controlssystem under the context of demand response for residential10] E. Arens et al. , Demand response enabling technology

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Smart Operation of Centralized Temperature Control System in Multi-Unit Residential Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Smart Grid has emerged a very important concept in modern power systems. The integration of different loads such as residential, commercial and industrial into the… (more)

Kundu, Rajib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optimizing Hydronic Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boiler Optimization Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org; Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com; HTP, www.htproducts.com; Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com; Grundfos, us.grundfos.com; Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com; Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Space heating, water heating Application: New; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): 4,5,6,7 PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $6,100-$8,200 Projected Energy Savings:

492

Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

493

2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

494

THERMAL BUILDING PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION USING SPATIAL ARCHETYPES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is spent for heating and cooling systems, see Figure 1.2. Figure 1.1 Primary energy consumption by sector, 1970-2020 in quadrillion Btu (EIA, 2001) Figure 1.2 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by end use encouragement, love and support #12;1 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1. Energy Consumption Energy conscious building

Papalambros, Panos

495

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage (1) | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 | Building Type Pre-1959 1960-1989 1990-2003 Health Care 178.1 216.0 135.7 | Education 77.7 88.3 80.6 Inpatient 230.3 255.3 253.8 | Service 62.4 86.0 74.8 Outpatient 91.6 110.4 84.4 | Food Service 145.2 290.1 361.2 Food Sales 205.8 197.6 198.3 | Religious Worship 46.6 39.9 43.3 Lodging 88.2 111.5 88.1 | Public Order & Safety N.A. 101.3 110.6 Office 93.6 94.4 88.0 | Warehouse & Storage N.A. 38.9 33.3 Mercantile 80.4 91.8 94.4 | Public Assembly 61.9 107.6 119.7 Retail (Non-Malls) 74.1 63.7 86.4 | Vacant 21.4 23.1 N.A. Retail (Malls) N.A. 103.9 99.5 | Other 161.3 204.9 125.3 Note(s): Source(s): Consumption (kBtu/SF) Consumption (kBtu/SF) 1) See Table 3.1.3 for primary versus delivered energy consumption.

496

HomeSim: Comprehensive, Smart, Residential Electrical Energy Simulation and Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HomeSim: Comprehensive, Smart, Residential Electrical Energy Simulation and Scheduling J. Venkatesh.edu + {jc.junqua, phmorin} @us.panasonic.com Abstract-- Residential energy constitutes 38% of the total energy consumption in the United States [1]. Although a number of building simulators have been proposed

Simunic, Tajana

497

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Other Total Nuclear Total (quad) 1980 41% 12% 28% 7% 6% 13% 6% 14.84 1981 40% 10% 29% 6% 6% 13% 7% 14.51 1982 39% 9% 30% 8% 7% 14% 7% 14.95 1983 37% 9% 31% 8% 7% 15% 8% 14.86 1984 37% 10% 31% 7% 7% 14% 8% 15.49 1985 36% 10% 32% 6% 7% 13% 9% 15.69 1986 34% 10% 32% 7% 6% 13% 10% 15.47 1987 34% 10% 33% 6% 6% 12% 10% 15.82 1988 34% 10% 33% 5% 6% 11% 12% 16.62 1989 35% 10% 32% 6% 7% 12% 11% 17.24 1990 34% 8% 34% 6% 5% 11% 13% 16.54 1991 34% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 17.03 1992 35% 8% 33% 5% 6% 11% 13% 17.05 1993 35% 8% 34% 6% 5% 11% 12% 17.89 1994 35% 8% 33% 5% 5% 10% 13% 17.79 1995 35% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 18.31 1996 35% 8% 33% 6% 5% 11% 13% 19.27 1997 35% 8% 35% 7% 4% 11% 12% 18.71 1998 34% 7% 36% 6% 4% 10% 13% 18.57 1999 34% 8% 35% 6% 4% 10% 14% 19.20 2000 34% 8% 35% 5% 4% 9% 14% 20.06 2001 35% 8% 35% 4% 4% 7% 14% 19.65 2002 34% 7% 35% 5% 4% 8% 14% 20.52 2003 34% 7% 36% 5% 4% 9% 14% 20.75 2004 34% 8% 36% 5% 4% 8% 14% 20.76 2005 34% 7% 36%

498

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Electricity Growth Rate Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Coal Renewable(2) Sales Losses Total TOTAL (2) 2010-Year 1980 4.79 30% 1.72 11% 0.03 0% 0.85 5% 2.45 5.89 8.33 53% 15.72 100% - 1981 4.57 30% 1.52 10% 0.03 0% 0.87 6% 2.46 5.77 8.24 54% 15.23 100% - 1982 4.68 30% 1.42 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.49 5.89 8.38 54% 15.48 100% - 1983 4.45 29% 1.33 9% 0.03 0% 0.97 6% 2.56 6.03 8.59 56% 15.38 100% - 1984 4.64 29% 1.51 10% 0.04 0% 0.98 6% 2.66 6.07 8.73 55% 15.90 100% - 1985 4.51 28% 1.55 10%