Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

2

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

3

Colorado State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The State of Colorado provides the following information to certify compliance with Title III of the Energy...

4

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

5

City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Austin Energy '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project.

6

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The purpose of this letter is to document that the State of Connecticut has met its stautory requirement with regard to adoption of energy codes that meet or exceed the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings. Publication Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 CT Certification of Building Energy Codes.pdf Document Details Last Name: Cassidy Initials: JV Affiliation: Connecticut Department of Administrative Services, Division of Construction Services Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Adoption Building Type:

7

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

8

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

9

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

11

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Potential for energy technologies in residential and commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The residential-commercial energy technology model was developed as a planning tool for policy analysis in the residential and commercial building sectors. The model and its procedures represent a detailed approach to estimating the future acceptance of energy-using technologies both in new construction and for retrofit into existing buildings. The model organizes into an analytical framework all relevant information and data on building energy technology, building markets, and government policy, and it allows for easy identification of the relative importance of key assumptions. The outputs include estimates of the degree of penetration of the various building energy technologies, the levels of energy use savings associated with them, and their costs - both private and government. The model was designed to estimate the annual energy savings associated with new technologies compared with continued use of conventional technology at 1975 levels. The amount of energy used under 1975 technology conditions is referred to as the reference case energy use. For analytical purposes the technologies were consolidated into ten groupings: electric and gas heat pumps; conservation categories I, II, and III; solar thermal (hot water, heating, and cooling); photovoltaics, and wind systems. These groupings clearly do not allow an assessment of the potential for individual technologies, but they do allow a reasonable comparison of their roles in the R/C sector. Assumptions were made regarding the technical and economic performances of the technologies over the period of the analysis. In addition, the study assessed the non-financial characteristics of the technologies - aesthetics, maintenance complexity, reliability, etc. - that will also influence their market acceptability.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

14

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Study: Window % of Consumption 1. Categorize component loads

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

17

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Links to Related Government Sites Publications list from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights Program Updated FLEX 3.0 Lighting software solution available from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs Section 3.4 on Lighting and Section 7.2 on Lighting Control can be obtained at this site U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs lights basic training will be completed in FY '98 Lighting mailing list for exchange of information on lighting issues Lights in commercial buildings in the 21st Century List of major areas of expertise at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, illustrated with specific projects

18

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

19

The Temperature Sensitivity of the Residential Load and Commercial Building Load  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a building modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building heating and cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. A building simulation software are first used to quantify the hourly energy consumption of different building types by end-use and by vintage. Then, the temperature sensitivities are derived based on the climate data inputs.

Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Correia, James; Leung, Lai R.; Wong, Pak C.

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Energy management in residential and small commercial buildings. Annual report, fiscal year 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the present program is to develop the technical basis for efficient energy use in space heating of residential and small commercial buildings. Efficiency measurements performed on conventional residential oil-fired hot water heating equipment, including both steady state and cyclic (part load) efficiency determinations are described. A list of preliminary recommendations for retrofit actions to improve efficiency is provided. A summary of work carried out in the areas of thermal storage media, fenestration, and building thermal dynamics is also presented.

Batey, J.; Gazerro, V.; Salzano, F.J.; Berlad, A.L.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has grown. Natural gas is the second largest energy source and petroleum (predominantly heating oil) a distant third. Buildings demand for electricity was the principal force...

22

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Information Texas Program Type Building Energy Code '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the...

23

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings … August 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings August 2010 Prepared by McGraw-Hill Construction for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy OF ENERGY Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 Chapter One DRIVERS OF ENERGY USE IN BUILDINGS 5 Chapter Two PROFILES OF BUILDING-SECTOR ENERGY USE 13 Chapter Three PATTERNS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDING PRODUCT ADOPTION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDING DESIGN 17 Chapter Four INDUSTRY RESEARCH FINDINGS DRIVING ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 25 Chapter Five ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS, CODES AND INCENTIVES 31 Chapter Six VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS AND LOCAL AND STATE POLICIES FOR GREEN AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 38 Chapter Seven RESOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION 50 Notes and definitions:

24

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

25

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Types > 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment 1995 CBECS Lighting Equipment Profile Lighting Equipment - Type and Characteristics of Equipment Emits Found In Incandescent Incandescent Light Bulb Produces light by electrically heating a tungsten filament Includes energy-efficient incandescent bulbs, such as Reflector or R-Lamps (accent and task lighting), Parabolic Aluminized Reflector (PAR) lamps (flood and spot lighting), and Ellipsoidal Reflector (ER) lamps (recessed lighting) Highly inefficient because much of the energy is lost as heat 14-18 Lumens Per Watt (LPW) 14% of Lit Commercial Floorspace Standard Fluorescent Lighting with Magnetic Ballast Standard Fluorescent with Magnetic Ballast Produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce

26

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

27

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

28

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

29

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

30

Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR

31

Commercial Buildings Communications protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many automation and control protocols in use in commercial building and residential sectors today. For both commercial building and residential sectors there are several thousand manufacturers throughout the world that supply end-use electrical appliances and other building fixtures that communicate using these automation and control protocols. Some of these protocols are based on open standards (for example, BACnet, DALI) while others are semi-proprietary (for example, Zigbee, LonWorks, Modbus...

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

33

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

34

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

35

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Technologies for Energy Efficiency in Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the ideas and opinions expressed by a variety of experts related to the basic science research needs for improving the energy efficiency of end-use technologies for the residential and commercial sectors. The experts participating in this project come from a wide range of institutions, including government research laboratories, universities, state and federal energy agencies, private research laboratories, industry consultants, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) member electri...

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

37

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

38

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

39

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

40

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

42

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

43

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored this project to estimate potential energy and monetary savings resulting from the implementation of light-colored roofs on residential and commercial buildings in major U.S. metropolitan areas. Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, so they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typically, rooftops in the United States are dark, and thus there is a potential for saving energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. Naturally, the expected savings are higher in southern, sunny, and cloudless climates. In this study, we make quantitative estimates of reduction in peak power demand and annual cooling electricity use that would result from increasing the reflectivity of the roofs. Since light-colored roofs also reflect heat in the winter, the estimates of annual electricity savings are a net value corrected for the increased wintertime energy use. Savings estimates only include direct reduction in building energy use and do not account for the indirect benefit that would also occur from the reduction in ambient temperature, i.e. a reduction in the heat island effect. This analysis is based on simulations of building energy use, using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Our methodology starts with specifying 11 prototypical buildings: single-family residential (old and new), office (old and new), retail store (old and new), school (primary and secondary), health (hospital and nursing home), and grocery store. Most prototypes are simulated with two heating systems: gas furnace and heat pumps. We then perform DOE-2 simulations of the prototypical buildings, with light and dark roofs, in a variety of climates and obtain estimates of the energy use for air conditioning and heating.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Gartland, L. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Residential Building Code Compliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

45

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Estimate Window % of Space Conditioning Use Original LBNLfactors to estimate space conditioning energy consumptionof Energy, in 2003 space conditioning in residential and

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting in Denver, Colorado, on...

47

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

48

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much energy is consumed in residential and commercial buildings in the United States? Nearly 40% of total U.S. energy consumption in 2012 was consumed in ...

49

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar gains with highly insulating windows, which leads to windows with positive heating energy flows offsetting buildingBuilding Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Year Made Number of Buildings (Thousands, 1993) U Factor SHGC Window Window SolarSolar Window Cond Window Infiltration Non-Window Infiltration Other Loads Total Loads Total Loads Window Properties Total Building Heating

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).section entitled National Energy Consumption Estimates).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

52

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Energy "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update (DOE/EA-1871) March 16, 2011 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update

53

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential and Commercial Integration Energy systems integration R&D at the small-scale, residential and commercial integration level encompasses diverse technologies such as...

54

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (2005).Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. : http://for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

56

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential...

57

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

58

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Design and thermal modeling of a residential building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent trends of green energy upgrade in commercial buildings show promise for application to residential houses as well, where there are potential energy-saving benefits of retrofitting the residential heating system from ...

Yeh, Alice Su-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Toward a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy: residential/commercial buildings market sector workbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workbook contains preliminary data and assumptions used during the preparation of inputs to a National Plan for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC). The workbook indicates the market potential, competitive position, market penetration, and technological characteristics of solar technologies for this market sector over the next twenty years. The workbook also presents projections of the mix of solar technologies by US Census Regions. In some cases, data have been aggregated to the national level. Emphasis of the workbook is on a mid-price fuel scenario, Option II, that meets about a 20% solar goal by the year 2000. The energy demand for the mid-price scenario is projected at 115 quads in the year 2000. The workbook, prepared in April 1979, represents government policies and programs anticipated at that time.

Taul, Jr., J. W.; de Jong, D. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the...

64

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and...

65

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics 1992 Buildings Characteristics Overview Full Report Tables National and Census region estimates of the number of commercial buildings in the U.S. and...

66

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

67

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

68

Transforming Commercial Building Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Transforming Commercial Building Operations Ron Underhill Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ronald.underhill@pnnl.gov (509)375-9765 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Most buildings are not commissioned (Cx) before occupancy, including HVAC and lighting systems * Buildings often are poorly operated and maintained leading to significant energy waste of 5 to 20%, even when they have building automation systems (BASs)

69

Commercial Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Integration Program Arah Schuur Program Manager arah.schuur@ee.doe.gov April 2, 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Vision Commercial buildings are constructed, operated, renovated and transacted with energy performance in mind and net zero ready commercial buildings are common and cost-effective. Commercial Buildings Integration Program Mission Accelerate voluntary uptake of significant energy performance improvements in existing and new commercial buildings. 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov BTO Goals: BTO supports the development and deployment of technologies and systems to reduce

70

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Sandy Fazeli National Association of State Energy Officials sfazeli@naseo.org; 703-299-8800 ext. 17 April 2, 2013 Supporting Consortium for the U.S. Department of Energy Net-Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Initiative 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * Many energy savings opportunities in commercial buildings remain untapped, underserved by the conventional "invest-design-build- operate" approach * The commercial buildings sector is siloed, with limited coordination

71

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

72

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/buildings/ appliance_standards/commercial/distributio n_Standards for Residential Appliances: 2004 Update, LBNL-

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

74

Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Not Available

1994-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

76

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

77

Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards for Residential and Commercial Equipment: Additional Opportunities Title Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Equipment: Additional...

78

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

79

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

80

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Residential Code Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Code Development Subscribe to updates To receive news and updates about code development activities subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. The model residential building...

82

Residential/commercial market for energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

The residential/commercial market sector, particularly as it relates to energy technologies, is described. Buildings account for about 25% of the total energy consumed in the US. Market response to energy technologies is influenced by several considerations. Some considerations discussed are: industry characteristics; market sectors; energy-consumption characeristics; industry forecasts; and market influences. Market acceptance may be slow or nonexistent, the technology may have little impact on energy consumption, and redesign or modification may be necessary to overcome belatedly perceived market barriers. 7 figures, 20 tables.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey—Commercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses | End-Use Equipment | Conservation Features and Practices Additional Information on: Survey methods, data limitations, and other information supporting the data The 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) was the seventh in the series begun in 1979. The 1999 CBECS estimated that 4.7 million commercial buildings (± 0.4 million buildings, at the 95% confidence level) were present in the United States in that year. Those buildings comprised a total of 67.3 (± 4.6) billion square feet of floorspace. Additional information on 1979 to 1999 trends

84

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes Conformity assessment is a term used to describe the processes followed to demonstrate that a product, service,...

85

Longmont Power & Communications - Residential and Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Electronics Maximum Rebate 50 per appliance. Residential: 1 clothes washer and 1 dishwasher per year Commercial: 3 clothes washers and 3 dishwashers per year Program...

86

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

87

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

88

Ohio Valley Gas Corporation - Residential and Small Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Natural Gas Incentive Program Ohio Valley Gas Corporation - Residential and Small Commercial Natural Gas Incentive Program Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings...

89

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

90

Lighting in Commercial Buildings, 1986  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 Lighting in Commercial Buildings Lighting in Commercial Buildings --1986 Overview Full Report and Tables Detailed analysis of energy consumption for lighting for U.S. commercial...

91

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10-15 years Provider City of Cleveland Department of Community Development The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to

92

Realized and Projected Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S. DepartmentProspective Impacts of U.S. Energy Efficiency Standards for2. US Residential and Commercial Primary Energy Consumption

Meyers, Stephen P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Data Now Available on OpenEI! Home > Groups > Utility Rate Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 12:03 building load building load data commercial load data dataset datasets electric load data load data load profile OpenEI residential load TMY3 United States Load data Image source: NREL I am pleased to announce that simulated hourly residential and commercial building load datasets are now available on OpenEI. These datasets are available for all TMY3 locations in the United States. They contain hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). In addition to various

94

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $250 - Residential; $750 (Commercial) Insulation: up to $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Water Heater Blanket: $20 per unit Radiant/Thermal Barrier Material: $500 - Residential; pre-approval required - Commercial Duct Repair/Replacement: $500

95

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

96

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

97

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

98

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

99

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

100

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

102

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

103

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

104

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

105

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

106

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

107

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

108

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

109

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

110

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

111

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

112

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

113

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events DOE Challenge Home Zero Net-Energy-Ready Home Training September 23, 2013 EEBA...

114

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting - Spring 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office:...

115

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting - Summer 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office:...

116

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Delicious

117

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors. Savings in the Residential and Commercial Sectors with High Efficiency Electric Motors.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Residential: $750 Commercial: $60,000 Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Residential''' Residential Construction: $750 '''Commercial/Industrial''' 10% to 20% to 30% above code, $40/MMBtu first-year savings Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) provides incentives to developers, home

119

Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program (Maine) Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program...

120

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling...

122

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building...

123

Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/4/2013 1 Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for Multi-Family Housing Tom Eckman Objectives Characterize Residential Sector Building Stock ­ Single Family (Four-plex and below) l if il ( i Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92)Survey (PNWRES92) NEEA Survey of Baseline

124

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace Trends in Commercial Buildings and Floorspace The addition of commercial buildings and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty years of CBECS. Each year more buildings are added to the sector (new construction or conversion of pre-existing buildings to commercial activity) than are removed (demolition or conversion to non-commercial activity). The definition for the commercial buildings population was changed for the 1995 CBECS which resulted in a slightly smaller buildings population and accounts for the data break in both Figures 1 and 2 (see report "Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector" for complete details). Figure 1. Total Commercial Buildings, 1979 to 1999

125

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score Energy Modeling Software Global Superior Energy Performance Partnership

126

The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

This report looks at different ways to verify energy code compliance and to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted document are achieved. Conformity assessment is the body of work that ensures compliance, including activities that can ensure residential and commercial buildings satisfy energy codes and standards. This report identifies and discusses conformity-assessment activities and provides guidance for conducting assessments.

Conover, David R.; Makela, Eric J.; Fannin, Jerica D.; Sullivan, Robin S.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

128

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

129

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Hourly load profiles are available for over all TMY3 locations in the United States here. Browse files in this dataset, accessible as individual files and as commercial and residential downloadable ZIP files. This dataset is approximately 4.8GiB compressed or 19GiB uncompressed. July 2nd, 2013 update: Residential High and Low load files have been updated from 366 days in a year for leap years to the more general 365 days in a normal year.

131

Green Residential Building Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on a wait list, and will be notified if additional funding becomes available.''''' The Green Residential Building Program, administered by the New York State Energy Research and...

132

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stakeholder's Meeting - Spring 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia,...

133

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Update Meeting - Summer 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting in Denver,...

134

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6a. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy

135

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings/appliance_standards/residential/ac_central.html>LBNL-56207 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential andLevels for Upgraded Standards....8 6. Estimation of

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Alabama State Certification of Residential Building Codes | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Name: Adams Initials: TL Affiliation: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Focus: Adoption Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: 2009 IECC 2009 IRC...

137

Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Also assume that the fan, both before and after project implementa-tion, was rated at 3 thousand cubic feet per minute (MCFM). The estimation was completed as follows:

138

Alabama State Certification of Commercial Building Codes | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Codes Commercial Building Codes In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 20, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register regarding ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, Alabama certifies that it has reviewed and adopted the provisions of its Alabama Energy and Residential Code to include the requirement for non-state-funded buildings to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, and by reference ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 Alabama Commercial Certification.pdf Document Details Last Name: Adams Initials: TL Affiliation: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Focus: Adoption Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: State-specific Target Audience:

139

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

140

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate ENERGY Star Light Fixtures: Not to exceed 50% of the fixture cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $60 Freezers: $60 Clothes Washers: $60

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

142

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and others to implement real-world energy saving opportunities. Commercial Building Basics Federal, state, and local governments as well as private companies, own, operate...

143

New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Furnace: $300 - $450 Boilers: $1000 - $1500 Combined High Efficiency Boiler/Water Heater: $1,200 Heat Recovery Ventilator: $500 High Efficiency Indirect Water Heater: $400 Condensing Gas Water Heater: $500 High Efficiency On-Demand, Tankless Water Heater: $500 - $800

144

Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential/Commercial Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate Add-On Heat Pump: $800 Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 (residential); $5,000 (commercial) Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Add-On Heat Pump: $200 per ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton (residential); $150/ton (commercial) Water Heater: $100 - $150 Energy Star Dishwasher: $25 Energy Star Refrigerator: $25 Energy Star Clothes Washer: $50 Provider

145

Building Technologies Office: Building America Residential Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research results to the market. Learn more about the research planning process. Read the Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report and view the...

146

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(92) (92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 April 1994 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this publication under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (202-586-1617). The project was directed by Lynda T. Carlson, Director of the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division (EEUISD) (202-586-1112) and Nancy L. Leach, Chief

147

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

148

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheet Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the number of American homes that are energy efficient. Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR ® Sponsors have leveraged over $1 billion in federal funding and local resources to build more energy-efficient communities. DOE is now expanding this network of residential energy efficiency programs and partners to new members. Who Should Join? Network membership is open to all organizations that are committed to accelerating the pace of energy

149

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

150

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program Lumbee River EMC - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Programmable Thermostat: $15 Central AC: $25 - $50 Heat Pump: $60 - $195 Geothermal Heat Pump: $350 Water Heaters: $45 - $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $425 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 - $75 Provider Lumbee River Electric Membership Corporation Lumbee River EMC (LREMC) offers rebates to its residential customers who purchase and install qualified energy efficient products or services.

151

EIA Energy Kids - In Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Using & Saving Energy In Commercial Buildings. How do commercial buildings like offices, hospitals, schools, places of worship, warehouses, hotels, ...

152

Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Commercial About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database

153

Commercial Codes and Standards | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(or non-residential) buildings, in the context of building energy codes and standards, are all buildings other than low-rise residential buildings, including multi-family...

154

OpenEI - commercial building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4040 en Commercial Reference Building: Quick Service Restaurant http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode441

155

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey About the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national sample survey that collects information on the stock of U.S. commercial buildings, their energy-related building characteristics, and their energy consumption and expenditures. Commercial buildings include all buildings in which at least half of the floorspace is used for a purpose that is not residential, industrial, or agricultural, so they include building types that might not traditionally be considered "commercial," such as schools, correctional institutions, and buildings used for religious worship. The CBECS was first conducted in 1979; the tenth, and most recent survey, will be fielded starting in April 2013 to provide data for calendar year

156

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

157

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential energy efficiency and the mission of the BBRN. Members are expected to be legally incorporated organizations or institutions, rather than individuals, actively engaged in the field of existing residential building energy efficiency with an ability to impact the market. Members should have the ability and capacity to carry out the requirements for membership (i.e., reporting the annual number of upgrades in their sphere of influence, and associated benefits), and actively engage as a member. Members must actively engage in significant work supporting, studying, researching, reporting, and/or

158

Number of U.S. Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 2

159

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5b

160

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 5a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7a

162

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table7c

163

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 7b

164

U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program Entergy Texas - Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Large Projects: 12.5% of total budget; or $237,500 (Residential); $162,500 for Hard-To-Reach A/C and Heat Pump Program: $40,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Standard Offer: $250/kW + $0.081/kWh Hard To Reach Standard Offer Program (all measures except CFL): $440/kW +

166

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum payment of 400,000 per year for performance-based incentives Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PV rebates will be awarded via lottery on August 12, 2013 Residential PV: $1.28/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (less than 30 kW): $0.97/W CEC-AC Commercial PV (30 kW or larger): ineligible at this time Solar Water Heaters (residential domestic hot water only; not pools):

167

Performance Metrics for Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Commercial building owners and operators have requested a standard set of key performance metrics to provide a systematic way to evaluate the performance of their buildings. The performance metrics included in this document provide standard metrics for the energy, water, operations and maintenance, indoor environmental quality, purchasing, waste and recycling and transportation impact of their building. The metrics can be used for comparative performance analysis between existing buildings and industry standards to clarify the impact of sustainably designed and operated buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Wang, Na; Romero, Rachel L.; Deru, Michael P.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

> Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption...

169

Lane Electric Cooperative- Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lane Electric Cooperative offers energy efficient Weatherization Grant Programs to Lane Electric residential and commercial members: a residential cash grant for 25% of measure costs up to $1,000,...

170

An energy standard for residential buildings in south China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: residential, buildings, energy standard, energyspiraling demand for building energy use, Chinas Ministryand implementing building energy standards, starting with a

Huang, Yu Joe; Lang, Siwei; Hogan, John; Lin, Haiyan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Final Report for the Energy Efficient and Affordable Small Commercial and Residential Buildings Research Program -- Project 6.6 - Development of the Assessment Framework  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology for assessing the impacts of potential products related to the buildings end-use energy efficiency program area that may results from projects performed as part of the California Energy Commissions (CECs) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. The methodology developed and described in this report applies strictly to new products designed for use in commercial buildings in California. We consider a new product any product or service offering that has an energy efficiency improvement feature or component that can be clearly characterized by either a performance metric or an improvement factor that expresses the improvement potential over the best currently available products or the installed base of the same or similar products. New products could include: new equipment in support of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC), lighting, domestic water heating or any other end-uses relevant for commercial buildings; diagnostics, controls, or monitoring service products that either assists in or perform monitoring or control functions of the energy uses or the thermal integrity of the building shell.

Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Anderson, Dave M.; Hostick, Donna J.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Size of Buildings Size of Buildings Size of Buildings The 1999 CBECS estimated that 2,348,000 commercial buildings, or just over half (50.4 percent) of total buildings, were found in the smallest building size category (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) (Figure 1). Only 7,000 buildings occupied the largest size category (over 500,000 square feet). Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Size of Building, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The middle size categories (10,001 to 100,000 square feet) had relatively more floorspace per category than smaller or larger size categories (Figure 2). The greatest amount of floorspace, about 11,153,000 square feet (or 17 percent of total floorspace) was found in the 10,001 to 25,000 square feet category. Figure 2. Distribution of Floorspace by Size of Building, 1999

173

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the...

174

Commercial Building Partnership  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Partnership Building Partnership (CBP) Adam Hirsch National Renewable Energy Laboratory Email: Adam.Hirsch@nrel.gov Phone: (303) 384-7874 Wednesday, April 3 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * 2008: NREL + PNNL selected partner companies and technical consultants and won joint solicitation - Collaborators selected based on commitment to hitting project goals and likelihood of success * Projects began in 2009 with aim of 3-5 year completion

175

Commercial Building Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Partnership Building Partnership (CBP) Adam Hirsch National Renewable Energy Laboratory Email: Adam.Hirsch@nrel.gov Phone: (303) 384-7874 Wednesday, April 3 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * 2008: NREL + PNNL selected partner companies and technical consultants and won joint solicitation - Collaborators selected based on commitment to hitting project goals and likelihood of success * Projects began in 2009 with aim of 3-5 year completion

176

Commercial Buildings Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies and practices 4 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives (cont.) Project Focus and Strategies: Collaboration * Facilitate information...

177

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings Promoting Energy Savings for Businesses S igned by President Bush on August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) lays the foundation for the new Federal tax incentives for consumers and businesses that pursue energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy. For updated information about the tax incentives, see www.energy.gov. This web- site also describes other EPACT provisions of interest to businesses, including incen- tives for distributed generation and hybrid fuel fleet vehicles. Tax Deductions for Commercial Building Owners Commercial building owners and lessees who purchase and install energy-saving products in their businesses can qualify for a tax deduction under EPACT. Buildings must achieve a 50 percent reduction in

178

Longmont Power and Communications - Residential and Commercial Appliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Longmont Power and Communications - Residential and Commercial Longmont Power and Communications - Residential and Commercial Appliance Rebate Program Longmont Power and Communications - Residential and Commercial Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate 50 per appliance. Residential: 1 clothes washer and 1 dishwasher per year Commercial: 3 clothes washers and 3 dishwashers per year Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dishwasher: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 Provider Customer Service Longmont Power and Communications offers an incentive for its residential and commercial customers to install energy efficient washing machines and dishwashers. The rebate [http://www.ci.longmont.co.us/lpc/pdfs/rebate_appl.pdf application] is

179

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

180

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 2: Final residential and commercial building prototypes and DOE-2.1E developed UECs and EUIs; Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This section contains the detailed measured impact results and market segment data for each DSM case examined for this building type. A complete index of all base and measure cases defined for this building type is shown first. This index represents an expansion of the base and measure matrix presented in Table 1 (residential) or Table 2 (commercial) for the applicable sector. Following this index, a summary report sheet is provided for each DSM measure case in the order shown in the index. The summary report sheet contains a host of information and selected graphs which define and depict the measure impacts and outline the market segment data assumptions utilized for each case in the DBEDT DSM Forecasting models. The variables and figures included in the summary report sheet are described. Numerous tables and figures are included.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Evaluating Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance The materials for this course may be used for in-person training courses, and are intended to provide the tools and specific training necessary to evaluate residential compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The course also provides useful training in general residential field inspection for energy code compliance. The recommended background for taking this course is significant experience and/or certification on the IECC in a plan review or inspection capacity. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, July 16, 2010. Course Type: Training Materials Video In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides Presentation Slides Presentation Slides and Windows Media Videos

182

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Danielle Sass Byrnett Better Buildings Residential Building Technologies Office Program Solution Center Demonstration Outline * Goals, History, Content Sources * Tour: Organization - Program Components - Handbooks * Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs & Partners * Provide an easily accessed repository for key lessons, resources, and knowledge collected from the experience of past programs. * Help programs and their partners plan, implement, manage, and evaluate better * Help stakeholders leapfrog past missteps en route to a larger and more successful industry. 4 eere.energy.gov Intended Audiences

183

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torchiere Space heating Air conditioning Electric motorsCommercial Space heating Air conditioning Ventilation GasResidential End Use: Air conditioning Product: Room air

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

CenterPoint Energy- Residential and Small Commercial Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

CenterPoint Energy's (CNP) Residential and Small Commercial Standard Offer Program (SOP) provides incentives to encourage contractors to install energy efficiency measures in homes and small...

185

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers....

186

Longmont Power & Communications- Residential and Commercial Appliance Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Longmont Power & Communications offers an incentive for its residential and commercial customers to install energy efficient washing machines and dishwashers. The rebate [http://www.ci.longmont...

187

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

207 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Equipment: Additional Opportunities Greg Rosenquist, Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Steve Meyers, and Jim McMahon...

189

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work they are doing to advance energy efficiency. AFC First Alabama Energy Doctors Austin Energy BC Hydro Boulder County, Colorado Building Sustainable Solutions, LLC California...

190

Computers in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

has risen as well. The Annual Energy Outlook 2002 forecasts that commercial energy demand will grow at an average annual rate of 1.7 percent, with the most rapid increases in...

191

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Partnership Opportunities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Partnership Opportunities with the Department of Energy Working with industry representatives and partners is critical to achieving significant improvements in the energy efficiency of new and existing commercial buildings. Here you will learn more about the government-industry partnerships that move us toward that goal. Key alliances and partnerships include: Photo of downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a municipal Better Buildings Challenge partner, at dusk. Credit: iStockphoto Better Buildings Challenge This national leadership initiative calls on corporate officers, university presidents, and local leaders to progess towards the goal of making American buildings 20 percent more energy-efficient by 2020. Photo of Jim McClendon of Walmart speaking during the CBEA Executive Exchange with Commercial Building Stakeholders forum at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, on May 24, 2012.

192

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's Working What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Digg

193

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

194

Design for Energy Efficiency in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the thermal design and heating design of an energy saving residential building in Beijing where the owners lived until 2004. Results show the advantages and disadvantages of a household-based heating mode by natural gas. Based on the quantity of natural gas by field tests in 2005, we conclude that thermal design influences heating design calculations.

Song, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NREL: Buildings Research - Commercial Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Research Staff Commercial Buildings Research Staff Members of the Commercial Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as computer science, physics, and chemistry. Brian Ball Kyle Benne Eric Bonnema Larry Brackney Alberta Carpenter Michael Deru Ian Doebber Kristin Field Katherine Fleming David Goldwasser Luigi Gentile Polese Brent Griffith Rob Guglielmetti Elaine Hale Bob Hendron Lesley Herrmann Adam Hirsch Eric Kozubal Feitau Kung Rois Langner Matt Leach Nicholas Long Daniel Macumber James Page Andrew Parker Shanti Pless Jennifer Scheib Marjorie Schott Michael Sheppy Greg Stark Justin Stein Daniel Studer Alex Swindler Paul Torcellini Evan Weaver Photo of Brian Ball Brian Ball, Ph.D., Senior Engineer brian.ball@nrel.gov

196

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Development to someone by E-mail Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Program Development on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator

197

SPP sales flyer for residential home builders | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential home builders residential home builders Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

198

Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program (Maine) Bangor Hydro Electric Company - Residential and Small Commercial Heat Pump Program (Maine) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Maine Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Mini-Split Heat Pumps: $600; plus 7.75% financing if necessary Provider Bangor Hydro Electric Company Bangor Hydro Electric Company offers a two-tiered incentive program for residential and small commercial customers. Mini-Split Heat Pumps are eligible for a rebate of $600, as well as a loan to cover the initial cost of the heat pump purchase. Financing is offered at 7.75% APR, for up to

199

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards: Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies...

200

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Place Norwalk, CT Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) is a company located in Norwalk, CT. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Steven_Winter_Associates_(Consortium_for_Advanced_Residential_Buildings)&oldid=379243" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

203

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

204

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Title Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Publication Type...

205

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The...

206

Commercial Building Asset Rating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 eere.energy.gov 1 eere.energy.gov Commercial Building Asset Rating Program August 23, 2011 12 p.m. ET, 9 a.m. PT Presenter: Cody Taylor PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 eere.energy.gov Outline * Goals * Scope & schedule * Guiding principles * Program design issues - Metrics - Rating method - Rating scale - Opportunities for efficiency improvement - Quality assurance Please submit clarifying questions during today's webinar via the Q&A function of Live Meeting. 3 eere.energy.gov National Building Rating Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating

207

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... such as principal building activity or energy sources used.

208

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial...

209

Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Suitcase for Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensor Suitcase for Small Commercial Building Retro-Commissioning Research Project on Digg

210

DOE Commercial Reference Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Version 1.4_7.0 New Construction, ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 Site Energy Use Intensities (EUIs) [kBtu/ft 2 /yr] August 2012 Miami Houston Phoenix Atlanta Los Angeles Las Vegas San Francisco Baltimore Albuquerque Seattle Chicago Denver Minneapolis Helena Duluth Fairbanks Weighted Average Climate Zone 1A 2A 2B 3A 3B 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 6A 6B 7 8 Large Office 47 48 45 44 39 41 41 46 40 41 47 42 52 46 53 67 45 Medium Office 51 51 51 48 41 47 43 51 46 45 52 47 57 51 59 76 50 Small Office 52 51 53 47 41 46 41 51 47 47 54 49 59 54 61 83 51 Warehouse 29 23 24 27 19 24 23 32 29 28 38 34 46 41 53 78 30 Stand-alone Retail 60 63 62 63 46 58 53 74 64 68 84 72 96 87 107 150 72 Strip Mall 57 61 60 65 48 61 57 78 68 74 89 76 103 94 115 164 71 Primary School 57 57 57 55 46 54 52 62 56 55 66 59 75 67 80 103 60 Secondary School 60 61 59 60 44 56 51 71 59 63 78 66 91 79 99 135 67 Supermarket

211

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? How Will Buildings Be Selected for the 2012 CBECS? Background and Overview Did You Know? In the CBECS, commercial refers to any structure that is neither residential, manufacturing/ industrial, nor agricultural. Building refers to a structure that is totally enclosed by walls that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) will begin in April 2013, collecting data for reference year 2012. The goal of the CBECS is to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The 2003 CBECS estimated that there were 4.9 million commercial buildings in the US. Because it would be completely impractical and prohibitively

212

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

SciTech Connect

Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and hence are reluctant to share their data. The California Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), the primary source of data for Cal-Arch, is a unique source of information on commercial buildings in California. It has not been made public; however, it was made available by CEC to LBNL for the purpose of developing a public benchmarking tool.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Principal Building...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

lit floorspace in commercial buildings. Figure 5. Office, education, and warehouse and storage buildings account for more than half of total lit floorspace in commercial...

214

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction | Trends | Major Characteristics Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1)

215

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

218

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Title Lighting Controls in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Williams, Alison A., Barbara A. Atkinson, Karina Garbesi, Erik Page, and Francis M. Rubinstein Series Title The Journal of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Volume 8 Document Number 3 Pagination 161-180 Date Published January ISBN Number 1550-2716 Keywords controls, daylighting, energy, occupancy sensors, tuning. Abstract Researchers have been quantifying energy savings from lighting controls in commercial buildings for more than 30 years. This study provides a meta-analysis of lighting energy savings identified in the literature-240 savings estimates from 88 papers and case studies, categorized into daylighting strategies, occupancy strategies, personal tuning, and institutional tuning. Beginning with an overall average of savings estimates by control strategy, successive analytical filters are added to identify potential biases introduced to the estimates by different analytical approaches. Based on this meta-analysis, the bestestimates of average lighting energy savings potential are 24 percent for occupancy, 28 percent for daylighting, 31 percent for personal tuning, 36 percent for institutional tuning, and 38 percent for multiple approaches. The results also suggest that simulations significantly overestimate (by at least 10 percent) the average savings obtainable from daylighting in actual buildings.

219

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... commercial buildings, manufacturing, ... solar, wind, geothermal, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal.

222

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Photo of NREL senior engineer Eric Kozubal examining a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner with a graph superimposed on the photo that shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the DEVap core. National Renewable Energy Laboratory senior engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner, an example of the advanced technology research the Building Technologies Office supports. The superimposed graph shows hot humid air (red) changing to cool dry air (blue) as the air passes through the DEVap core. Credit: Pat Corkery, NREL PIX 17437 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) researches advanced technologies, systems, tools, and strategies to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions that accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's principal research projects. For more BTO research results, visit the Commercial Buildings Resource Database.

223

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full Report Full Report Energy Information Administration > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey > Overview of Commercial Buildings Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: ● total nearly 4.9 million buildings ● comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace ● consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) ●

224

commercial buildings | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

buildings buildings Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2

225

Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners with a variety of organizations to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. Home builders, governments, researchers, and universities have several opportunities to work with the Building Technologies Office and other DOE projects. Home Builders Home builders who want to be recognized for building high performance homes can find out what it takes to participate in DOE's Challenge Home and sign up today. DOE Challenge Homes are verified by a qualified third-party and are at least 40%-50% more energy efficient than a typical new home. State or Local Governments, Utilities, and Other Organizations

226

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carbon Power and Light - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Water Heater: $75 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $1.50 - $3 /gallon, plus $50 Tri-State G&T incentive Resistive Heat: $8 /kW Electric Thermal Storage: $50 /unit or $12 /kW Air-Source Heat Pump: $125 - $150 /ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150 /ton Terminal Unit: $85 Motors: $8 - $13 /hp (CPL and Tri-State Combined Rebate) Provider Carbon Power and Light, Inc.

227

Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial, and Industrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial Oak Ridge National Laboratory Energy and Transportation Science Division Residential, Commercial

228

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Major Characteristics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 Major Characteristics of All Commercial Buildings in 2003 CBECS data are used to answer basic questions about the commercial buildings sector, such as: What types are there? How large are they? How old are they? and Where are they? Results from the 2003 CBECS show that: The commercial buildings sector is not dominated by a single building type. Office buildings, the most common type of commercial building, account for 17 percent of buildings, floorspace, and energy consumed. Commercial buildings range widely in size and smaller buildings are much more numerous than larger buildings. The smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet) account for 53 percent of buildings, but consume only 11 percent of total energy. The largest buildings (those larger than 500,000 square feet)

229

Commercial Reference Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings » Research Projects » Commercial Reference Buildings » Research Projects » Commercial Reference Buildings Commercial Reference Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories, developed commercial reference buildings, formerly known as commercial building benchmark models. These reference buildings play a critical role in the program's energy modeling software research by providing complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. There are 16 building types that represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S., according to the report published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory titled U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock. These

230

Redding Electric - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps...

231

Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Appliance & Equipment Standards...

232

commercial building | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

building building Dataset Summary Description Source EERE Date Released September 27th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated September 27th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords buildings commercial building DOE energy use Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon New construction (xlsx, 391.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Post-1980 construction (in or after 1980) (xlsx, 391.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Pre-1980 construction (xlsx, 367.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

233

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

234

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

235

Entity State Code Class of Ownership Residential Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Code Class of Ownership Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors DTE Energy Services AL Non-Utility - - 458,868 - 458,868 Riceland Foods Inc. AR Non-Utility -...

236

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Reports & Publications All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial BuildingsAvailable formats PDF Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors Released: August 29, 2013 This report focuses on how EIA models residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook. PDF Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Released: August 7, 2013 EIA works with technology experts to project the cost and performance of future residential and commercial sector photovoltaic (PV) and small wind installations rather than developing technology projections in-house. These reports have always been available by request. By providing the reports

237

Residential and Commercial Briefings 2000: Characteristics of the Retail Marketplace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This industry report examines changes in the competitive electricity market throughout the year 2000, and how these changes affect residential and commercial customers. The following issues are discussed: o Characteristics of the residential and commercial markets: current and future energy use data by market and fuel type o Industry restructuring, deregulation, and its energy suppliers: deregulation issues by state and energy supplier activity within those states o Corporate moves, mergers, and business...

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Major models and data sources for residential and commercial sector energy conservation analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Major models and data sources are reviewed that can be used for energy-conservation analysis in the residential and commercial sectors to provide an introduction to the information that can or is available to DOE in order to further its efforts in analyzing and quantifying their policy and program requirements. Models and data sources examined in the residential sector are: ORNL Residential Energy Model; BECOM; NEPOOL; MATH/CHRDS; NIECS; Energy Consumption Data Base: Household Sector; Patterns of Energy Use by Electrical Appliances Data Base; Annual Housing Survey; 1970 Census of Housing; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; RECS; Solar Market Development Model; and ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book. Models and data sources examined in the commercial sector are: ORNL Commercial Sector Model of Energy Demand; BECOM; NEPOOL; Energy Consumption Data Base: Commercial Sector; F.W. Dodge Data Base; NFIB Energy Report for Small Businesses; ADL Commercial Sector Energy Use Data Base; AIA Research Corporation Data Base; Nonresidential Buildings Surveys of Energy Consumption; General Electric Co: Commercial Sector Data Base; The BOMA Commercial Sector Data Base; The Tishman-Syska and Hennessy Data Base; The NEMA Commercial Sector Data Base; ORNL Buildings Energy Use Data Book; and Solar Market Development Model. Purpose; basis for model structure; policy variables and parameters; level of regional, sectoral, and fuels detail; outputs; input requirements; sources of data; computer accessibility and requirements; and a bibliography are provided for each model and data source.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scoring Tool to someone by E-mail Scoring Tool to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification

240

Polychlorinated biphenyls in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) is planning to implement a conservation acquisition program in new and existing commercial buildings. In anticipation of that program, Bonneville is examining the potential environmental effects of conservation measures in commercial buildings. An important conservation measure is the installation of new energy-efficient lighting fixtures. Some of the old lighting fixtures that these new lights will be replacing were manufactured before 1978, when polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were still used in the capacitors of the lighting ballasts. This report focuses on a summary of information about PCBs in fluorescent light fixtures manufactured before 1978. A key issue associated with these PCBs is the potential effect of lamp change-outs on ballast failure. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) speculates that installing energy-efficient lamps in old, PCB-laden ballasts may contribute to ballast failure and PCB leaks, which is addressed in Section 3 of this report. Section 2 discusses applicable standards and regulations; Section 4 describes PCB concentrations in commercial buildings. Sections 5 and 6 discuss cleanup practices and disposal options. 4 tabs.

Baechler, M.C.; Foley, L.O.; Jarnagin, R.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards The...

242

Commercial Building Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Activities Building Activities Commercial Building Activities The Building Technologies Office commercial buildings effort researches and deploys advanced technologies and systems to reduce energy consumption in commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions to accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's key projects. 179d Tax Calculator The 179d Calculator can help determine whether improvements qualify for a Federal tax deduction, and allows owners and managers to estimate energy cost savings of efficiency improvements. Advanced Energy Design Guides These recommendations can help designers achieve between 30% and 50% energy savings in a new commercial building.

243

Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference on Building Commissioning. San Francisco, CA. 17.Commercial Buildings Commissioning, LBNL- 56637, Nov. 2004.Automated Continuous Commissioning Tool GUI Screenshots from

Bailey, Trevor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using Primary Energy 1 by Census Region and Principal Building Activity, 1992-1999 (Million Btu per Worker)

245

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) SolarWind Permitting Standards...

246

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) This is the approved revision of...

247

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive The City of Portland's...

248

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tool Report to someone by E-mail Tool Report to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Tool Report on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

249

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline ... representing a variety of industries ... Following the suspension of the 2011 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption ...

251

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, ... Grundfos, National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing.

252

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, refrigeration, water ...

253

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and ... Data Tools & Models ...

254

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Buildings and Floorspace  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Trends in Buildings Floorspace Data tables Commercial Buildings Trend—Detail Commercial Floorspace Trend—Detail Background: Adjustment to data Trends in Buildings and Floorspace Each year buildings are added to and removed from the commercial buildings sector. Buildings are added by new construction or conversion of existing buildings from noncommercial to commercial activity. Buildings are removed by demolition or conversion from commercial to noncommercial activity. Number of Commercial Buildings In 1979, the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey estimated that there were 3.8 million commercial buildings in the United States; by 1992, the number increased 27 percent to 4.8 million (an average annual increase of 1.8%) (Figure 1). In 1995, the estimated number declined to 4.6 million buildings, but it is unlikely that there was an actual decline in the number of buildings. To understand the apparent decline, two factors should be considered—the change in the way that the target population of commercial buildings was defined in 1995 and the uncertainty of estimates from sample surveys:

255

Commercial Reference Buildings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Commercial Reference Buildings Jump to: navigation, search DOE developed Commercial Reference Buildings which provide descriptions for whole building analysis using EnergyPlus. There are 16 building types and three categories that apply to all building types. The commercial reference buildings were developed across 16 reference locations. Contents 1 Building Types 2 Construction Categories 3 Climate Zones Used to Create Reference Buildings 4 References Building Types DOE developed 16 Commercial Reference Building Types[1] , which represent approximately 70% of the commercial buildings in the U.S. [2]. Whole

256

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Feasibility of Small-Scale Residential DC Distributionof a DC microgrid for residential houses. In Transmission &energy storage with PV for residential and commercial use.

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Small Commercial Appliance and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info Funding Source Fort Collins Utilities and the Governor's Energy Office State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated clothes washers and $25 for Energy Star dishwashers. Applications for equipment rebates are available on the Fort Collins web site as well as at select local manufacturers and

258

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the buildings/commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

260

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 Existing Commercial Reference Buildings Constructed Before 1980 The files on this page contain commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. These U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reference buildings are complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis. You can also return to a summary of building types and climate zones and information about other building vintages. These files are updated regularly. There are two versions of these files on this page. Version 1.3_5.0 was updated September 27, 2010 and Version 1.4_7.2 was updated November 13, 2012. You can also view related resources: an archive of past reference buildings files

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

262

Design commercial buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Follow EPA's step-by-step process ENERGY STAR Challenge for Architects Design commercial buildings Photo of several people congregated around a building design plan. The climate is changing. Commercial buildings in the United States consume 17 percent of the

263

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code include requirements for interior and exterior lighting in new construction, additions, and alterations for all commercial buildings, including residential structures with four or more stories above grade. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_comparing_commercial_lighting_energy_requirements.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-49098 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 15:22

264

Educating the design professional: energy-conscious design for commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy problem in a residence is substantially different from that in a commercial building; therefore, the approach to using renewable resources in a commercial building differs from that in a residence. For this reason, educational materials, seminars, and workshops developed to teach architects and engineers basic design principles to integrate renewable energy into commercial buildings must differ from that developed for residential building designers. The purpose of this paper is to identify some of the differences in approach between residential and commercial solar design, discuss what the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) Commercial Buildings Group has learned about educating commercial building design professionals through experience, and describe the American Institute of Architects (AIA) national effort to educate architects about energy-conscious design.

Carlisle, N.; Franta, G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

querying (building type, climate zone, etc) sufficient forBuilding Type Floor Area Climate Zone Building Age Heatingtype, and zip code/climate zone. A memo describing the

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

267

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an incentive of 13MMBtu, 24MMBtu or 40MMBtu in first year energy savings. Commercial incentives are capped at 60,000 per project. Projects may use a variety of...

268

Building Technologies Office: Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Renovate and Retrofit Commercial Buildings for Energy Efficiency Photo of the Denver skyline with Wells Fargo Center building in the center of the image and the Rocky Mountains in the background. A local law firm upgraded one floor of their offices in the Wells Fargo Center (center) in Denver as part of Commercial Building Partnerships. Renovation, retrofit and refurbishment of existing buildings represent an opportunity to upgrade the energy performance of commercial building assets for their ongoing life. Often retrofit involves modifications to existing commercial buildings that may improve energy efficiency or decrease energy demand. In addition, retrofits are often used as opportune time to install distributed generation to a building. Energy efficiency retrofits can reduce the operational costs, particularly in older buildings, as well as help to attract tenants and gain a market edge.

269

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling...

270

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Principal Building Activities Three of the four activities that dominated commercial floorspace-office, warehouse and storage, and mercantile-dominated the distribution of buildings (Figure 1). Each of these three activity categories included more than 600,000 buildings, while no other building activity had more than a half-million buildings and only service buildings exceeded 350,000 buildings. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

271

Retrofit of Existing Residential Building: a Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are about 42 billion square meters of existing buildings in China. The energy efficiency of existing buildings directly relates to the energy consumption of the building sector. The retrofit of existing residential building began in the 1990s in Heilongjiang. The Sino-Canada demonstration project and Sino-France demonstration project of retrofitting existing residential buildings were carried out in 1997 and 2004, respectively. The retrofit method and energy conservation potential of the envelope and heating system of northern existing buildings are analyzed in this paper, combining the experiences of retrofitting existing residential buildings in Heilongjiang. The software was compiled to aid the design of the envelope retrofit in Heilongjiang and to analyze the working situation in existing residential building heating systems. The imbalance of the indoor temperature and the quantity of heating loss from opening the window in different retrofit projects are presented. The emphasis on energy efficiency retrofit of the envelope of existing residential buildings should be placed on the wall in northern region. It is possible to reduce about 50 percent of energy consumption of buildings by insulating the wall. The external insulation is suitable for retrofitting existing buildings, and the moisture transfer should be considered at the same time. To insure actual reduction in energy consumption, the heating system should be retrofitted when the envelope is insulated.

Zhao, L.; Xu, W.; Li, L.; Gao, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Home > Trends in Commercial Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The commercial sector consists of business establishments and other organizations that provide services. The sector includes service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as a wide range of buildings that would not be considered “commercial” in a traditional economic sense, such as public schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction.

273

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock, it is either impossible or more costly to improve the energy efficiency. Therefore, by not expanding or upgrading energy efficiency standards, opportunities for saving energy would be lost. In the past two decades, standards have significantly raised the level of energy efficiency for new products. How much more might be gained by making standards more stringent on products already subject to them, or by extending standards to products not yet covered? The main goal of this study is to estimate key national impacts of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment. These impacts approximate the opportunity for national benefits that may be lost if standards are not upgraded and expanded from current levels. This study also identifies the end uses where the largest opportunities exist. This analysis was prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP). It uses an analytical approach that is similar in concept to that used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to set standard levels. It relies on much less data and uses more simplified assumptions than the detailed and complex formulations used in DOE's standard-setting process. The results of this analysis should thus be viewed as a first approximation of the impacts that would actually be achieved by new standards. All monetary values in this report are in 2002 dollars.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock, it is either impossible or more costly to improve the energy efficiency. Therefore, by not expanding or upgrading energy efficiency standards, opportunities for saving energy would be lost. In the past two decades, standards have significantly raised the level of energy efficiency for new products. How much more might be gained by making standards more stringent on products already subject to them, or by extending standards to products not yet covered? The main goal of this study is to estimate key national impacts of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment. These impacts approximate the opportunity for national benefits that may be lost if standards are not upgraded and expanded from current levels. This study also identifies the end uses where the largest opportunities exist. This analysis was prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP). It uses an analytical approach that is similar in concept to that used by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to set standard levels. It relies on much less data and uses more simplified assumptions than the detailed and complex formulations used in DOE's standard-setting process. The results of this analysis should thus be viewed as a first approximation of the impacts that would actually be achieved by new standards. All monetary values in this report are in 2002 dollars.

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

275

Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development » Commercial Development » Commercial Site Map Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) evaluates published model codes and standards to help states and local jurisdictions better understand the impacts of updating commercial building energy codes and standards. A methodology was used for evaluating the energy and economic performance of commercial energy codes and standards and proposed changes thereto. This method serves to ensure DOE proposals are both energy efficient and cost-effective. The DOE methodology contains two primary assessments: Energy savings Cost-effectiveness Energy and economic calculations are performed through a comparison of

276

Commercial Reference Building: Hospital | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

09 09 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278309 Varnish cache server Commercial Reference Building: Hospital Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Hospital for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

277

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather-Adjusted Site Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 1b . U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather-Adjusted Site Energy

278

Commercial Building National Accounts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Building National Accounts Commercial Building National Accounts Jump to: navigation, search National Accounts is part of DOE's Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative (CBI), which was mandated by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA enabled DOE to bring together parties from the private sector, DOE national labs, other federal agencies and nongovernmental organizations to advance research into low- and zero-net-energy buildings. CBI's goal is to develop market-ready, net zero-energy commercial buildings by 2025. A net zero-energy building makes as much energy as it uses over a year[1] [2]. As of 2009, estimates indicated that retail and office buildings consume 18 percent of the nation's total energy and half of nation's overall building energy (including homes, schools, and other structures). The program

279

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... we will request energy use and cost data ... social workers , interior ...

280

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Laboratory: 25: 455: 108: 203: Lodging: 158: 3,618: 461: 839 ... Source: 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Energy Information Administration.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities > Table 6b . ... Warehouse and Storage 42: 38 45: Other: 3. 154: 170 163: Vacant 28: 21 21: Total ...

282

Saving Electrical Energy in Commercial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the commercial and institutional building sectors using approximately 29% and 34% of all electrical energy consumption in Canada and the United States, respectively, saving (more)

Case, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1995 - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

>Commercial Buildings Home > 1995 Characteristics Data 1995 Data Executive Summary Table of Contents Overview to Detailed Tables Detailed Tables 1995 national and Census region...

284

Specifying Fenestration Products for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brochure which explains how this relatively new and low-cost technology can reduce cooling loads in commercial buildings without any loss in visible light or change in...

285

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this...

286

Training the Next Generation of Commercial Building ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tools, building energy codes and appliance standards. ... automation system (BAS) and small-to-medium ... intended to apply to smaller commercial and ...

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Commercial Reference Building: Warehouse | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warehouse Warehouse Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Warehouse for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for three categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

288

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 5 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings Characteristics Tables, number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables, energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy End-Use Data, total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. All Principal Buildings Activities Number of Buildings, Total Floorspace, and Total Site and Primary Energy Consumption for All Principal Building Activities, 1995

289

Building Technologies Program: Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 and there is a limit of $1,500 for all products. Improvements made in 2008 are not eligible for a tax credit. See the ENERGY STAR® Web site for a detailed listing of eligible improvements.

290

Commercial | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

291

Total Floorspace of Commercial Buildings - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Commercial Buildings Energy Intensities >Table 4

292

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency...

293

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Age (years) Average Hours Open per Week Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) All Commercial Buildings 30.5 62 5,321 69,618 Building...

294

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

295

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this...

297

Green Residential Building Program (New York) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Green Residential Building Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

298

Commercial Reference Building: Supermarket | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supermarket Supermarket Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Supermarket for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for each of the three construction categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

299

Technical support document for the proposed Federal Commercial Building energy code  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the justification and technical documentation for all changes and updates made (since 1993) to the Energy Code for Commercial and High-Rise Residential Buildings, the codified version of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989, ``Energy Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.`` These changes and updates, which were subject to the ASHRAE addenda approval process, include Addenda b, c, d, e, g, and i. A seventh addenda, Addenda f, which has not been officially approved by ASHRAE, has been included into the proposed rule. Also included in the changes was technical work conducted to justify revisions to the 1993 DOE lighting power densities. The updated text will be reviewed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and issued as the new Federal Commercial Building Energy Code (10 CFR 434); Mandatory for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings.

Somasundaram, S.; Halverson, M.A.; Jones, C.C.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Lighting and Building Size and Year Constructed Building Size Smaller commercial buildings are much more numerous than larger commercial buildings, but comprise less total floorspace-the 1,001 to 5,000 square feet category includes more than half of total buildings, but just 11 percent of total floorspace. In contrast, just 5 percent of buildings are larger than 50,000 square feet, but they account for half of total floorspace. Lighting consumes 38 percent of total site electricity. Larger buildings consume relatively more electricity for lighting than smaller buildings. Nearly half (47%) of electricity is consumed by lighting in the largest buildings (larger than 500,000 square feet). In the smallest buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet), one-fourth of electricity goes to lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

302

Building Technologies Office: Existing Commercial Reference Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You can also view related resources: an archive of past reference buildings files a ZIP file containing the TMY2 weather data that were used to generate the following...

303

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In order to allow equivalent comparisons of buildings across the U.S., the Asset Scoring Tool applies a weather adjustment to those energy uses that depend on climate (e.g.,...

304

California commercial building energy benchmarking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings.

Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Sample Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMERCIAL BUILDING COMMERCIAL BUILDING ENERGY ASSET SCORE 1 SUMMARY BUILDING INFORMATION Example Building 2000 A St., Chicago, IL 60601 Building Type: Mixed-Use Gross Floor Area: 140,000 ft 2 Year Built: 2005 Office: 100,000 ft 2 Retail: 40,000 ft 2 Report #: IL-1234567 Score Date: 02/2013 Building ID #: XXXXX ASSET SCORE DATA LEVEL: ¨ Simple Score ¨ Advanced Score ¨ Verified Advanced Score Current Score Potential Score BUILDING USE TYPES: This report includes a Score for the entire building as well as individual Scores for each of the separate use types. CONTENTS BUILDING ASSET SCORE: * Summary.......................................................... Page 1 * Score................................................................ Pages 2-4 * Upgrade Opportunities

306

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

307

Commercial Building Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Partnerships Building Partnerships Commercial Building Partnerships Image shows a well-lit, warehouse-like produce section of a Whole Foods store. Much of the lighting in the photo eminates from windows along the left side of the photo. The Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) initiative is demonstrating dramatic energy savings in commercial buildings. Through this cost-shared initiative, partner organizations team with Building Technologies Office (BTO) representatives and others to improve energy efficiency in new and existing buildings. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory staff and private-sector technical experts provide energy analysis support and engineering expertise to explore energy-saving ideas and strategies. Organizations not involved with CBP will benefit from the lessons learned,

308

Project materials [Commercial High Performance Buildings Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Consortium for High Performance Buildings (ChiPB) is an outgrowth of DOE'S Commercial Whole Buildings Roadmapping initiatives. It is a team-driven public/private partnership that seeks to enable and demonstrate the benefit of buildings that are designed, built and operated to be energy efficient, environmentally sustainable, superior quality, and cost effective.

None

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1,

310

Building America Puts Residential Research Results to Work  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential buildings use more than 20% of the energy consumed annually in the United States. To help reduce that energy use, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its Building America partners conduct research to develop advanced building energy systems that make homes and communities much more energy-efficient. DOE and its partners design, build, and evaluate attractive, comfortable homes that increase performance with little or no increase in construction costs.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

312

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Commercial Building Technology Evaluation Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow 4 Proposed Program Elements Building Technologies Program 2 2 commercialbuildings.energy.gov ver ew Program Overview * Program Objective: - Evaluate emerging and underutilized...

314

Arizona Map for Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Documents%20and%20SettingsLPJEMEUstyleseiasitewideF.css" rel"stylesheet" type"textcss" > Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Background Information on CBECS > 2003...

315

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 2 Table 2. Photocopiers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Photocopiers (thousand) Photocopiers per Million Square Feet Photocopiers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 4,934 73 60 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 433 50 48 Food Sales 174 994 980 41 42 42 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 Q Q 26 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 401 138 65 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 187 100 56 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 214 204 75 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 78 17 33 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 526 51 46

316

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Commercial Building HVAC: How it Affects People Speaker(s): William Fisk Date: November 13, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Faulkner Commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed primarily to maintain a reasonable level of thermal comfort while limiting first costs and energy consumption. However, research conducted predominately within the last decade suggests that commercial building HVAC significantly influences human outcomes other than thermal comfort, including the health, satisfaction, and work performance of the building's occupants. This presentation will review the relationships of these outcomes with HVAC system type, filtration system efficiency, indoor air temperature, and outside air ventilation rate.

317

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Constructed Year Constructed Year Constructed More than one-third (37 percent) of the floorspace in commercial buildings was constructed since 1980 and more than one-half (55 percent) after 1969 (Figure 1). Less than one-third of floorspace was constructed before 1960. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Overall, relatively more buildings than floorspace were represented in the older age categories and more floorspace than buildings in the newer categories (see graphical comparison) because older buildings were smaller than more recently constructed buildings (Figure 2). Buildings constructed prior to 1960 were 11,700 square feet in size on average while those constructed after 1959 were 37 percent larger at 16,000 square feet per building.

318

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Photo of two inspectors looking at a clipboard on a commercial building site with the steel frame of a commercial building in the background. Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by including it in state and local codes is an effective strategy for achieving that goal. The Building Energy Codes Program works with the International Code Council (ICC), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), American Institute of Architects (AIA), the building industry, and state and local officials to develop and promote more stringent and easy-to-understand building energy codes and to assess potential code barriers to new energy-efficient technologies.

319

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

320

Evaluation of advanced technologies for residential appliances and residential and commercial lighting  

SciTech Connect

Section 127 of the Energy Policy Act requires that the Department of Energy (DOE) prepare a report to Congress on the potential for the development and commercialization of appliances that substantially exceed the present federal or state efficiency standards. Candidate high-efficiency appliances must meet several criteria including: the potential exists for substantial improvement (beyond the minimum established in law) of the appliance`s energy efficiency; electric, water, or gas utilities are prepared to support and promote the commercialization of such appliances; manufacturers are unlikely to undertake development and commercialization of such appliances on their own, or development and production would be substantially accelerated by support to manufacturers. This report describes options to improve the efficiency of residential appliances, including water heaters, clothes washers and dryers, refrigerator/freezers, dishwashers, space heating and cooling devices, as well as residential and commercial lighting products. Data from this report (particularly Appendix 1)were used to prepare the report to Congress mentioned previously. For the residential sector, national energy savings are calculated using the LBL Residential Energy Model. This model projects the number of households and appliance saturations over time. First, end-use consumption is calculated for a base case where models that only meet the standard replace existing models as these reach the end of their lifetime. Second, models with efficiencies equal to the technology under consideration replace existing models that reach the end of their lifetime. For the commercial sector, the COMMEND model was utilized to project national energy savings from new technologies. In this report, energy savings are shown for the period 1988 to 2015.

Turiel, I.; Atkinson, B.; Boghosian, S.; Chan, P.; Jennings, J.; Lutz, J.; McMahon, J.; Rosenquist, G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction The Energy Information Administration conducts the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) to collect information on energy-related building characteristics and types and amounts of energy consumed in commercial buildings in the United States. In 2003, CBECS reports that commercial buildings: total nearly 4.9 million buildings comprise more than 71.6 billion square feet of floorspace consumed more than 6,500 trillion Btu of energy, with electricity accounting for 55 percent and natural gas 32 percent (Figure 1) consumed 36 percent of energy for space heating and 21 percent for lighting (Figure 2) The CBECS is a national-level sample survey conducted quadrennially of buildings greater than 1,000 square feet in size that devote more than 50

322

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Introduction Introduction Lighting is a major consumer of electricity in commercial buildings and a target for energy savings through use of energy-efficient light sources along with other advanced lighting technologies. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects information on types of lighting equipment, the amount of floorspace that is lit, and the percentage of floorspace lit by each type. In addition, CBECS data are used to model end-use consumption, including energy consumed for lighting in commercial buildings. CBECS building characteristics data can answer a wide range of questions about lighting from the most basic, "How many buildings are lit?" to more detailed questions such as, "How many office buildings have compact

323

Regulations establishing energy-conservation standards for new residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The text of the California Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 6, Article 1 is presented. The energy conservation standards described apply to all new hotels, motels, apartment houses, lodging houses, dwellings, and other residential buildings which are heated or mechanically cooled. Standards for the building envelope, climate control systems and equipment, and water heating are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Residential Code Methodology | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Site Map...

325

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

326

Evaluating Commercial Buildings for Statewide Compliance | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings for Statewide Compliance Commercial Buildings for Statewide Compliance The materials for this course may be used for in-person training courses, and are intended to provide the tools and specific training necessary to evaluate statewide commercial compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1. The course also provides useful training for the commercial provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code and general commercial field inspection for energy code compliance. The recommended background for taking this class is significant experience with plan review and/or inspection of commercial energy code provisions. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, July 16, 2010. Course Type: Training Materials Video In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides

327

A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page site. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995 “A Look at Commercial Buildings in 1995: Characteristics, Energy Consumption, and Energy Expenditures” The report can be downloaded in its entirety, or in sections (all in PDF format): Full report (includes all detailed tables; 402 pages, 5.7 MB) Contents: At A Glance (4 pages, 315 KB) Chapters 1 through 5 (61 pages, 363 KB) 1. Overview 2. Major Characteristics of Commercial Buildings 3. End Uses, Energy Sources, and Energy Consumption 4. End-Use Equipment and Energy Conservation 5. Detailed Tables (introductory text) How to Read the Tables Categories of Data in the Tables

328

Commercial Building Energy Efficiency Education Project  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this grant is to educate the public about carbon emissions and the energy-saving and job-related benefits of commercial building energy efficiency. investments in Illinois.

None

2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Commercial Building Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Research Commercial Building Research Photo of NREL senior engineer Eric Kozubal examining a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner with a graph superimposed on the photo that shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the DEVap core. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) researches advanced technologies, systems, tools, and strategies to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions that accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's principal research projects. For more BTO research results, visit the Commercial Buildings Resource Database.

330

New hot-water use data for commercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that researchers have found that hot water usage in certain commercial buildings may be significantly higher than designers expect. ASHRAE Technical Committee 6.6, Service Water Heating, recognized the need for a comprehensive compilation and evaluation of available hot water usage information in residential and commercial installations. The bulk of the commercial building hot water demand and sizing information presented in Chapter 44 of the 1991 ASHRAE Handbook--HVAC Application is based on a comprehensive study published in 1969. However, information received by members of TC 6.6 and data appearing in some of the current literature suggest that the Handbook values may be too conservative. Because of conflicting information in the literature and possible variations in lifestyles and use patterns since the Handbook values were originally published, ASHRAE sponsored research project RP-600 to study and review these issues. In this research project, domestic hot water consumption was monitored at five separate commercial buildings in four building category types: one nursing home, two dormitories (one coed and one women's), one full-service restaurant and one hotel.

Thrasher, W.H.; DeWerth, D.W. (American Gas Association Lab., Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Asset Score Energy Asset Score Photo of a laptop with energy asset score image on the screen The free online Asset Scoring Tool will generate a score based on inputs about the building envelope and buildling systems (heating, ventilation, cooling, lighting, and service hot water). Launch Energy Asset Score The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) program to allow building owners and managers to more accurately assess building energy performance. The Asset Score program will act as a national standard and will include the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool) to evaluate the physical characteristics and as-built energy efficiency of buildings. The Asset Scoring Tool will identify cost-effective energy efficient improvements that, if implemented, can reduce energy bills and potentially improve building asset value. View the Asset Score fact sheet for a brief overview of the program.

332

NREL Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Dataset Summary Description This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential Buildings Group has formed a partnership. The two types of partnership included in this spreadsheet are: Incubator and Test & Evaluation. This list was generated in April 2011. Source NREL Date Released April 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords incubator NREL partnerships Test & Evaluation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon members_and_partners_-_nrel_resbldgs_04072011.xlsx (xlsx, 29.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

333

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Title Thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51860 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Diamond, Richard C., Craig P. Wray, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, Nance Matson, and Duo Wang Start Page Chapter Abstract Previous research suggests that HVAC thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings suffer from thermal losses, such as those caused by duct air leakage and poor duct location. Due to a lack of metrics and data showing the potentially large energy savings from reducing these losses, the California building industry has mostly overlooked energy efficiency improvements in this area. The purpose of this project is to obtain the technical knowledge needed to properly measure and understand the energy efficiency of these systems. This project has three specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for determining system efficiencies, to develop design and retrofit information that the building industry can use to improve these systems, and to determine the energy impacts associated with duct leakage airflows in an existing large commercial building. The primary outcome of this project is the confirmation that duct leakage airflows can significantly impact energy use in large commercial buildings: our measurements indicate that adding 15% duct leakage at operating conditions leads to an increase in fan power of about 25 to 35%. This finding is consistent with impacts of increased duct leakage airflows on fan power that have been predicted by previous simulations. Other project outcomes include the definition of a new metric for distribution system efficiency, the demonstration of a reliable test for determining duct leakage airflows, and the development of new techniques for duct sealing. We expect that the project outcomes will lead to new requirements for commercial thermal distribution system efficiency in future revisions of California's Title 24.

334

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings................................................................................................................. 1 2. Non-Residential .......................................................................................................... 1 2.1. Non-Residential Lighting

335

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization...

336

Characterization of commercial building appliances. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study focuses on ``other`` end-uses category. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of energy end-use functions other than HVAC and lighting for commercial buildings, and to identify general avenues and approaches for energy use reduction. Specific energy consuming technologies addressed include non-HVAC and lighting technologies in commercial buildings with significant energy use to warrant detailed analyses. The end-uses include office equipment, refrigeration, water heating, cooking, vending machines, water coolers, laundry equipment and electronics other than office equipment. The building types include offices, retail, restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels/motels, grocery stores, and warehouses.

Patel, R.F.; Teagan, P.W.; Dieckmann, J.T.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective energy codes and standards to increase efficiency in residential and commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a series of cost analyses for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1: Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings - the commercial model energy code. The cost analyses compare Standard 90.1-2010 to the prior 2007 edition, based on six prototype buildings in five representative U.S. climate zones. PNNL also conducted energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2010 and the commercial requirements of the

338

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

207 207 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Commercial Equipment: Additional Opportunities Greg Rosenquist, Michael McNeil, Maithili Iyer, Steve Meyers, and Jim McMahon Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 September 2004 This work was supported by the National Commission on Energy Policy through the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Table of Contents 1. Introduction........................................................................1 2. Products Considered..............................................................2 3. Technology Cost-Efficiency Analysis...........................................3

339

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical characterization, air leakage and heat conduction gains Title Duct systems in large commercial buildings: physical...

340

Harris County - Green Building Tax Abatement for New Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Harris County - Green Building Tax Abatement for New Commercial Construction (Texas) Harris County - Green Building Tax Abatement for New Commercial Construction (Texas) < Back...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: Week 4 Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

342

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

343

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: About the Course...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

344

ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings College Course: Week 3 Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program...

345

Opt-E-Plus Software for Commercial Building Optimization; Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Commercial Building Optimization Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado...

346

"Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning AgentsAuditors" "Recovery Act: Training...

347

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

348

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

4 Beginning in 1995, excludes commercial buildings at multi-building manufacturing facilities, and parking garages. ... excludes electricity system ...

349

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

High-performance commercial building systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes key technical accomplishments resulting from the three year PIER-funded R&D program, ''High Performance Commercial Building Systems'' (HPCBS). The program targets the commercial building sector in California, an end-use sector that accounts for about one-third of all California electricity consumption and an even larger fraction of peak demand, at a cost of over $10B/year. Commercial buildings also have a major impact on occupant health, comfort and productivity. Building design and operations practices that influence energy use are deeply engrained in a fragmented, risk-averse industry that is slow to change. Although California's aggressive standards efforts have resulted in new buildings designed to use less energy than those constructed 20 years ago, the actual savings realized are still well below technical and economic potentials. The broad goal of this program is to develop and deploy a set of energy-saving technologies, strategies, and techniques, and improve processes for designing, commissioning, and operating commercial buildings, while improving health, comfort, and performance of occupants, all in a manner consistent with sound economic investment practices. Results are to be broadly applicable to the commercial sector for different building sizes and types, e.g. offices and schools, for different classes of ownership, both public and private, and for owner-occupied as well as speculative buildings. The program aims to facilitate significant electricity use savings in the California commercial sector by 2015, while assuring that these savings are affordable and promote high quality indoor environments. The five linked technical program elements contain 14 projects with 41 distinct R&D tasks. Collectively they form a comprehensive Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) program with the potential to capture large savings in the commercial building sector, providing significant economic benefits to building owners and health and performance benefits to occupants. At the same time this program can strengthen the growing energy efficiency industry in California by providing new jobs and growth opportunities for companies providing the technology, systems, software, design, and building services to the commercial sector. The broad objectives across all five program elements were: (1) To develop and deploy an integrated set of tools and techniques to support the design and operation of energy-efficient commercial buildings; (2) To develop open software specifications for a building data model that will support the interoperability of these tools throughout the building life-cycle; (3) To create new technology options (hardware and controls) for substantially reducing controllable lighting, envelope, and cooling loads in buildings; (4) To create and implement a new generation of diagnostic techniques so that commissioning and efficient building operations can be accomplished reliably and cost effectively and provide sustained energy savings; (5) To enhance the health, comfort and performance of building occupants. (6) To provide the information technology infrastructure for owners to minimize their energy costs and manage their energy information in a manner that creates added value for their buildings as the commercial sector transitions to an era of deregulated utility markets, distributed generation, and changing business practices. Our ultimate goal is for our R&D effort to have measurable market impact. This requires that the research tasks be carried out with a variety of connections to key market actors or trends so that they are recognized as relevant and useful and can be adopted by expected users. While some of this activity is directly integrated into our research tasks, the handoff from ''market-connected R&D'' to ''field deployment'' is still an art as well as a science and in many areas requires resources and a timeframe well beyond the scope of this PIER research program. The TAGs, PAC and other industry partners have assisted directly in this effort

Selkowitz, Stephen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Variable Refrigerant Flow Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-split heat pumps have evolved from a technology suitable for residential and light commercial buildings to variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems that can provide efficient space conditioning for large commercial buildings. VRF systems are enhanced versions of ductless multi-split systems, permitting more indoor units to be connected to each outdoor unit and providing additional features such as simultaneous heating and cooling and heat recovery. VRF systems are very popular in Asia and Europe and...

2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Building Technologies Office: National Residential Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at all levels. The data from the efficiency measures database is used in the Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) software. Benefits The National Retrofit Measures Database...

353

Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING BUILDING ENERGY ASSET RATING WORKSHOP December 8-9, 2011 Washington, D.C. Nora Wang (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Will Gorrissen (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Molly McCabe (Hayden Tanner, LLC) Cody Taylor (Department of Energy) 1 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov PRE-DECISIONAL Information included in this document is for discussion purposes and does not constitute the final program design. FOR INFORMATION ONLY 2 I Asset Rating D.C. Workshop eere.energy.gov Program Goals * Facilitate cost-effective investment in energy efficiency and reduce energy use in the commercial building sector * Establish a national standard for voluntary commercial building asset rating * Create a tool to help building owners identify and implement

354

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

355

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pervidi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products. Keywords , building systems, performance, preventative maintenance, analysis, residential and commercial buildings ValidationTesting NA Expertise Required High level...

356

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Title Sealing Ducts in Large Commercial Buildings with Aerosolized Sealant Particles Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-42414 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Modera, Mark P., Olivier Brzozowski, François Rémi Carrié, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, William W. Delp, William J. Fisk, Ronnen M. Levinson, and Duo Wang Journal Energy & Buildings Volume 34 Start Page Chapter Pagination 705-714 Abstract Electricity energy savings potential by eliminating air leakage from ducts in large commercial buildings is on the order of 10 kWh/m2 per year (1 kWh/ft2). We have tested, in two large commercial buildings, a new technology that simultaneously seals duct leaks and measures effective leakage area of ducts. The technology is based upon injecting a fog of aerosolized sealant particles into a pressurized duct system. In brief, this process involves blocking all of the intentional openings in a duct system (e.g., diffusers). Therefore, when the system is pressurized, the only place for the air carrying the aerosol particles to exit the system is through the leaks. The key to the technology is to keep the particles suspended within the airstream until they reach the leaks, and then to have them leave the airstream and deposit on the leak sites. The principal finding from this field study was that the aerosol technology is capable of sealing the leaks in a large commercial building duct system within a reasonable time frame. In the first building, 66% of the leakage area was sealed within 2.5 hours of injection, and in the second building 86% of the leakage area was sealed within 5 hours. We also found that the aerosol could be blown through the VAV boxes in the second building without impacting their calibrations or performance. Some remaining questions are (1) how to achieve sealing rates comparable to those experienced in smaller residential systems; and (2) what tightness level these ducts systems can be brought to by means of aerosol sealing.

357

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures with using various measures to improve the efficiency of residential buildings. This database offers

358

Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka  

SciTech Connect

1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.

Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 4 6 8 10 0 50 100 150 200 250 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1980 1985 1990 1995 1975 2000 Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use is classified as industrial use. In 1995 and earlier years, agricultural use was classified as commercial use. Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1996: Form EIA- 176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report." 23. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1930-1996 Figure

360

Statewide Savings Projections from the Adoption of Commercial Building Energy Codes in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. A number of jurisdictions in the state of Illinois are considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as their commercial building energy code. This report builds on the results of a previous study, "Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions," to estimate the total potential impact of adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as a statewide commercial building code in terms of Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) savings, total primary energy savings, and pollution emissions reductions.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Commercial Building Partners Catalyze High Performance Buildings Across the Nation  

SciTech Connect

In 2008 the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Commercial Buildings Partnership (CBP) project to accelerate market adoption of commercially available energy saving technologies into the design process for new and upgraded commercial buildings. The CBP represents a unique collaboration between industry leaders and DOE to develop high performance buildings as a model for future construction and renovation. CBP was implemented in two stages. This paper focuses on lessons learned at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the first stage and discusses some partner insights from the second stage. In the first stage, PNNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recruited CBP partners that own large portfolios of buildings. The labs provide assistance to the partners' design teams and make a business case for energy investments.

Baechler, Michael C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Bartlett, Rosemarie

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Enhancing Residential Building Operation through its Envelope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study heat loss is evaluated with the modeling software of Iranian Construction Engineering Organization, for both with and without insulation in the building. Of course the evaluation is in accordance with the laws of this organization, which support environmental and constructional matters. Also the amounts of energy consumption for these two states are compared and a substantial economy of energy consumption is presented. Eventually, results represent that 32% in heat load and 25% in cooling load of the building can be economized. And also most energy loss is related to the windows and the roof of the building.

Vazifeshenas, Y.; Sajjadi, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Steve Taylor Date: April 20, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Steve Taylor, the principal of Taylor Engineering, will be providing an overview of the envelope, lighting, and HVAC requirements of Standard 90.1. Mr. Taylor is a registered mechanical engineer specializing in HVAC system design, control system design, indoor air quality engineering, computerized building energy analysis, and HVAC system commissioning. He graduated from Stanford University with a BS in Physics and a MS in Mechanical Engineering and has over 20 years of commercial HVAC system design and construction experience. He was the primary author of the HVAC

364

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Energy October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings and the Electric Grid An increasing fraction of the most efficient appliances on the market operate on direct current (DC) internally, making it possible to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoid the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back, as is current practice. Products are also emerging on the commercial market that take advantage of that possibility. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers Vagelis Vossos, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen investigated the potential savings of direct-DC power distribution in net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics

365

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured Airflows in a Multifamily Building," AirflowPerformance of Building Envelopes, Components, and Systems,APARTMENTS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Price, P.N. ; Shehabi,

Price, P.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An energy standard for residential buildings in south China  

SciTech Connect

To curb the spiraling demand for building energy use, China's Ministry of Construction has worked at developing and implementing building energy standards, starting with a standard for heated residential buildings in the Cold regions in 1986, followed by a standard for residential buildings in the Hot Summer Cold Winter Region in central China in 2001. In July 2001, a similar effort was started to develop a standard for residential buildings in the Hot Summer Warm Winter Region, comprising of the entirety or large portions of Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan and Fujian. The target for the standard is to improve the thermal efficiency of buildings by 50 percent compared to current construction, which are typically uninsulated and have single-pane windows. Because of the importance of controlling window solar gain, the standard developed tables specifying the required window thermal transmittance and shading coefficient for differing window-to-wall ratios. The intent of such trade-off table is to permit flexibility in the location and size of windows, as long as their thermal performances meet the requirements of the standard. For further flexibility, the standard provides three methods of compliance: (1) a simple set of prescriptive requirements, (2) a simplified performance calculation, and (3) a detailed computer-based performance calculation using a Custom Budget approach.

Huang, Yu Joe; Lang, Siwei; Hogan, John; Lin, Haiyan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18px" classApple-style-span>The Buildings PerformanceDatabase will havean API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private...

368

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Burbank Water and Power - Residential and Commercial Solar Support...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum...

370

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 2 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in three groups of detailed tables: Buildings characteristics tables-number of buildings and amount of floorspace for major building characteristics. Energy consumption and expenditures tables-energy consumption and expenditures for major energy sources. Energy end-use tables-total, electricity and natural gas consumption and energy intensities for nine specific end-uses. Guide to the 1992 CBECS Detailed Tables Released: Nov 1999 Column Categories Row Categories The first set of detailed tables for the 1992 CBECS, Tables A1 through A70,

371

Ohio Valley Gas Corporation- Residential and Small Commercial Natural Gas Incentive Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ohio Valley Gas Corporation (OVG) offers rebates to its residential and small commercial customers for the purchase of energy efficient equipment and appliances. The program's rebate offering...

372

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 1 Table 1. Computers in Commercial Buildings, 1999 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657 67,338 81,852 57,864 859 707 Principal Building Activity Education 327 8,651 8,927 11,914 1,377 1,335 Food Sales 174 994 980 247 249 252 Food Service 349 1,851 4,031 557 301 138 Health Care 127 2,918 6,219 3,652 1,252 587 Inpatient 11 1,865 3,350 2,230 1,196 666 Outpatient 116 1,053 2,869 1,421 1,351 495 Lodging 153 4,521 2,356 1,884 417 800 Mercantile 667 10,398 11,384 3,561 342 313 Retail (Other than Mall) 534 4,766 4,668 1,802 378 386 Enclosed and Strip Malls

373

Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion  

SciTech Connect

This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organizations building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Take Action to Save Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Take Action to Save Energy in Commercial Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Manage Organizational Energy Use Design & Construct New Buildings

375

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

user interface valueType text user interface valueType text sector valueType text abstract valueType text website valueType text openei tool keyword valueType text openei tool uri valueType text items label Calculator user interface Spreadsheet Website sector Renewable Energy Non renewable Energy Biomass Buildings Commercial Buildings Residential Economic Development Gateway Geothermal Greenhouse Gas Multi model Integration Multi sector Impact Evaluation Gateway Solar Wind energy website https www gov uk pathways analysis openei tool keyword calculator greenhouse gas emissions GHG low carbon energy planning energy data emissions data openei tool uri http calculator tool decc gov uk pathways primary energy chart uri http en openei org w index php title Calculator type Tools label AGI

377

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

378

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S....

379

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

382

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 - Publication and Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Characteristics Data > Publication and Tables Buildings Characteristics Data > Publication and Tables Publication and Tables Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 figure on percent of building and floorspace by census region, 1992 separater bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Full Report - Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992 with only selected tables (file size 1.34 MB) pages: 157 Selected Sections: Main Text (file size 883,980 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background Organization of the report

384

Commercial Building Profiles | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Profiles Building Profiles Dataset Summary Description This dataset includes simulation results from a national-scale study of the commercial buildings sector. Electric load profiles contain the hour-by-hour demand for electricity for each building. Summary tables describe individual buildings and their overall annual energy performance. The study developed detailed EnergyPlus models for 4,820 different samples in 2003 CBECS. Simulation output is available for all and organized by CBECS's identification number in public use datasets. Three modeling scenarios are available: existing stock (with 2003 historical weather), stock as if rebuilt new (with typical weather), and the stock if rebuilt using maximum efficiency technology (with typical weather). The following reports describe how the dataset was developed:

385

Computers in Commercial Buildings - Table 3  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > EIA Home > Commercial Home > Data Reports > Computers in Commercial Buildings >Table 3 Table 3. Change in the Number of Computers in Commercial Buildings, 1992 to 1999 Computers (thousand) Computers per Thousand Employees Computers per Million Square Feet 1992 1995 1999 1992 1995 1999 1992 1995 1999 All Buildings 29,752 43,003 57,864 431 571 707 463 732 859 Principal Building Activity Assembly* 845 1,763 1,654 167 258 526 102 262 377 Education 6,004 8,046 11,914 877 847 1,335 710 1,039 1,377 Food Sales 85 206 247 101 316 252 113 321 249 Food Service 146 276 557 65 118 138 98 204 301 Health Care 1,128 2,549 3,652 334 569 587 641 1,092 1,252 Lodging 651 1,296 1,884 322 472 800 225 358 417 Mercantile and Service 2,478 4,021 5,044 157 308 639 201 316 780 Office 15,451 21,173 27,642 599 797 954 1,319 2,021 2,295

386

City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Antonio - Green Building Requirement City of San Antonio - Green Building Requirement Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Heating...

387

City of Palo Alto - Green Building Requirement (California) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place California Name City of Palo Alto - Green Building Requirement Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Multi-Family Residential, Residential...

388

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program (Colorado) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado Name City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial, Construction, Multi-Family Residential, Residential...

389

Thermal Performance Analysis of a High-Mass Residential Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimizing energy consumption in residential buildings using passive solar strategies almost always calls for the efficient use of massive building materials combined with solar gain control and adequate insulation. Using computerized simulation tools to understand the interactions among all the elements facilitates designing low-energy houses. Finally, the design team must feel confident that these tools are providing realistic results. The design team for the residential building described in this paper relied on computerized design tools to determine building envelope features that would maximize the energy performance [1]. Orientation, overhang dimensions, insulation amounts, window characteristics and other strategies were analyzed to optimize performance in the Pueblo, Colorado, climate. After construction, the actual performance of the house was monitored using both short-term and long-term monitoring approaches to verify the simulation results and document performance. Calibrated computer simulations showed that this house consumes 56% less energy than would a similar theoretical house constructed to meet the minimum residential energy code requirements. This paper discusses this high-mass house and compares the expected energy performance, based on the computer simulations, versus actual energy performance.

Smith, M.W.; Torcellini, P.A., Hayter, S.J.; Judkoff, R.

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a metropolitan city, Belgrade is a dwelling place for about 25% of total citizen number of Republic of Serbia, and at the same time regional cultural, educational, scientific and business center with its own energy production. Belgrade represents a significant consumer of final energy to support the living standard of the occupants. Energy production is based on domestic coal and imported fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas resulting in a high impact to the environment by emission of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings is based on geographic position and type of heating. This paper presents the sustainable assessment of energy system for residential building sector in Belgrade. In order to present the energy system options for residential building sector, three sets of energy indicators: economical, social and environmental are taken into consideration.

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy conservation opportunities in small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint project between Duke Power Co. and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a study was performed to determine the energy savings potential of small commercial buildings, located in the Duke Power service territory. This relatively untouched portion of the commercial sector has the potential for reducing energy consumption by 13% - 25%, which corresponds to a reduction in average annual operating costs of $500 - $1000 per building. A database of over sixty customers was used to target five buildings with unusually high levels of energy consumption and/or peak demand. Conservation measures in these buildings were selected on the basis of cost-effectiveness and relative non-intrusiveness on the occupants. Together, ORNL and Duke Power representatives worked on data analysis, site-audits, and measure recommendations. Duke Power supplied hourly and monthly utility data, customer survey information and participated in site-audits. ORNL analyzed the data, developed targeting indices, performed site-audits and corresponding first-order energy simulations on candidate buildings, and recommended individualized conservation retrofits. For the five buildings examined, retrofits including lighting, controls, and HVAC systems accounted for a total reduction in consumption of 32%, and in peak demand of 22%. In addition, the study emphasizes the importance of continuous attention to the operating conditions of HVAC equipment and controls, in order to ensure long-term sustainability of these energy savings.

Abraham, M.M.; MacDonald, J.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Commercial Buildings Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More Engaging Industry Leaders to Deploy Energy Saving Tools, Technologies and Best Practices Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and techniques in both existing and new commercial buildings. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by at least 1,600 TBtu. Key Tools and Resources Use the guides, case studies, and other tools developed by the DOE

393

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Minnesota  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minnesota Minnesota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Minnesota Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Minnesota building code are based on the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) with relatively extensive modifications. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IRC. The most notable

394

"Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Program Development for Commercial Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" "Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" A report detailling the Recovery Act: training program development for commercial building equipment technicians, building operators, and energy commissioning agents/auditors. "Recovery Act: Training Program Development for Commercial Building Equipment Technicians, Building Operators, and Energy Commissioning Agents/Auditors" More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - kDE-FOA-0000090.rtf Recovery Act: Wind Energy Consortia between Institutions of Higher Learning

395

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--CBECS Building Types  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Description of CBECS Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types Description of CBECS Building Types In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace at the time of the interview. Thus, a building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a portion of its space or at some time during the year. In the 1999 CBECS, respondents were asked to place their building into a sub-category that was a more specific activity than has been collected in prior surveys. This was done to ensure the quality of the data; after data collection, the sub-categories were combined into the more general categories that are found in the detailed tables. These categories are consistent with prior years.

396

Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Changes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes in Lighting Changes in Lighting The percentage of commercial buildings with lighting was unchanged between 1995 and 2003; however, three lighting types did show change in usage. Compact fluorescent lamps and halogen lamps showed a significant increase between 1995 and 2003 while the use of incandescent lights declined. The lighting questions in the 1995, 1999, and 2003 CBECS questionnaires were virtually identical which facilitates comparison across survey years. The use of compact fluorescent lamps more than doubled, from just under 10 percent of lit buildings to more than 20 percent (Figure 17 and Table 5). The use of halogen lamps nearly doubled, from 7 percent to 13 percent of lit buildings. Use of incandescent lights was the only lighting type to decline; their use dropped from 59 percent to just over one-half of lit buildings.

397

Residential Use of Building Integrated Photo Voltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Integrated Photo Voltaics (BIPVs) are devices which are manufactured to replace building components exposed to sufficient sunlight to generate energy. Photo Voltaic Roof tiles are Building Integrated components which can be used instead of traditional roofing materials. The following thesis is focused on comparing traditional, cheaper asphalt roof tiles with Photo Voltaic (PV) roofing tiles in terms of energy cost savings during their respective Net Present Values. The method used for achieving this is computer simulation made possible by software named "Solar Advisory Model" (SAM), developed by National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL), to simulate energy output and resultant energy costs saved. The simulations have been run on a prototype example of a model of a dwelling unit's roof area. The simulations have been repeated for 35 cities all over the U.S.A. for 5 different climatic zones on the same prototype example of the dwelling unit. Similarly, the roof area being laid with an array of PV roof tiles has been estimated for coverage by traditional asphalt roof shingles by using data from the RS Means construction costs data. The estimated costs associated with the asphalt roof area have been adjusted to a different set of 35 locations from the 5 climatic zones by using the location factor from RS Means. A statistical analysis was done to analyze the data, net present value of roofing materials being the dependent variable versus climatic zones and roofing material as the independent variables. The statistical model also included CDD (Cooling Degree Days) and HDD (Heating Degree Days) as co-variates. The results indicate that NPV (Net Present Value) of BIPV roof is significantly different from that of asphalt roof. Another statistical analysis was done to determine the effect of climatic zones on energy savings due to the use of BIPV roofing. Energy savings (in US$) was used as a dependent variable, and climatic zone as the independent variable. HDD AND CDD were also included in this model as co-variates. The results of this test indicate that both climatic zone and HDD have an effect on total energy savings.

Balabadhrapatruni, Aswini

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Advanced Commercial Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Commercial Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

1992 Commercial Buildings Characteristics -- Overview/Executive Summary  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Overview Overview Overview Percent of Buildings and Floorspace by Census Region, 1992 Percent of Buildings and Floorspace By Census Region divider line Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Marin County - Green Building Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marin County - Green Building Requirements Marin County - Green Building Requirements Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home...

402

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. This database: * Provides information in a standardized format. * Improves the technical consistency and accuracy of the results of software programs. * Enables experts and stakeholders to view the retrofit information and provide comments to improve data

403

Analytical study of residential building with reflecting roofs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the effect of roof solar reflectance on the annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and roof temperatures of the residential buildings. The annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and exterior roof temperatures for a small compact ranch house are computed using the Thermal Analysis Research Program (TARP). The residential models, with minor modifications in the thermal envelope for different locations, are subjected to hourly weather data for one year compiled in the Weather Year for Energy Calculation (WYEC) for in the following locations: Birmingham, Alabama; Bismarck, North Dakota; Miami, Florida; Phoenix, Arizona; Portland, Maine; and, Washington, D.C. Building loads have been determined for a full factorial experimental design that varies the following parameters of the residential model: solar reflectance of the roof, ceiling thermal resistance, attic ventilation, and attic mass framing area. The computed results for annual heating (cooling) loads and peak heating (cooling) loads are illustrated graphically, both globally for all cities and locally for each geographic location. The effect of peak parameter is ranked (highest to lowest) for effect on annual heating and cooling loads, and peak heating and cooling loads. A parametric study plots the building loads as a function of roof solar reflectance for different levels of ceiling thermal resistances and for each geographic location.

Zarr, R.R.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Duct Systems in Large Commercial Buildings: Physical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Systems in Large Commercial Buildings: Physical Characterization, Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk, Woody Delp, Rick Diamond, Darryl Dickerhoff, Ronnen Levinson, Mark Modera, Matty Nematollahi, Duo Wang Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Department Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 March 30, 1999 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology and Community Systems, of the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and by the California Institute For Energy Efficiency. LBNL-42339

405

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

406

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Delaware Summary Delaware recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective July 1, 2010. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

407

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Hampshire Summary New Hampshire has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective October 1, 2009. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

408

Heat Pump Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reviews the technology of heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) for commercial building applications. The report discusses the technical and conceptual background of heat pump water heaters, laboratory testing as performed at EPRI's laboratory, and implications of the test results. It provides analysis of the climactic applicability, financial scenarios, the air-cooling benefit or detriment of HPWH technology.

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Information Resources: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Commercial Building Energy Alliances' (CBEA) efforts to explore the viability of LED site lighting in commercial parking lots. LED technology has the potential for...

411

Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ASHRAE

Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings - Experiences and Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HostPoint of Contact: Peng Xu Within the German funding program "Solar optimized buildings - SolarBau" commercial buildings are subsidized, if the predicted primary energy...

413

Web-based energy information systems for large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and benchmark energy use among a portfolio of buildings bybenchmark Motegi et al: Web-based Energy Information Systems For Large Commercial Buildings

Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

U.S. Commercial Buildings Weather Adjusted Site Energy Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 6c. U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Intensity Using. Weather-Adjusted Site Energy. 1. ... Laboratory buildings are included in the "Other" category.

415

Analysis of electric vehicle interconnection with commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with commercial building microgrids Michael Stadler, Gonalocommercial building microgrids *) Michael Stadler GonaloSVOW), http://der.lbl.gov/microgrids-lbnl/current-project-

Stadler, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the...

417

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003: Energy Source and Year: Building Characteristics

418

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Value of Residential Building Improvements and Repairs, by Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Total 1980 72.2 35.2 107.4 1985 82.3 65.3 147.6 1990 91.4 85.5 176.9 1995 105.8 63.8 169.6 2000 138.2 52.7 191.0 2003 156.2 51.9 208.0 2004 169.2 57.9 227.1 2005 179.0 59.7 238.6 2006 187.4 57.2 244.6 2007 (2) 178.7 57.0 235.7 Note(s): Source(s): Improvements Maintenance and Repairs 1) Improvements includes additions, alterations, reconstruction, and major replacements. Repairs include maintenance. 2) The US Census Bureau discontinued the Survey of Residential Alterations and Repairs (SORAR) after 2007. DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Properties by Property Type: Quarterly 1962-2003 (Old structural purposes) for 1980-2000; DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Proerties by Property Type: Quarterly 2003-2007 (New structural purposes) for 1995-2007; and EIA, Annual Energy Review

419

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Wisconsin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Wisconsin Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Wisconsin building code are the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments that increase stringency. The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the Wisconsin code for the total building energy

420

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales data on the different fuels are compiled in individual fuel reports. Annual electricity sales data are currently collected on Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report," which is sent to all electric utilities in the United States. Supply data for natural gas are collected on Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : HVAC Residential Load...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD for the iPad Back to Tool HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD screenshot HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD screenshot HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD...

423

Intelligent Buildings Series, Volume 1: Large Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As utilities seek the means to manage supply and demand of electricity, they increasingly look to the demand-side for opportunities. Commercial and institutional buildings represent substantial electrical loads that account for approximately 30% of all electric power consumed in the United States. Given the right circumstances, these energy consumers can act as demand-side resources by reducing their electrical demand in response to conditions on the supply-side. While demand response applications in com...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings October 8, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis DOE recently updated the requirements for energy efficiency in newly constructed federal buildings. The new rule, 10 CFR 435, Subpart A: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, applies to residential buildings (one- and two-family dwellings as well as multifamily buildings three stories or less in height) for which design for construction began on or after August 10, 2012. The rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 435, Subpart A to the 2009 IECC. New federal residential buildings are required (effective August 10, 2012) to achieve the 2009 IECC level of energy efficiency or 30% greater

425

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings - Commercial Phase: Evaluate Options Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Technical report User Interface: Website Website: web.anl.gov/renewables/research/building_agent_based_model.html OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Commercial Buildings Sector Agent-Based Model Language: English References: Building Efficiency: Development of an Agent-based Model of the US Commercial Buildings Sector[1] Model the market-participants, dynamics, and constraints-help decide whether to adopt energy-efficient technologies to meet commercial building

426

Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

428

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface NORA WANG GEOFF ELLIOTT JUSTIN ALMQUIST EDWARD ELLIS Pacific Northwest National Laboratory JUNE 14, 2013 Commercial Building Energy Asset Score Energy asset score evaluates the as- built physical characteristics of a building Energy Asset Score and its overall energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The physical characteristics include Building envelope (window, wall, roof) HVAC systems (heating, cooling, air distribution) Lighting system (luminaire and lighting control systems) Service hot water system Other major energy-using equipment (e.g. commercial refrigerator, commercial kitchen appliances, etc.) Building energy use is affected by many factors.

429

Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 IECC 09 IECC This training includes an overview of the residential requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 9 minutes Presenters: Todd Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

430

Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal. ... Refrigeration: Office Equipment: Computers: Other 1: Total: ...

431

Energy Efficiency Report-Chapter 4: Commercial Buildings Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) The CBECS ... water heating, refrigeration, powering office equipment, and other uses.

432

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

433

Tips for effective energy analysis of commercial building designs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify...

434

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

435

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

436

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

437

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

438

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

439

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

440

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

442

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

443

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

444

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

445

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

446

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

447

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

448

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

449

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

450

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

451

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

452

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

453

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

454

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

455

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

456

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

457

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

458

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

459

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

460

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential buildings commercial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

New England Gas Company - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Furnace: 300 - 450 Boilers: 1000 - 1500 Combined High Efficiency BoilerWater Heater: 1,200 Heat Recovery...

462

Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects » Commercial Building Research Projects » Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation Commercial Building Performance Monitoring and Evaluation The Building Technologies Office (BTO) uses performance metrics to standardize the measurement and characterization of energy performance in commercial buildings. These metrics help inform the effectiveness of energy efficiency measures in existing buildings and highlight opportunities to improve performance. Various tiers of metrics are available for different users. Performance Metrics Objectives Performance metrics deal with building energy consumption and on-site energy production. To be useful, industry must agree on standard definitions for these metrics and share consistent procedures for collecting and reporting data as well as ensuring data quality.

463

PCs and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Special Topics and Data Reports > PC's and Computer Terminals Picture of a personal computer Personal Computers and Computer Terminals in Commercial Buildings PCs and Computer Terminals in 1995 Changes Between 1992 and 1995 How the Number of PCs and Computer Terminals Were Estimated References and Additional Links Over the past 10 to 15 years, the use of personal computers (PCs) has risen dramatically. The energy consumed by PCs and other types of office equipment has become a significant component of electricity consumption in commercial buildings -- 13 percent (98 billion kWh) of all electricity consumed in 1995. That amount was nearly as much as the amount used to air condition these buildings. The Energy Information Administration's 1999 Annual Energy Outlook[1] forecasts that, for the next two decades, electricity consumption for office equipment (3.2 percent annually) will grow over twice as fast as electricity use as a whole (1.4 percent annually).

464

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program About the Commercial Buildings Integration Program The Building Technologies Office (BTO) works to identify and develop strategies and technologies to dramatically reduce commercial building energy consumption. BTO's commercial building efforts focus on highly innovative, cost-effective, energy saving measures-ones that promise large energy savings at cost-effective levels, but are underutilized by the market. These efforts are carried out in collaboration with researchers at national laboratories and partners within industry with the goal of dramatically reducing new and existing commercial building energy consumption. Aggressive Energy Savings Goals BTO is targeting a 20% energy use reduction in commercial buildings by

465

Commercial Building Codes and Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Commercial Building Codes and Standards Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by

466

Energy conservation potential of the US Department of Energy interim commercial building standards  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project conducted to demonstrate the whole-building energy conservation potential achievable from full implementation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Interim Energy Conservation Performance Standards for New Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings. DOE`s development and implementation of energy performance standards for commercial buildings were established by the Energy Conservation Standards for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, Public Law (PL) 94-385, 42 USC 6831 et seq., hereinafter referred to as the Act. In accordance with the Act, DOE was to establish performance standards for both federal and private sector buildings ``to achieve the maximum practicable improvements in energy efficiency and use of non-depletable resources for all new buildings``.

Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sumary Comparison Table Sumary Comparison Table Return to: A Look at CBECS Building Activities SUMMARY COMPARISON TABLE Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Average Square Feet per Building (thousand) Total Workers (thousand) Average Square Feet per Worker All Commercial Buildings 4,579 58,772 12.8 76,767 766 Building Activity Retail and Service 1,289 12,728 9.9 13,464 945 -- Retail 704 9,127 13.0 8,675 1,052 --- Strip Mall 130 2,887 22.3 3,529 818 --- Enclosed Mall 12 1,817 Q 1,814 1,001 --- Other Retail 562 4,423 7.9 3,332 1,328 --Service 585 3,601 6.2 4,788 752 Office 705 10,478 14.9 27,053 387 Warehouse 580 8,481 14.6 4,904 1,730 Public Assembly 326 3,948 12.1 2,997 1,317 Education 309 7,740 25.1 10,096 767

468

Infiltration and Natural Ventilation Model for Whole-Building Energy Simulation of Residential Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The infiltration term in the building energy balance equation is one of the least understood and most difficult to model. For many residential buildings, which have an energy performance dominated by the envelope, it can be one of the most important terms. There are numerous airflow models; however, these are not combined with whole-building energy simulation programs that are in common use in North America. This paper describes a simple multizone nodal airflow model integrated with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program.

Deru, M.; Burns, P.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Discussion on Energy-Efficient Technology for the Reconstruction of Residential Buildings in Cold Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Based on the existing residential buildings in cold areas, this paper takes the existing residential buildings in a certain district in Beijing to provide an analysis of the thermal characteristics of envelope and energy consumption in winter with the software PKPM, and provides the technical and economic analysis, which may provide reference for suitable plans for energy efficient reconstruction of buildings in cold areas.

Zhao, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy consumption structure and building conditions, living customs, family income, and thermal environment, as well as local climatic conditions, etc., is analyzed. Measures to optimize the energy utilization consumption are proposed, and further improvements to the energy efficiency of current residential buildings is also discussed.

Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Protocol Platform Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial Building Operations and Energy Management Algorithm Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial Building Operations and Energy Management Algorithm Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial Building Operations and Energy Management Algorithm Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial Building Operations and Energy Management Algorithm Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for Commercial Building Operations and Energy Management Algorithm Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Open-Protocol Platform for

472

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.P. Jamieson, DC Microgrids: Benefits and Barriers.of direct-DC and DC microgrids in residential and commercial

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Improve energy use in commercial buildings | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improve energy use in commercial buildings Improve energy use in commercial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Build an energy program Improve building and plant performance Improve energy use in commercial buildings Find guidance for energy-efficient design projects Manage energy use in manufacturing Develop programs and policies

474

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Assessment of photovoltaic application on a residential building in Gvle, Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The paper presents a PV-based electricity generation system of residential building located at Norra Fiskargatan in Gvle, Sweden, and aims to examine the environmental (more)

Wang, Kangkang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Simulering av energieffektiviserande tgrder fr sm- och flerbostadshus; Simulation of energy efficiently measures for residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this project was to evaluate how energy efficiently some of JMs residential buildings can become in standard production. What kind of (more)

Jakobsson, Niklas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z