Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements Studies show that duct air leakage results in major energy losses. A ll versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) require ducts, air handlers, filter boxes, and air cavities used as ducts to be sealed, and reference Chapter 16 of the International Residential Code for details on air sealing. This sealing is required on all ducts and other air distribution components regardless of whether they are located inside or outside the conditioned living space. For single-family homes and other low-rise residential buildings, the 2009 and 2012 IECC have duct insulation and sealing requirements in Section 403.2. Both codes require insulation

2

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

3

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

4

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

5

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

6

Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

8

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

9

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

10

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

11

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

12

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

13

Building Insulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Insulation Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Building Insulation Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBuildingInsulat...

14

List of Building Insulation Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Residential Building Insulation Ceiling Fan Central Air conditioners CustomOthers pending approval DuctAir sealing Heat pumps...

15

Residential Building Code Compliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

16

18 December 2006 BUILDING INSULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 December 2006 07200-1 BUILDING INSULATION CONSTRUCTION STANDARD SPECIFICATION SECTION 07200 BUILDING INSULATION PART 1 - GENERAL 1.01 Summary.....................................................................................5 2.04 Pre-Engineered Building Insulation

17

An Experimental Study of the Performance of PCM-Enhanced Cellulose Insulation Used in Residential Building Walls Exposed to Full Weather Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air conditioning energy consumption in summer represents a major concern in many areas with hot and humid climates. When incorporated into the walls of light-weight residential buildings, phase change materials (PCMs) can increase the effective thermal mass of the walls and shift part of the space cooling loads to off-peak hours. The thermal properties of pure phase change materials (PCMs) and those of the mixtures of PCMs with cellulose insulation were studied via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) tests and mass change tests. To directly prove the concept that PCM-enhanced insulation can reduce the peak heat flux across walls as well as its potential to shift part of the space cooling loads to a later time of the day, the performance of PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation was studied using two small-scale testing houses exposed to full weather conditions during the summer seasons. The testing houses were air conditioned and independently metered. Both houses had identical thermal responses prior to any retrofits. Before the tests, the PCM enhanced insulation was blown into the wall cavities in one test house while plain cellulose insulation was installed in the other house for comparison purposes. Hourly heat fluxes and daily heat flow data for four walls are presented. Based on the results, important recommendations are provided for the optimal use of PCMs in insulation systems.

Fang, Y.; Medina, M.; Evers, A.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

19

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting in Denver, Colorado, on...

20

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential...

22

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the...

23

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

24

Basement Insulation Techniques | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basement Insulation Techniques Residential basement insulation levels should be selected in accordance with the International Energy Conservation Code, or the local energy code. Be...

25

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

26

Thermal insulation for residential homes. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning materials and methods used for thermal insulation of residential buildings. The thermal efficiency of window glass, cellular materials, glass wool, fibers, wood, foams, and other insulating materials is reviewed. Construction methods and insulation R values are compared between geographic regions. (Contains a minimum of 217 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

28

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

29

Retrofit of Existing Residential Building: a Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are about 42 billion square meters of existing buildings in China. The energy efficiency of existing buildings directly relates to the energy consumption of the building sector. The retrofit of existing residential building began in the 1990s in Heilongjiang. The Sino-Canada demonstration project and Sino-France demonstration project of retrofitting existing residential buildings were carried out in 1997 and 2004, respectively. The retrofit method and energy conservation potential of the envelope and heating system of northern existing buildings are analyzed in this paper, combining the experiences of retrofitting existing residential buildings in Heilongjiang. The software was compiled to aid the design of the envelope retrofit in Heilongjiang and to analyze the working situation in existing residential building heating systems. The imbalance of the indoor temperature and the quantity of heating loss from opening the window in different retrofit projects are presented. The emphasis on energy efficiency retrofit of the envelope of existing residential buildings should be placed on the wall in northern region. It is possible to reduce about 50 percent of energy consumption of buildings by insulating the wall. The external insulation is suitable for retrofitting existing buildings, and the moisture transfer should be considered at the same time. To insure actual reduction in energy consumption, the heating system should be retrofitted when the envelope is insulated.

Zhao, L.; Xu, W.; Li, L.; Gao, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Residential Code Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Code Development Subscribe to updates To receive news and updates about code development activities subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. The model residential building...

31

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

32

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webinars Building America Residential Research Better Buildings Alliance Solid-State Lighting Events DOE Challenge Home Zero Net-Energy-Ready Home Training September 23, 2013 EEBA...

33

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting - Spring 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office:...

34

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting - Summer 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office:...

35

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

36

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

37

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

38

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

39

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

40

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

42

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

43

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

44

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

45

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

46

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

47

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

48

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

49

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

50

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

51

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

52

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

53

Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR

54

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Delicious

55

Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago  

SciTech Connect

This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

Neuhauser, K.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling...

57

Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/4/2013 1 Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for Multi-Family Housing Tom Eckman Objectives Characterize Residential Sector Building Stock ­ Single Family (Four-plex and below) l if il ( i Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92)Survey (PNWRES92) NEEA Survey of Baseline

58

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1,

59

Farmers RECC - Residential Insulation Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmers RECC - Residential Insulation Rebate Program Farmers RECC - Residential Insulation Rebate Program Farmers RECC - Residential Insulation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate $200 Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Free energy audit at Farmers RECC members residence and up to $200 depending on amount of energy which can be saved. Provider Farmers RECC The Farmers Rural Electric Cooperative (RECC) Button-Up Program provides free energy audits and rebates for insulation upgrades to its residential customers. Farmers RECC's energy advisor will visit the customer's home, conduct an energy audit, and calculate the heat gain/heat loss for the home. If needed, customers can then receive up to $200 to increase the

60

Green Residential Building Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on a wait list, and will be notified if additional funding becomes available.''''' The Green Residential Building Program, administered by the New York State Energy Research and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholde...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stakeholder's Meeting - Spring 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder's Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia,...

62

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Update Meeting - Summer 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting in Denver,...

63

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

64

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

65

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heaters; water heaters; blowing agents; insulation; residential buildings; physical properties; thermal conductivity; polyurethane foams Abstract: ...

66

Alabama State Certification of Residential Building Codes | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Name: Adams Initials: TL Affiliation: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Focus: Adoption Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: 2009 IECC 2009 IRC...

67

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

68

Building Technologies Program: Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 and there is a limit of $1,500 for all products. Improvements made in 2008 are not eligible for a tax credit. See the ENERGY STAR® Web site for a detailed listing of eligible improvements.

69

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

70

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheet Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the number of American homes that are energy efficient. Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR ® Sponsors have leveraged over $1 billion in federal funding and local resources to build more energy-efficient communities. DOE is now expanding this network of residential energy efficiency programs and partners to new members. Who Should Join? Network membership is open to all organizations that are committed to accelerating the pace of energy

71

Building Technologies Office: Building America Residential Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research results to the market. Learn more about the research planning process. Read the Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting Summary Report and view the...

72

U.S. Residential Buildings Weather-Adjusted Primary Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency Page > Energy Intensities > Table 8c Glossary U.S. Residential Buildings ...

73

Thermal Performance Analysis of a High-Mass Residential Building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimizing energy consumption in residential buildings using passive solar strategies almost always calls for the efficient use of massive building materials combined with solar gain control and adequate insulation. Using computerized simulation tools to understand the interactions among all the elements facilitates designing low-energy houses. Finally, the design team must feel confident that these tools are providing realistic results. The design team for the residential building described in this paper relied on computerized design tools to determine building envelope features that would maximize the energy performance [1]. Orientation, overhang dimensions, insulation amounts, window characteristics and other strategies were analyzed to optimize performance in the Pueblo, Colorado, climate. After construction, the actual performance of the house was monitored using both short-term and long-term monitoring approaches to verify the simulation results and document performance. Calibrated computer simulations showed that this house consumes 56% less energy than would a similar theoretical house constructed to meet the minimum residential energy code requirements. This paper discusses this high-mass house and compares the expected energy performance, based on the computer simulations, versus actual energy performance.

Smith, M.W.; Torcellini, P.A., Hayter, S.J.; Judkoff, R.

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equivalent to taking 225 million cars off the road. Additionally, homeowners find energy efficient homes to be more comfortable because less air leakage and more insulation...

75

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

76

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential energy efficiency and the mission of the BBRN. Members are expected to be legally incorporated organizations or institutions, rather than individuals, actively engaged in the field of existing residential building energy efficiency with an ability to impact the market. Members should have the ability and capacity to carry out the requirements for membership (i.e., reporting the annual number of upgrades in their sphere of influence, and associated benefits), and actively engage as a member. Members must actively engage in significant work supporting, studying, researching, reporting, and/or

77

An energy standard for residential buildings in south China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: residential, buildings, energy standard, energyspiraling demand for building energy use, Chinas Ministryand implementing building energy standards, starting with a

Huang, Yu Joe; Lang, Siwei; Hogan, John; Lin, Haiyan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vacuum Insulation Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research

79

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

80

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Danielle Sass Byrnett Better Buildings Residential Building Technologies Office Program Solution Center Demonstration Outline * Goals, History, Content Sources * Tour: Organization - Program Components - Handbooks * Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs & Partners * Provide an easily accessed repository for key lessons, resources, and knowledge collected from the experience of past programs. * Help programs and their partners plan, implement, manage, and evaluate better * Help stakeholders leapfrog past missteps en route to a larger and more successful industry. 4 eere.energy.gov Intended Audiences

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluating Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance The materials for this course may be used for in-person training courses, and are intended to provide the tools and specific training necessary to evaluate residential compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The course also provides useful training in general residential field inspection for energy code compliance. The recommended background for taking this course is significant experience and/or certification on the IECC in a plan review or inspection capacity. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, July 16, 2010. Course Type: Training Materials Video In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides Presentation Slides Presentation Slides and Windows Media Videos

82

Better Buildings Partners: Better Buildings Residential Network...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work they are doing to advance energy efficiency. AFC First Alabama Energy Doctors Austin Energy BC Hydro Boulder County, Colorado Building Sustainable Solutions, LLC California...

83

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's Working What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Digg

84

Design for Energy Efficiency in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the thermal design and heating design of an energy saving residential building in Beijing where the owners lived until 2004. Results show the advantages and disadvantages of a household-based heating mode by natural gas. Based on the quantity of natural gas by field tests in 2005, we conclude that thermal design influences heating design calculations.

Song, M.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

88

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 Industry Use Shares of Mineral Fiber (GlassWool) Insulation (1) 1997 1999 2001 2003 2004 2005 Insulating Buildings (2) Industrial, Equipment, and Appliance Insulation Unknown...

89

South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Residential Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, Doors, Heat pumps, Windows, Geothermal Heat Pumps Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy...

90

Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Place Norwalk, CT Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) is a company located in Norwalk, CT. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Steven_Winter_Associates_(Consortium_for_Advanced_Residential_Buildings)&oldid=379243" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

91

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

92

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in building materials such as insulation, particleboard,Particleboard Insulation Adhesives Paint Building Contentsfoam insulation, and radon from various building materials -

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human and Socialof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Enhancing Residential Building Operation through its Envelope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study heat loss is evaluated with the modeling software of Iranian Construction Engineering Organization, for both with and without insulation in the building. Of course the evaluation is in accordance with the laws of this organization, which support environmental and constructional matters. Also the amounts of energy consumption for these two states are compared and a substantial economy of energy consumption is presented. Eventually, results represent that 32% in heat load and 25% in cooling load of the building can be economized. And also most energy loss is related to the windows and the roof of the building.

Vazifeshenas, Y.; Sajjadi, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

98

Energy Efficient Residential Building Code for Arab Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an energy analysis to support the Egyptian efforts to develop a New Energy Code for New Residential Buildings in the Arab Countries. Also, the paper represents a brief summary of the code contents specially, the effectiveness of building envelope and weather data in reducing electrical energy consumption. The impacts of the following parameters were studied namely; walls and roof constructions, window size and glazing type for different geographical locations in the Arab Countries. Two different distinguish weather classification were developed and analyzed and presented in this study, the DDC18.3& DDH 25. The first was developed by the Author to calculate DD using a mathematical model on electronic spread sheet. The second depends on the hourly values for each geographical location. The analysis includes the capitals and major cities representing most of the Arab countries. It was determined that the window to wall ratio (WWR) of 15% minimizes the total annual electricity use for the buildings. The Solar Factors (SF) and Window Orientation Factors (OF) were calculated for the eight wall orientations. The Over All Transfer Value (OTTV) was calculated for each orientation for different variables, e.g. WWR, Glazing Type, Shading, wall color and mid and top floor. The results show that the mass and types of building materials; WWR (15%), glass type and shutters; orientation; wall insulation (25mm), wall solar absorptivity (a=.3); roof insulation and shading effect enhance the thermal performance and reduces the cooling load by 60%.

Hanna, G. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of aerial thermography to discriminate loft insulation in residential housing .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the use of aerial thermography data to discriminate loft (attic) insulation levels in residential housing, with ventilated pitched roofs, in the UK. (more)

Allinson, David

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Influence of two dynamic predictive clothing insulation models on building energy performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energy Use, HVACClothing Insulation Models on Building Energy Performance K.insulation variation should be captured during the building

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners with a variety of organizations to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. Home builders, governments, researchers, and universities have several opportunities to work with the Building Technologies Office and other DOE projects. Home Builders Home builders who want to be recognized for building high performance homes can find out what it takes to participate in DOE's Challenge Home and sign up today. DOE Challenge Homes are verified by a qualified third-party and are at least 40%-50% more energy efficient than a typical new home. State or Local Governments, Utilities, and Other Organizations

102

Design and thermal modeling of a residential building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent trends of green energy upgrade in commercial buildings show promise for application to residential houses as well, where there are potential energy-saving benefits of retrofitting the residential heating system from ...

Yeh, Alice Su-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Effect of Green Insulation Standards on Moisture Accumulation within Framing of Residential Structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Green building standards recommend use of a variety of new thermal insulation products. However, durability of wooden framing used in conjunction with new insulation materials (more)

Knight, Kevin Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements  

SciTech Connect

The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE Building America Case Study Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing homes with vapor open wall assemblies Type: Residential Climate Zones: All PERFORMANCE DATA Insulation Ratio The R-value ratio of exterior to interior insulation (e.g., R-15 exterior insulation on R-11 cavity insulation has a ratio of 0.58). This variable controls sheathing temperature. Vapor Permeable Insulation An insulation with vapor permeance greater than five U.S. perms (e.g., rigid mineral fiber insulations). This variable controls water vapor flow and sheathing temperatures. Water Resisting Barrier A membrane that resists liquid water transfer. Permeable WRBs allow water

106

Rule-based Mamdani-type fuzzy modelling of thermal performance of multi-layer precast concrete panels used in residential buildings in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat insulation applied on outer wall surfaces of buildings for the purpose of conserving energy, can be analyzed experimentally, mathematically and by using simulation modelling. In this study, simulation modelling of insulation layer (d"2), for residential ... Keywords: Insulation, Prefabricated panel, Rule-based Mamdani-type fuzzy modelling, Thermal analysis

M. Tosun; K. Dincer; S. Baskaya

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

108

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) SolarWind Permitting Standards...

109

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar Systems (Oregon) This is the approved revision of...

110

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive The City of Portland's...

111

Colorado State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The State of Colorado provides the following information to certify compliance with Title III of the Energy...

112

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EI2 Insulation EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm on AddThis.com...

113

Thermal insulation for residential homes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning materials and methods used for thermal insulation of residential homes. The thermal efficiency of window glass, cellular materials, glass wool, fibers, wood, foams, and other insulating materials is reviewed. Construction methods and insulation effectiveness are compared among geographic regions. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Thermal insulation for residential homes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning materials and methods used for thermal insulation of residential homes. The thermal efficiency of window glass, cellular materials, glass wool, fibers, wood, foams, and other insulating materials is reviewed. Construction methods and insulation effectiveness are compared among geographic regions. (Contains a minimum of 219 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal insulation for residential homes. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning materials and methods used for thermal insulation of residential homes. The thermal efficiency of window glass, cellular materials, glass wool, fibers, wood, foams, and other insulating materials is reviewed. Construction methods and insulation effectiveness are compared among geographic regions. (Contains a minimum of 220 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Austin Energy '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project.

118

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Information Texas Program Type Building Energy Code '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the...

119

Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Insulation for Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High Performance Cost-Effective Wall, Roof, and Foundation Systems Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advanced Insulation for High

120

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10-15 years Provider City of Cleveland Department of Community Development The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Validation of the thermal effect of roof with the Spraying and green plants in an insulated building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the insulation efficiency of the RC building. Windfor an RC building with a high degree of insulation in thebuildings have insulating material to provide thermal insulation

Zhou, Nan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru; Ojima, Toshio

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

123

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The purpose of this letter is to document that the State of Connecticut has met its stautory requirement with regard to adoption of energy codes that meet or exceed the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings. Publication Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 CT Certification of Building Energy Codes.pdf Document Details Last Name: Cassidy Initials: JV Affiliation: Connecticut Department of Administrative Services, Division of Construction Services Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Adoption Building Type:

124

The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The summer in Guangzhou, China, is hot and long. Heat proofing is very important for the energy efficiency of buildings and improvement of the indoor thermal environment. The residential buildings in the southern region are cooled by air conditioning mainly with the increase of the live level. This study investigates the influence of the thermal dynamic performance on the yearly cooling load and yearly maximum cooling demand in typical residential flats by employing KVALUE and DeST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated.

Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOTHING INSULATION MODELS ON BUILDING ENERGY USE, HVACClothing Insulation Model; Clothing; Building Energy;clothing insulation models on the building simulation is

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this...

127

Green Residential Building Program (New York) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Green Residential Building Program (New York) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being...

128

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels Researcher: Mrst October 2010 Funding bodies: EPSRC and ErgoHome Ltd. Introduction Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) are high performance building panels which are considered to be the next generation of timber

Birmingham, University of

129

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency...

130

Influence of two dynamic predictive clothing insulation models on building energy performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energyunnecessarily higher clothing insulation and lower heatingthat the constant clothing insulation assumption lead to the

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

132

Building America Puts Residential Research Results to Work  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential buildings use more than 20% of the energy consumed annually in the United States. To help reduce that energy use, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its Building America partners conduct research to develop advanced building energy systems that make homes and communities much more energy-efficient. DOE and its partners design, build, and evaluate attractive, comfortable homes that increase performance with little or no increase in construction costs.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Regulations establishing energy-conservation standards for new residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

The text of the California Administrative Code, Title 24, Part 6, Article 1 is presented. The energy conservation standards described apply to all new hotels, motels, apartment houses, lodging houses, dwellings, and other residential buildings which are heated or mechanically cooled. Standards for the building envelope, climate control systems and equipment, and water heating are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Chelan County PUD - Residential Weatherization Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

136

Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Residential Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, DuctAir sealing, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

137

Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

freezers, CFLs, HVAC systems, and Building Insulation. The Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Program also provides residential incentives including envelope and...

138

Residential Code Methodology | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Site Map...

139

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

140

NREL Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Dataset Summary Description This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential Buildings Group has formed a partnership. The two types of partnership included in this spreadsheet are: Incubator and Test & Evaluation. This list was generated in April 2011. Source NREL Date Released April 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords incubator NREL partnerships Test & Evaluation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon members_and_partners_-_nrel_resbldgs_04072011.xlsx (xlsx, 29.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings................................................................................................................. 1 2. Non-Residential .......................................................................................................... 1 2.1. Non-Residential Lighting

142

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures with using various measures to improve the efficiency of residential buildings. This database offers

145

Building Technologies Office: National Residential Efficiency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at all levels. The data from the efficiency measures database is used in the Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) software. Benefits The National Retrofit Measures Database...

146

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

147

An energy standard for residential buildings in south China  

SciTech Connect

To curb the spiraling demand for building energy use, China's Ministry of Construction has worked at developing and implementing building energy standards, starting with a standard for heated residential buildings in the Cold regions in 1986, followed by a standard for residential buildings in the Hot Summer Cold Winter Region in central China in 2001. In July 2001, a similar effort was started to develop a standard for residential buildings in the Hot Summer Warm Winter Region, comprising of the entirety or large portions of Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan and Fujian. The target for the standard is to improve the thermal efficiency of buildings by 50 percent compared to current construction, which are typically uninsulated and have single-pane windows. Because of the importance of controlling window solar gain, the standard developed tables specifying the required window thermal transmittance and shading coefficient for differing window-to-wall ratios. The intent of such trade-off table is to permit flexibility in the location and size of windows, as long as their thermal performances meet the requirements of the standard. For further flexibility, the standard provides three methods of compliance: (1) a simple set of prescriptive requirements, (2) a simplified performance calculation, and (3) a detailed computer-based performance calculation using a Custom Budget approach.

Huang, Yu Joe; Lang, Siwei; Hogan, John; Lin, Haiyan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18px" classApple-style-span>The Buildings PerformanceDatabase will havean API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private...

149

Influence of two dynamic predictive clothing insulation models on building energy performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Consumption, Energy and Buildings, Vol. 26, 283-291.Insulation Models on Building Energy Use, HVAC sizing andClothing Model Impact on Building Energy Performance

Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S....

152

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S....

154

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

155

Analysis of institutional mechanisms affecting residential and commercial buildings retrofit  

SciTech Connect

Barriers to energy conservation in the residential and commercial sectors influence (1) the willingness of building occupants to modify their energy usage habits, and (2) the willingness of building owners/occupants to upgrade the thermal characteristics of the structures within which they live or work and the appliances which they use. The barriers that influence the willingness of building owners/occupants to modify the thermal efficiency characteristics of building structures and heating/cooling systems are discussed. This focus is further narrowed to include only those barriers that impede modifications to existing buildings, i.e., energy conservation retrofit activity. Eight barriers selected for their suitability for Federal action in the residential and commercial sectors and examined are: fuel pricing policies that in the short term do not provide enough incentive to invest in energy conservation; high finance cost; inability to evaluate contractor performance; inability to evaluate retrofit products; lack of well-integrated or one-stop marketing systems (referred to as lack of delivery systems); lack of precise or customized information; lack of sociological/psychological incentives; and use of the first-cost decision criterion (expanded to include short-term payback criterion for the commercial sector). The impacts of these barriers on energy conservation are separately assessed for the residential and commercial sectors.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Value of thermal insulation in residential construction: economics and the conservation of energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential monetary and energy savings through the use of additional thermal insulation in residential construction were estimated. Insulation systems as required by Federal Housing Administration Minimum Property Standards for a southern, a central, and a northern region of the U.S. were used as the basis for comparison. Whereas the owner of a gas-heated home would generally realize small monetary savings from increased insulation, his energy savings could be as high as 30 to 50 percent at no economic penalty. The owner of an electrically heated home can save as much as approximately 1/3 of the cost of heating his home by using additional insulation and reduce the energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent.

Moyers, J.C.

1971-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings, hence are greatly influenced by the outside climatic conditions. Due to the hot humid climate of Malaysia, air conditioning system accounts for more than 45% of the total electricity used in the residential sector which is required to remove substantial amount of gained heat due to poor thermal envelope performance. This paper uses Ecotect software to analyze the impact of building envelope design on energy cooling load for residential building in Penang, Malaysia, which include area ratio of window to floor, exterior wall thermal insulation, and several kinds of shading system. This paper describes an integrated passive design approach to reduce the cooling requirement for high-rise apartments through an improved building envelope design. Comparing with the other passive strategies investigated in this paper, the results indicated that exterior wall thermal insulation is the best strategy to decrease both annual cooling energy load and peak cooling load which achieved a reduction of 10.2% and 26.3% respectively. However, the other passive strategies applied also have some marginal effect on decreasing the cooling load.

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a metropolitan city, Belgrade is a dwelling place for about 25% of total citizen number of Republic of Serbia, and at the same time regional cultural, educational, scientific and business center with its own energy production. Belgrade represents a significant consumer of final energy to support the living standard of the occupants. Energy production is based on domestic coal and imported fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas resulting in a high impact to the environment by emission of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings is based on geographic position and type of heating. This paper presents the sustainable assessment of energy system for residential building sector in Belgrade. In order to present the energy system options for residential building sector, three sets of energy indicators: economical, social and environmental are taken into consideration.

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Minnesota  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minnesota Minnesota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Minnesota Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Minnesota building code are based on the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) with relatively extensive modifications. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IRC. The most notable

160

Residential Use of Building Integrated Photo Voltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Integrated Photo Voltaics (BIPVs) are devices which are manufactured to replace building components exposed to sufficient sunlight to generate energy. Photo Voltaic Roof tiles are Building Integrated components which can be used instead of traditional roofing materials. The following thesis is focused on comparing traditional, cheaper asphalt roof tiles with Photo Voltaic (PV) roofing tiles in terms of energy cost savings during their respective Net Present Values. The method used for achieving this is computer simulation made possible by software named "Solar Advisory Model" (SAM), developed by National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL), to simulate energy output and resultant energy costs saved. The simulations have been run on a prototype example of a model of a dwelling unit's roof area. The simulations have been repeated for 35 cities all over the U.S.A. for 5 different climatic zones on the same prototype example of the dwelling unit. Similarly, the roof area being laid with an array of PV roof tiles has been estimated for coverage by traditional asphalt roof shingles by using data from the RS Means construction costs data. The estimated costs associated with the asphalt roof area have been adjusted to a different set of 35 locations from the 5 climatic zones by using the location factor from RS Means. A statistical analysis was done to analyze the data, net present value of roofing materials being the dependent variable versus climatic zones and roofing material as the independent variables. The statistical model also included CDD (Cooling Degree Days) and HDD (Heating Degree Days) as co-variates. The results indicate that NPV (Net Present Value) of BIPV roof is significantly different from that of asphalt roof. Another statistical analysis was done to determine the effect of climatic zones on energy savings due to the use of BIPV roofing. Energy savings (in US$) was used as a dependent variable, and climatic zone as the independent variable. HDD AND CDD were also included in this model as co-variates. The results of this test indicate that both climatic zone and HDD have an effect on total energy savings.

Balabadhrapatruni, Aswini

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. This database: * Provides information in a standardized format. * Improves the technical consistency and accuracy of the results of software programs. * Enables experts and stakeholders to view the retrofit information and provide comments to improve data

162

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

adding thermal insulation to buildings and i m p r o v i n grespect to insulation for residential buildings, the reportbuildings; these calculations include fluorocarbon emissions from thermal insulation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Analytical study of residential building with reflecting roofs  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the effect of roof solar reflectance on the annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and roof temperatures of the residential buildings. The annual heating (cooling) loads, peak heating (cooling) loads, and exterior roof temperatures for a small compact ranch house are computed using the Thermal Analysis Research Program (TARP). The residential models, with minor modifications in the thermal envelope for different locations, are subjected to hourly weather data for one year compiled in the Weather Year for Energy Calculation (WYEC) for in the following locations: Birmingham, Alabama; Bismarck, North Dakota; Miami, Florida; Phoenix, Arizona; Portland, Maine; and, Washington, D.C. Building loads have been determined for a full factorial experimental design that varies the following parameters of the residential model: solar reflectance of the roof, ceiling thermal resistance, attic ventilation, and attic mass framing area. The computed results for annual heating (cooling) loads and peak heating (cooling) loads are illustrated graphically, both globally for all cities and locally for each geographic location. The effect of peak parameter is ranked (highest to lowest) for effect on annual heating and cooling loads, and peak heating and cooling loads. A parametric study plots the building loads as a function of roof solar reflectance for different levels of ceiling thermal resistances and for each geographic location.

Zarr, R.R.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Influence Of Three Dynamic Predictive Clothing Insulation Models On Building Energy Use, HVAC Sizing And Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predictive Clothing Insulation Models based on Outdoor AirPREDICTIVE CLOTHING INSULATION MODELS ON BUILDING ENERGYthat the clothing insulation is equal to a constant value of

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Delaware Summary Delaware recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective July 1, 2010. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

166

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Hampshire Summary New Hampshire has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective October 1, 2009. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

167

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Basement Insulation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research on basement insulation, which identifies the wall installation methods and materials that perform best in terms of insulation and water resistance.

168

Evaluation of The Thermal Performance and Cost Effectiveness of Radiant Barrier Thermal Insulation Materials In Residential Construction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reducing heating and cooling systems loads in buildings is a cost effective way to decrease energy consumption in residential houses. This reduction can be achieved (more)

Asadi, Somayeh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Wisconsin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Wisconsin Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Wisconsin building code are the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments that increase stringency. The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the Wisconsin code for the total building energy

170

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Value of Residential Building Improvements and Repairs, by Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Total 1980 72.2 35.2 107.4 1985 82.3 65.3 147.6 1990 91.4 85.5 176.9 1995 105.8 63.8 169.6 2000 138.2 52.7 191.0 2003 156.2 51.9 208.0 2004 169.2 57.9 227.1 2005 179.0 59.7 238.6 2006 187.4 57.2 244.6 2007 (2) 178.7 57.0 235.7 Note(s): Source(s): Improvements Maintenance and Repairs 1) Improvements includes additions, alterations, reconstruction, and major replacements. Repairs include maintenance. 2) The US Census Bureau discontinued the Survey of Residential Alterations and Repairs (SORAR) after 2007. DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Properties by Property Type: Quarterly 1962-2003 (Old structural purposes) for 1980-2000; DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Proerties by Property Type: Quarterly 2003-2007 (New structural purposes) for 1995-2007; and EIA, Annual Energy Review

171

Environmental assessment in support of proposed voluntary energy conservation standard for new residential buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. 49 refs., 15 tabs.

Hadley, D.L.; Parker, G.B.; Callaway, J.W.; Marsh, S.J.; Roop, J.M.; Taylor, Z.T.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings October 8, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis DOE recently updated the requirements for energy efficiency in newly constructed federal buildings. The new rule, 10 CFR 435, Subpart A: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, applies to residential buildings (one- and two-family dwellings as well as multifamily buildings three stories or less in height) for which design for construction began on or after August 10, 2012. The rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 435, Subpart A to the 2009 IECC. New federal residential buildings are required (effective August 10, 2012) to achieve the 2009 IECC level of energy efficiency or 30% greater

173

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : HVAC Residential Load...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD for the iPad Back to Tool HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD screenshot HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD screenshot HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD...

174

Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 IECC 09 IECC This training includes an overview of the residential requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 9 minutes Presenters: Todd Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

175

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

176

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

177

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

178

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

179

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

180

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

182

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

183

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

184

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

185

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

186

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

187

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

188

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

189

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

190

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

191

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

192

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

193

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

194

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

195

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

196

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

197

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

198

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

199

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

200

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

202

Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application of Spray Foam Application of Spray Foam Insulation Under Plywood and OSB Roof Sheathing PROJECT aPPliCaTiON Construction: Existing homes with unvented cathedralized roofs. Type: Residential Climate Zones: All TEam mEmbERs Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com BASF www.basf.com Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com Honeywell http://honeywell.com Icynene www.icynene.com COdE COmPliaNCE 2012 International Code Council, International Residential Code Spray polyurethane foams (SPFs) have advantages over alternative insulation methods because they provide air sealing in complex assemblies, particularly roofs. Spray foam can provide the thermal, air, and vapor control layers in both new and retrofit construction. Unvented roof strategies with open cell and

203

Discussion on Energy-Efficient Technology for the Reconstruction of Residential Buildings in Cold Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Based on the existing residential buildings in cold areas, this paper takes the existing residential buildings in a certain district in Beijing to provide an analysis of the thermal characteristics of envelope and energy consumption in winter with the software PKPM, and provides the technical and economic analysis, which may provide reference for suitable plans for energy efficient reconstruction of buildings in cold areas.

Zhao, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Infiltration and Natural Ventilation Model for Whole-Building Energy Simulation of Residential Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The infiltration term in the building energy balance equation is one of the least understood and most difficult to model. For many residential buildings, which have an energy performance dominated by the envelope, it can be one of the most important terms. There are numerous airflow models; however, these are not combined with whole-building energy simulation programs that are in common use in North America. This paper describes a simple multizone nodal airflow model integrated with the SUNREL whole-building energy simulation program.

Deru, M.; Burns, P.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Investigation and Analysis of Summer Energy Consumption of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings in Xi'an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests and questionnaire surveys on the summer energy consumption structure of 100 energy efficient residential buildings have been performed in a certain residential district in Xi'an, China. The relationship between the formation of the energy consumption structure and building conditions, living customs, family income, and thermal environment, as well as local climatic conditions, etc., is analyzed. Measures to optimize the energy utilization consumption are proposed, and further improvements to the energy efficiency of current residential buildings is also discussed.

Ma, B.; Yan, Z.; Gui, Z.; He, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Potential for energy technologies in residential and commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The residential-commercial energy technology model was developed as a planning tool for policy analysis in the residential and commercial building sectors. The model and its procedures represent a detailed approach to estimating the future acceptance of energy-using technologies both in new construction and for retrofit into existing buildings. The model organizes into an analytical framework all relevant information and data on building energy technology, building markets, and government policy, and it allows for easy identification of the relative importance of key assumptions. The outputs include estimates of the degree of penetration of the various building energy technologies, the levels of energy use savings associated with them, and their costs - both private and government. The model was designed to estimate the annual energy savings associated with new technologies compared with continued use of conventional technology at 1975 levels. The amount of energy used under 1975 technology conditions is referred to as the reference case energy use. For analytical purposes the technologies were consolidated into ten groupings: electric and gas heat pumps; conservation categories I, II, and III; solar thermal (hot water, heating, and cooling); photovoltaics, and wind systems. These groupings clearly do not allow an assessment of the potential for individual technologies, but they do allow a reasonable comparison of their roles in the R/C sector. Assumptions were made regarding the technical and economic performances of the technologies over the period of the analysis. In addition, the study assessed the non-financial characteristics of the technologies - aesthetics, maintenance complexity, reliability, etc. - that will also influence their market acceptability.

Glesk, M.M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Assessment of photovoltaic application on a residential building in Gvle, Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The paper presents a PV-based electricity generation system of residential building located at Norra Fiskargatan in Gvle, Sweden, and aims to examine the environmental (more)

Wang, Kangkang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Study: Window % of Consumption 1. Categorize component loads

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Simulering av energieffektiviserande tgrder fr sm- och flerbostadshus; Simulation of energy efficiently measures for residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this project was to evaluate how energy efficiently some of JMs residential buildings can become in standard production. What kind of (more)

Jakobsson, Niklas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Investigation of Peak Load Reduction Strategies in Residential Buildings in Cooling Dominated Climates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This investigation of peak load reduction strategies in residential buildings contributes to the global international efforts in reducing energy consumption and is related directly to (more)

Atallah, Fady

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Virginia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Virginia Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IRC and IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of

214

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New York  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

York York September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New York Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2004 IECC Supplement with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

215

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Michigan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Michigan Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IRC with considerable amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

216

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Missouri  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Missouri Summary Missouri currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Missouri homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $353 to $565 a year for an average

217

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Texas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Texas Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2001 IECC Supplement. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. An energy analysis comparing the 2009 IECC to the state code

218

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nebraska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nebraska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $236 a year

219

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utah Utah September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Utah Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $219 to

220

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Oklahoma Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $266 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Tennessee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Tennessee Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $231 to

222

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Mississippi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mississippi Summary Mississippi currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Mississippi homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $173 to $250 a year for an average

223

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nevada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nevada Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $205 to

224

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Jersey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Jersey Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with extensive amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

225

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Alaska  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Alaska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Alaska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A comparison of the overall impacts on energy use for these two

226

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Iowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Iowa Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $245 to

227

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Rhode Island Summary Rhode Island has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

228

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Illinois Summary Illinois recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

229

SINTEF Building and Infrastructure State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SINTEF Building and Infrastructure State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames ­ Research-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames ­ Research and Market Review Project report 6 ­ 2007 SINTEF Building) and Christian Kohler4) State-of-the-Art Highly Insulating Window Frames ­ Research and Market Review Keywords

230

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

231

Cavity and Continuous Insulation in REScheck | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cavity and Continuous Insulation in REScheck Insulation should be installed to fill the entire cavity. REScheck(tm) uses nominal insulation R-values. The assemblies listed in...

232

EMPS-2.1 Computer Program for Residential Building Energy Analysis, Engineering Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating the projected energy efficiency of residential building designs and equipment options requires a sophisticated analytic methodology. Techniques described in this manual analyze building thermal loads, heating and cooling systems, water heaters, and life-cycle costs and electric rates.

1988-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL homes energy efficient through Title 24 Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Standards for Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings (AB 549 Report), the Energy Commission made a series

234

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Energy and global warming impacts of CFC alternative technologies for foam building insulations  

SciTech Connect

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCS) have been used as blowing agents in foam insulation, as the working fluids in cooling and refrigeration equipment, and as solvents in general and precision cleaning applications since their introduction in the 1930s. The number of applications and volumes of CFCs used grew at a tremendous pace during the 1960s and 1970s, but in the mid-1980s it was confirmed that these extremely useful chemicals contribute to the destruction of stratospheric zone and that they are the primary cause of the CFCs have also been found to be second only to carbon dioxide as a factor causing increased greenhouse warming. These chemicals are being phased out of use rapidly to protect the ozone layer and it is very important that the replacements for CFCs do not result in a net increase in global warming by introducing less efficient processes that lead to higher energy use and increased carbon dioxide emissions. A study was conducted to identify those alternative chemicals and technologies that could replace CFCs in energy related applications before the year 2000, and to assess the total potential impact of those alternatives on global warming. The analysis for this project included an estimate of the direct effects from the release of blowing agents, refrigerants, and solvents into the atmosphere and the indirect effects of carbon dioxide emissions resulting from energy use for commercial and residential building insulation, household and commercial refrigeration, building and automobile air conditioning, and general metal and electronics solvent cleaning. This paper focuses on those aspects of the study relevant to building insulation. In general the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon alternatives for CFCs lead to large and sometimes dramatic reductions in total equivalent warming impact, lifetime equivalent C0{sub 2} emissions (TEWI). Most of the reductions result from decreased direct effects without significant changes in energy use.

Fischer, S.K.; Fairchild, P.D.; Hughes, P.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Key Residential Building Equipment Technologies for Control and Grid Support PART I (Residential)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy consumption of the residential sector is a crucial area of research that has in the past primarily focused on increasing the efficiency of household devices such as water heaters, dishwashers, air conditioners, and clothes washer and dryer units. However, the focus of this research is shifting as objectives such as developing the smart grid and ensuring that the power system remains reliable come to the fore, along with the increasing need to reduce energy use and costs. Load research has started to focus on mechanisms to support the power system through demand reduction and/or reliability services. The power system relies on matching generation and load, and day-ahead and real-time energy markets capture most of this need. However, a separate set of grid services exist to address the discrepancies in load and generation arising from contingencies and operational mismatches, and to ensure that the transmission system is available for delivery of power from generation to load. Currently, these grid services are mostly provided by generation resources. The addition of renewable resources with their inherent variability can complicate the issue of power system reliability and lead to the increased need for grid services. Using load as a resource, through demand response programs, can fill the additional need for flexible resources and even reduce costly energy peaks. Loads have been shown to have response that is equal to or better than generation in some cases. Furthermore, price-incentivized demand response programs have been shown to reduce the peak energy requirements, thereby affecting the wholesale market efficiency and overall energy prices. The residential sector is not only the largest consumer of electrical energy in the United States, but also has the highest potential to provide demand reduction and power system support, as technological advancements in load control, sensor technologies, and communication are made. The prevailing loads based on the largest electrical energy consumers in the residential sector are space heating and cooling, washer and dryer, water heating, lighting, computers and electronics, dishwasher and range, and refrigeration. As the largest loads, these loads provide the highest potential for delivering demand response and reliability services. Many residential loads have inherent flexibility that is related to the purpose of the load. Depending on the load type, electric power consumption levels can either be ramped, changed in a step-change fashion, or completely removed. Loads with only on-off capability (such as clothes washers and dryers) provide less flexibility than resources that can be ramped or step-changed. Add-on devices may be able to provide extra demand response capabilities. Still, operating residential loads effectively requires awareness of the delicate balance of occupants health and comfort and electrical energy consumption. This report is Phase I of a series of reports aimed at identifying gaps in automated home energy management systems for incorporation of building appliances, vehicles, and renewable adoption into a smart grid, specifically with the intent of examining demand response and load factor control for power system support. The objective is to capture existing gaps in load control, energy management systems, and sensor technology with consideration of PHEV and renewable technologies to establish areas of research for the Department of Energy. In this report, (1) data is collected and examined from state of the art homes to characterize the primary residential loads as well as PHEVs and photovoltaic for potential adoption into energy management control strategies; and (2) demand response rules and requirements across the various demand response programs are examined for potential participation of residential loads. This report will be followed by a Phase II report aimed at identifying the current state of technology of energy management systems, sensors, and communication technologies for demand response and load factor control applications

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; DeVault, Robert C [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Residential U.S. Site Res.% Res.% Fossil Electricity Total Total of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 385 525 909 4723 19% 4.9% 1981 361 518 878 4601 19% 4.8% 1982 359 511 870 4357 20% 4.8% 1983 340 525 865 4332 20% 4.7% 1984 349 535 883 4561 19% 4.6% 1985 351 549 901 4559 20% 4.6% 1986 343 551 894 4564 20% 4.5% 1987 346 574 920 4714 20% 4.5% 1988 367 603 970 4939 20% 4.6% 1989 374 606 980 4983 20% 4.6% 1990 340 624 963 5039 19% 4.5% 1991 347 633 980 4996 20% 4.6% 1992 357 624 981 5093 19% 4.6% 1993 372 667 1040 5185 20% 4.8% 1994 364 668 1032 5258 20% 4.7% 1995 361 678 1039 5314 20% 4.7% 1996 389 710 1099 5501 20% 4.9% 1997 371 719 1090 5575 20% 4.7% 1998 339 759 1097 5622 20% 4.8% 1999 360 762 1122 5682 20% 4.8% 2000 380 805 1185 5867 20% 5.0% 2001 367 805 1172 5759 20% 4.9% 2002 368 835 1204 5809 21% 4.9% 2003 383 847 1230

238

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.8 66.1 142.2 130 60 102.3 37 1,309 0.61 1,033 377 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.0 12.5 34.4 175 64 121.7 44 1,942 0.71 1,353 490 New England 4.2 3.0 9.1 173 56 121.9 43 1,991 0.65 1,402 498 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.5 25.2 175 66 121.7 44 1,926 0.73 1,338 487

239

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,038 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,028 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,041 0.70 1,491 555

240

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 107.0 85.2 211.3 116 47 92.2 36 1,875 0.76 1,493 583 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 153 49 106.6 44 2,501 0.81 1,741 715 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 152 47 115.3 48 2,403 0.75 1,825 768 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 154 50 103.4 42 2,541 0.83 1,710 696

242

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.5 181.2 131 55 103.6 40 1,620 0.68 1,282 491 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 173 60 122.4 47 2,157 0.74 1,526 583 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 168 59 123.1 48 2,094 0.73 1,532 598 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 175 60 122.1 46 2,180 0.75 1,523 578

243

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 86.3 67.5 144.4 134 63 104.7 39 1,437 0.67 1,123 417 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 176 65 125.2 46 2,033 0.75 1,443 533 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 174 61 127.6 46 2,010 0.70 1,471 527 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 177 67 124.5 46 2,040 0.77 1,435 535

244

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 90.5 70.4 156.8 130 58 100.8 39 1,388 0.62 1,080 416 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 179 64 124.4 48 1,836 0.66 1,276 494 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 174 61 121.0 47 1,753 0.62 1,222 475 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.3 28.4 181 65 125.4 48 1,860 0.67 1,292 499

245

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (millionBtu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.1 66.1 144.2 141 64 111.7 40 1,256 0.58 998 356 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 194 67 131.6 46 2,016 0.70 1,365 475 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 181 63 123.9 44 2,018 0.71 1,384 492 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 199 68 134.0 46 2,016 0.69 1,359 470

246

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.3 34.8 199 70 138.3 49 1,874 0.66 1,301 459 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 197 65 134.4 47 1,964 0.65 1,341 466 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 200 72 139.5 49 1,846 0.66 1,288 456

247

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,034 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,023 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,037 0.70 1,491 555

248

The evaluation of retrofit measures in a tall residential building  

SciTech Connect

As part of a joint demonstration effort involving the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Boston Edison Company (BECo), and the Chelsea Housing Authority, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) participated in the evaluation of energy and demand saving retrofits for a tall residential building located in Boston. The thirteen story all-electric building underwent window, lighting, and control renovations in December, 1992. annual energy consumption was reduced by 15% and peak demand fell by 17%. Hourly should building consumption data were available for the comparison of pre- and post- conditions and for calibration of a DOE-2.1D simulation model. The analysis found the window retrofit accounted for 90% of total energy savings and 95% of average demand savings, due to reductions in both conduction and infiltration. Benefits from lighting retrofits were low in cooling months and negligible in winter months due to the increase in the demand for electric resistance heating which was proportional to the reduction in lighting capacity. Finally, the simulation model verified that heating system controls had not been used as intended, and that the utility rate structure would not allow cost savings from the original control strategy. These results and other interesting lessons learned are presented.

Abraham, M.M.; McLain, H.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation.

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

251

Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

252

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

253

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type Fuel Type Petroleum 1.0 Natural Gas 38.8 Coal 0.0 Wood 2.6 Electricity (2) 51.6 Total 94.0 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent (1) 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009, April 2011, Table 3-10, p. 3-9 for stationary combustion emissions; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release,

254

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: HVAC Residential Load...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD for the iPad Carmel Software logo HVAC Residential Load Calcs HD is a comprehensive HVAC heating and cooling load calculation application for the...

255

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar gains with highly insulating windows, which leads to windows with positive heating energy flows offsetting buildingBuilding Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Year Made Number of Buildings (Thousands, 1993) U Factor SHGC Window Window SolarSolar Window Cond Window Infiltration Non-Window Infiltration Other Loads Total Loads Total Loads Window Properties Total Building Heating

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

A soft computing method for detecting lifetime building thermal insulation failures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection of thermal insulation failures in buildings in operation responds to the challenge of improving building energy efficiency. This multidisciplinary study presents a novel four-step soft computing knowledge identification model called IKBIS ...

Javier Sedano; Leticia Curiel; Emilio Corchado; Enrique de la Cal; Jos R. Villar

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hygric Redistribution in Insulated Assemblies: Retrofitting Residential Envelopes Without Creating Moisture Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program has recognized that most of the current housing stock is in need of energy related retrofits. One of the best ways of reducing the space conditioning energy consumption is to improve the thermal performance of the enclosure by adding exterior board foam insulation. This report quantifies the amount of water that can become trapped in the drainage cavity of typical wall systems, and measures the effect of water trapped in the drainage cavity on the moisture content of the sheathing. This study also attempts to explain the discrepancy between hygrothermal simulations and field performance of low permeance, low R-value exterior insulation (e.g. 3/4-in. foil faced polyisocyanurate) in cold climates.

Smegal, J.; Lstiburek, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows (Replacement): $500 Storm Windows: $500 Duct Work: $500 HVAC (Replacement): $250 Building Insulation (Contractor Installed): $500 Building Insulation (Self Installed): $250 Water Heater Insulation: $50 Air Sealing: $500 HVAC Tune-Up: $150 Provider Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation

260

Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector Berkeley Lab's Gas-filled Insulation Rivals Fiber in Buildings Sector October 19, 2011 - 1:10pm Addthis An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as its pink fibrous counterparts with less material in less space. | Photo courtesy of FiFoil, Inc. An insulation worker installs argon-filled panels behind the radiators in the LEED Gold-rated New York Power Authority building in White Plains. The unique construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence

262

Detecting sources of heat loss in residential buildings from infrared imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrared image analysis was conducted to determine the most common sources of heat loss during the winter in residential buildings. 135 houses in the greater Boston and Cambridge area were photographed, stitched, and tallied ...

Shao, Emily Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

Barley, D.

2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

264

Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Section: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop Prices (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 17, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) in the residential section and includes an analysis of installed rooftop prices.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Square footage includes attic, garage, and basement square footage. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. Share of Average Home Size (1) Average Home Size...

266

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards The...

267

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - West Virginia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia West Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in West Virginia Summary West Virginia is proceeding with adoption of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) through the State Fire Commission. No energy analysis was conducted here comparing the current West Virginia code to the 2009 IECC for this reason. However, the West Virginia energy code has been one of the weaker codes in

268

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas Summary Kansas currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Kansas homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $355 to $582 a year for an average new house

269

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Mexico Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $216 to

270

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - South Dakota  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South Dakota South Dakota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in South Dakota Summary South Dakota currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in South Dakota homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $383 to $427 a year for an average

271

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Arizona  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Arizona Summary Arizona is a "home rule" state with no mandatory state-wide energy efficiency code. However, many counties and cities have adopted an energy efficiency code, most often the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The

272

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Right-Suite Residential for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows logo. All-in-one HVAC software performs residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, equipment selection, cost comparison calculations, and geothermal loop design. Also allows you to design your own custom proposals. Used for system design, for sales representation, and for quotation preparations. Buy only what you need. Unused functions are shipped as demos, so the program can grow with your needs. Keywords residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, HVAC equipment selection, system design Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of general HVAC concepts. High level of computer literacy not required. Users Over 10,000 users of Right-J loads.

273

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

274

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2015 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 180.5 34.9 16.6 1.8 53.3 0.6 66.6 301.0 27.4% Space Cooling 0.0 161.1 161.1 14.7% Water Heating 69.6 5.1 3.1 8.2 75.3 153.1 13.9% Lighting 83.7 83.7 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 71.7 71.7 6.5% Electronics (6) 52.0 52.0 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.2 51.6 54.7 5.0% Cooking 11.5 1.8 1.8 17.9 31.1 2.8% Computers 30.0 30.0 2.7% Other (8) 10.6 10.6 149.3 160.0 14.6% Total 264.7 40.1 32.2 1.8 74.0 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 759.1 1,098.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

275

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2010 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 185.5 38.8 18.7 2.2 59.7 0.7 77.6 323.5 26.3% Space Cooling 0.0 210.2 210.2 17.1% Water Heating 68.7 7.1 4.6 11.7 90.4 170.8 13.9% Lighting 126.0 126.0 10.2% Electronics (5) 96.5 96.5 7.8% Refrigeration (6) 80.7 80.7 6.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 2.9 57.8 60.8 4.9% Cooking 11.4 1.9 1.9 42.6 55.9 4.5% Computers 30.5 30.5 2.5% Other (8) 10.2 10.2 36.3 46.5 3.8% Adjust to SEDS (9) 30.1 30.1 2.4% Total 268.5 45.9 35.3 2.2 83.5 0.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 878.7 1,231.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

276

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2035 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (4) 169.7 22.8 14.1 1.5 38.3 0.5 76.7 285.3 23.1% Water Heating 67.2 2.6 2.1 4.7 84.8 156.7 12.7% Space Cooling 0.0 194.5 194.5 15.7% Electronics (5) 68.1 68.1 5.5% Refrigeration (6) 81.5 81.5 6.6% Lighting 74.3 74.3 6.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.5 50.0 53.4 4.3% Cooking 12.2 1.5 1.5 23.2 37.0 3.0% Computers 41.9 41.9 3.4% Other (8) 14.1 14.1 229.6 243.7 19.7% Total 252.7 25.4 31.9 1.5 58.7 0.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): Electricity (3) 924.5 1,236.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

277

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2025 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 173.9 27.9 15.2 1.6 44.7 0.6 73.2 292.3 25.1% Space Cooling 0.0 177.2 177.2 15.2% Water Heating 70.2 3.5 2.5 6.0 83.7 159.9 13.8% Lighting 74.1 74.1 6.4% Refrigeration (5) 75.8 75.8 6.5% Electronics (6) 58.7 58.7 5.1% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.3 47.9 51.2 4.4% Cooking 11.7 1.6 1.6 20.8 34.2 2.9% Computers 37.6 37.6 3.2% Other (8) 12.4 12.4 189.1 201.5 17.3% Total 259.1 31.3 31.8 1.6 64.7 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 838.1 1,162.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

278

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Computerized/Web-Based Occupant Health Survey Instrument Speaker(s): James Craner Date: September 15, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Epidemiological investigation of occupants of a residential or non-industrial workplace building (or building complex) is a well-established, public health method used to identify and measure the nature, distribution, and cause of occupational or environmental illness related to indoor air quality (IAQ) problems or concerns. Such an investigation is particularly useful where disease-exposure associations have not been clearly established and multiple environmental and human factors may be implicated or considered. --The "sick building syndrome"

279

Potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic hot water and space heating and cooling sectors in Lebanon in the period 2010 - 2030.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of thermal insulation and solar thermal energy in domestic water heating, space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings Lebanon is studied (more)

Zaatari, Z.A.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window to wall. The integrated influence result will be different when the building is in different climate zone. This paper studies the variation rule of some aggregative indicators and building energy efficiency rates by simulation and analysis of the same building in different climate zones by eQuest, in order to determine how building energy efficiency works in different climate zones.

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

282

Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

BTS fact sheet: Ryan Homes and the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

Through Building America's unique collaboration process, Ryan Homes, the US Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings worked together to identify ways to incorporate money-saving energy features throughout the Carborne house.

1999-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

SPP sales flyer for residential home builders | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential home builders residential home builders Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

285

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

286

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

287

The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) - A Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) (http://www.carb-swa.com/), one of the 'Building America Energy Efficient Housing Partnership' Industry Teams, for the period January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. The Building America Program (BAP) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program (BTP). The long term goal of the BAP is to develop cost effective, production ready systems in five major climate zones that will result in zero energy homes (ZEH) that produce as much energy as they use on an annual basis by 2020. CARB is led by Steven Winter Associates, Inc. with Davis Energy Group, Inc. (DEG), MaGrann Associates, and Johnson Research, LLC as team members. In partnership with our numerous builders and industry partners, work was performed in three primary areas - advanced systems research, prototype home development, and technical support for communities of high performance homes. Our advanced systems research work focuses on developing a better understanding of the installed performance of advanced technology systems when integrated in a whole-house scenario. Technology systems researched included: - High-R Wall Assemblies - Non-Ducted Air-Source Heat Pumps - Low-Load HVAC Systems - Solar Thermal Water Heating - Ventilation Systems - Cold-Climate Ground and Air Source Heat Pumps - Hot/Dry Climate Air-to-Water Heat Pump - Condensing Boilers - Evaporative condensers - Water Heating CARB continued to support several prototype home projects in the design and specification phase. These projects are located in all five program climate regions and most are targeting greater than 50% source energy savings over the Building America Benchmark home. CARB provided technical support and developed builder project case studies to be included in near-term Joule Milestone reports for the following community scale projects: - SBER Overlook at Clipper Mill (mixed, humid climate) - William Ryan Homes - Tampa (hot, humid climate).

Robb Aldrich; Lois Arena; Dianne Griffiths; Srikanth Puttagunta; David Springer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme  

SciTech Connect

Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

List of Equipment Insulation Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation Incentives Insulation Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 242 Equipment Insulation Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 242) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Central Air conditioners Chillers Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Equipment Insulation Heat pumps Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators Yes AEP Public Service Company of Oklahoma - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program (Oklahoma) Utility Rebate Program Oklahoma Residential Building Insulation

291

Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Building Shell Components Containing Blown Fiber Glass Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material (PCM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different types of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) have been tested as dynamic components in buildings during the last 4 decades. Most historical studies have found that PCMs enhance building energy performance. Some PCM-enhanced building materials, like PCM-gypsum boards or PCM-impregnated concretes have already found their limited applications in different countries. Today, continued improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that throughout Southern and Central US climates, residences may soon be routinely constructed with PCM in order to maximize insulation effectiveness and maintain low heating and cooling loads. The proposed paper presents experimental and numerical results from thermal performance studies. These studies focus on blown fiber glass insulation modified with a novel spray-applied microencapsulated PCM. Experimental results are reported for both laboratory-scale and full-size building elements tested in the field. In order to confirm theoretical predictions, PCM enhanced fiber glass insulation was evaluated in a guarded hot box facility to demonstrate heat flow reductions when one side of a test wall is subjected to a temperature increase. The laboratory work showed reductions in heat flow of 30% due to the presence of approximately 20 wt % PCM in the insulation. Field testing of residential attics insulated with blown fiber glass and PCM was completed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Experimental work was followed by detailed whole building EnergyPlus simulations in order to generate energy performance data for different US climates. In addition, a series of numerical simulations and field experiments demonstrated a potential for application of a novel PCM fiber glass insulation as enabling technology to be utilized during the attic thermal renovations.

Miller, William A [ORNL; Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Bianchi, Marcus V [ORNL; Smith, John B [ORNL; Fellinger, Thomas [ORNL; Kossecka, Elizabeth [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research, Polish Academy of Sciences; Lee, Edwin S [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

to 1,499 24% 1,500 to 1,999 16% 2,000 to 2,499 9% 2,500 to 2,999 7% 3,000 or more 11% Total 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC1-3....

293

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6.9% 5 or more units 2.1% 13.0% 15.0% Mobile Homes 5.1% 1.1% 6.2% Total 70.3% 29.6% 100% Source(s): EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC3-1 and HC4...

294

The Temperature Sensitivity of the Residential Load and Commercial Building Load  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a building modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building heating and cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. A building simulation software are first used to quantify the hourly energy consumption of different building types by end-use and by vintage. Then, the temperature sensitivities are derived based on the climate data inputs.

Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Correia, James; Leung, Lai R.; Wong, Pak C.

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

Application and Design of Residential Building Energy Saving in Cold Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate is the one of main considerations for residential building design since the green and energy saving building has become the trend in the building industry. China is actively popularizing high energy-effective and environment harmonious buildings that integrate new techniques, new materials and new equipment. It is absolutely essential to summarize and demonstrate the application of energy-saving building in cold climates for the sake of a favorable economy and directions in the modern building industry. This paper discusses the cold climate features in China vis--vis the residential building layout, construction, building materials, envelope and cost from the aspects of environmental optimization and energy efficiency. The investigation combines indoor microclimates in order to decrease the building life cycle energy consumption. The air wall technology is studied for adoption of cold climate features. The research results through a National Demonstration Building Project (NDBP) show that the exterior wall total heat transfer coefficient is K=0.3w/(m2.k). Moreover, this four-layer dual heat-preservation exterior wall has more conformability and higher energy efficiency. It is completely successful for energy saving building project NDBP that deserves generalization because of adoption of cold climates features. The application of energy saving buildings can achieve social, environmental and economical benefits.

Li, Z.; Li, D.; Mei, S.; Zhang, G.; Liu, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. The overall analysis found that transforming the U.S. housing stock through the adoption of more energy-efficient building energy codes could create hundreds of jobs in each of several states. The following reports discuss the analysis and results for four representative states. Minnesota Nevada Rhode Island Tennessee *Please note, these reports have been formatted to facilitate double-sided printing. Contacts Web Site Policies

297

Energy management in residential and small commercial buildings. Annual report, fiscal year 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the present program is to develop the technical basis for efficient energy use in space heating of residential and small commercial buildings. Efficiency measurements performed on conventional residential oil-fired hot water heating equipment, including both steady state and cyclic (part load) efficiency determinations are described. A list of preliminary recommendations for retrofit actions to improve efficiency is provided. A summary of work carried out in the areas of thermal storage media, fenestration, and building thermal dynamics is also presented.

Batey, J.; Gazerro, V.; Salzano, F.J.; Berlad, A.L.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

299

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

300

Technical support documentation for the Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) program is designed to identify levels of thermal integrity (e.g., insulation levels, glazing layers, equipment efficiencies, etc.) that are cost effective for typical residential structures and to create a residential energy standard based on these levels. This document contains technical background the explains the data and the algorithms used by the program.

NONE

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has grown. Natural gas is the second largest energy source and petroleum (predominantly heating oil) a distant third. Buildings demand for electricity was the principal force...

302

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For detached residential buildings located in the tropics, it is more challenging and difficult to deal with the space cooling load due to hot and humid climates. In this paper, daily and monthly computer simulations of solar heat gain and cooling load for a detached residential building are carried out using Design Builder software. Different glazing systems ranging from single glazed clear glass to double glaze with electro chromic reflective colored have been analyzed in terms of their impact on solar heat gain and cooling load. The simulation results show reductions in solar heat gain, cooling load and better thermal comfort can be achieved using proper glazing systems for a specific orientation of the building. The significance of these results stems from the fact that they are obtained under local weather conditions, a matter of importance to building architects, designers, contractors, and builders as well as air conditioning equipment manufacturers.

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Insulation as a Part of the Building System If you are designing and constructing a house, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insulation as a Part of the Building System If you are designing and constructing a house, a whole as how to calculate the R-value of the insulation in relation to the other building components's design. A whole- house systems approach considers the interaction between you, your building site, your

304

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 DISCLAIMER: The results contained in this report are complete and accurate to the best of BECP's knowledge, based on information available at the time it was written. BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVEL V Table of Contents 1.0 Chapter 1 Overview of the 2009 IECC ........................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Overview of the 2009 IECC ..................................................................................................................... 1

305

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Improving the Accuracy of Software-Based Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the basic components of software-based energy analysis for residential buildings, explores the concepts of 'error' and 'accuracy' when analysis predictions are compared to measured data, and explains how NREL is working to continuously improve the accuracy of energy analysis methods.

Polly, B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

APPLICATION OF DOE-2 TO RESIDENTIAL BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

One important requirement emerging from national and international efforts to shift from our present energy-intensive way of life to an energy conservation mode is the development of standards for assessing and regulating energy use and performance in buildings. This paper describes a life-cycle-cost approach to Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS) calculated by using DOE-2: The Energy Use Analysis of Buildings Computer Program. The procedure outlined raises important questions that must be answered before the energy budgets devised from this approach can be reliably used as a policy tool, The DOE-2 program was used to calculate the energy consumption in prototype buildings and in their modified versions in which energy conservation measures were effected. The energy use of a modified building with lowest life-cycle-cost determines the energy budget for all buildings of that type. These calculations were based on a number of assumptions that may be controversial. These assumptions regard accuracy of the model, comparison of the DOE-2 program with other programs, stability of the energy budget, and sensitivity of the results to variations in the building parameters.

Lokmanhekim, M.; Goldstein, D. B.; Levine, M. D.; Rosenfield, A. H.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings … August 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings August 2010 Prepared by McGraw-Hill Construction for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy OF ENERGY Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 Chapter One DRIVERS OF ENERGY USE IN BUILDINGS 5 Chapter Two PROFILES OF BUILDING-SECTOR ENERGY USE 13 Chapter Three PATTERNS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDING PRODUCT ADOPTION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDING DESIGN 17 Chapter Four INDUSTRY RESEARCH FINDINGS DRIVING ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 25 Chapter Five ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS, CODES AND INCENTIVES 31 Chapter Six VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS AND LOCAL AND STATE POLICIES FOR GREEN AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 38 Chapter Seven RESOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION 50 Notes and definitions:

309

Energy performance of evacuated glazings in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of evacuated glazings or glazings which maintain a vacuum between two panes of glass. Their performance is determined by comparing results to prototype highly insulated superwindows as well as a more conventional. insulating glass unit with a low-E coating and argon gas fill. We used the DOE2.1E energy analysis simulation program to analyze the annual and hourly heating energy use due to the windows of a prototypical single-story house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Cooling energy performance was also investigated. Our results show that for highly insulating windows, the solar heat gain coefficient is as important as the window`s U-factor in determining heating performance for window orientations facing west-south-east. For other orientations in which there is not much direct solar radiation, the window`s U-factor primarily governs performance. The vacuum glazings had lower heating requirements than the superwindows for most window orientations. The conventional low-E window outperformed the superwindows for southwest-south-southeast orientations These performance differences are directly related to the solar heat gain coefficients of the various windows analyzed. The cooling performance of the windows was inversely related to the heating performance. The lower solar heat gain coefficients of the superwindows resulted in the best cooling performance. However, we were able to mitigate the cooling differences of the windows by using an interior shading device that reduced the amount of solar gain at appropriate times.

Sullivan, R.; Beck, F.; arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy performance of evacuated glazings in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a study investigating the energy performance of evacuated glazings or glazings which maintain a vacuum between two panes of glass. Their performance is determined by comparing results to prototype highly insulated superwindows as well as a more conventional insulating glass unit with a low-E coating and argon gas fill. The authors used the DOE-2.1E energy analysis simulation program to analyze the annual and hourly heating energy use due to the windows of a prototypical single-story house located in Madison, Wisconsin. Cooling energy performance was also investigated. The results show that for highly insulating windows, the solar heat gain coefficient is as important as the window`s U-factor in determining heating performance for window orientations facing west-south-east. For other orientations in which there is not much direct solar radiation, the window`s U-factor primarily governs performance. The vacuum glazings had lower heating requirements than the superwindows for most window orientations. The conventional low-E window outperformed the superwindows for southwest-south-southeast orientations. These performance differences are directly related to the solar heat gain coefficients of the various windows analyzed. The cooling performance of the windows was inversely related to the heating performance. The lower solar heat gain coefficients of the superwindows resulted in the best cooling performance. However, the authors were able to mitigate the cooling differences of the windows by using an interior shading device that reduced the amount of solar gain at appropriate times.

Sullivan, R.; Beck, F.; Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Title Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Vossos, Vagelis, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen Journal Energy and Buildings Volume Volume 68, Part A Pagination 223-231 Date Published 09/2013 Keywords Direct current (DC), energy conservation, Photovoltaics (PV), residential buildings Abstract An increasing number of energy-efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC directly from renewable energy systems, thereby avoiding the energy losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of a 'direct-DC house' compared to that of a typical net-metered house with AC distribution, assuming identical DC-internal loads. The model comparisons were run for 14 cities in the United States, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The model tested the effects of climate and battery storage. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect potential energy savings. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate.

312

New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed

313

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

314

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

315

The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning units in residential buildings, and are using the central air-conditioning system in residential buildings. To determine the best air conditioning mode, a residential tower building with 22 layers was chosen for analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the central air-conditioning system and the residential multi-unit air-conditioning equipment system and the LiBr absorption chiller were compared based on calculating the first-cost and the annual cost (according to providing cooling 90 days annually). The predicted results show the economical feasibility of using the refrigerating units in air-conditioning systems in Beijing region, and point out the developing directions for the future.

Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

317

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

318

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Energy October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings and the Electric Grid An increasing fraction of the most efficient appliances on the market operate on direct current (DC) internally, making it possible to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoid the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back, as is current practice. Products are also emerging on the commercial market that take advantage of that possibility. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers Vagelis Vossos, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen investigated the potential savings of direct-DC power distribution in net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics

319

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Steve Taylor Date: April 20, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Steve Taylor, the principal of Taylor Engineering, will be providing an overview of the envelope, lighting, and HVAC requirements of Standard 90.1. Mr. Taylor is a registered mechanical engineer specializing in HVAC system design, control system design, indoor air quality engineering, computerized building energy analysis, and HVAC system commissioning. He graduated from Stanford University with a BS in Physics and a MS in Mechanical Engineering and has over 20 years of commercial HVAC system design and construction experience. He was the primary author of the HVAC

320

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaps and Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies 2010 Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting Denver, Colorado - July 20 - 22, 2010 August 2010 Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) on residential buildings on a state-by-state basis with a separate, stand-alone chapter for each state. A summary of the requirements of the code is given for each state. The 2009 IECC is then compared to the current state code for most states or typical current construction practice for the states that do not have a residential energy efficiency code. This is the final version of a draft report by the same name that was previously cleared for release (ERICA # PNNL-18545).

Lucas, Robert G.; Cole, Pamala C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 2007 and 2009 Do-It-Yourself Home Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, The Remodeling market in Transition, 2009, Table A.2, p. 30 for 2007; Joint Center for Housing

323

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 2007 and 2009 Professional Home Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, The Remodeling Market in Transition, 2009, Table A.2, p. 30 for 2007; Joint Center for Housing

324

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2009 Home Improvement Spending by Household Income ($2010) Income Under $40,000 $40-79,999 $80-119,999 120,000 and Over Note(s): Source(s): 13,005 4,097 16,531 67,731 Home improvements include room additions, remodeling, replacements of household systems and appliances, porches and garages, additions and replacements of roofing, siding, window/doors, insulation, flooring/paneling/ceiling, and disaster repairs. Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, A New Decade of Growth for Remodeling, 2011, Table A-3, pg. 29; EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for GDP and price deflators. 23,178 6,545 6,841 44,772 14,051 4,299 9,189 39,505 (thousand) (thousand) ($) ($million) 24,675 6,113 5,697 34,825 Number of Homeowners Average Total Homeowners

325

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 2007 Professional and Do-It-Yourself Improvements, by Project ($2010) Total Mean Total Mean Projects Expenditures Expenditures Projects Expenditures Expenditures Repair/Improvement (thousand) ($million) ($) (thousand) ($million) ($) Room Additions, Alterations, and Remodelings Kitchen Bathroom Bedroom Other Systems and Equipment Plumbing (Pipes and Fixtures) Electrical System HVAC Appliance/Major Equipment Exterior Additions and Replacements Roof Siding Windows/Doors Interior Additions and Replacements Insulation Flooring/Paneling/Ceiling Other Interior Disaster Repair Other Additions and Replacements (1) Total (2) Note(s): Source(s): 1) Other additions and replacements include porches, carports, swimming pools and other major improvements or repairs to lot or yard. 2)Total expenditures (professional installation plus do-it-yourself installation) are $1.8 billion higher compared to Table 2.6.1. This

326

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

327

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

328

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … National Residential Efficiency Measures Database  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robust cost data for energy-efficiency Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures provide an essential framework for transforming the housing industry to high-performance homes. These data allow for effective optimization capabilities to guide builders, researchers, HERS raters, contractors, and designers. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy-efficiency measures. The database, called the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, can be found at www.buildingamerica.gov. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective measures to improve the energy efficiency of new and existing residential buildings.

329

Steam Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland  

SciTech Connect

Older heating systems often suffer from mis-investment--multiple contractors upgrading parts of systems in inadequate or inappropriate ways that reduce system functionality and efficiency--or from a lack of proper maintenance. This technical report addresses these barriers to information, contractor resources, and cost-savings. Building off of previous research, CNT Energy conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam; system balancing.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Background to the development process, Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations generated to serve as a primary basis for the Congressionally-mandated residential standard. This report treats only the residential building recommendations.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Assessing the impacts of tropical cyclone Tracy on residential building stock 1974 and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tropical cyclone Tracy (Tracy) remains one of the most destructive natural hazard events in Australias history. Growth in the population and size of Darwin since 1974 makes it desirable to know what impact an event similar to Tracy would have on the present day built environment. To assess the impacts in 1974 and the present day, we apply the Tropical Cyclone Risk Model (TCRM) developed at Geoscience Australia. A parametric wind field generated by TCRM is applied to building damage models in an attempt to reproduce the widespread damage to residential structures associated with Tracy in 1974. Employing these models yields a mean damage estimate of 36 per cent of replacement cost across all residential building stock in Darwin a figure lower than that determined by post-event damage assessments. The unaccounted impact of large windborne debris is one possible explanation for the discrepancy between the observed and simulated damage. Based on the satisfactory replication of the damage associated with the historical impacts of Tracy, the wind field is then applied to the current day residential building database in order to assess the impact of Tracy were it to strike Darwin in 2008. We find that the mean damage to Darwin for the same urban footprint as the 1974 analysis in the present day would be around five per cent. This represents an approximately 90 per cent reduction in the modelled damage, and a significant portion of this reduction can be attributed to building code improvements.

Anthony Schofield; Craig Arthur; Bob Cechet

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

SciTech Connect

China's rapid economic expansion has propelled it into the ranks of the largest energy consuming nation in the world, with energy demand growth continuing at a pace commensurate with its economic growth. Even though the rapid growth is largely attributable to heavy industry, this in turn is driven by rapid urbanization process, by construction materials and equipment produced for use in buildings. Residential energy is mostly used in urban areas, where rising incomes have allowed acquisition of home appliances, as well as increased use of heating in southern China. The urban population is expected to grow by 20 million every year, accompanied by construction of 2 billion square meters of buildings every year through 2020. Thus residential energy use is very likely to continue its very rapid growth. Understanding the underlying drivers of this growth helps to identify the key areas to analyze energy efficiency potential, appropriate policies to reduce energy use, as well as to understand future energy in the building sector. This paper provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis of residential building energy consumption in China using data from a wide variety of sources and a modeling effort that relies on a very detailed characterization of China's energy demand. It assesses the current energy situation with consideration of end use, intensity, and efficiency etc, and forecast the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020, based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity, availability of energy services, technology improvement and energy intensities.

Zhou, Nan; Nishida, Masaru; Gao, Weijun

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

335

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

336

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

337

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

338

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Basement Insulation Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Efficient and durable construction practices are critical for basements because basements can account for 10% to 30% of a home's total heat loss and provide significant risk of moisture problems due to extensive cold surfaces at the walls and slab. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.1 Building Science Solutions Basement Insulation Systems Building America research has provided essential guidance for one of the most challenging construction assemblies in cold-climate high-performance homes. Basements can easily develop mold, rot, and odor problems if not designed properly. Building America researchers have investigated basement insulation systems that keep the space dry, healthy, and odor-free. These systems effectively address the

339

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

340

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Share of Total U.S. Households, by Census Region, Division, and Vintage, as of 2005 Prior to 1950 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Region 1950 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Northeast 6.7% 5.2% 2.4% 2.1% 1.3% 0.8% 18.5% New England 2.1% 1.2% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 4.9% Middle Atlantic 4.6% 4.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.0% 0.5% 13.6% Midwest 5.7% 5.8% 3.6% 2.5% 3.7% 1.7% 23.0% East North Central 4.3% 3.9% 2.7% 1.8% 2.1% 1.1% 16.0% West North Central 1.4% 1.9% 0.9% 0.7% 1.6% 0.6% 7.1% South 4.0% 6.9% 6.4% 7.5% 7.5% 4.3% 36.6% South Atlantic 2.0% 3.4% 3.5% 4.2% 4.3% 2.2% 17.4% East South Central 0.9% 1.3% 0.9% 1.0% 1.3% 0.7% 6.2% West South Central 1.2% 2.3% 4.7% 2.2% 1.8% 1.4% 13.6% West 3.4% 4.6% 4.5% 4.6% 3.1% 1.5% 21.8% Mountain 0.7% 1.2% 1.3% 1.5% 1.3% 0.9% 6.8% Pacific 2.8% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 1.8% 0.6% 15.0% United States 19.9% 22.5% 17.0% 16.7% 15.6% 8.3% 100% Source(s): All Vintages EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Links to Related Government Sites Publications list from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights Program Updated FLEX 3.0 Lighting software solution available from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs Section 3.4 on Lighting and Section 7.2 on Lighting Control can be obtained at this site U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs lights basic training will be completed in FY '98 Lighting mailing list for exchange of information on lighting issues Lights in commercial buildings in the 21st Century List of major areas of expertise at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, illustrated with specific projects

342

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Heating Energy Consumption in a Residential Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In winter, much of the building energy is used for heating in the north region of China. In this study, the heating energy consumption of a residential building in Tianjin during a heating period was simulated by using the EnergyPlus energy simulation program. The study showed that the heat loss from exterior walls, exterior windows and infiltration took three main parts of the total heat loss. Furthermore, the results of on-site measurement are presented with the conclusion that the EnergyPlus program provides sufficient accuracy for this energy simulation application.

Liu, J.; Yang, M.; Zhao, X.; Zhu, N.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Comparison of residential window distributions and effects of mass and insulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy requirements and comfort implications of various window distributions and window areas (representing conventional, sun-tempered, and passive solar designs) are investigated for single-family residences in Albuquerque, NM, Denver, CO, and Madison, WI. Three distinct mass levels ranging from lightweight to heavyweight interiors and three distinct insulation levels, including energy-conserving, night-insulated, and superinsulated cases, are analyzed. Energy requirements are reported for residences with electric resistance heating and mechanical air conditioning. Comfort conditions reported are based on interior average air temperatures and mean-squared errors.

Hannifan, M.; Christensen, C.; Perkins, R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Progress in Residential Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit A geographic representation of saturations of ceiling fans based on data from the RASSes. White areas indicate a lack of data for that region. Many utilities survey their customers to learn more about the buildings and the occupants in their service areas. These surveys-usually called "residential appliance saturation surveys," or RASSes-ask for the number and types of appliances present, the number of people living in the home, and sometimes personal information. The RASSes are also used to collect information about the presence of conservation measures such as wall and ceiling insulation, weatherstripping, multipane windows, and water flow restrictors. Building Energy Analysis Group researchers Alan Meier and Brian Pon gathered RASSes

345

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 U.S. Insulation Demand, by Type (Million Pounds) (1) Insulation Type 1992 2001 2006 (1) Fiberglass 2,938 55% 3,760 54% 4,085 53% Foamed Plastic 1,223 23% 1,775 25% 1,955 26%...

346

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Feasibility of Small-Scale Residential DC Distributionof a DC microgrid for residential houses. In Transmission &energy storage with PV for residential and commercial use.

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of insulation location on initial transient thermal response of building walls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The effect of insulation location on the heat transfer characteristics of building wall elements under initial transient conditions is studied. Thermal performance with an insulation layer placed on the inside of a wall is compared to that when the insulation layer is placed on the outside. The investigation is carried out for the climatic conditions of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during representative days for July and January using a finite-volume implicit procedure. The initial temperature distribution across the wall is assumed to be uniform and equal to the daily mean external air temperature. The numerical model is validated against a semi-analytic solution developed for a simple test case. The results of model application under the present conditions show that placing the insulation on the inside gives an instantaneous load that is about 20 % of the value for outside insulation during the first few hours in the initial transient process. Besides, the duration of the transient process which leads to steady periodic state, and thus, the period of thermal discomfort due to radiation exchange is much shorter for the inside insulation. The average heat transmission over the first 24 hours

Building Walls; Sami A. Al-sanea; M. F. Zedan; Response Of Building Walls; Sami A. Al-sanea; M. F. Zedan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVELBUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVEL Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) recently conducted a nationwide residential energy code analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The analysis compares the requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with the residential codeor typical construction practice in the absence of a codein most states as of June 2009. The results, which include estimated typical energy savings of updating each states code to the 2009 IECC, are provided in this report in chapters specific to each state. An overview of the 2009 IECC and its major chapters, as well as a brief comparison to previous versions, is provided as introductory information. The IECC is then briefly compared to the International Residential Code, which contains a chapter with energy efficiency requirements that are very similar to the IECC. Several states have either not adopted a mandatory energy code or developed their own codes which have minimal or no connection to the IECC. The latterincluding California, Florida, Oregon, and Washington were not included in this analysis as the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to the 2009 IECC and most of these states have energy offices that have already assessed the IECC on their own. Chapter 2 is dedicated to outlining some of the major code differences in the 2009 IECC that are not contained in any previous version of the code, and to which much of the energy savings of the 2009 IECC compared to previous versions is attributable. These energy saving differences are described in further detail in the report,

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

350

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

351

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A. 279 2.7 2000 106 N.A. 282 2.7 2001 107 2% 285 2.7 2002 105 3% 288 2.7 2003 106 5% 290 2.8 2004 107 7% 293 2.7 2005 109 9% 296 2.7 2006 110 11% 299 2.7 2007 110 12% 302 2.7 2008 111 13% 304 2.8 2009 111 13% 307 2.8 2010 114 14% 310 2.7 2011 115 14% 313 2.7 2012 116 15% 316 2.7 2013 117 16% 319 2.7 2014 118 17% 322 2.7 2015 119 18% 326 2.7 2016 120 19% 329 2.7 2017 122 21% 332 2.7 2018 123 22% 335 2.7 2019 125 23% 338 2.7 2020 126 25% 341 2.7 2021 127 26% 345

352

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Thermal Performance of Insulation Fiberglass (2) Perlite/Vermiculite Batts (3) Loose-Fill 2.1 - 3.7 Loose-Fill Foam Boards Spray-Applied Expanded Polystyrene 3.9 - 4.4 Rock Wool (2) Polyisocyanurate/Polyurethane 5.6 - 7.0 Loose-Fill Phenolic 4.4 - 8.2 Cellulose Reflective Insulation 2 - 17 Loose-Fill Vacuum Powder Insulation 25 - 30 Spray-Applied Vacuum Insulation Panel 20 - 100 Note(s): Source(s): 3.1 - 3.7 2.9 - 3.5 1) Hr-SF-F/Btu-in. Does not include the effects of aging and settling. 2) Mineral fiber. 3) System R-Value depends on heat-flow direction and number of air spaces. ASHRAE, 1997 ASHRAE Handbook: Fundamentals, p. 24-4, 22-5; DOE, Insulation Fact Sheet, Jan. 1988, p. 6; Journal of Thermal Insulation, 1987, p. 81-95; ORNL, ORNL/SUB/88-SA835/1, 1990; ORNL, Science and Technology for a Sustainable Energy Future, Mar. 1995, p. 17; and ORNL for vacuum insulation

353

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Maximum Rebate Commercial Green Building: $75,000 Residential Green Building: $100,000 LEED Certification: $30,000 Green Building Rater Incentive: $6,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program

354

Residential sidewall insulation case histories, including experiences and problems in the field application of loose fill  

SciTech Connect

An unbonded fiberglass loose-fill insulation was selected for this sidewall application study. The insert tube technique is described and the parameters that affect pneumatic application of the product are identified. The initial evaluation was conducted in the laboratory and included density and thermal testing. The laboratory results were then utilized in field studies. Ten homes with no sidewall insulation were retrofitted. Thermographic scans of sidewalls before and after retrofit confirmed the predicted reductions in heat loss based on calculation techniques given in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. The improvement was further confirmed by comparing utility bills. Typical problems that occur while preparing a house for sidewall retrofit are discussed. The simple payback for typical houses is presented. Good correlation is shown between laboratory test results and field performance. Test data indicate that the application procedure used gave an effective R-value per product claim.

Infante, L.J.; Aller, P.F.; Fay, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cladding Attachment Over Thick Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Project InformatIon: Project name: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Partners: Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com The Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com James Hardie Building Products www.jameshardie.com Building component: Building envelope component application: New and/or retrofit; Single and/or multifamily Year research conducted: 2011 through 2012 applicable climate Zone(s): All The addition of insulation to the exterior of buildings is an effective means of increasing the thermal resistance of wood-framed walls and mass masonry wall assemblies. The location of the insulation on the exterior of the structure has many direct benefits, including better effective R-value from reduced thermal

357

Assessment of the Energy Rating of Insulated Wall Assemblies - A Step Towards Building Energy Labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerable efforts are recently focusing on energy labeling of components and systems in buildings. In Canada, the energy rating of windows was established, which provides a protocol to rate different types of windows with respect to their energy performance. It takes into account the interaction between: solar heat gain, heat loss due to air leakage and due to the thermal properties of the entire window assembly. A major research project, jointly sponsored by NRC-IRC and the polyurethane spray foam industry, was established to assess the thermal and air leakage performance of insulated walls with the focus on developing an energy rating procedure for insulated wall assemblies. This paper is one in a series of publications to present partial results of this project. Experimental data and computer simulation comparison of a set of wall specimens are presented together with a summary of the proposed procedure for the determination of the energy rating of insulated walls (WER).

Elmahdy, H.; Maref, W.; Saber, H.; Swinton, M.; Glazer, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

teams has provided the critical scientific basis for acceptance of foam sheathing by the codes community and understanding of the best practices for implementation to ensure thermal performance as well as air barrier and drainage plane integrity. Although rigid foam has long been recognized as one of the key Building America technologies for high-R walls, the practice lacked a precise engineering basis for the basic elements of the wall system such as foam thickness, connection schedules, and cladding requirements to resist wind loading. As prescriptive construction provisions in residential building codes came under increased scrutiny in building code forums, the need for a consistent, building-science-based methodology became apparent. Research by the Partnership for Home Innovation, led by the Home

359

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile … Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

teams teams has provided the critical scientific basis for acceptance of foam sheathing by the codes community and an understanding of best practices for installation to ensure thermal performance as well as air barrier and drainage plane integrity. Although rigid foam has long been recognized as one of the key Building America technologies for high-R walls, the practice lacked a precise engineering basis for the basic elements of the wall system such as foam thickness, connection schedules, and cladding requirements to resist wind loading. As prescriptive construction provisions in residential building codes came under increased scrutiny in building code forums, the need for a consistent, building-science-based methodology became apparent. Research by the Partnership for Home Innovation led by the Home

360

Energy and building envelope  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on building thermal insulation, energy efficiency, and solar architecture. Topics considered at the conference include thermal comfort, heating loads, the air change rate in residential buildings, core-insulated external walls, passive solar options, cooling loads, daylighting, solar gain, the energy transmittance of glazings, heat storage units in phase change materials, heat transfer through windows, and rock bed heat storage for solar heating systems.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

362

A Spatial Structural and Statistical Approach to Building Classification of Residential Function for City-Scale Impact Assessment Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to implement robust climate change adaption and mitigation strategies in cities fine spatial scale information on building stock is required. However, for many cities such information is rarely available. In response, we present a methodology ... Keywords: City Spatial Planning and Impact Assessment, Morphological and Spatial Metrics, Multinomial Logistic Regression, Residential Building Classification

Dimitrios P. Triantakonstantis; Stuart L. Barr

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

364

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Title Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5193E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Garbesi, Karina, Vagelis Vossos, Alan H. Sanstad, and Gabriel Burch Document Number LBNL-5193E Pagination 59 Date Published October Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the 'direct-DC house' with respect to today's typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sector-because of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolation-this paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

365

Energy conservation standards for new federal residential buildings: A decision analysis study using relative value discounting  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a reassessment of the proposed standard for energy conservation in new federal residential buildings. The analysis uses the data presented in the report, Economic Analysis: In Support of Interim Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Residential Buildings (June 1988)-to be referred to as the EASIECS report. The reassessment differs from that report in several respects. In modeling factual information, it uses more recent forecasts of future energy prices and it uses data from the Bureau of the Census in order to estimate the distribution of lifetimes of residential buildings rather than assuming a hypothetical 25-year lifetime. In modeling social preferences decision analysis techniques are used in order to examine issues of public values that often are not included in traditional cost-benefit analyses. The present report concludes that the public would benefit from the proposed standard. Several issues of public values regarding energy use are illustrated with methods to include them in a formal analysis of a proposed energy policy. The first issue places a value on costs and benefits that will occur in the future as an irreversible consequence of current policy choices. This report discusses an alternative method, called relative value discounting which permits flexible discounting of future events-and the possibility of placing greater values on future events. The second issue places a value on the indirect benefits of energy savings so that benefits accrue to everyone rather than only to the person who saves the energy. This report includes non-zero estimates of the indirect benefits. The third issue is how the costs and benefits discussed in a public policy evaluation should be compared. In summary, selection of individual projects with larger benefit to cost ratios leads to a portfolio of projects with the maximum benefit to cost difference. 30 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs. (JF)

Harvey, C. (Houston Univ., TX (USA). Coll. of Business Administration); Merkhofer, M.M.; Hamm, G.L. (Applied Decision Analysis, Inc., Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

367

Analyzing the Impact of Residential Building Attributes, Demographic and Behavioral Factors on Natural Gas Usage  

SciTech Connect

This analysis examines the relationship between energy demand and residential building attributes, demographic characteristics, and behavioral variables using the U.S. Department of Energys Residential Energy Consumption Survey 2005 microdata. This study investigates the applicability of the smooth backfitting estimator to statistical analysis of residential energy consumption via nonparametric regression. The methodology utilized in the study extends nonparametric additive regression via local linear smooth backfitting to categorical variables. The conventional methods used for analyzing residential energy consumption are econometric modeling and engineering simulations. This study suggests an econometric approach that can be utilized in combination with simulation results. A common weakness of previously used econometric models is a very high likelihood that any suggested parametric relationships will be misspecified. Nonparametric modeling does not have this drawback. Its flexibility allows for uncovering more complex relationships between energy use and the explanatory variables than can possibly be achieved by parametric models. Traditionally, building simulation models overestimated the effects of energy efficiency measures when compared to actual "as-built" observed savings. While focusing on technical efficiency, they do not account for behavioral or market effects. The magnitude of behavioral or market effects may have a substantial influence on the final energy savings resulting from implementation of various energy conservation measures and programs. Moreover, variability in behavioral aspects and user characteristics appears to have a significant impact on total energy consumption. Inaccurate estimates of energy consumption and potential savings also impact investment decisions. The existing modeling literature, whether it relies on parametric specifications or engineering simulation, does not accommodate inclusion of a behavioral component. This study attempts to bridge that gap by analyzing behavioral data and investigate the applicability of additive nonparametric regression to this task. This study evaluates the impact of 31 regressors on residential natural gas usage. The regressors include weather, economic variables, demographic and behavioral characteristics, and building attributes related to energy use. In general, most of the regression results were in line with previous engineering and economic studies in this area. There were, however, some counterintuitive results, particularly with regard to thermostat controls and behaviors. There are a number of possible reasons for these counterintuitive results including the inability to control for regional climate variability due to the data sanitization (to prevent identification of respondents), inaccurate data caused by to self-reporting, and the fact that not all relevant behavioral variables were included in the data set, so we were not able to control for them in the study. The results of this analysis could be used as an in-sample prediction for approximating energy demand of a residential building whose characteristics are described by the regressors in this analysis, but a certain combination of their particular values does not exist in the real world. In addition, this study has potential applications for benefit-cost analysis of residential upgrades and retrofits under a fixed budget, because the results of this study contain information on how natural gas consumption might change once a particular characteristic or attribute is altered. Finally, the results of this study can help establish a relationship between natural gas consumption and changes in behavior of occupants.

Livingston, Olga V.; Cort, Katherine A.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

Impact of Thermally Insulated Floors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presently in Kuwait the code of practice for energy conservation in the air conditioned buildings implemented by the Ministry of Electricity and Water (MEW) which has been in effect since 1983 has no consideration taken for thermally insulating the floors of residential and commercial buildings with unconditioned basements. As a part of a comprehensive research program conducted by the Building and Energy Technologies Department of Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research for revision of the code this paper analyzes the effect of using un-insulated floors on the peak cooling demand and energy consumption of a middle income residential private villa and a onebedroom multi-story apartment building in Kuwait. These floors typically separate air-conditioned spaces with ambient environment or un-conditioned spaces. This was done using the ESP-r, a building's energy simulation program, in conjunction with typical meteorological year for Kuwait. The study compared such typical floors with three types of insulated floors. It was found that using an R- 10 floors in multi-story apartment buildings greatly reduce both the peak cooling demand as well as the energy consumption by about 15%, whereas only minimal savings (about 4%) were detected in the case of the residential villas.

Alghimlas, F.; Omar, E. A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Information Modeling (BIM) has changed the ways buildings are designed and constructed. Along with design and construction, operation and maintenance of the built facility is also gaining importance in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction industry. Facility management (FM) is widely adopted by industrial, healthcare and other types of commercial facilities for better maintenance and management of assets. BIM is being adopted in the field of Facility management and has become one of the most important tools for better application of operation and maintenance. Facility management is performed by professionals with training and experience in the related fields of building operation, maintenance, upgrade and repair. BIM is a professional tool which requires intense training and knowledge. This tool cannot be used and is hard to understand for non-professionals and people who do not have training to use it. Management of residences is as important as management of commercial, industrial and healthcare facilities for the life and smooth running of such facilities. Residential facilities are properties with one or more residential units or buildings. These buildings could be low rise, high rise or individual units. This thesis will help in analyzing the scope of using BIM and Application Programming Interface (API) for management of maintenance in residences by the owner who are not professionally trained. The research analyzes a single, basic function of a BIM tool to determine the potential for such a tool to help non-expert, first time user to be able to understand their residential facilities maintenance requirements. It is an attempt to propose a system which provides alerts to the owners regarding required maintenance and which shows the location of the work in a 3D model. The system was designed and tested in Microsoft Windows 7 operating system by using Autodesk Revit building information software to make the 3D model, a Revit API plug-in to craft the alerts and show the location of work and Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) to export the model to a web browser. The system worked through Revit program, but the concept of applying the system to work through web browser failed.

Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Potential Job Creation in Nevada as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Potential Job Creation in Minnesota as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

379

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The current insulation of the building was compared to improved insulation to meet the ResidentialLIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF THE H.R. MACMILLAN BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Ivan Yip.R. MacMillan building at the University of British Columbia (UBC). This study, completed in conjunction

380

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database National Residential Efficiency Measures Database This photo shows a man in a white hazardous materials suit blowing insulation inside of an attic. He is wearing a headlamp on his head and the beam shines in the general direction of the insulation tube he is holding. Home improvement can be expensive. The good news is that many energy efficiency improvements quickly pay for themselves in energy savings. Having accurate and consistent performance and cost data for energy efficiency measures enables researchers and the building industry to determine the most cost-effective means of improving existing homes all across the nation. The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and associated estimated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies in Residential Building Codes: June 15, 1998 to September 15, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report is an attempt to describe the building code requirements and impediments to the application of EE and RE technologies in residential buildings. Several modern model building codes were reviewed. These are representative of the codes that will be adopted by most locations in the coming years. The codes reviewed for this report include: International Residential Code, First Draft, April 1998; International Energy Conservation Code, 1998; International Mechanical Code, 1998; International Plumbing Code, 1997; International Fuel Gas Code, 1997; National Electrical Code, 1996. These codes were reviewed as to their application to (1) PV systems in buildings and building-integrated PV systems and (2) active solar domestic hot water and space-heating systems. A discussion of general code issues that impact these technologies is also included. Examples of this are solar access and sustainability.

Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Measured energy savings from the application of reflective roofsin 2 small non-residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Energy use and environmental parameters were monitored in two small (14.9 m{sup 2}) non-residential buildings during the summer of 2000. The buildings were initially monitored for about 1 1/2 months to establish a base condition. The roofs of the buildings were then painted with a white coating and the monitoring was continued. The original solar reflectivities of the roofs were about 26%; after the application of roof coatings the reflectivities increased to about 72%. The monitored electricity savings were about 0.5kWh per day (33 Wh/m2 per day). The estimated annual savings are about 125kWh per year (8.4 kWh/m2); at a cost of $0.1/kWh, savings are about $0.86/m2 per year. Obviously, it costs significantly more than this amount to coat the roofs with reflective coating, particularly because of the remote locations of these buildings. However, since the prefabricated roofs are already painted green at the factory, painting them a white (reflective) color would bring no additional cost. Hence, a reflective roof saves energy at no incremental cost.

Akbari, Hashem

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential electricity consumption, a simplified approach was used to determine plausible future penetration rates

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

386

Saving energy in occupied buildings: results from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory residential data bases  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes results to date from the residential portion of the Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) project, comprising findings from several hundred studies of new and retrofitted buildings. The following are discussed for both new and retrofitted homes: (1) energy savings and the range of savings for given types of measures; (2) cost and cost-effectiveness of various measures; and (3) methodology. In existing residences, data compiled from roughly 70 retrofit projects, with sample sizes that range from 1 to 33,000 homes, strongly indicate that retrofits often significantly reduce annual space heating energy consumption. But, results are highly variable. The maximum energy savings from individual measures installed in different households are 3 to 7 times greater than the median value. Nineteen conservation programs sponsored by utilities achieved annual space heat savings of 38.5 million Btu at an average investment level of $1050. Twenty-nine of 215 new homes in our BECA-A database have detailed sub-metered data that permits normalization of space heat loads for both indoor temperature and internal gains. In these homes, the standardized heating energy requirement ranges from 10 to 25 kBtu/ft/sup 2/ over various climatic regions, a value that is roughly 50% less than current building practice.

Goldman, C.A.; Wagner, B.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing and Improving the Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings B. Polly, N. Kruis, and D. Roberts July 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

388

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

389

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

NREL's Field Data Repository Supports Accurate Home Energy Analysis (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Data Field Data Repository Supports Accurate Home Energy Analysis The Residential Buildings Research Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a repository of research-level residential building characteristics and historical energy use data to support ongoing efforts to improve the accuracy of residential energy analysis tools and the efficiency of energy assessment processes. The Field Data Repository currently includes data collected from historical programs where residential building characteristics (building geometry, insulation levels, equipment types, etc.), generally collected through energy audits, have been connected to measured energy use. With an emphasis on older homes, the repository contains datasets from Home Energy Rating System

391

Insulation Strategies to Meet Upcoming Code and Above Code Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Strategies to Meet Insulation Strategies to Meet Upcoming Code and Above Code Programs 1 Christopher Little, BASF Corporation, Center for Building Excellence 3/2/2012 Presentation Overview Innovative insulating & wall assembly strategies  Typical assembly  New innovations  Features & benefits of each 2 3/2/2012 Typical Site Built Residential Wall Concept: Site built wood frame wall with exterior sheathing and batt insulation Components:  Exterior Finish (bulk moisture control)  Building wrap  Exterior sheathing 2x4 Studs @16" O.C.  Batt Insulation (+/- 3.7 R per inch)  Gypsum board Benefits: Relatively low cost ICF Site-built 3 3/2/2012 Typical Site Built Residential Wall Key performance deficiencies  Low effective R-value  Difficulty meeting IECC 2012 R-value

392

Highly Insulating Window Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window Technology Window Technology Temperature differentials across a window, particularly with cold exterior environments in residential buildings, can lead to significant energy losses. Currently available low-emissivity coatings, gas-fills, and insulating frames provide significant energy savings over typical single or double glazed products. The EWC website provides information on how double glazed low-e gas-filled windows work as well as information on commercially available superwindows (three layer, multiple low-e coatings, high performance gas-fills). The next generation of highly insulating window systems will benefit from incremental improvements being made to current components (i.e. more insulating spacers and frame materials/designs, low-e coatings with improved performance properties). LBNL uses its experimental facilities and software tools to collaborate with window and glass industry representatives to better understand the impacts of new components on overall product performance.

393

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

8 8 2009 Sales Price and Construction Cost Breakdown of an Average New Single-Family Home ($2010) (1) Function Finished Lot 20% Construction Cost 59% Financing 2% Overhead & General Expenses 5% Marketing 1% Sales Commission 3% Profit 9% Total 100% Function Building Permit Fees 2% Impact Fees 1% Water and Sewer Inspection 2% Excavation, Foundation, & Backfill 7% Steel 1% Framing and Trusses 16% Sheathing 2% Windows 3% Exterior Doors 1% Interior Doors & Hardware 2% Stairs 1% Roof Shingles 4% Siding 6% Gutters & Downspouts 0% Plumbing 5% Electrical Wiring 4% Lighting Fixtures 1% HVAC 4% Insulation 2% Drywall 5% Painting 3% Cabinets, Countertops 6% Appliances 2% Tiles & Carpet 5% Trim Material 3% Landscaping & Sodding 3% Wood Deck/Patio 1% Asphalt Driveway 1% Other 9% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): NAHB, Breaking Down House Price and Construction Costs, 2010, Table 1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price

394

Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Insulation A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 2012 May 2012 * PNNL-20972 BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 17. R BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES Energy Renovations Volume 17: Insulation A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael C. Baechler, Project Manager K. T. Adams, M. G. Hefty, and T. L. Gilbride and Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pat M. Love May 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program PNNL-20972 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 Contract DE-AC05-76RLO 1830 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the

395

A procedure for analyzing energy and global warming impacts of foam insulation in U.S. commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to develop a procedure for evaluating the energy and global warming impacts of alternative insulation technologies for US commercial building applications. The analysis is focused on the sum of the direct contribution of greenhouse gas emissions from a system and the indirect contribution of the carbon dioxide emission resulting from the energy required to operate the system over its expected lifetime. In this paper, parametric analysis was used to calculate building related CO{sub 2} emission in two US locations. A retail mail building has been used as a model building for this analysis. For the analyzed building, minimal R-values of insulation are estimated using ASHRAE 90.1 requirements.

Kosny, J.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Desjarlais, A.O.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Methodology for Residential Building Energy Simulations Implemented in the International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2001, Texas has been proactive in initiating clean air and energy efficiency in building policies. The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan legislation (SB 5, 77TH Leg., 2001) mandates statewide adoption of energy codes, creates a 5% annual energy savings goal for public facilities in affected counties through 2007 and provides approximately $150 million in cash incentives for clean diesel emissions grants and energy research. The Texas Legislation extended this annual electric reduction goal in public facilities through 2013. Texas was the first state in the nation to create NOx emissions reduction credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy through the State Implementation Plan under the Federal Clean Air Act. This paper presents the methodology for calculating the energy usage from a proposed residential house and the corresponding 2001 International Energy Conservation Code baseline house. This methodology is applied in the International Code Compliance Calculator, which is a publicly accessible web-based energy code compliance software developed by the Energy Systems Laboratory based on the Texas Building Energy Performance Standards. This calculator evaluates and certifies above-code compliance for homes in Texas. It also calculates NOx, SOx and CO2 emissions reductions from the energy savings of the proposed house for the electric utility associated with the user using the data from the Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database provided by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.; Gilman, D.; Montgomery, C.; McKelvey, K.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the Topical Report documenting the first year of work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under US Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project is being conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser Company, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August, 2002 through October, 2003. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that will monitor long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. In the first year WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, and installed instrumentation in the test walls. By the end of the contract period described in this document, WSU was recording data from the test wall specimens. The experiment described in this report will continue through December, 2005. Each year a number of reports will be published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results will be made available to the building industry by industry partners and the University cooperators.

Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Energy "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update (DOE/EA-1871) March 16, 2011 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update

399

A review of vacuum insulation research and development in the Building Materials Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the development work on flat-vacuum insulation performed by the Building Materials Group (BMG) in the Metals and Ceramics Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the last two years. A historical review of the technology of vacuum insulation is presented, and the role that ORNL played in this development is documented. The ORNL work in vacuum insulation has been concentrated in Powder-filled Evacuated Panels (PEPs) that have a thermal resistivity over 2.5 times that of insulating foams and seven times that of many batt-type insulations, such as fiberglass. Experimental results of substituting PEPs for chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) foal insulation in Igloo Corporation ice coolers are summarized. This work demonstrated that one-dimensional (1D) heat flow models overestimated the increase in thermal insulation of a foam/PEP-composite insulation, but three-dimensional (3D) models provided by a finite-difference, heat-transfer code (HEATING-7) accurately predicted the resistance of the composites. Edges and corners of the ice coolers were shown to cause the errors in the 1D models as well as shunting of the heat through the foam and around the PEPs. The area of coverage of a PEP in a foam/PEP composite is established as an important parameter in maximizing the resistance of such composites. 50 refs., 27 figs,. 22 tabs.

Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.; Childs, K.W.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Revision of the UK Pipe Insulation Standard: - Its Likely Effect on Building Energy Efficiency and the Uptake of Highly Efficient Insulation Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UK Government has set an ambitious target of a 20% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2010 based on a 1990 baseline. Since buildings account for over 40% of current CO2 emissions, the revision of building and building services insulation standards has been a high priority. The previous UK pipe insulation standard (BS 5422 - 1990) was based on an economic thickness methodology that resulted in thickness requirements for different materials of unequal energy saving value. The 2001 revision (BS 5422 - 2001) not only addresses this imbalance by defining environmental thicknesses that deliver equivalent energy savings but also increases the potential to reduce CO2 emissions by up to 5 million tonnes per annum. To stimulate this potential, the UK Government has introduced a tax incentive under the existing Capital Allowances scheme to promote the widespread adoption of the new standard in both new build and, more importantly, in renovation projects. Just as importantly, the new standard highlights the true cost-effectiveness of highly efficient insulation materials such as phenolic foam. Phenolic foam had already gained more than a 15% market share in the UK pipe insulation market prior to the recent changes to the standard on the basis of its excellent thermal resistance and fire properties. However, previous economic thickness models had promoted the use of less efficient materials with a poorer level of energy saving being the result. With this loophole now closed, the phenolic foam industry believes that its product will receive the acclamation that it deserves - while helping the UK Government to meet its own CO2 targets.

Ashford, P.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Crawlspace Insulation: Technology Fact Sheet; Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to manage moisture in the crawlspace, insulate crawlspace walls, insulate underflooring, handle ventilation, and manage radon.

Southern Energy Institute

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Recommendations for 2009 IECC 15% Above Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 79th Legislature (2005) the Energy Systems Laboratory was required to develop three alternative methods for achieving 15% above-code energy savings in new residential, commercial and industrial construction. The Laboratory continues to work closely with code officials, energy raters, manufacturers, state officials and other stakeholders to develop cost effective energy efficiency measures. This report presents detailed information about the recommendations for achieving 15% above-code energy performance, which are based on the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), for single-family residences across the State of Texas. To estimate above-code savings (%) of energy efficiency measures, total source energy savings from heating, cooling, lighting, equipment, and DHW were considered for emissions reductions determination. The recommendations were developed for three 2009 IECC climate zones in Texas along with simple payback calculations. This information is useful to homebuilders, utility demand side energy managers, homeowners and others who wish to construct residential buildings that exceed the minimum national energy code requirements. The analysis was performed using an ESL simulation model based on the DOE-2.1e simulation of a 2009 IECC code-compliant, single family residence and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for seventeen counties in Texas for which TMY2 data is available. According to 2009 IECC Climate Zone, seventeen counties were categorized into three climate zones: Climate Zone 2, 3, and 4, and the 2009 IECC code-compliance base-case models were constructed for each climate zone. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) natural gas (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) electricity (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). A total of eighteen measures based on the energy savings above the base-case house were selected. These measures include building envelope and fenestration, HVAC system, domestic hot water (DHW) system, lighting and renewable options. The implementation costs of each individual measure were also calculated along with simple payback calculations. These measures were then combined to achieve the total source energy savings of the group is 15% above the base-case 2009 code-compliant house. As a result, three example combinations were proposed for each base case ((a) electric/gas house and (b) all-electric house) in each climate zone. Each combination was formed to have a different payback period. Finally, the corresponding emissions savings of each combination were calculated based on the eGrid for Texas.

Kim, H.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

404

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Arizona Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Scottsdale Scottsdale's Green Building Program, established in 1998, was the first such program in Arizona with an emphasis on residential home construction.

405

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... building materials; thermal conductivity; databases; insulation; building technology; density; fibrous glass; guarded hot plate; heat flow; insulation ...

406

Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

Kleinfelder, W.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental assessment in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 7  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to identify the potential environmental impacts that could result from the proposed voluntary residential standard (VOLRES) on private sector construction of new residential buildings. In this report, the scope, objectives, and approach of this EA are presented.

NONE

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Economic analysis in support of proposed interim energy conservation voluntary performance standards for new non-federal residential buildings: Volume 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to present an analysis of the impacts of the proposed voluntary energy conservation standard fr the construction of new residential buildings. This analysis examines the impacts of having the proposed residential standard apply immediately and, alternatively, having the proposed standard phased in over a five-year period.

NONE

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optimizing Hydronic Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boiler Optimization Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org; Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com; HTP, www.htproducts.com; Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com; Grundfos, us.grundfos.com; Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com; Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Space heating, water heating Application: New; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): 4,5,6,7 PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $6,100-$8,200 Projected Energy Savings:

410

Sensitivity analysis of window characteristics and their interactions on thermal performance in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the effects of different window characteristics such as area, conductance and shading on annual energy performance in residential buildings. A single parameter analysis is used to quantify the effect on annual energy due to a change in an individual parameter. However misconceptions about these effects (without regard to the values of the other parameters of the window) lead to predictions that overestimate or underestimate actual savings by neglecting interactions that exist between the parameters. The effect of interactions of two parameter changes is determined in this study using a two parameter analysis technique. This technique uses the difference between changes in annual energy of a parameter at different values of an associated parameter to determine the importance of the interaction effect between the parameters. This interaction effect is used as a measure to determine the important two parameter changes in different orientations for six different climates. The interactions were shown to have significant effects on predicted energy reductions in the six climates studied.

George, Julie N

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation  

SciTech Connect

This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Predicting natural ventilation in residential buildings in the context of urban environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Induced Ventila- tion in Shielded Buildings. Report, Central Building Research Institute, Roorkee, India.

Sharag-Eldin, A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S.P. Jamieson, DC Microgrids: Benefits and Barriers.of direct-DC and DC microgrids in residential and commercial

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Estimate Window % of Space Conditioning Use Original LBNLfactors to estimate space conditioning energy consumptionof Energy, in 2003 space conditioning in residential and

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Renewables and Efficiency: Net Metering Policies SummaryDC residential distribution. Net-Metering Because the gridgrid-connected [33]. Net metering makes grid-connected PV

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Combined Heat and Power for Saving Energy and Carbon in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This section describes four micro CHP prime movers. Eachtime frame, the Stirling micro-CHP packages are targeted toComparison of residential micro CHP technologies to separate

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Recommendations for energy conservation standards for new residential buildings - volume 3: Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Conservation for New Buildings Act of 1976, as amended, 42 U.S.C Section 6831 et. seq. requires the US Department of Energy to issue energy conservation standards for the design of new residential and commercial buildings. The standards will be mandatory only for the design of new federal buildings, and will serve as voluntary guidelines for the design of new non-federal buildings. This report documents the development and testing of a set of recommendations, from the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Special Projects Committee No. 53, designed to provide the technical foundation for the Congressionally-mandated energy standard for new residential buildings. The recommendations have been developed over the past 25 months by a multidisciplinary project team, under the management of the US Department of Energy and its prime contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Volume III -- Introduction and Background to the Standard Development Effort is a description of the Standard development process and contains the rationale for the general approach and specific criteria contained within the recommendations.

Not Available

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance for innovative passive and active solar building components for residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A system-based framework creates the ability to integrate operational, aesthetic, and construction process performance. The framework can be used to evaluate innovations within residential construction. By reducing the ...

Settlemyre, Kevin (Kevin Franklin), 1971-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the buildings/commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Expert Meeting Report: Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assembliesessment of risk factors for premature building deterioration due to interior insulation retrofits, and methods to reduce such risks.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Interior Insulation Retrofit of Mass Masonry Wall Assemblies on July 30, 2011 at the Westford Regency Hotel in Westford, MA. This report outlines the extensive information that was presented on ass

422

Exterior Insulation and Overclad Retrofits  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exterior Insulation & Overclad Exterior Insulation & Overclad Retrofits Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 - Austin, TX Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 | Austin, TX 2  Incredible practical experience:  New construction - nearly a century  Retrofit applications - many decades Exterior Insulation Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 | Austin, TX 3 1980s ON - a "weird" builder Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 | Austin, TX 4 1990s ON - a "good" builder Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 | Austin, TX 5 2000s ON - a "typical" builder Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 2, 2012 | Austin, TX 6

423

Modeling with finite element the convective heat transfer in civil building EPS insulated walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the analysis of convective heat transfer in the walls of a house insulated with polystyrene. In the first part we make an evaluation of the insulation that is currently used in the houses. We start the simulation using a real ... Keywords: convective heat transfer, dew-point, finite element, polystyrene insulation

Madalina Xenia Calbureanu; Mihai Lungu; Dragos Tutunea; Raluca Malciu; Alexandru Dima

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the influence of Indoor Environmental Quality, [IEQ] requirements associated with occupation regimes on the criterion of energy demand s for HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning) central systems that were constructed for student hostels as a residential building in Cairo, Egypt. The paper focuses on the effects of occupation rate profiles with IEQ thermal parameters; (those are air dry-bulb temperatures, relative humidity, fresh air requirements, and local air velocities), on yearly energy demands. It is applied on, in-service, real project as a case study "10-Stories Hostel of 6000 m2 built-up area" that is utilized by Non-Local students as a transferred Egyptian citizens [ EC ] from different governorates. It was concluded that. during energy simulation, occupation rate schedules and operation profiles for each source of heat inside space shall simulate the reality. These profiles and schedules should be added to the local energy code as a guideline for designers. Although in this case study results from simulation task reach the real bills, but sometimes, with multi-use apartments there is another required schedule for the Pre-Action days. Those days before holidays and feasts on which the air conditioning system shall operate in a certain procedure for cleaning or scavenging. Another important issue is the effect of Effective Temperatures [ET] (Temperature for constant thermal sensations) that could implement to reduce the cooling capacity by increasing the room temperature against indoor relative humidity for the same comfort sensation. These two concepts will save 17% to 22% of the project total energy demand, In addition to introducing new design criteria for acceptable indoor conditions in the new rural developed zones in Egypt and similar regions.

Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part III. Residential studies in Colorado and Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

Formaldehyde levels were measured in homes in problem and non-problem areas in Wisconsin and Colorado to elucidate the severity and the extent of formaldehyde emission under field conditions, help correlate laboratory findings with field observations, and investigate the cause and effect relationship between insulation stability and weather conditions of an area. Methods for selecting homes and sampling are described. Interviews were conducted with occupants of the homes and the data are tabulated. Results are summarized. Investigation forms are shown and weather information in Denver and Wisconsin is tabulated. (MCW)

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored this project to estimate potential energy and monetary savings resulting from the implementation of light-colored roofs on residential and commercial buildings in major U.S. metropolitan areas. Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, so they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typically, rooftops in the United States are dark, and thus there is a potential for saving energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. Naturally, the expected savings are higher in southern, sunny, and cloudless climates. In this study, we make quantitative estimates of reduction in peak power demand and annual cooling electricity use that would result from increasing the reflectivity of the roofs. Since light-colored roofs also reflect heat in the winter, the estimates of annual electricity savings are a net value corrected for the increased wintertime energy use. Savings estimates only include direct reduction in building energy use and do not account for the indirect benefit that would also occur from the reduction in ambient temperature, i.e. a reduction in the heat island effect. This analysis is based on simulations of building energy use, using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Our methodology starts with specifying 11 prototypical buildings: single-family residential (old and new), office (old and new), retail store (old and new), school (primary and secondary), health (hospital and nursing home), and grocery store. Most prototypes are simulated with two heating systems: gas furnace and heat pumps. We then perform DOE-2 simulations of the prototypical buildings, with light and dark roofs, in a variety of climates and obtain estimates of the energy use for air conditioning and heating.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Gartland, L. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Evaluation of solar gain through skylights for inclusion in the SP53 residential building loads data base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy performance of skylights is similar to that of windows in admitting solar heat gain, while at the same time providing a pathway for convective and conductive heat transfer through the building envelope. Since skylights are typically installed at angles ranging from 0{degrees} to 45{degrees}, and differ from windows in both their construction and operation, their conductive and convective heat gains or losses, as well as solar heat gain, will differ for the same rough opening and thermal characteristics. The objective of this work is to quantify the impact of solar gain through skylights on building heating and cooling loads in 45 climates, and to develop a method for including these data into the SP53 residential loads data base previously developed by LBL in support of DOE`s Automated Residential Energy Standard (ARES) program. The authors used the DOE-2.1C program to simulate the heating and cooling loads of a prototypical residential building while varying the size and solar characteristics of skylights and windows. The results are presented as Skylight Solar Loads, which are the contribution of solar gains through skylights to the overall building heating and cooling loads, and as Skylight Solar Load Ratios, which are the ratios of skylight solar loads to those for windows with the same orientation. The study shows that skylight solar loads are larger than those for windows in both heating and cooling. Skylight solar cooling loads are from three to four times greater than those for windows regardless of the skylight tilt, except for those facing north. These cooling loads are largest for south-facing skylights at a tilt angle of approximately 20{degrees}, and drop off at higher tilts and other orientations.

Hanford, J.W.; Huang, Y.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Where and how much : density scenarios for the residential build-out of Gaoming, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author will use Gaoming District in the western part of China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) as an opportunity to examine the impact a range of residential densities along planned public transportation corridors can have ...

Hu, Karen Jia Ying

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Achieving real transparency : optimizing building energy ratings and disclosure in the U.S. residential sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential energy efficiency in the U.S. has the potential to generate significant energy, carbon, and financial savings. Nonetheless, the market of home energy upgrades remains fragmented, and the number of homes being ...

Nadkarni, Nikhil S. (Nikhil Sunil)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

About Residential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » About Residential Residential Buildings » About Residential About Residential The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with home builders, energy professionals, state and local governments, utilities, product manufacturers, educators, and researchers to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. Residential Sector Activities Include: Demonstrating to builders and remodelers how to build and renovate for high performance through best practice guides and case studies and continuing to developing innovative whole-house energy efficiency solutions through Building America research projects. We also provide guidelines and tools for researchers conducting building related research projects. Promoting a trusted, whole-house process for upgrading existing homes with

433

In Proc. 1996 ACEEE Summer Study, August 1996, Asilomar, CA. Energy Effectiveness of Duct Sealing and Insulation in Two Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Duct Sealing and Insulation in Two Multifamily Buildings Iain S. Walker, Mark P. Modera, Adrian Tuluca forced air distribution systems have a significant impact on the energy efficiency of buildings. Little work has been done to quantify these losses in apartment buildings. In this paper we will discuss field

434

Sound insulation in buildings: linking theory and University of Liverpool, School of Architecture, Abercromby Square, L69 7ZN Liverpool, UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sound insulation in buildings: linking theory and practice C. Hopkins University of Liverpool exist to predict sound and vibration transmission across some, but not all types of building element over the building acoustics frequency range. For this reason, laboratory measurements remain important

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential energy consumption. Field Study of the Effect of Wall Mass on the Heating and Cooling Loads of Residential Buildings. ...

436

Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terms of age, building size, and insulation levels, we alsoshowed that insulation levels for pre-1980 buildings werebuildings, based on combinations of roof and wall insulation

Wenzel, T.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residential building energy analysis : development and uncertainty assessment of a simplified model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective design of energy-efficient buildings requires attention to energy issues during the preliminary stages of design. To aid in the early consideration of a building's future energy usage, a simplified building energy ...

Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Slab Insulation: Technology Fact Sheet; Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet for homeowners and contractors on how to insulate slab-on-grade floors and control moisture, air leakage, termites, and radon.

Southern Energy Institute

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

Dynamic predictive clothing insulation models based on outdoor air and indoor operative temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clothing Insulation Models on Building Energy Use, HVACinsulation for mechanically conditioned buildings andclothing insulation calculated for each building). Figure 8

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thermal Insulation Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... IN. Knauf Insulation Product Testing Laboratory, Shelbyville, IN [200883- 0] MI. Dow Chemical Building Solutions Product Perf. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Owens Corning Acoustic & Insulation Product Testing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Insulation. [01/T10] ASTM C687 Thermal Resistance of Loose-Fill Building Insulation. Acoustical Testing Services. Accreditation ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

443

EnergyPlus Analysis Capabilities for Use in California Building Energy Efficiency Standards Development and Compliance Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in terms of building shell insulation, evaporator fanwarehouse: building shell insulation, evaporator fanwarehouse: building shell insulation, evaporator fan

Hong, Tianzhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boilers, Building Insulation, CustomOthers pending approval, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Heat recovery,...

447

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

448

AB 758 MANDATED COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS A. Legislative Requirements AB 758 requires the Energy Commission to develop and nonresidential building stock. The program will be established through regulations; the Energy Commission by the current California Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6). The Legislature recognizes

449

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenElectricity price escalation rates for the residentialelectricity rate that is 20% higher than the average statewide residential

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Building America Top Innovations 2013 Profile Exterior Rigid Insulation Best Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Field and lab studies by BSC, PHI, and Northern Star characterize the thermal, air, and vapor resistance properties of rigid foam insulation and describe best practices for their use on walls, roofs, and foundations.

451

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

452

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

453

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy cost reduction programs. One of the best places to start with energy conservation is to employ proper insulation systems. This article discusses the significant properties of thermal insulation materials primarily for industrial application. Some of the information is applicable to commercial and residential insulation. Only hot service conditions will be covered.

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Technologies for Energy Efficiency in Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the ideas and opinions expressed by a variety of experts related to the basic science research needs for improving the energy efficiency of end-use technologies for the residential and commercial sectors. The experts participating in this project come from a wide range of institutions, including government research laboratories, universities, state and federal energy agencies, private research laboratories, industry consultants, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) member electri...

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

456

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

457

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide estimates of residential use from public supplies in 2000. This value was estimated based on the residential portion of public supply in 1995 and applied to the total public supply water use in 2000. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

458

Figure 6. Type of Homes by Insulation, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home >>Residential Home Page>>Insulation > Figure 6. Type of Homes by Insulation, 2001. To Top. Contacts: Specific questions may be directed to:

459

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

460

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the direct-DC house with respect to todays typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sectorbecause of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolationthis paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

Garbesi, Karina; Vossos, Vagelis; Sanstad, Alan; Burch, Gabriel

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building insulation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Energy Benchmarking And Energy Saving Assessment In High-Rise Multi-Unit Residential Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of energy benchmarking is to promote efficient use of energy. Knowing that the energy used by a building is excessive is the first (more)

Huang, Yirong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (2005).Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. : http://for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 2: 1995 Residential Buildings, Appliances, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the region, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how to best narrow a research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with residential market profiles for 10 regions in the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funders m...

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Market Profiles: Volume 2: 1998 Residential Buildings, Appliances, and Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy use and equipment profiles at the regional, segment, and end-use levels provide key information required to lay the groundwork for major marketing decisions. These decisions include how desirable a market is for utility entry, how quickly to enter a market, and how to best narrow a research focus. This study provides utility managers and decision makers with residential market profiles for ten regions of the United States. This report is available only to funders of Program 101A or 101.001. Funder...

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Comparison of the 2003 and 2006 International Energy Conservation Codes to Determine the Potential Impact on Residential Building Energy Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The IECC was updated in 2006. As required in the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1992, Title 3, DOE has a legislative requirement to "determine whether such revision would improve energy efficiency in residential buildings" within 12 months of the latest revision. This requirement is part of a three-year cycle of regular code updates. To meet this requirement, an independent review was completed using personnel experienced in building science but not involved in the code development process.

Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Appliance & Equipment Standards...

467

Advanced thermal insulation for energy efficient buildings : structural performance of aerogel composite panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerogels are well known as exceptional thermal insulators. Thermal conductivities of 9 to 10 mW/m.K have been achieved at atmospheric pressure, and a moderate vacuum (between 1/3 and 1/10 of an atmosphere) can lower this ...

Goutierre, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sherman, M.H. (2008). Energy Implications of Meeting ASHRAE62.2, ASHRAE Transactions, June 2008, Vol. 114, Pt. 2, pp.and Sustainable Buildings, ASHRAE. Orme, M. 1998. "Energy

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The Potential of Vegetation in Reducing Summer Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of trees and other vegetation to reduce building cooling loads has been recorded in a number of studies but the meso- and microclimate changes producing such savings are not well understood. This paper describes a preliminary ...