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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Residential Building Industry Consulting Services Place New York, NY Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Residential Building Industry Consulting Services is a company located in New York, NY. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Residential_Building_Industry_Consulting_Services&oldid=381757" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations What links here Related changes Special pages

2

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

3

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

4

Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

5

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost- effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. This database: * Provides information in a standardized format. * Improves the technical consistency and accuracy of the results of software programs. * Enables experts and stakeholders to view the retrofit information and provide comments to improve data

6

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

7

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Residential Buildings Integration Program Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

8

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

9

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About Residential About Residential Building Programs to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat.

10

Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings Residential programs work with residential energy efficiency programs and their partners to improve homeowners' lives, the economy, and the...

11

Energy Department Announces $5 Million for Residential Building...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Research and University-Industry Partnerships Energy Department Announces 5 Million for Residential Building Energy...

12

Fact Sheet- Better Buildings Residential  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fact Sheet - Better Buildings Residential, from U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

13

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010 On this page, you may link to the summary...

14

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network-Current Members on AddThis.com...

15

Energy Department Announces $5 Million for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Research and University-Industry Partnerships  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department today announced a $5 million investment to develop and demonstrate new residential energy efficiency solutions, and that will support building energy efficiency research at universities and colleges.

16

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

17

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

18

Residential Building Code Compliance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

19

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Capabilities Photo showing a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the...

20

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Activities Building Activities The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. The U.S. DOE Solar Decathlon is a biennial contest which challenges college teams to design and build energy efficient houses powered by the sun. Each team competes in 10 contests designed to gauge the performance, livability and affordability of their house. The Building America program develops market-ready energy solutions that improve the efficiency of new and existing homes while increasing comfort, safety, and durability. Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals foster the growth of a high quality residential energy upgrade industry and a skilled and credentialed workforce.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network, increasing the number of...

22

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Improving the Energy Efficiency of Residential Buildings Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology. Learn More The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with the residential building industry to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. By developing, demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development Conduct research that focuses on engineering solutions to design, test, and

24

Industrial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Industrial Industrial Industrial / Manufacturing Buildings Industrial/manufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). See the MECS home page for further information. Commercial buildings found on a manufacturing industrial complex, such as an office building for a manufacturer, are not considered to be commercial if they have the same owner and operator as the industrial complex. However, they would be counted in the CBECS if they were owned and operated independently of the manufacturing industrial complex. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/industrial.html

25

Building Technologies Office: Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming technical challenges and delivering Building America research results to the market. Learn more about the STCs and the research planning process.

26

Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partner With DOE and Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links

27

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar Better Buildings Residential Network Orientation Peer Exchange Webinar September 11, 2014 7:00PM to 8:3...

28

Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Network Membership Form Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form Membership form from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network Recommended...

29

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Buildings Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Research Staff Residential Buildings Research Staff Members of the Residential Buildings research staff have backgrounds in architectural, civil, electrical, environmental, and mechanical engineering, as well as environmental design and physics. Ren Anderson Dennis Barley Chuck Booten Jay Burch Sean Casey Craig Christensen Dane Christensen Lieko Earle Cheryn Engebrecht Mike Gestwick Mike Heaney Scott Horowitz Kate Hudon Xin Jin Noel Merket Tim Merrigan David Roberts Joseph Robertson Stacey Rothgeb Bethany Sparn Paulo Cesar Tabares-Velasco Jeff Tomerlin Jon Winkler Jason Woods Support Staff Marcia Fratello Kristy Usnick Photo of Ren Anderson Ren Anderson, Ph.D., Manager, Residential Research Group ren.anderson@nrel.gov Research Focus: Evaluating the whole building benefits of emerging building energy

30

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, from the U.S. Department of Energy, Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

31

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Danielle Sass Byrnett Better Buildings Residential Building Technologies Office Program Solution Center Demonstration Outline * Goals, History, Content Sources * Tour: Organization - Program Components - Handbooks * Tour: Navigation Options * Tour: Examples * Next Steps * Questions & Feedback 2 eere.energy.gov Overview 3 eere.energy.gov Purpose: Support Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs & Partners * Provide an easily accessed repository for key lessons, resources, and knowledge collected from the experience of past programs. * Help programs and their partners plan, implement, manage, and evaluate better * Help stakeholders leapfrog past missteps en route to a larger and more successful industry. 4 eere.energy.gov Intended Audiences

32

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

33

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another...

34

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011 On this page, you may link...

35

Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

more. Residential Network Members Welcome Our Newest Members Cascadia Consulting Group Johnson Environmental The Building Performance Center, Inc. *Residential Network members that...

36

Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, and Cooking Products, and Commercial Clothes Washers ANOPR

37

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Residential Energy Efficiency Solutions: From Innovation to Market Transformation Conference, July 2012 on Delicious

38

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

39

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

40

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

42

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

43

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

1 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

44

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

45

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

46

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

47

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

48

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

49

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

50

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

51

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households...

52

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

53

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation: Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, April 2014.

54

Residential Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Residential Building Integration Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Lee, U.S. Department of...

55

NREL Residential Buildings Group Partners - Datasets - OpenEI...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Buildings ... Dataset Activity Stream NREL Residential Buildings Group Partners This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential...

56

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY HANKIN CHAIR IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research in the areas of residential building design and construction, sustainable buildings, energy issues in residential buildings, lifecycle analysis of buildings and related infrastructure, and sustainable landTHE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY HANKIN CHAIR IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION The College

Guiltinan, Mark

57

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings - August 2010 Overview of building...

58

Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network Case Study: Partnerships, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

59

Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

demonstrating, and deploying cost-effective solutions, BTO strives to reduce energy consumption across the residential building sector by at least 50%. Research and Development...

60

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

62

Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Better Buildings Residential Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Danielle Byrnett, U.S. Department of Energy The Better Buildings...

63

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer...

64

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

65

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

66

Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Furnaces Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Furnaces and Boilers Framework Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

67

Fact Sheet: Better Buildings Residential Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sheet Sheet BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn What Is the Residential Network? The Better Buildings Residential Network connects energy efficiency programs and partners to share best practices and learn from one another to dramatically increase the number of American homes that are energy efficient. Since 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), local Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, and Home Performance with ENERGY STAR ® Sponsors have leveraged over $1 billion in federal funding and local resources to build more energy-efficient communities. DOE is now expanding this network of residential energy efficiency programs and partners to new members. Who Should Join? Network membership is open to all organizations that are committed to accelerating the pace of energy

68

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Demonstration webinar slides for Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center, November 19, 2014.

69

Discover the New Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A transcript of "Discover the New Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center," Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Webcast, June 19, 2014.

70

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Criteria Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov/bbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential energy efficiency and the mission of the BBRN. Members are expected to be legally incorporated organizations or institutions, rather than individuals, actively engaged in the field of existing residential building energy efficiency with an ability to impact the market. Members should have the ability and capacity to carry out the requirements for membership (i.e., reporting the annual number of upgrades in their sphere of influence, and associated benefits), and actively engage as a member. Members must actively engage in significant work supporting, studying, researching, reporting, and/or

71

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Aimed at Reducing Risk for Residential Retrofit Industry (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a publicly available database of energy retrofit measures containing performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 measures. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy efficiency measures. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective retrofit measures to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The database provides a single, consistent source of current data for DOE and private-sector energy audit and simulation software tools and the retrofit industry. The database will reduce risk for residential retrofit industry stakeholders by providing a central, publicly vetted source of up-to-date information.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The statistics show that this sector consumes and pollutes more than industry (22% energy) or transport sectors1 Use-phase memory: a tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings in the variability of the energy consumption and environmental impact of residential buildings during their use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Evaluating Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance | Building Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance Residential Buildings for Statewide Compliance The materials for this course may be used for in-person training courses, and are intended to provide the tools and specific training necessary to evaluate residential compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The course also provides useful training in general residential field inspection for energy code compliance. The recommended background for taking this course is significant experience and/or certification on the IECC in a plan review or inspection capacity. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, July 16, 2010. Course Type: Training Materials Video In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides Presentation Slides Presentation Slides and Windows Media Videos

74

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article profiles the Building America teams, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA).

75

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What's Working What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Workshop, May 2011 on Digg

76

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Residential Network: Lessons Learned: Peer Exchange Calls, from the U.S. Department of Energy.

77

Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Place Norwalk, CT Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) is a company located in Norwalk, CT. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Steven_Winter_Associates_(Consortium_for_Advanced_Residential_Buildings)&oldid=379243" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

78

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

80

Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Residential Buildings » Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partners with a variety of organizations to improve the energy efficiency of residential buildings. Home builders, governments, researchers, and universities have several opportunities to work with the Building Technologies Office and other DOE projects. Home Builders Home builders who want to be recognized for building high performance homes can find out what it takes to participate in DOE's Challenge Home and sign up today. DOE Challenge Homes are verified by a qualified third-party and are at least 40%-50% more energy efficient than a typical new home. State or Local Governments, Utilities, and Other Organizations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate ENERGY Star Light Fixtures: Not to exceed 50% of the fixture cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $60 Freezers: $60 Clothes Washers: $60

82

About the Better Buildings Residential Network | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

partners to share best practices and learn from one another to increase the number of homes that are energy efficient. Better Buildings Residential programs and partners have...

83

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

84

SPP sales flyer for residential home builders | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

residential home builders residential home builders Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

85

Ozone Reductions Using Residential Building Envelopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ozone is an air pollutant with that can have significant health effects and a significant source of ozone in some regions of California is outdoor air. Because people spend the vast majority of their time indoors, reduction in indoor levels of ozone could lead to improved health for many California residents. Ozone is removed from indoor air by surface reactions and can also be filtered by building envelopes. The magnitude of the envelope impact depends on the specific building materials that the air flows over and the geometry of the air flow paths through the envelope that can be changes by mechanical ventilation operation. The 2008 Residential Building Standards in California include minimum requirements for mechanical ventilation by referencing ASHRAE Standard 62.2. This study examines the changes in indoor ozone depending on the mechanical ventilation system selected to meet these requirements. This study used detailed simulations of ventilation in a house to examine the impacts of different ventilation systems on indoor ozone concentrations. The simulation results showed that staying indoors reduces exposure to ozone by 80percent to 90percent, that exhaust ventilation systems lead to lower indoor ozone concentrations, that opening of windows should be avoided at times of high outdoor ozone, and that changing the time at which mechanical ventilation occurs has the ability to halve exposure to ozone. Future work should focus on the products of ozone reactions in the building envelope and the fate of these products with respect to indoor exposures.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max; Nazaroff, William W.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Austin Energy '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project.

87

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings...

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Energy Efficient Industrial Building Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of industrial buildings today is still largely unaffected by energy legislation and building technologies. The present corporate tax structures for industry do little to encourage investment of capital for future operating cost savings...

Holness, G. V. R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10-15 years Provider City of Cleveland Department of Community Development The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to

90

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors Title Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-4557E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sathaye, Jayant A., Stephane Rue de la du Can, Maithili Iyer, Michael A. McNeil, Klaas Jan Kramer, Joyashree Roy, Moumita Roy, and Shreya Roy Chowdhury Date Published 5/2011 Publisher LBNL Keywords Buildings Energy Efficiency, CO2 Accounting Methodology, CO2 mitigation, Demand Side Management, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas (ghg), india, industrial energy efficiency, industrial sector, Low Carbon Growth, Low Growth, Non Residential Abstract This report analyzed the potential for increasing energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the non-residential building and the industrial sectors in India. The first two sections describe the research and analyses supporting the establishment of baseline energy consumption using a bottom up approach for the non residential sector and for the industry sector respectively. The third section covers the explanation of a modeling framework where GHG emissions are projected according to a baseline scenario and alternative scenarios that account for the implementation of cleaner technology.

91

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Investigation of "Sick" Residential and Workplace Buildings using a Computerized/Web-Based Occupant Health Survey Instrument Speaker(s): James Craner Date: September 15, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Epidemiological investigation of occupants of a residential or non-industrial workplace building (or building complex) is a well-established, public health method used to identify and measure the nature, distribution, and cause of occupational or environmental illness related to indoor air quality (IAQ) problems or concerns. Such an investigation is particularly useful where disease-exposure associations have not been clearly established and multiple environmental and human factors may be implicated or considered. --The "sick building syndrome"

92

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, researchers from the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address performance issues and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

93

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Connecticut State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes The purpose of this letter is to document that the State of Connecticut has met its stautory requirement with regard to adoption of energy codes that meet or exceed the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings. Publication Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2013 CT Certification of Building Energy Codes.pdf Document Details Last Name: Cassidy Initials: JV Affiliation: Connecticut Department of Administrative Services, Division of Construction Services Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Adoption Building Type:

94

Audit Procedures for Improving Residential Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audit Procedures for Improving Residential Building Energy Efficiency This report analyses Sustainability Program Subtask 3.5.1: Residential Energy Efficiency Deliverable 1 Prepared by The University Delivery and Energy Reliability As part of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507 Under Task 3.5: Energy

95

Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Audit Results for Residential Building Energy Efficiency Forrest City Phases I and II This report analyses complete energy audit results from 28 homes within the Forest City residential complex. Relationships between temperature, humidity, comfort, and energy consumption are detailed. Recommendations

96

Building Technologies Program: Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2010 and there is a limit of $1,500 for all products. Improvements made in 2008 are not eligible for a tax credit. See the ENERGY STAR® Web site for a detailed listing of eligible improvements.

97

Energy Savings in Industrial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for deployment of energy savings technologies will be explored along with recommendations for policies to promote energy efficiency in industrial buildings....

Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

98

Residential and commercial buildings data book: Third edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in September, 1986 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; and Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. 12 refs., 59 figs., 118 tabs.

Amols, G.R.; Howard, K.B.; Nicholls, A.K.; Guerra, T.D.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Better Buildings Residential Network Membership Form  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Are You Already a DOE Partner or Sponsor? (Check if applicable) Better Buildings Alliance Member Building America Team Member Better Buildings Challenge Partner or Ally Home...

100

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings On this page you'll find information about the tax deductions available for purchasing and installing energy-efficient products and constructing new energy-efficient homes. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 offers tax credits for residential energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems. Many of these credits were originally introduced in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT) and amended in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-343). Energy Efficiency Tax Credits for Existing Homes Homeowners are eligible for a tax credit of 30% of the cost for improvements to windows, roofing, insulation, and heating and cooling equipment. These improvements must be placed in service from January 1,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In this project, researchers from Building America team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings worked with industry partners to develop hydronic system designs that would address barriers and result in higher overall system efficiencies and improved response times.

102

DOE Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Buildings Performance Database, sample Residential data Dataset Summary Description This is a non-proprietary subset of DOE's Buildings Performance Database. Buildings from the cities of Dayton, OH and Gainesville, FL areas are provided as an example of the data in full database. Sample data here is formatted as CSV The Buildings Performance Database will have an API that allows access to the statistics about the data without exposing private information about individual buildings. The data available in this sample is limited due to the nature of the original datasets; the Buildings Performance database combines data from multiple sources to improve overall robustness. Data fields stored in the database can be seen in the BPD taxonomy: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/buildingsperformance/taxonomy.html

103

Residential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The residential sector can be divided into apartment blocks and low-rise housing. Apartment blocks have many similarities to the non-domestic sector, such as office buildings, which are covered by the range of...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Building energy calculator : a design tool for energy analysis of residential buildings in Developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings are one of the world's largest consumers of energy, yet measures to reduce energy consumption are often ignored during the building design process. In developing countries, enormous numbers of new residential ...

Smith, Jonathan Y. (Jonathan York), 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Residential Building Integration Program Overview- 2014 BTO Peer Review  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presenter: David Lee, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Residential Building Integration Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

106

Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center Demonstration Webinar Transcript  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Residential Program Solution Center is a robust online collection of nearly 1,000 examples, strategies, and resources from Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partners, Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Sponsors, and others. This webinar presented on November 19, 2014 gives more information on the Solution Center.

107

BetterBuildings for Michigan: Residential Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuildings for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

108

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of approximately 2-3 business days for building permits.

109

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzed the potential for increasing energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the non-residential building and the industrial sectors in India. The first two sections describe the research and analysis supporting the establishment of baseline energy consumption using a bottom up approach for the non residential sector and for the industry sector respectively. The third section covers the explanation of a modeling framework where GHG emissions are projected according to a baseline scenario and alternative scenarios that account for the implementation of cleaner technology.

Sathaye, Jayant; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Iyer, Maithili; McNeil, Michael; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Roy, Joyashree; Roy, Moumita; Chowdhury, Shreya Roy

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

NREL Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Partnerships with External Organizations (Residential Buildings Group) Dataset Summary Description This spreadsheet contains a list of all the companies with which NREL's Residential Buildings Group has formed a partnership. The two types of partnership included in this spreadsheet are: Incubator and Test & Evaluation. This list was generated in April 2011. Source NREL Date Released April 07th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords incubator NREL partnerships Test & Evaluation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon members_and_partners_-_nrel_resbldgs_04072011.xlsx (xlsx, 29.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

111

Modeling of Residential Buildings and Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-zone building model is used in each case. A model of the heating system is also used for the multi-storey building. Both co-heating and tracer gas measurements are used in order to adjust the parameters of each building model. A complete monitoring...

Masy, G.; Lebrun, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Building A New Biofuels Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building A New Biofuels Industry ... It may be another five years or more before the fledgling industry catches up to the lofty goals called for in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS)a federal-government-mandated schedule of yearly biofuel production targets. ...

MELODY M. BOMGARDNER

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Residential Buildings Integration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Use a whole building approach for home upgrades through ENERGY STAR. Support energy efficiency upgrade markets by providing grants to states, local governments, and...

115

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Commercial Buildings Home > Special Topics and Data Reports > Types of Lights Picture of a light bulb At Home and At Work: What Types of Lights Are We Using? Two national EIA surveys report that . . . Of residential households, 98 percent use incandescent, 42 percent use fluorescent. Of commercial buildings, 59 percent use incandescent, 92 percent use fluorescent. At a glance, we might conclude that substantial energy savings could occur in both the residential and commercial sectors if they replaced their incandescent lights with fluorescent lights, given that fluorescent lights consume approximately 75-85 percent less electricity than incandescent lights. In the residential sector, this is true. However, in the commercial sector, where approximately 92 percent of the buildings already use fluorescent lights, increasing energy savings will require upgrading existing lights and lighting systems. To maximize energy savings, analysis must also consider the hours the lights are used and the amount of floorspace lit by that lighting type. Figures 1 and 2 show the types of lights used by the percent of households and by the percent of floorspace lit for the residential and the commercial sectors, respectively.

116

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes the DOE-sponsored National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, which contains performance characteristics and cost estimates for nearly 3,000 energy retrofit measures. To date, it is used in four prominent DOE software packages to help optimize energy-efficiency recommendations.

117

Energy Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings … August 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Efficiency Efficiency Trends in Residential and Commercial Buildings August 2010 Prepared by McGraw-Hill Construction for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy OF ENERGY Table of Contents INTRODUCTION 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 Chapter One DRIVERS OF ENERGY USE IN BUILDINGS 5 Chapter Two PROFILES OF BUILDING-SECTOR ENERGY USE 13 Chapter Three PATTERNS OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDING PRODUCT ADOPTION IN COMMERCIAL BUILDING DESIGN 17 Chapter Four INDUSTRY RESEARCH FINDINGS DRIVING ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 25 Chapter Five ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS, CODES AND INCENTIVES 31 Chapter Six VOLUNTARY PROGRAMS AND LOCAL AND STATE POLICIES FOR GREEN AND ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS 38 Chapter Seven RESOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION 50 Notes and definitions:

118

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) methodology to assess and improve the accuracy of whole-building energy analysis for residential buildings.

Polly, B.; Kruis, N.; Roberts, D.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Building Component Loads as of 1998 (1) 1) "Load" represents the thermal energy lossesgains that when combined will be offset by a building's heatingcooling system...

120

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory Burden RFI (Federal Register August 8, 2012) On behalf of the Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association, I am providing the following comments and information in response to DOE's request. The Association represents residential builders, developers and associated professionals and service firms. Final Letter to DOE Regulatory Burden 9_7_2012.pdf More Documents & Publications National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Ex Parte Memorandum Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid. May 2011 Frederick County (Maryland) Department of Permits and Inspections (FCDPI

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … National Residential Efficiency Measures Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Robust cost data for energy-efficiency Robust cost data for energy-efficiency measures provide an essential framework for transforming the housing industry to high-performance homes. These data allow for effective optimization capabilities to guide builders, researchers, HERS raters, contractors, and designers. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a public database that characterizes the performance and costs of common residential energy-efficiency measures. The database, called the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, can be found at www.buildingamerica.gov. The data are available for use in software programs that evaluate cost-effective measures to improve the energy efficiency of new and existing residential buildings.

122

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Minnesota  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Minnesota Minnesota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MINNESOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Minnesota Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Minnesota building code are based on the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC) with relatively extensive modifications. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IRC. The most notable

123

Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rolf Butters Rolf Butters Industrial Technologies Program Industrial Buildings Tools and Resources Webinar - June 11, 2009 Michael MacDonald Agenda  Introduction to Industrial Buildings Opportunity and Tools  EERE Funding, Opportunities, and Resources  Next Steps 6/11/2009 2 Facilities Energy  ITP has been working for a couple years now to develop tools to address facilities energy use, present in most plants, and about 8% of total sector energy use  First tool is a Score Card, implemented both as a stand- alone Excel file and for QuickPEP - Score Card has to be simple, so is approximate - But it can be a very important tool for scoping facilities energy use at a plant  Second tool is an adaptation of the BCHP Screening Tool, originally developed by the Distributed Energy program but

124

Building America Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting: July 2010  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Energy Efficiency meeting in July 2011, held in Denver, Colorado.

125

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Delaware  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Delaware Delaware September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Delaware Summary Delaware recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective July 1, 2010. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

126

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Hampshire  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Hampshire Summary New Hampshire has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The code becomes effective October 1, 2009. Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above-

127

Apply: Funding Opportunity- Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Application Deadline: February 4, 2015 The Building Technologies Office (BTO)s Residential Buildings Integration Program has announced the availability of up to $4 million in 2015 for the Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovation Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) DE-FOA-0001117.

128

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.6 Residential Home Improvement  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Value of Residential Building Improvements and Repairs, by Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Total 1980 72.2 35.2 107.4 1985 82.3 65.3 147.6 1990 91.4 85.5 176.9 1995 105.8 63.8 169.6 2000 138.2 52.7 191.0 2003 156.2 51.9 208.0 2004 169.2 57.9 227.1 2005 179.0 59.7 238.6 2006 187.4 57.2 244.6 2007 (2) 178.7 57.0 235.7 Note(s): Source(s): Improvements Maintenance and Repairs 1) Improvements includes additions, alterations, reconstruction, and major replacements. Repairs include maintenance. 2) The US Census Bureau discontinued the Survey of Residential Alterations and Repairs (SORAR) after 2007. DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Properties by Property Type: Quarterly 1962-2003 (Old structural purposes) for 1980-2000; DOC, Historic Expenditures for Residential Proerties by Property Type: Quarterly 2003-2007 (New structural purposes) for 1995-2007; and EIA, Annual Energy Review

129

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Wisconsin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Wisconsin Summary The energy efficiency requirements in the Wisconsin building code are the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with amendments that increase stringency. The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the Wisconsin code for the total building energy

130

Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings October 8, 2013 - 1:57pm Addthis DOE recently updated the requirements for energy efficiency in newly constructed federal buildings. The new rule, 10 CFR 435, Subpart A: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, applies to residential buildings (one- and two-family dwellings as well as multifamily buildings three stories or less in height) for which design for construction began on or after August 10, 2012. The rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 435, Subpart A to the 2009 IECC. New federal residential buildings are required (effective August 10, 2012) to achieve the 2009 IECC level of energy efficiency or 30% greater

131

Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09 IECC 09 IECC This training includes an overview of the residential requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 9 minutes Presenters: Todd Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

132

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.3 42.5 99.4 114 49 84.3 33 615 0.26 456 176 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.4 21.2 139 49 88.5 34 898 0.31 571 221 New England 1.7 1.0 3.0 155 49 86.8 33 1,044 0.33 586 223 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.5 18.2 137 49 88.8 35 877 0.31 568 221

133

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 58.7 46.0 111.9 115 47 89.9 34 696 0.29 546 206 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.2 7.7 23.3 145 48 90.9 35 1,122 0.37 703 272 New England 2.2 1.2 4.2 154 45 85.7 34 1,298 0.38 722 290 Middle Atlantic 10.0 6.4 19.1 143 48 92.0 35 1,089 0.37 699 269

134

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 31 12 22.3 8 938 0.35 665 245 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 31 11 22.6 8 869 0.30 635 227 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 32 12 22.2 8 959 0.36 674 251

135

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260

136

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 57.7 44.8 106.3 109 46 84.2 32 609 0.26 472 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.9 7.7 23.6 134 44 86.8 33 952 0.31 615 232 New England 2.0 1.1 3.5 146 45 76.0 29 1,135 0.35 592 227 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.6 20.1 133 44 89.1 34 923 0.30 620 234

137

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 55.4 41.3 93.2 121 53 89.9 33 722 0.32 537 198 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.7 7.5 21.1 125 44 79.2 30 925 0.33 588 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.2 122 39 80.3 29 955 0.30 626 224 Middle Atlantic 9.7 6.1 16.9 125 45 78.9 30 919 0.33 580 220

138

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.3 7.2 12.2 44 26 42.8 15 389 0.23 382 133 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.2 1.1 2.7 29 11 26.2 9 318 0.13 288 94 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 25 11 22.5 8 282 0.12 250 91 Middle Atlantic 0.7 0.7 1.7 31 12 28.6 9 341 0.13 312 96

139

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204

140

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 34 12 23.3 9 934 0.34 648 251 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 33 12 22.9 9 864 0.30 600 234 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.2 28.4 34 12 23.4 9 954 0.34 661 256

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 37 12 26.0 11 1,268 0.41 883 362 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 32 10 24.0 10 1,121 0.35 852 358 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 40 13 27.0 11 1,328 0.44 894 364

142

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.8 7.7 12.0 41 26 40.1 15 406 0.26 398 146 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.4 1.2 2.7 23 10 20.1 7 295 0.13 264 91 New England 0.5 0.4 1.0 31 14 27.6 9 370 0.17 330 114 Middle Atlantic 0.9 0.8 1.8 18 8 15.9 6 253 0.11 226 79

143

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

90 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 6.4 19.3 121 40 87.7 32 950 0.32 690 253 New England 2.5 2.1 5.9 121 43 99.0 39 956 0.34 784 307 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.4 13.4 121 39 83.2 30 947 0.31 652 234

144

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

97 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 32 14 25.0 10 1,130 0.49 863 345 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 31 14 24.0 9 1,081 0.49 854 336 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 33 14 25.0 10 1,149 0.49 867 349

145

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322

146

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335

147

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 33 11 22.1 8 830 0.29 561 195 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 31 11 21.3 8 776 0.27 531 189 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 33 11 22.4 8 847 0.29 571 197

148

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1997 Natural Gas, 1997 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 61.9 51.3 106.1 103 50 85.3 32 698 0.34 579 218 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.8 8.3 19.9 123 52 86.9 35 1,097 0.46 772 310 New England 1.9 1.4 3.3 123 50 87.0 32 1,158 0.48 819 301 Middle Atlantic 9.9 6.9 16.6 124 52 86.9 36 1,085 0.45 763 312

149

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 34 12 24.1 9 1,144 0.39 809 309 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 33 11 24.1 9 1,089 0.38 797 311 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 35 12 24.2 9 1,165 0.40 814 309

150

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260

151

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219

152

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.2 34.8 33 12 23.0 8 742 0.26 514 181 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 34 11 23.1 8 747 0.25 508 177 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 33 12 22.9 8 740 0.27 516 183

153

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 66.9 53.8 137.2 90 35 72.4 27 873 0.34 702 265 Census Region and Division Northeast 12.5 7.8 25.4 126 39 78.3 33 1,434 0.44 889 372 New England 2.3 1.5 5.5 128 34 82.5 35 1,567 0.42 1,014 428 Middle Atlantic 10.3 6.3 19.9 126 40 77.4 32 1,403 0.45 861 360

154

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.5 6.6 18.2 141 51 97.3 35 1,066 0.38 734 266 New England 2.5 1.9 5.6 140 49 108.8 39 1,105 0.38 856 306 Middle Atlantic 7.0 4.6 12.6 142 52 93.2 34 1,050 0.38 690 252

155

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, 1980 Natural Gas, 1980 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168

156

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 9.4 9.2 19.6 41 19 40.2 16 607 0.29 598 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 1.7 1.7 4.5 31 11 29.8 11 538 0.20 519 186 New England 0.7 0.7 2.2 34 11 33.1 12 580 0.19 569 209 Middle Atlantic 1.0 0.9 2.4 29 11 27.4 10 506 0.20 482 169

157

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Natural Gas Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 54.2 41.0 91.8 116 52 87.6 32 658 0.29 498 183 Census Region and Division Northeast 11.6 7.3 21.1 132 46 82.6 31 951 0.33 598 221 New England 2.0 1.3 4.5 126 35 77.9 28 1,062 0.30 658 235 Middle Atlantic 9.6 6.0 16.5 133 49 83.6 31 928 0.34 585 217

158

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272

159

Residential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Heaters Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales...

160

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Rhode Island  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN RHODE ISLAND Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Rhode Island Summary Rhode Island has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

162

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Illinois  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ILLINOIS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Illinois Summary Illinois recently adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Overview of the 2009 IECC The IECC scope includes residential single-family housing and multifamily housing three stories or less above- grade intended for permanent living (hotel/motel is not "residential"). The code applies to new buildings and

163

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Michigan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MICHIGAN Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Michigan Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IRC with considerable amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

164

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Missouri  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSOURI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Missouri Summary Missouri currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Missouri homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $353 to $565 a year for an average

165

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Texas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Texas Texas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TEXAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Texas Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2001 IECC Supplement. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. An energy analysis comparing the 2009 IECC to the state code

166

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nebraska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEBRASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nebraska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $236 a year

167

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Utah  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utah Utah September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN UTAH Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Utah Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $219 to

168

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Oklahoma  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Oklahoma September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN OKLAHOMA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Oklahoma Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $266 to

169

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Tennessee  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN TENNESSEE Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Tennessee Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2003 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $231 to

170

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Mississippi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mississippi Mississippi September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN MISSISSIPPI Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mississippi Summary Mississippi currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Mississippi homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $173 to $250 a year for an average

171

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Nevada  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEVADA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Nevada Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $205 to

172

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Virginia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Virginia Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IRC and IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of

173

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New York  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

York York September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW YORK Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New York Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2004 IECC Supplement with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

174

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Jersey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW JERSEY Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Jersey Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with extensive amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in

175

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Alaska  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaska Alaska September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ALASKA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Alaska Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC with amendments. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A comparison of the overall impacts on energy use for these two

176

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Iowa  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iowa Iowa September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN IOWA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Iowa Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $245 to

177

Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANDATORY MEASURES CHAPTER 4 RESIDENTIAL MANDATORY MEASURES DIVISION 4.2 ­ ENERGY EFFFICIENCY SECTION 4 RESIDENTIAL VOLUNTARY MEASURES DIVISION A4.2 ­ ENERGY EFFFICIENCY SECTION A4.201 GENERAL A4.201.1 ScopeEnergy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code Page 2 CHAPTER 4, RESIDENTIAL

178

Smart Operation of Centralized Temperature Control System in Multi-Unit Residential Buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Smart Grid has emerged a very important concept in modern power systems. The integration of different loads such as residential, commercial and industrial into the (more)

Kundu, Rajib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this talk will deal with the project on Energy Consumption and Indoor Environment Problems of Residential Buildings in China, organized by the Architectural Institute of Japan. Prof. Yoshino will discuss the results of project elements, including: 1) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 2) Compilation of weather data for building design based on observed data in China, 3) Literature survey and field investigation on energy consumption and indoor environment of residential buildings, 4) Estimation and verification of the effects of various

180

Al Azhar International Conference, Cairo 2008 Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings: Amman as a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in residential buildings: Amman as a case study Environmental healthy requirements in residential buildings in the Jordanian residential buildings, in general, and in Amman particularly, considering the healthy problems requested for a healthy environment in the modern buildings, especially regarding the natural aeration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL homes energy efficient through Title 24 Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Standards for Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings (AB 549 Report), the Energy Commission made a series

182

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings, by Year (Million Metric Tons) (1) Residential U.S. Site Res.% Res.% Fossil Electricity Total Total of Total U.S. of Total Global 1980 385 525 909 4723 19% 4.9% 1981 361 518 878 4601 19% 4.8% 1982 359 511 870 4357 20% 4.8% 1983 340 525 865 4332 20% 4.7% 1984 349 535 883 4561 19% 4.6% 1985 351 549 901 4559 20% 4.6% 1986 343 551 894 4564 20% 4.5% 1987 346 574 920 4714 20% 4.5% 1988 367 603 970 4939 20% 4.6% 1989 374 606 980 4983 20% 4.6% 1990 340 624 963 5039 19% 4.5% 1991 347 633 980 4996 20% 4.6% 1992 357 624 981 5093 19% 4.6% 1993 372 667 1040 5185 20% 4.8% 1994 364 668 1032 5258 20% 4.7% 1995 361 678 1039 5314 20% 4.7% 1996 389 710 1099 5501 20% 4.9% 1997 371 719 1090 5575 20% 4.7% 1998 339 759 1097 5622 20% 4.8% 1999 360 762 1122 5682 20% 4.8% 2000 380 805 1185 5867 20% 5.0% 2001 367 805 1172 5759 20% 4.9% 2002 368 835 1204 5809 21% 4.9% 2003 383 847 1230

183

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2001 2001 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 107.0 85.2 211.3 116 47 92.2 36 1,875 0.76 1,493 583 Census Region and Division Northeast 20.3 14.1 43.7 153 49 106.6 44 2,501 0.81 1,741 715 New England 5.4 4.1 13.2 152 47 115.3 48 2,403 0.75 1,825 768 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.0 30.5 154 50 103.4 42 2,541 0.83 1,710 696

184

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.5 181.2 131 55 103.6 40 1,620 0.68 1,282 491 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.5 13.8 40.1 173 60 122.4 47 2,157 0.74 1,526 583 New England 5.1 3.7 10.6 168 59 123.1 48 2,094 0.73 1,532 598 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.1 29.4 175 60 122.1 46 2,180 0.75 1,523 578

185

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 86.3 67.5 144.4 134 63 104.7 39 1,437 0.67 1,123 417 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.3 13.0 35.0 176 65 125.2 46 2,033 0.75 1,443 533 New England 4.3 3.1 9.0 174 61 127.6 46 2,010 0.70 1,471 527 Middle Atlantic 14.0 9.9 26.0 177 67 124.5 46 2,040 0.77 1,435 535

186

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 90.5 70.4 156.8 130 58 100.8 39 1,388 0.62 1,080 416 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.0 13.2 36.8 179 64 124.4 48 1,836 0.66 1,276 494 New England 4.3 3.0 8.4 174 61 121.0 47 1,753 0.62 1,222 475 Middle Atlantic 14.8 10.3 28.4 181 65 125.4 48 1,860 0.67 1,292 499

187

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (millionBtu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.1 66.1 144.2 141 64 111.7 40 1,256 0.58 998 356 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.9 12.1 35.1 194 67 131.6 46 2,016 0.70 1,365 475 New England 4.3 2.9 8.3 181 63 123.9 44 2,018 0.71 1,384 492 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.2 26.7 199 68 134.0 46 2,016 0.69 1,359 470

188

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330 Census Region and Division Northeast 17.7 12.3 34.8 199 70 138.3 49 1,874 0.66 1,301 459 New England 4.3 2.9 8.9 197 65 134.4 47 1,964 0.65 1,341 466 Middle Atlantic 13.4 9.3 26.0 200 72 139.5 49 1,846 0.66 1,288 456

189

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,034 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,023 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,037 0.70 1,491 555

190

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 83.8 66.1 142.2 130 60 102.3 37 1,309 0.61 1,033 377 Census Region and Division Northeast 18.0 12.5 34.4 175 64 121.7 44 1,942 0.71 1,353 490 New England 4.2 3.0 9.1 173 56 121.9 43 1,991 0.65 1,402 498 Middle Atlantic 13.7 9.5 25.2 175 66 121.7 44 1,926 0.73 1,338 487

191

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.2 13.9 40.3 165 57 119.6 45 2,038 0.70 1,471 556 New England 4.5 3.2 9.3 164 56 113.9 45 2,028 0.69 1,408 562 Middle Atlantic 14.7 10.7 31.1 166 57 121.3 45 2,041 0.70 1,491 555

192

Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space(2) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 101.5 83.2 168.8 123 61 101.0 39 1,633 0.80 1,338 517 Census Region and Division Northeast 19.7 15.1 34.6 158 69 121.0 48 2,153 0.94 1,644 658 New England 5.3 4.2 9.3 156 70 123.0 48 2,085 0.94 1,647 648 Middle Atlantic 14.4 10.9 25.3 159 68 120.0 48 2,179 0.94 1,643 662

193

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Cost of a Generic Quad Used in the Residential Sector ($2010 Billion) (1) Residential 1980 10.45 1981 11.20 1982 11.58 1983 11.85 1984 11.65 1985 11.43 1986 10.90 1987 10.55 1988 10.18 1989 9.98 1990 10.12 1991 9.94 1992 9.78 1993 9.77 1994 9.78 1995 9.44 1996 9.44 1997 9.59 1998 9.23 1999 8.97 2000 9.57 2001 10.24 2002 9.33 2003 10.00 2004 10.32 2005 11.10 2006 11.60 2007 11.61 2008 12.29 2009 11.65 2010 9.98 2011 9.99 2012 9.87 2013 9.77 2014 9.76 2015 9.88 2016 9.85 2017 9.83 2018 9.86 2019 9.88 2020 9.91 2021 10.00 2022 10.09 2023 10.11 2024 10.12 2025 10.09 2026 10.10 2027 10.13 2028 10.11 2029 10.06 2030 10.06 2031 10.13 2032 10.23 2033 10.34 2034 10.45 2035 10.57 Note(s): 1) See Table 1.5.1 for generic quad definition. This table provides the consumer cost of a generic quad in the buildings sector. Use this table to estimate the average consumer cost savings resulting from the savings of a generic (primary) quad in the buildings sector. 2) Price of

194

Use-phase memory: A tool for the sustainable construction and renovation of residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residents' usages and behavior play a determining role in the variability of the energy consumption and environmental impact of residential buildings during their use-phase. At present, however, they are inadequately documented and understood, as well as being highly variable. In this paper, we propose a use-phase memory model for residential buildings, whose aim is to store energy consumption and usage patterns. This storage can be done automatically or voluntarily. We give examples of useful information extracted from the data captured. The objective of this data analysis and synthesis is to provide building experts two specific use-cases: designing a new sustainable building, and renovating an existing one. Our model is deployed on a residential building, integrating the beneficial services for all stakeholders to demonstrate a sustainable relationship between designers, the residential building and the users.

Lucile Picon; Bernard Yannou; Toufic Zaraket; Stphanie Minel; Gwenola Bertoluci; Franois Cluzel; Romain Farel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Residential Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type Fuel Type Petroleum 1.0 Natural Gas 38.8 Coal 0.0 Wood 2.6 Electricity (2) 51.6 Total 94.0 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent (1) 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2009, April 2011, Table 3-10, p. 3-9 for stationary combustion emissions; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release,

196

Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the key gaps and barriers to implementing residential energy efficiency strategies in the U.S. market, as identified in sessions at the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America 2010 Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting held in Denver, Colorado, on July 20-22, 2010.

198

Building America Expert Meeting: Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building Science Consortium held an Expert Meeting on Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment on April 26,l 2010 on the NIST campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

199

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Residential Building HVAC Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report assesses 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and provide analysis on 19 priority technology options in various stages of development.

200

Calculation program for design of windows in residential buildings Ins Palma Santos and Svend Svendsen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable buildings at the Department of Civil Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark1 Calculation program for design of windows in residential buildings Inês Palma Santos and Svend Svendsen* Department of Civil Engineering, Brovej, Building 118, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - West Virginia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

West Virginia West Virginia September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN WEST VIRGINIA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in West Virginia Summary West Virginia is proceeding with adoption of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) through the State Fire Commission. No energy analysis was conducted here comparing the current West Virginia code to the 2009 IECC for this reason. However, the West Virginia energy code has been one of the weaker codes in

202

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN KANSAS Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas Summary Kansas currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in Kansas homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $355 to $582 a year for an average new house

203

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - New Mexico  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mexico Mexico September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN NEW MEXICO Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in New Mexico Summary The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the current state code, the 2006 IECC. The most notable changes are improved duct sealing and efficient lighting requirements. A limited analysis of these changes resulted in estimated savings of $216 to

204

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - South Dakota  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

South Dakota South Dakota September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN SOUTH DAKOTA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in South Dakota Summary South Dakota currently does not have a mandatory energy efficiency code. The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) would substantially improve energy efficiency in South Dakota homes. A limited analysis of the impact of the 2009 IECC resulted in estimated savings of $383 to $427 a year for an average

205

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level - Arizona  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arizona Arizona September 2009 Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN ARIZONA Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Arizona Summary Arizona is a "home rule" state with no mandatory state-wide energy efficiency code. However, many counties and cities have adopted an energy efficiency code, most often the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The 2009 IECC contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The

206

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Right-Suite Residential for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows Right-Suite Residential for Windows logo. All-in-one HVAC software performs residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, equipment selection, cost comparison calculations, and geothermal loop design. Also allows you to design your own custom proposals. Used for system design, for sales representation, and for quotation preparations. Buy only what you need. Unused functions are shipped as demos, so the program can grow with your needs. Keywords residential loads calculations, duct sizing, energy analysis, HVAC equipment selection, system design Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge of general HVAC concepts. High level of computer literacy not required. Users Over 10,000 users of Right-J loads.

207

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2015 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 180.5 34.9 16.6 1.8 53.3 0.6 66.6 301.0 27.4% Space Cooling 0.0 161.1 161.1 14.7% Water Heating 69.6 5.1 3.1 8.2 75.3 153.1 13.9% Lighting 83.7 83.7 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 71.7 71.7 6.5% Electronics (6) 52.0 52.0 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.2 51.6 54.7 5.0% Cooking 11.5 1.8 1.8 17.9 31.1 2.8% Computers 30.0 30.0 2.7% Other (8) 10.6 10.6 149.3 160.0 14.6% Total 264.7 40.1 32.2 1.8 74.0 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 759.1 1,098.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

208

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2010 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 185.5 38.8 18.7 2.2 59.7 0.7 77.6 323.5 26.3% Space Cooling 0.0 210.2 210.2 17.1% Water Heating 68.7 7.1 4.6 11.7 90.4 170.8 13.9% Lighting 126.0 126.0 10.2% Electronics (5) 96.5 96.5 7.8% Refrigeration (6) 80.7 80.7 6.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 2.9 57.8 60.8 4.9% Cooking 11.4 1.9 1.9 42.6 55.9 4.5% Computers 30.5 30.5 2.5% Other (8) 10.2 10.2 36.3 46.5 3.8% Adjust to SEDS (9) 30.1 30.1 2.4% Total 268.5 45.9 35.3 2.2 83.5 0.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 878.7 1,231.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. Carbon emissions

209

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2035 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Total Percent Space Heating (4) 169.7 22.8 14.1 1.5 38.3 0.5 76.7 285.3 23.1% Water Heating 67.2 2.6 2.1 4.7 84.8 156.7 12.7% Space Cooling 0.0 194.5 194.5 15.7% Electronics (5) 68.1 68.1 5.5% Refrigeration (6) 81.5 81.5 6.6% Lighting 74.3 74.3 6.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.5 50.0 53.4 4.3% Cooking 12.2 1.5 1.5 23.2 37.0 3.0% Computers 41.9 41.9 3.4% Other (8) 14.1 14.1 229.6 243.7 19.7% Total 252.7 25.4 31.9 1.5 58.7 0.5 100% Note(s): Source(s): Electricity (3) 924.5 1,236.4 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

210

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.4 Residential Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2025 Residential Buildings Energy End-Use Carbon Dioxide Emissions Splits, by Fuel Type (Million Metric Tons) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. Resid. LPG Oth(2) Total Coal Electricity (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 173.9 27.9 15.2 1.6 44.7 0.6 73.2 292.3 25.1% Space Cooling 0.0 177.2 177.2 15.2% Water Heating 70.2 3.5 2.5 6.0 83.7 159.9 13.8% Lighting 74.1 74.1 6.4% Refrigeration (5) 75.8 75.8 6.5% Electronics (6) 58.7 58.7 5.1% Wet Cleaning (7) 3.3 47.9 51.2 4.4% Cooking 11.7 1.6 1.6 20.8 34.2 2.9% Computers 37.6 37.6 3.2% Other (8) 12.4 12.4 189.1 201.5 17.3% Total 259.1 31.3 31.8 1.6 64.7 0.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 838.1 1,162.5 1) Emissions assume complete combustion from energy consumption, excluding gas flaring, coal mining, and cement production. Emissions exclude wood since it is assumed that the carbon released from combustion is reabsorbed in a future carbon cycle. 2) Includes kerosene

211

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential Solar  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commercial Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of Portland The City of Portland's Bureau of Development Services (BDS) developed an electronic permitting process for residential solar energy system installations. With this streamlined, expedited process, solar contractors can submit the project plans and permit application online for residential installations. In order to file the online application, the contractor must first be trained. The City of Portland has staff at the permitting desk trained as solar experts to assist solar contractors who need help filing their permits in person. This process has a turnaround time of

212

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

213

Ranking cost effective energy conservation measures for heating in Hellenic residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Residential buildings comprise the biggest segment of the European building stock and they are responsible for the majority of the building's sector energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This paper documents the potential benefits and sets the priorities of individual energy conservation measures (ECMs) to reduce heating energy consumption in Hellenic residential buildings, including space heating and domestic hot water production. The analysis is facilitated by using the available Hellenic typology for residential buildings that consists of 24 typical buildings, derived after a classification in three construction periods, two building sizes and four climate zones. The focus is mainly on the implementation of \\{ECMs\\} that have low first-cost investment and short payback period. In order to prioritize \\{ECMs\\} that would be most attractive to building owners, two ranking criteria are used, namely primary heating energy savings and payback period. Finally, the preliminary results are used to provide an insight on the potential abatement of CO2 emissions for the national residential building stock.

K.G. Droutsa; S. Kontoyiannidis; E.G. Dascalaki; C.A. Balaras

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard for New Non-Residential Buildings Specifications for Implementation of Fifth Power Plan Model Conservation Standards for New Commercial Buildings Adapted from: Northwest Energy NWBest Project Summary of Components of the "Best of the Region" Standard

215

Industrial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products Industrial Institutional Multi-Sector Residential Momentum Savings Regional Efficiency Progress Report Utility Toolkit Energy Smart Industrial - Energy Management...

216

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 Data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Types of Lights > Lit Floorspace In Lit Buildings Lit Floorspace in Lit Buildings To analyze the use of different kinds of lighting equipment with data from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), building floorspace can be described in three different ways: total floorspace in all buildings; total floorspace in lit buildings; and total lit floorspace in buildings. The latter two measures of floorspace with lighting differ because not all of the floorspace in lit buildings is illuminated (see Table 1): Table 1: Floorspace Denominators Used To Analyze Lighting Equipment Usage (Million Square Feet) 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in All Buildings: 58, 772 1995 CBECS Total Floorspace in Lit Buildings: 56, 261 1995 CBECS Total Lit Floorspace in Buildings: 50, 303

217

BetterBuildings for Michigan Residential Case Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a document from BetterBuilding for Michigan posted on the website of the U.S. Department of Energy's BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program.

218

Building America Expert Meeting: Achieving the Best Installed Performance from High-Efficiency Residential Gas Furnaces  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes a Building America expert meeting hosted on July 28, 2011, by the Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit team. The purpose of this meeting was to identify installation practices that provide the best installed efficiency for residential gas furnaces, explain how AFUE and field efficiency can differ, and investigate the impact of installation practices on the efficiency and long-term durability of the furnace.

219

The Temperature Sensitivity of the Residential Load and Commercial Building Load  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a building modeling approach to quickly quantify climate change impacts on energy consumption, peak load, and load composition of residential and commercial buildings. This research focuses on addressing the impact of temperature changes on the building heating and cooling load in 10 major cities across the Western United States and Canada. A building simulation software are first used to quantify the hourly energy consumption of different building types by end-use and by vintage. Then, the temperature sensitivities are derived based on the climate data inputs.

Lu, Ning; Taylor, Zachary T.; Jiang, Wei; Correia, James; Leung, Lai R.; Wong, Pak C.

2009-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

EA-2001: Energy Efficiency Design Standards: New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is publishing this final rule to implement provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal commercial and multi-family high-rise residential buildings. This rule updates the baseline Federal commercial standard to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2013.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Potential Job Creation as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. The overall analysis found that transforming the U.S. housing stock through the adoption of more energy-efficient building energy codes could create hundreds of jobs in each of several states. The following reports discuss the analysis and results for four representative states. Minnesota Nevada Rhode Island Tennessee *Please note, these reports have been formatted to facilitate double-sided printing. Contacts Web Site Policies

222

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

223

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2005 Household Energy Expenditures, by Vintage ($2010) | Year | Prior to 1950 887 | 22% 1950 to 1969 771 | 22% 1970 to 1979 736 | 16% 1980 to 1989 741 | 16% 1990 to 1999 752 | 16% 2000 to 2005 777 | 9% | Average 780 | Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1.24 2,003 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 for 2005 expenditures; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators.

224

Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial, and Industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Energy Efficiency Group are experts in the technical, financial, and contractual aspects of ESPCs, and Industrial Energy Efficiency Group (865) 574-1013 kelleyjs@ornl.gov 9/08 r1 ORNL helps organizations

225

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings...

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

How Leaders Leverage Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Data: A Guide for the North American Residential Window Industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research studied ways in which leaders leverage Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) data, specifically as it relates to the North American residential window industry. Multiple (more)

Perkins, Annie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Technical Update Meeting: August 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Technical Update meeting in August 2011, held in Denver, Colorado.

228

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholders Meeting: March 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Stakeholders meeting in March 2011, held in Atlanta, Georgia.

229

Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Research Planning Meeting: October 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On this page, you may link to the summary report and presentations for the Building America Research Planning meeting in October 2011, held in Washington, D.C.

230

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

explore specific technology areas that can radically improve home performance. BARA communication projects include Building America outreach products and activities (see...

231

EA-1463: 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final Rule with the no-action alternative of using the current Federal standards 10 CFR Part 434 and 10 CFR Part 435 Subpart C (referred to as the no-action alternative).

232

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Building Industry Workshops  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

team Puerto Rico student stands over the team's gray-water pool, which is filled with green plants, and explains to visitors surrounding the pool how it recycles water for reuse. team Puerto Rico student stands over the team's gray-water pool, which is filled with green plants, and explains to visitors surrounding the pool how it recycles water for reuse. Universidad de Puerto Rico student Wilfredo Rodriguez explains the team's gray-water pool to visitors at the 2007 Solar Decathlon. The pool is used to filter wash water for reuse. Solar Decathlon 2007 Building Industry Workshops Below are descriptions of the workshops offered at the 2007 Solar Decathlon on Building Industry Day, Thursday, October 18, 2007. Solar Applications for Homes Revised Title: Translating Sustainability to Affordable Housing 9:00 a.m. Presenter: ASHRAE and John Quale, Assistant Professor, University of Virginia School of Architecture The focus of the workshop is translating sustainability to affordable

233

The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings...

Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Better Buildings Residential Network: Using Loan Performance Data to Inform Program Implementation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Please join the Better Buildings Residential Network for the Financing & Revenue/Data & Evaluation co-series peer exchange call: Using Loan Performance Data to Inform Program Implementation. What is the relationship, if any, between loan performance and completed energy efficiency measures? How are home affordability, loan default rates, and decreasing energy costs related?

235

2008 Residential Building Efficiency Standards 1 Efficiency Ratings and Performance Modeling Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Building Efficiency Standards 2 a. Refrigerant charge and metering (Reference Appendices, RA3 Cooling · SplitHeatPump: SEER 13 · Refrigerant charge (or charge indicator light), watts/cfm and air flow.2), or presence of charge indicator display (Reference Appendices, RA3.4) b. Air system fan flow and air handler

236

Revised: March 6, 2013 2013 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards Measures Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for all residential buildings including kitchens, bathrooms, dining rooms, utility rooms, garages, hall.0(j)2Aii and Section 150.0(j)4) 5. Solar Ready Measure ­ 250 square feet of solar ready zone on single family roofs. (Section150.0(r)) Compliance Options 1. Solar Photovoltaic can be used

237

A Temporal Motif Mining Approach to Unsupervised Energy Disaggregation: Applications to Residential and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

every device in a building. The ensu- ing computational problem is to disaggregate total energy us- age disaggregation. This is the task of, non-intrusively, monitoring aggregate energy usage (electricity, waterA Temporal Motif Mining Approach to Unsupervised Energy Disaggregation: Applications to Residential

Ramakrishnan, Naren

238

Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings at State Level  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 DISCLAIMER: The results contained in this report are complete and accurate to the best of BECP's knowledge, based on information available at the time it was written. BUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVEL V Table of Contents 1.0 Chapter 1 Overview of the 2009 IECC ........................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................................. 1 1.2 Overview of the 2009 IECC ..................................................................................................................... 1

239

Expansion of the residential conservation service program to multi-family and small commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative regulatory provisions are considered which might permit achievement of the building energy conservation regulatory goals at a lower cost. Major issues, regulatory and legislative options, and cost-benefit analyses are discussed for multi-family and commercial buildings. The following are presented: related government programs, urban and community impact analysis, institutional impacts, energy cost, Residential Conservation Service coverage, methods of analysis, and regional studies. (MHR)

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Energy Efficient Residential Building Code for Arab Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of building envelope and weather data in reducing electrical energy consumption. The impacts of the following parameters were studied namely; walls and roof constructions, window size and glazing type for different geographical locations in the Arab Countries...

Hanna, G. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Title Energy savings from direct-DC in U.S. residential buildings Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Vossos, Vagelis, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen Journal Energy and Buildings Volume Volume 68, Part A Pagination 223-231 Date Published 09/2013 Keywords Direct current (DC), energy conservation, Photovoltaics (PV), residential buildings Abstract An increasing number of energy-efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC directly from renewable energy systems, thereby avoiding the energy losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of a 'direct-DC house' compared to that of a typical net-metered house with AC distribution, assuming identical DC-internal loads. The model comparisons were run for 14 cities in the United States, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The model tested the effects of climate and battery storage. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect potential energy savings. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate.

242

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2005 Average Household Expenditures as Percent of Annual Income, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Average Annual Expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

243

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 2005 Average Household Expenditures, by Census Region ($2010) Item Energy (1) Shelter (2) Food Telephone, water and other public services Household supplies, furnishings and equipment (3) Transportation (4) Healthcare Education Personal taxes (5) Other expenditures Average Annual Income Note(s): Source(s): 1) Average household energy expenditures are calculated from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), while average expenditures for other categories are calculated from the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CE). RECS assumed total US households to be 111,090,617 in 2005, while the CE data is based on 117,356,000 "consumer units," which the Bureau of Labor Statistics defines to be financially independent persons or groups of people that use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions, including all members of a

244

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 38.7 11.2 8.0 19.8 0.0 14.3 72.9 28.9% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 35.4 35.4 14.0% Water Heating (4) 14.3 2.1 2.0 4.0 14.2 32.6 12.9% Lighting 22.6 22.6 9.0% Refrigeration (5) 14.9 14.9 5.9% Electronics (6) 17.8 17.8 7.1% Cooking 2.4 0.8 0.8 6.0 9.2 3.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.6 10.7 11.3 4.5% Computers 5.6 5.6 2.2% Other (8) 0.0 4.4 4.4 6.7 11.1 4.4% Adjust to SEDS (9) 13.6 13.6 5.4% Total 56.1 13.3 15.2 29.0 0.0 166.8 251.8 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.5 0.5 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.5 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes residential recreational water heating ($1.4 billion). 5) Includes refrigerators ($15.3 billion) and freezers ($4.4 billion). 6) Includes color televisions ($11.0

245

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Residential Aggregate Energy Expenditures, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Electricity Total 1980 158.5 1981 164.0 1982 172.3 1983 176.1 1984 178.5 1985 176.8 1986 169.2 1987 167.1 1988 170.1 1989 172.8 1990 168.2 1991 169.9 1992 166.7 1993 175.6 1994 174.9 1995 172.7 1996 181.8 1997 180.0 1998 173.5 1999 174.0 2000 192.8 2001 203.3 2002 192.1 2003 208.8 2004 215.1 2005 236.7 2006 240.0 2007 246.1 2008 259.6 2009 241.6 2010 251.8 2011 251.3 2012 247.1 2013 240.3 2014 239.4 2015 241.7 2016 241.8 2017 243.0 2018 244.7 2019 246.4 2020 247.9 2021 250.4 2022 253.3 2023 255.6 2024 257.8 2025 260.3 2026 263.2 2027 266.0 2028 267.6 2029 268.1 2030 269.7 2031 272.9 2032 276.6 2033 280.4 2034 284.6 2035 288.6 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Residential petroleum products include distillate fuel oil, LPG, and kerosene. EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table

246

ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) Jump to: navigation, search Name ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) Place Stockton, CA Website http://www.consol.com References ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance)[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2004 Link to project description http://www.nrel.gov/news/press/2004/382.html LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance) is a company located in Stockton, CA. References ↑ "ConSol (Building Industry Research Alliance)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ConSol_(Building_Industry_Research_Alliance)&oldid=379316

247

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999 Energy Conservation in Non-Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Steve Taylor Date: April 20, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Steve Taylor, the principal of Taylor Engineering, will be providing an overview of the envelope, lighting, and HVAC requirements of Standard 90.1. Mr. Taylor is a registered mechanical engineer specializing in HVAC system design, control system design, indoor air quality engineering, computerized building energy analysis, and HVAC system commissioning. He graduated from Stanford University with a BS in Physics and a MS in Mechanical Engineering and has over 20 years of commercial HVAC system design and construction experience. He was the primary author of the HVAC

248

Summary of Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gaps and Gaps and Barriers for Implementing Residential Building Energy Efficiency Strategies 2010 Residential Buildings Energy Efficiency Meeting Denver, Colorado - July 20 - 22, 2010 August 2010 Prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory For the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

249

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Using Direct-DC Power Distribution in U.S. Residential Buildings Can Save Energy October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings and the Electric Grid An increasing fraction of the most efficient appliances on the market operate on direct current (DC) internally, making it possible to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoid the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back, as is current practice. Products are also emerging on the commercial market that take advantage of that possibility. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers Vagelis Vossos, Karina Garbesi, and Hongxia Shen investigated the potential savings of direct-DC power distribution in net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics

250

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 2005 Households and Energy Expenditures, by Income Level ($2010) Energy Expenditures by Household Income Households (millions) Household Less than $10,000 9.9 9% $10,000 to $14,999 8.5 8% $15,000 to $19,999 8.4 8% $20,000 to $29,999 15.1 14% $30,000 to $39,999 13.6 12% $40,000 to $49,999 11.0 10% $50,000 to $74,999 19.8 18% $75,000 to $99,999 10.6 10% $100,000 or more 14.2 13% Total 111.1 100% Note(s): Source(s): 7% 1) See Table 2.3.15 for more on energy burdens. 2) A household is defined as a family, an individual, or a group of up to nine unrelated individuals occupying the same housing unit. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part 2; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price inflators. 2,431 847 3% 2,774 909 3% 1,995

251

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements Studies show that duct air leakage results in major energy losses. A ll versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) require ducts, air handlers, filter boxes, and air cavities used as ducts to be sealed, and reference Chapter 16 of the International Residential Code for details on air sealing. This sealing is required on all ducts and other air distribution components regardless of whether they are located inside or outside the conditioned living space. For single-family homes and other low-rise residential buildings, the 2009 and 2012 IECC have duct insulation and sealing requirements in Section 403.2. Both codes require insulation

252

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Range 10 4 48 Clothes Dryer 359 (2) 4 49 Water Heating Water Heater-Family of 4 40 64 (3) 26 294 Water Heater-Family of 2 40 32 (3) 12 140 Note(s): Source(s): 1) $1.139/therm. 2) Cycles/year. 3) Gallons/day. A.D. Little, EIA-Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case, Sept. 2, 1998, p. 30 for range and clothes dryer; LBNL, Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector, LBNL-40297, Sept. 1997, p. 62-67 for water heating; GAMA, Consumers' Directory of Certified Efficiency Ratings for Heating and Water Heating Equipment, Apr. 2002, for water heater capacity; and American Gas Association, Gas Facts 1998, December 1999, www.aga.org for range and clothes dryer consumption. Operating Characteristics of Natural Gas Appliances in the Residential Sector

253

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 44.3 10.3 7.7 18.6 0.0 16.0 79.0 27.4% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 40.6 40.6 14.1% Water Heating 17.6 1.2 1.2 2.3 17.7 37.6 13.0% Lighting 15.5 15.5 5.4% Refrigeration (4) 17.0 17.0 5.9% Electronics (5) 14.2 14.2 4.9% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.9 10.4 11.3 3.9% Cooking 3.2 0.8 0.8 4.8 8.9 3.1% Computers 8.7 8.7 3.0% Other (7) 0.0 7.7 7.7 47.9 55.7 19.3% Total 66.0 11.5 17.5 29.6 0.0 193.0 288.6 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.8 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($14.1 billion) and freezers ($2.9 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($14.2 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

254

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Fuel Type ($2010) LPG ($/gal) 1980 2.24 1981 2.51 1982 2.30 1983 2.14 1984 2.10 1985 1.96 1986 1.54 1987 1.42 1988 1.39 1989 1.48 1990 1.69 1991 1.56 1992 1.40 1993 1.33 1994 1.27 1995 1.22 1996 1.37 1997 1.34 1998 1.15 1999 1.16 2000 1.70 2001 1.59 2002 1.42 2003 1.67 2004 1.84 2005 2.36 2006 2.64 2007 2.81 2008 3.41 2009 2.52 2010 2.92 2011 3.62 2012 3.65 2013 3.43 2014 3.60 2015 3.74 2016 3.79 2017 3.86 2018 3.89 2019 3.92 2020 3.96 2021 3.99 2022 4.02 2023 4.07 2024 4.10 2025 4.15 2026 4.19 2027 4.23 2028 4.26 2029 4.30 2030 4.34 2031 4.35 2032 4.38 2033 4.43 2034 4.50 2035 4.55 Source(s): EIA, State Energy Data 2009: Prices and Expenditures, Jun. 2011, Table 2, p. 24-25 for 1980-2009; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012, Table A3, p. 6-8 for 2010-2035 and Table G1, p. 215 for fuels' heat content; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

255

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 39.7 11.5 7.8 19.9 0.0 15.0 74.5 28.6% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 36.2 36.2 13.9% Water Heating 16.0 1.4 1.3 2.7 17.1 35.9 13.8% Lighting 15.2 15.2 5.8% Refrigeration (4) 15.5 15.5 6.0% Electronics (5) 12.0 12.0 4.6% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.8 9.8 10.5 4.1% Cooking 2.7 0.8 0.8 4.3 7.8 3.0% Computers 7.7 7.7 2.9% Other (7) 0.0 6.4 6.4 38.7 45.0 17.3% Total 59.1 12.9 16.3 29.8 0.0 171.3 260.3 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.7 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.7 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($12 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($0.8 billion), natural gas

256

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Expenditure Splits, by Fuel Type ($2010 Billion) (1) Natural Petroleum Gas Distil. LPG Kerosene Total Coal Electricity Total Percent Space Heating (2) 35.0 13.0 8.1 21.6 0.0 14.0 70.6 29.2% Space Cooling (3) 0.0 33.8 33.8 14.0% Water Heating 13.5 1.9 1.5 3.4 15.8 32.7 13.5% Lighting 17.6 17.6 7.3% Refrigeration (4) 15.0 15.0 6.2% Electronics (5) 10.9 10.9 4.5% Wet Cleaning (6) 0.6 10.8 11.4 4.7% Cooking 2.2 0.9 0.9 3.8 6.8 2.8% Computers 6.3 6.3 2.6% Other (7) 0.0 5.2 5.2 31.3 36.5 15.1% Total 51.3 14.9 15.7 31.1 0.0 159.3 241.7 100% Note(s): Source(s): 0.6 0.6 1) Expenditures include coal and exclude wood. 2) Includes furnace fans ($4.6 billion). 3) Fan energy use included. 4) Includes refrigerators ($12.3 billion) and freezers ($2.8 billion). 5) Includes color televisions ($10.9 billion). 6) Includes clothes washers ($1.1 billion), natural gas

257

Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting - Spring 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program held the second annual Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas. At this meeting, hundreds of building industry professionals came together to share their perspective on the most current innovation projects in the residential buildings sector. This meeting provided an opportunity for researchers and industry stakeholders to showcase and discuss the latest in cutting-edge, energy-efficient residential building technologies and practices. The meeting also included working sessions from each Standing Technical Committee (STC), which outlined work that will best assist in overcoming

258

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Energy Prices, by Year and Major Fuel Type ($2010 per Million Btu) Electricity Natural Gas Petroleum (1) Avg. 1980 36.40 8.35 16.77 17.64 1981 38.50 8.88 18.35 19.09 1982 40.15 10.08 17.28 19.98 1983 40.43 11.30 16.08 21.00 1984 38.80 11.02 15.61 20.20 1985 38.92 10.68 14.61 20.10 1986 38.24 9.98 11.88 19.38 1987 37.29 9.22 11.23 18.73 1988 36.22 8.80 10.83 18.02 1989 35.67 8.71 11.96 17.93 1990 35.19 8.63 13.27 18.64 1991 34.88 8.38 12.49 18.31 1992 34.79 8.28 11.23 17.76 1993 34.52 8.47 10.75 17.76 1994 34.04 8.63 10.63 17.87 1995 33.43 8.00 10.33 17.50 1996 32.63 8.21 11.70 17.28 1997 32.34 8.83 11.47 17.69 1998 31.33 8.55 9.96 17.73 1999 30.52 8.29 10.13 17.09 2000 30.13 9.54 14.18 18.06 2001 30.71 11.50 13.98 19.38 2002 29.73 9.24 12.26 17.89 2003 30.05 10.87 14.21 18.88 2004 29.98 11.97 15.54 19.76 2005 30.64 13.66 18.93 21.50 2006 32.67 14.30 21.06 23.34 2007 32.50

259

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Share of Total U.S. Households, by Census Region, Division, and Vintage, as of 2005 Prior to 1950 to 1970 to 1980 to 1990 to 2000 to Region 1950 1969 1979 1989 1999 2005 Northeast 6.7% 5.2% 2.4% 2.1% 1.3% 0.8% 18.5% New England 2.1% 1.2% 0.5% 0.5% 0.3% 0.3% 4.9% Middle Atlantic 4.6% 4.0% 1.9% 1.6% 1.0% 0.5% 13.6% Midwest 5.7% 5.8% 3.6% 2.5% 3.7% 1.7% 23.0% East North Central 4.3% 3.9% 2.7% 1.8% 2.1% 1.1% 16.0% West North Central 1.4% 1.9% 0.9% 0.7% 1.6% 0.6% 7.1% South 4.0% 6.9% 6.4% 7.5% 7.5% 4.3% 36.6% South Atlantic 2.0% 3.4% 3.5% 4.2% 4.3% 2.2% 17.4% East South Central 0.9% 1.3% 0.9% 1.0% 1.3% 0.7% 6.2% West South Central 1.2% 2.3% 4.7% 2.2% 1.8% 1.4% 13.6% West 3.4% 4.6% 4.5% 4.6% 3.1% 1.5% 21.8% Mountain 0.7% 1.2% 1.3% 1.5% 1.3% 0.9% 6.8% Pacific 2.8% 3.4% 3.3% 3.1% 1.8% 0.6% 15.0% United States 19.9% 22.5% 17.0% 16.7% 15.6% 8.3% 100% Source(s): All Vintages EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table HC10

260

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Brochure: ENERGY STAR for Commercial Buildings and Industrial Plants Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Global warming implications of facade parameters: A life cycle assessment of residential buildings in Bahrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On a global scale, the Gulf Corporation Council Countries (GCCC), including Bahrain, are amongst the top countries in terms of carbon dioxide emissions per capita. Building authority in Bahrain has set a target of 40% reduction of electricity consumption and associated CO{sub 2} emissions to be achieved by using facade parameters. This work evaluates how the life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions of buildings are affected by facade parameters. The main focus is placed on direct and indirect CO{sub 2} emissions from three contributors, namely, chemical reactions during production processes (Pco{sub 2}), embodied energy (Eco{sub 2}) and operational energy (OPco{sub 2}). By means of the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, it has been possible to show that the greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase (80-90%). However, embodied CO{sub 2} emissions are an important factor that needs to be brought into the systems used for appraisal of projects, and hence into the design decisions made in developing projects. The assessment shows that masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO{sub 2} emissions of facade construction, mainly due to their physical characteristics. The highest Pco{sub 2} emissions factors are those of window elements, particularly aluminium frames. However, their contribution of CO{sub 2} emissions depends largely on the number and size of windows. Each square metre of glazing is able to increase the total CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 30% when compared with the same areas of opaque walls. The use of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) walls reduces the total life cycle CO{sub 2} emissions by almost 5.2% when compared with ordinary walls, while the use of thermal insulation with concrete wall reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 1.2%. The outcome of this work offers to the building industry a reliable indicator of the environmental impact of residential facade parameters. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle carbon assessment of facade parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greatest environmental impact occurs during the operational phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Masonry blocks are responsible for 70-90% of the total CO2 emissions of facade construction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Window contribution of CO2 emissions depends on the number and size of windows. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Without insulation, AAC walls offer more savings in CO2 emissions.

Radhi, Hassan, E-mail: h_alradhi@yahoo.com [Global Engineering Bureau, P.O Box 33130, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain (Bahrain); Sharples, Stephen, E-mail: steve.sharples@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Architecture, University of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

1 INTRODUCTION Regulations in the Building Industry are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Modeling Regulatory Documents in Building Industry K.R. Bouzidi & B. Fies Centre Scientifique et Technique1 INTRODUCTION Regulations in the Building Industry are becoming increasingly complex and involve an important role to ensure the quality of a building, its features, and to minimize its environmental impact

Boyer, Edmond

263

Lighting in Residential and Commercial Buildings (1993 and 1995 data) --  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Light Type Used > Related Goverment Sites Links to Related Government Sites Publications list from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (FEMP) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Green Lights Program Updated FLEX 3.0 Lighting software solution available from U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs Section 3.4 on Lighting and Section 7.2 on Lighting Control can be obtained at this site U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs lights basic training will be completed in FY '98 Lighting mailing list for exchange of information on lighting issues Lights in commercial buildings in the 21st Century List of major areas of expertise at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, illustrated with specific projects

264

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Characteristics of a Typical Single-Family Home (1) Year Built | Building Equipment Fuel Age (5) Occupants 3 | Space Heating Natural Gas 12 Floorspace | Water Heating Natural Gas 8 Heated Floorspace (SF) 1,934 | Space Cooling 8 Cooled Floorspace (SF) 1,495 | Garage 2-Car | Stories 1 | Appliances Size Age (5) Foundation Concrete Slab | Refrigerator 19 Cubic Feet 8 Total Rooms (2) 6 | Clothes Dryer Bedrooms 3 | Clothes Washer Other Rooms 3 | Range/Oven Full Bathroom 2 | Microwave Oven Half Bathroom 0 | Dishwasher Windows | Color Televisions 3 Area (3) 222 | Ceiling Fans 3 Number (4) 15 | Computer 2 Type Double-Pane | Printer Insulation: Well or Adequate | Note(s): Source(s): 2-Door Top and Bottom Electric Top-Loading Electric 1) This is a weighted-average house that has combined characteristics of the Nation's stock homes. Although the population of homes with

265

Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014.

266

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR industrial partnership ENERGY STAR industrial partnership Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance ENERGY STAR industrial partnership New ENERGY STAR industrial partners Energy guides Energy efficiency and air regulation

267

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assuming north?south and east?west facings of the building. For each orientation, different types of glazing (Table 4) and different glazing areas are considered. The first case(the base case) assumes a single clear glazing with a window-to-wall ratio.... Floor plan of the east-west oriented residential building taken for study (not to scale) Table 1. The zones basic characteristics Zone Area (m2) Volume (m3) Occupancy (people/m2) Venti- lation (l/s) HVAC system Bed room1 15.12 52...

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption by End Use. 2011a [average residential electricity consumption by end-use inaverage residential electricity consumption by end-use in

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the work conducted by the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (www.baihp.org) for the period 9/1/99-6/30/06. BAIHP is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida and focuses on factory built housing. In partnership with over 50 factory and site builders, work was performed in two main areas--research and technical assistance. In the research area--through site visits in over 75 problem homes, we discovered the prime causes of moisture problems in some manufactured homes and our industry partners adopted our solutions to nearly eliminate this vexing problem. Through testing conducted in over two dozen housing factories of six factory builders we documented the value of leak free duct design and construction which was embraced by our industry partners and implemented in all the thousands of homes they built. Through laboratory test facilities and measurements in real homes we documented the merits of 'cool roof' technologies and developed an innovative night sky radiative cooling concept currently being tested. We patented an energy efficient condenser fan design, documented energy efficient home retrofit strategies after hurricane damage, developed improved specifications for federal procurement for future temporary housing, compared the Building America benchmark to HERS Index and IECC 2006, developed a toolkit for improving the accuracy and speed of benchmark calculations, monitored the field performance of over a dozen prototype homes and initiated research on the effectiveness of occupancy feedback in reducing household energy use. In the technical assistance area we provided systems engineering analysis, conducted training, testing and commissioning that have resulted in over 128,000 factory built and over 5,000 site built homes which are saving their owners over $17,000,000 annually in energy bills. These include homes built by Palm Harbor Homes, Fleetwood, Southern Energy Homes, Cavalier and the manufacturers participating in the Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home program. We worked with over two dozen Habitat for Humanity affiliates and helped them build over 700 Energy Star or near Energy Star homes. We have provided technical assistance to several show homes constructed for the International builders show in Orlando, FL and assisted with other prototype homes in cold climates that save 40% over the benchmark reference. In the Gainesville Fl area we have several builders that are consistently producing 15 to 30 homes per month in several subdivisions that meet the 30% benchmark savings goal. We have contributed to the 2006 DOE Joule goals by providing two community case studies meeting the 30% benchmark goal in marine climates.

McIlvaine, Janet; Chandra, Subrato; Barkaszi, Stephen; Beal, David; Chasar, David; Colon, Carlos; Fonorow, Ken; Gordon, Andrew; Hoak, David; Hutchinson, Stephanie; Lubliner, Mike; Martin, Eric; McCluney, Ross; McGinley, Mark; McSorley, Mike; Moyer, Neil; Mullens, Mike; Parker, Danny; Sherwin, John; Vieira, Rob; Wichers, Susan

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Tools for Assessing Building Energy Use in Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This presentation will cover a brief history of building energy measures savings potential for industrial plants and briefly characterize building energy measures and their savings identified over approximately the past 15 years in energy audits...

Martin, M.; MacDonald, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

272

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

273

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Total Number of Households and Buildings, Floorspace, and Household Size, by Year 1980 80 N.A. 227 2.9 1981 83 N.A. 229 2.8 1982 84 N.A. 232 2.8 1983 85 N.A. 234 2.8 1984 86 N.A. 236 2.7 1985 88 N.A. 238 2.7 1986 89 N.A. 240 2.7 1987 91 N.A. 242 2.7 1988 92 N.A. 244 2.7 1989 93 N.A. 247 2.6 1990 94 N.A. 250 2.6 1991 95 N.A. 253 2.7 1992 96 N.A. 257 2.7 1993 98 N.A. 260 2.7 1994 99 N.A. 263 2.7 1995 100 N.A. 266 2.7 1996 101 N.A. 269 2.7 1997 102 N.A. 273 2.7 1998 104 N.A. 276 2.7 1999 105 N.A. 279 2.7 2000 106 N.A. 282 2.7 2001 107 2% 285 2.7 2002 105 3% 288 2.7 2003 106 5% 290 2.8 2004 107 7% 293 2.7 2005 109 9% 296 2.7 2006 110 11% 299 2.7 2007 110 12% 302 2.7 2008 111 13% 304 2.8 2009 111 13% 307 2.8 2010 114 14% 310 2.7 2011 115 14% 313 2.7 2012 116 15% 316 2.7 2013 117 16% 319 2.7 2014 118 17% 322 2.7 2015 119 18% 326 2.7 2016 120 19% 329 2.7 2017 122 21% 332 2.7 2018 123 22% 335 2.7 2019 125 23% 338 2.7 2020 126 25% 341 2.7 2021 127 26% 345

274

EA-1871: Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, EE Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435, EE Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOEs Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, ?Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings? and 10 CFR 435, ?Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings? Baseline Standards Update. The final rule updates the baseline standards in 10 CFR 433 and 10 CFR 435 to the latest private sector standards based on the cost-effectiveness of the latest private sector standards and DOEs determination that energy efficiency has been improved in these codes as required by 42 U.S.C 6831 et seq. DOE is issuing its final determinations on American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE 2007) and the International Code Councils 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in the same edition of the Federal Register as this final rule.

275

Analysis of improved fenestration for code-compliant residential buildings in hot and humid climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glazing technologies were developed, tested and subsequently adopted by the building industry. The underlying goal that has been carried through to present day research has been to develop the potential of windows as net energy suppliers (Arasteh 1994...

Mukhopadhyay, Jaya

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modelling the impacts of building regulations and a property bubble on residential space and water heating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper develops a bottom-up model of space and water heating energy demand for new build dwellings in the Irish residential sector. This is used to assess the impacts of measures proposed in Ireland's National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP). The impact of the housing construction boom, which resulted in 23% of occupied dwellings in 2008 having been built since 2002, and the subsequent bust, are also assessed. The model structure treats separately new dwellings added to the stock after 2007 and pre-existing occupied dwellings. The former is modelled as a set of archetype dwellings with energy end use affected by the relevant set of building regulations that apply during construction. Energy demand of existing dwellings is predicted by a simpler top down method based on historical energy use trends. The baseline scenario suggests residential energy demand will grow by 19% from 3206ktoe in 2007 to 3810ktoe in 2020. The results indicate that 2008 and 2010 building regulations will lead to energy savings of 305ktoe (8.0%) in 2020. Had the 2008 building regulations been introduced in 2002, at the start of the boom, there would be additional savings of 238ktoe (6.7%) in 2020.

D. Dineen; B.P. Gallachir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Development of a housing performance evaluation model for multi-family residential buildings in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the development and application of a housing performance evaluation model for multi-family residential buildings in Korea. This model is intended to encourage initiatives toward achieving better housing performance and to support a homebuyer's decision-making on housing comparison and selection. Forty-one objective and feasible housing performance indicators, which were selected from the review of existing evaluation models and interviews with experts, are classified into a series of categories. The weights of each category and indicator are calculated by using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) analysis, and a weight is converted into credit. Next, the performance grades are divided into four levels, and evaluation criteria are suggested based on statutory performance value or the one frequently met in practice. Finally, the evaluation program and the application procedure are established through the field case study. This model can be used for objective and practical evaluation and comparison of residential housing alternatives.

Sun-Sook Kim; In-Ho Yang; Myoung-Souk Yeo; Kwang-Woo Kim

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

279

Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Dr. Jani Lehto presentation at the May 9 Pyrolysis Oil Workshop on Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings.

280

Assessment of Cost-optimal Energy Performance Requirements for the Italian Residential Building Stock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Directive 2010/31/EU establishes that Member States must ensure that minimum energy performance requirements for buildings are set with a view to achieve cost-optimal levels. The paper presents a methodology for identifying the cost-optimal levels for the Italian residential building stock, following the Guidelines accompanying the Commission Delegated Regulation No. 244/2012. The methodology is applied to a reference building of the IEE-TABULA project and considering different energy efficiency measures. The energy performance and the global cost calculations are performed according to UNI/TS 11300 and UNI EN 15459, respectively. A new cost optimisation procedure based on a sequential search-optimisation technique considering discrete options is applied.

Vincenzo Corrado; Ilaria Ballarini; Simona Paduos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Title Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5193E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Garbesi, Karina, Vagelis Vossos, Alan H. Sanstad, and Gabriel Burch Document Number LBNL-5193E Pagination 59 Date Published October Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the 'direct-DC house' with respect to today's typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sector-because of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolation-this paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

282

EA-1926: Energy Efficiency Design Standards for New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings (RIN# 1904-AC61)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing the provisions in the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) that require DOE to update the baseline Federal energy efficiency performance standards for the construction of new Federal buildings, including low-rise residential buildings.

283

About ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings | ENERGY STAR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section How can we help you? Find out who's partnered with ENERGY STAR Become an ENERGY STAR partner Find ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants ENERGY STAR certification Featured research and reports Facts and stats Climate change and buildings

284

Industrial/manufacturing resources | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial/manufacturing resources Industrial/manufacturing resources Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

285

Industrial energy management information center | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy management information center energy management information center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition Market impacts: Improvements in the industrial sector

286

Agenda for Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Download the agenda below for the July 11 Public Meeting on the Physical Characterization of Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances.

287

Emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA) of multi-unit and single-family residential buildings in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The construction and building process depends on substantial consumption of natural resources with far-reaching impacts beyond their development area. In general, a significant portion of annual resource consumption by the building and construction industry is a result of applying traditional building strategies and practices such as designing and selecting types of development (e.g. multi-unit condo and single-family house, etc.), building materials and structure, heating/cooling systems, and planning renovation and maintenance practices. On the other hand, apart from structural suitability, building developers mostly consider the basic requirements of public owners or private occupants of the buildings, where the main criteria for selecting building strategies are costs, and long-term environmental and socio-economic impacts are generally ignored. The main purpose of this paper is to develop an improved building sustainability assessment framework to measure and integrate different sustainability factors, i.e. long-term environmental upstream and downstream impacts and associated socio-economic costs, in a unified and quantitative basis. The application of the proposed framework has been explained through a case study of single-family houses and multi-unit residential buildings in Canada. A comprehensive framework based on the integration of emergy synthesis and life cycle assessment (LCA) has been developed and applied. The results of this research prove that the proposed emergy-based life cycle assessment (Em-LCA) framework offers a practical sustainability assessment tool by providing quantitative and transparent results for informed decision-making.

Bahareh Reza; Rehan Sadiq; Kasun Hewage

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Industry Research and Recommendations for New Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers evaluated industry needs and developed logic models to support possible future commercial new construction research and deployment efforts that could be led or supported by DOE's Commercial Building Integration program or other national initiatives. The authors believe that these recommendations support a proposed course of action from the current state of commercial building energy efficiency to a possible long-term goal of achieving significant market penetration of cost-effective NZE buildings in all building sectors and climates by 2030.

Hendron, B.; Leach, M.; Gregory, N.; Pless, S.; Selkowitz, S.; Matthew, P.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

13 - Micro combined heat and power (CHP) systems for residential and small commercial buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The principal market for micro-CHP is as a replacement for gas boilers in the 18 million or so existing homes in the UK currently provided with gas-fired central heating systems. In addition there are a significant number of potential applications of micro-CHP in small commercial and residential buildings. In order to gain the optimum benefit from micro-CHP, it is essential to ensure that an appropriate technology is selected to integrate with the energy systems of the building. This chapter describes the key characteristics of the leading micro-CHP technologies, external and internal combustion engines and fuel cells, and how these align with the relevant applications.

J. Harrison

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Monitoring energy reduction through applying green roofs to residential buildings in Dubai  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Green roofing in a building has many advantages including absorbing rainwater, providing thermal insulation, enhancing the ecology, creating a peaceful retreat for people and animals, improving air quality and helping to offset the air temperature and heat island effect. The aim of this paper is to monitor energy saving in the residential buildings of Dubai after applying green roofing techniques. The paper also attempts to provide a thermal analysis after the application of green roofs. A villa in Dubai was chosen as a case study. With the aid of energy simulation software, namely DesignBuilder, as well as manual recording and calculations, the energy savings after applying the green roofing were detected. To that extent, the paper draws some recommendations with regard to the types of green roofing that should be used in these particular climatic conditions based on this real experiment that took place over a one year period.

Hanan Taleb

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Building Type Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Pre-1995 1995-2005 Single-Family 38.4 44.9 102.7 106.2 38.5 35.5 Detached 37.9 44.7 104.5 107.8 38.8 35.4 Attached 43.8 55.5 86.9 85.1 34.2 37.6 Multi-Family 63.8 58.7 58.3 49.2 27.2 24.3 2 to 4 units 69.0 55.1 70.7 59.4 29.5 25.0 5 or more units 61.5 59.6 53.6 47.2 26.3 24.2 Mobile Homes 82.4 57.1 69.6 74.5 29.7 25.2 Note(s): Source(s): 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Principal Building Type and Vintage Per Square Foot (thousand Btu) (1) Per Household (million Btu) Per Household Member (million Btu) 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average

294

Stochastic model for electrical loads in Mediterranean residential buildings: Validation and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A major issue in modelling the electrical load of residential building is reproducing the variability between dwellings due to the stochastic use of different electrical equipment. In that sense and with the objective to reproduce this variability, a stochastic model to obtain load profiles of household electricity is developed. The model is based on a probabilistic approach and is developed using data from the Mediterranean region of Spain. A detailed validation of the model has been done, analysing and comparing the results with Spanish and European data. The results of the validation show that the model is able to reproduce the most important features of the residential electrical consumption, especially the particularities of the Mediterranean countries. The final part of the paper is focused on the potential applications of the models, and some examples are proposed. The model is useful to simulate a cluster of buildings or individual households. The model allows obtaining synthetic profiles representing the most important characteristics of the mean dwelling, by means of a stochastic approach. The inputs of the proposed model are adapted to energy labelling information of the electric devices. An example case is presented considering a dwelling with high performance equipment.

Joana Ortiz; Francesco Guarino; Jaume Salom; Cristina Corchero; Maurizio Cellura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section News and announcements ENERGY STAR in the news Media FAQs Photos and graphics Media FAQs about ENERGY STAR for commercial and industrial buildings Tip: To search by keyword, hit Ctrl+F (Windows) or Cmd+F (Mac). To browse

296

Building a State Industrial Energy Efficiency Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industries of the Future brings the tools and resources of the Industrial Technology Program of the Department of Energy to the state level. In addition, with the guidance of an industry-led advisory board, the program has developed conferences and forums...

Ferland, K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The effect of an enclosure retrofit on air leakage rates for a multi-unit residential case-study building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a relatively new, simple and robust, method for air leakage testing. A thirteen-story multi-unit residential building was tested for air leakage before and after an enclosure retrofit. The building suites had a pre-retrofit NLA50 average of 6.77cm2/m2 and an average post-retrofit NLA50 of 2.82cm2/m2a 58% betterment. The effect of the retrofit on air leakage rates was assessed and compared to other multi-unit residential buildings across Canada and USA. The case study building was significantly tighter than other multi-unit residential buildings included in published studies. Recommendations were made for field-testing procedures in order to maximize the potential for accurate measured flow characteristics. Field-testing for air-tightness needs to be standardized in order for useful comparative results to be generated in order to inform future research and operational considerations for the multi-unit residential building stock across North America.

Robin Urquhart; Russell Richman; Graham Finch

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Workshop proceeding of the industrial building energy use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California has a large number of small and medium sized industries which have a major impact on the demand growth of California utilities. Energy use in building services (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.). These industries constitute an important but largely neglected fraction of the total site energy use. The ratio of energy use in building service to the total site energy use is a function of the industrial activity, its size, and the climate at the site of the facility. Also, energy use in building services is more responsive to weather and occupant schedules than the traditional base-load'' industrial process energy. Industrial energy use is considered as a base-load'' by utility companies because it helps to increase the utilities' load factor. To increase this further, utilities often market energy at lower rates to industrial facilities. Presently, the energy use in the building services of the industrial sector is often clubbed together with industrial process load. Data on non-process industrial energy use are not readily available in the literature. In cases where the major portion of the energy is used in the building services (with daily and seasonal load profiles that in fact peak at the same time as systemwide load peaks), the utility may be selling below cost at peak power times. These cases frequently happen with electric utilities. 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Gadgil, A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Industries in focus | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants ENERGY STAR Energy Performance Indicators for plants » Industries in focus Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Tools for benchmarking energy management practices Tools for tracking and benchmarking facility energy performance

300

Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3/20/09 Making the Most of Financed Energy Projects The energy engineers in the Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Energy Efficiency Group are experts in the technical, financial, and contractual, Commercial, and Industrial Energy Efficiency Group kelleyjs@ornl.gov ORNL helps organizations with training

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

California Building Industry Association et al. v. State Water...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

et al. v. State Water Resources Control Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal CaseHearing: California Building Industry Association et al....

302

Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing and Improving the Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis for Residential Buildings B. Polly, N. Kruis, and D. Roberts July 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

303

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Joshua Apte and Dariush Arasteh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate

304

Discussion on Energy-Efficient Technology for the Reconstruction of Residential Buildings in Cold Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to wall is 0.33 in south, 0.30 in north, 0.05 in east and 0.03 in west. The heat transfer coefficient of roof is 1.26 W/m2?K and the area is 1028.5m2. The ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol. VI-5...-1 ) heat transfer coefficient of external wall is 1.57 W/m2?K and the area is 3002.67 m2. The heat transfer coefficient of external window is 6.4 W/m2?K and the area is 908.64 m2. 2.2 Design Heating Load The design heating load of residential...

Zhao, J.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.; Li, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Development and validation of regression models to predict monthly heating demand for residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present research work concerns development of regression models to predict the monthly heating demand for single-family residential sector in temperate climates, with the aim to be used by architects or design engineers as support tools in the very first stage of their projects in finding efficiently energetic solutions. Another interest to use such simplified models is to make it possible a very quick parametric study in order to optimize the building structure versus environmental or economic criteria. All the energy prediction models were based on an extended database obtained by dynamic simulations for 16 major cities of France. The inputs for the regression models are the building shape factor, the building envelope U-value, the window to floor area ratio, the building time constant and the climate which is defined as function of the sol-air temperature and heating set-point. If the neural network (NN) methods could give precise representations in predicting energy use, with the advantage that they are capable of adjusting themselves to unexpected pattern changes in the incoming data, the multiple regression analysis was also found to be an efficient method, nevertheless with the requirement that an extended database should be used for the regression. The validation is probably the most important level when trying to find prediction models, so 270 different scenarios are analysed in this research work for different inputs of the models. It has been established that the energy equations obtained can do predictions quite well, a maximum deviation between the predicted and the simulated is noticed to be 5.1% for Nice climate, with an average error of 2%. In this paper, we also show that is possible to predict the building heating demand even for more complex scenarios, when the construction is adjacent to non-heated spaces, basements or roof attics.

Tiberiu Catalina; Joseph Virgone; Eric Blanco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

307

Assessing the sustainability of the energy use of residential buildings in Belgrade through multi-criteria analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents a method for selecting and calculation indicators of sustainable development, needed for determining the level of sustainable development, expressed through sustainability index of residential buildings. It is important to verify procedure for determining economic, social and environmental sub-indicators based on consumption of final energy (used to meet space heating, hot water generation and household cooking needs, as well as for operation of various household electrical appliances, indoor temperature and humidity). It was done for representative sample of Belgrade buildings stock. Different dwelling types constructed in two different periods and heated by electricity, district heating and fossil fuels were analysed. Multi-criteria analysis was used to evaluate residential buildings sustainability. The results showed that the best building options, constructed in the period 19812006, are: the apartment buildings and single family houses (electricity for space heating) when economy indicator has priority; the apartments connected to the district heating system when environmental indicator has priority; and single family houses connected to the district heating system when social indicator has priority. Implementation of proposed methodology is beneficial when evaluating and comparing sustainability of different residential buildings, enabling decision makers to more easily reach decisions on the issues related to energy policy and environmental protection.

Biljana Vu?i?evi?; Marina Jovanovi?; Naim Afgan; Valentina Turanjanin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Construction Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Water Heating Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of cost of upgraded equipment, or an amount that buys down the cost of the project to a 1.5 year simple payback. New Construction: 70% of incremental cost of higher efficiency equipment, or an amount that buys down the incremental investment to a 1.5 year simple

309

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders Building the Next Generation of Automotive Industry Leaders December 7, 2010 - 4:23pm Addthis Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Zach Heir , a recent hire in the electric vehicle field Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities It's no secret that when it comes to advanced vehicle technologies, the Department of Energy is kicking into high gear. We're investing more than $12 billion in grants and loans for research, development and deployment of advanced technology vehicles. These investments are helping to create a clean energy workforce. If we want to continue a leadership role in the global automotive industry, it is crucial that we take the long view and invest heavily in the next generation of innovators and critical thinkers

310

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit (PARR), a U.S. Department of Energy Building America team, conducted a study to identify best practices, costs, and savings associated with balancing steam distribution systems through increased main line air venting, radiator vent replacement, and boiler control system upgrades.

311

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

20 20 Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 5% 28% 8% 56% | 8% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 5% 26% 7% 59% | 7% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 5% 26% 5% 61% | 6% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 6% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 5% 26% 4% 61% | 6% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 5% 25% 4% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 32.9 1988 5% 24% 5% 63% | 6% 26% 63% 34.2 1989 5% 24% 5% 63% | 7% 25% 63% 34.2 1990 4% 25% 4% 64% | 5% 26% 64% 33.6 1991 4% 24% 4% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 32.8 1992 4% 26% 3% 65% | 5% 27% 65% 33.5 1993 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 33.8 1994 4% 25% 3% 65% | 5% 26% 65% 34.7 1995 4% 25% 2% 67% | 5% 26% 67% 34.6 1996 4% 25% 2% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 35.8 1997 4% 26% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.3 1998 3% 25% 4% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 36.9 1999 4% 25% 3% 66% | 5% 26% 66% 38.0 2000 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.4 2001 4% 24% 3% 67% | 5% 25% 67% 38.3 2002 4% 24% 3% 68% | 5% 25% 68% 38.4 2003

312

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

9 9 Total Residential Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Residential Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 24% 41% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 23% 42% 19% 3% | 30% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 26% 39% 18% 3% | 32% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 26% 39% 17% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 25% 40% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 25% 40% 18% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 26% 40% 16% 3% | 32% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 25% 41% 17% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 17.63 1988 26% 42% 15% 3% | 31% 47% 3% 18.44 1989 25% 41% 16% 3% | 30% 47% 3% 19.56 1990 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 4% 19.57 1991 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.03 1992 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 20.71 1993 24% 43% 17% 3% | 30% 48% 3% 21.24 1994 23% 42% 18% 3% | 29% 48% 3% 21.75 1995 22% 42% 19% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 22.71 1996 23% 43% 17% 3% | 29% 49% 3% 23.14 1997 22% 43% 18% 3% | 28% 49% 3% 23.34 1998 20% 43% 20% 3% | 27% 50% 3% 22.86 1999 21% 41% 21% 3% | 28% 48% 3% 22.88 2000 21% 40% 22% 3% | 29% 47% 3% 23.66 2001 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45% 3% 22.69 2002 21% 38% 24% 3% | 30% 45%

313

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

314

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Energy "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update (DOE/EA-1871) March 16, 2011 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update

315

A methodology to assess energy-demand savings and cost effectiveness of retrofitting in existing Swedish residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Swedish residential buildings are typically retrofitted on a case-by-case basis. Large numbers of building consultants are involved in the decision-making, and stakeholders find it difficult to quantify the sustainable profits from retrofits and to make an efficient selection of the optimal alternative. The present paper presents an approach to design and assess energy-demand retrofitting scenarios. This aims to contribute to retrofitting decision-making regarding the main archetypes of existing Swedish residential buildings and to the evaluation of their long-term cost effectiveness. The approach combines energy-demand modeling and retrofit option rankings with life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA). Four types of typical Swedish residential buildings are used to demonstrate the model. Retrofits in the archetypes are defined, analyzed and ranked to indicate the long-term energy savings and economic profits. The model indicates that the energy saving potential of retrofitting is 3654% in the archetypes. However, retrofits with the largest energy-saving potential are not always the most cost effective. The long-term profits of retrofitting are largely dominated by the building types. The finding can contribute to the standardization of future retrofitting designs on municipality scale in Sweden.

Qian Wang; Sture Holmberg

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Implementation of Industry Foundation Classes in Simulation Tools for the Building Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) provide an environment of interoperability among IFC-compliant software applications in the architecture, engineering, construction, and facilities management (AEC/FM) industry. They allow building simulation software to automatically acquire building geometry and other building data from project models created with IFC compliant CAD software. They also facilitate direct exchange of input and output data with other simulation software. This paper discusses how simulation software can be made compliant with version 1.5 of the IFC. It also describes the immediate plans for expansion of IFC and the process of definition and addition of new classes to the model.

Bazjanac, Vladimir; Crawley, Drury B.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Evaluation of Automated Model Calibration Techniques for Residential Building Energy Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This simulation study adapts and applies the general framework described in BESTEST-EX (Judkoff et al 2010) for self-testing residential building energy model calibration methods. BEopt/DOE-2.2 is used to evaluate four mathematical calibration methods in the context of monthly, daily, and hourly synthetic utility data for a 1960's-era existing home in a cooling-dominated climate. The home's model inputs are assigned probability distributions representing uncertainty ranges, random selections are made from the uncertainty ranges to define 'explicit' input values, and synthetic utility billing data are generated using the explicit input values. The four calibration methods evaluated in this study are: an ASHRAE 1051-RP-based approach (Reddy and Maor 2006), a simplified simulated annealing optimization approach, a regression metamodeling optimization approach, and a simple output ratio calibration approach. The calibration methods are evaluated for monthly, daily, and hourly cases; various retrofit measures are applied to the calibrated models and the methods are evaluated based on the accuracy of predicted savings, computational cost, repeatability, automation, and ease of implementation.

Robertson, J.; Polly, B.; Collis, J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Variability in Automated Responses of Commercial Buildings and Industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption of commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities) during Demand Response (DR. Keywords: demand response, baseline models, load prediction, error analysis, variability, measurement in the past ­ either with relays that interrupt power to air conditioners and water heaters [1], [2

319

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plausible future penetration rates for residential PVefficiencies and penetration rates. A subset of outputs areof localized high penetration rates, but the lack of a sound

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Demand response-enabled autonomous control for interior space conditioning in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Response Autonomous Controlssystem under the context of demand response for residential10] E. Arens et al. , Demand response enabling technology

Chen, Xue

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Residential building solar thermal analysis| A case study on Sophia Gordon Hall.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Solar thermal technologies, such as residential hot water heating and space conditioning, have potential for reducing green house gas emissions and fossil fuel consumption. (more)

Trethewey, Ross M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain Building a More Efficient Industrial Supply Chain November 7, 2011 - 3:06pm Addthis This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. This infographic highlights some of the ways businesses can save money at each step of the energy supply chain. Many companies can identify low-cost ways to reduce energy costs in electricity generation, electricity transmission, industrial processes, product delivery, and retail sales. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

323

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Optimizing Hydronic Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boiler Optimization Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org; Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com; HTP, www.htproducts.com; Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com; Grundfos, us.grundfos.com; Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com; Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Space heating, water heating Application: New; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): 4,5,6,7 PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $6,100-$8,200 Projected Energy Savings:

324

Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Residential Retrofit Program Design Guide focuses on the key elements and design characteristics of building and maintaining a successful residential retrofit program.

325

Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and Buildings, Energy, Greenhouse Gas, Industrial and Policy Modeling and Simulation Tools Available from Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Tools header image January 2014 Tools and models to find the best way to save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in cities and industries, to follow the transport of pollutants through the environment, and to calculate the cost of power interruptions are among those available on a new Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) web site. The site brings together models and simulation tools developed by the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts (EAEI) Department of the Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division. "Our hope is that the site will facilitate greater technical awareness of

326

2014-04-30 Public Meeting Agenda: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is the agenda for the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting being held on April 30, 2014.

327

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE MARKET POTENTIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF ENERGY CONSERVATION IN THE CANADIAN RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL SECTORS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Energy conservation in the residential/commercial/industrial sectors is a significant supply option for Canada. The conservation business can also produce an important impact on national economic performance. Although some achievement has been made in energy conservation, the potential in Canada has remained mostly untapped. In order to develop the energy conservation potential aggressively, demographic and institutional barriers must be overcome. The non-residential sector is likely to experience a more aggressive rate of energy conservation achievement than the residential sector. Financing is a crucial issue confronting the aggressive development of energy conservation. Good decisions require good information bases. There is much to improve on the quality and variety of data available to the public on energy conservation. Emphasis should also be placed on education and effective communication of energy conservation to managers and the public.

Lorne D.R. Dyke; W. Samuel Chan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the buildings/commercial/ref_buildings.html">DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

329

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Maximum Rebate Commercial Green Building: $75,000 Residential Green Building: $100,000 LEED Certification: $30,000 Green Building Rater Incentive: $6,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program

330

Dynamic Simulation and Analysis of Factors Impacting the Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings have a close relationship with climate. There are a lot of important factors that influence building energy consumption such as building shape coefficient, insulation work of building envelope, covered area, and the area ratio of window...

Lian, Y.; Hao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Envelope-related energy demand: A design indicator of energy performance for residential buildings in early design stages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The architectural design variables which most influence the energy performance of a building are the envelope materials, shape and window areas. As these start to be defined in the early design stages, designers require simple tools to obtain information about the energy performance of the building for the design variations being considered at this phase. The shape factor is one of those tools, but it fails to correlate with energy demand in the presence of important solar gains. This paper presents a new design indicator of energy performance for residential buildings, the Envelope-Related Energy Demand (ERED), which aims to overcome the shortcomings of the shape factor while maintaining a reasonable simplicity of use. The inputs to ERED are areas of envelope elements (floor, walls, roofs and windows), U-values of envelope materials, solar heat gain coefficients (SHGC) of windows and site related parameters, concerning temperature and solar irradiation. ERED was validated against detailed simulation results of 8000 hypothetical residential buildings, varying in envelope shape, window areas and materials. Results show that there is a strong correlation between ERED and simulated energy demand. These results confirm the adequacy of ERED to assist design decisions in early stages of the design process.

Vasco Granadeiro; Joo R. Correia; Vtor M.S. Leal; Jos P. Duarte

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

About Residential | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » About Residential Residential Buildings » About Residential About Residential The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with home builders, energy professionals, state and local governments, utilities, product manufacturers, educators, and researchers to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. Residential Sector Activities Include: Demonstrating to builders and remodelers how to build and renovate for high performance through best practice guides and case studies and continuing to developing innovative whole-house energy efficiency solutions through Building America research projects. We also provide guidelines and tools for researchers conducting building related research projects. Promoting a trusted, whole-house process for upgrading existing homes with

333

Where and how much : density scenarios for the residential build-out of Gaoming, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author will use Gaoming District in the western part of China's Pearl River Delta (PRD) as an opportunity to examine the impact a range of residential densities along planned public transportation corridors can have ...

Hu, Karen Jia Ying

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Expert Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GTI PROJECT NUMBER 20970 GTI PROJECT NUMBER 20970 Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership II Subtask 1.8: Building America Expert Meeting Report Issued: December 20, 2010 Prepared For: Philip Fairey Deputy Director Florida Solar Energy Center 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (321) 638-1434 pfairey@fsec.ucf.edu GTI Technical Contacts: Ryan Kerr Douglas Kosar R&D Market Analyst Institute Engineer 847-768-0941 847-768-0725 ryan.kerr@gastechnology.org douglas.kosar@gastechnology.org Gas Technology Institute 1700 S. Mount Prospect Rd. Des Plaines, Illinois 60018 www.gastechnology.org FINAL EXPERT MEETING REPORT Building America Expert Meeting Final Report Page i Legal Notice This information was prepared by Gas Technology Institute ("GTI") for the Florida Solar

335

EVALUATION OF INDUSTRY FOUNDATION CLASSES FOR PRACTICAL BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING INTEROPERABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard Project Committee defines a Building Information Model as "a digital representation of physicalEVALUATION OF INDUSTRY FOUNDATION CLASSES FOR PRACTICAL BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING FOR PRACTICAL BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING INTEROPERABILITY ABSTRACT The AEC (Architecture, Engineering

Kamat, Vineet R.

336

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies, U.S.and Renewable Energy (2005). 2005 Buildings Energy Databook,Buildings Energy Databook Table 1.2.3 (US DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Residential building energy analysis : development and uncertainty assessment of a simplified model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective design of energy-efficient buildings requires attention to energy issues during the preliminary stages of design. To aid in the early consideration of a building's future energy usage, a simplified building energy ...

Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

Stansbury, E.E. [Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 Ownership (1) Owned 54.9 104.5 40.3 78% Rented 77.4 71.7 28.4 22% Public Housing 75.7 62.7 28.7 2% Not Public Housing 77.7 73.0 28.4 19% 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit Per Square Per Household Per Household Percent of Foot (thousand Btu) (million Btu) Members (million Btu) Total Consumption

340

Supporting Photovoltaics in Market-Rate Residential New Construction: A Summary of Programmatic Experience to Date and Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of, new, multi- family residential buildings with PV (seemarket-rate, multi-family residential building. One of thecapacity) on multi- family residential buildings. Installed

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This 2014 Top Innovation describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2.

342

Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Residential Sector Energy Consumption March 2012 1.2.9 Implicit Price Deflators (2005 1.00) Year Year Year 1980 0.48 1990 0.72 2000 0.89 1981 0.52 1991 0.75 2001 0.91 1982 0.55...

344

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

345

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

346

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Type (1) Single-Family: 55.4 106.6 39.4 80.5% Detached 55.0 108.4 39.8 73.9% Attached 60.5 89.3 36.1 6.6% Multi-Family: 78.3 64.1 29.7 14.9% 2 to 4 units 94.3 85.0 35.2 6.3% 5 or more units 69.8 54.4 26.7 8.6% Mobile Homes 74.6 70.4 28.5 4.6% All Housing Types 58.7 95.0 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Housing Type

347

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Year Built (1) Prior to 1950 74.5 114.9 46.8 24% 1950 to 1969 66.0 96.6 38.1 23% 1970 to 1979 59.4 83.4 33.5 15% 1980 to 1989 51.9 81.4 32.3 14% 1990 to 1999 48.2 94.4 33.7 16% 2000 to 2005 44.7 94.7 34.3 8% Average 58.7 95.0 40.0 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008. 2005 Residential Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Vintage Per Square Per Household Per Household

348

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 1 Residential Water Use by Source (Million Gallons per Day) Year 1980 3,400 1985 3,320 1990 3,390 1995 3,390 2000 (3) (3) 3,590 2005 3,830 Note(s): Source(s): 29,430 25,600 1) Public supply water use: water withdrawn by public and private water suppliers that furnish water to at least 25 people or have a minimum of 15 connections. 2) Self-supply water use: Water withdrawn from a groundwater or surface-water source by a user rather than being obtained from a public supply. 3) USGS did not provide estimates of residential use from public supplies in 2000. This value was estimated based on the residential portion of public supply in 1995 and applied to the total public supply water use in 2000. U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 1985, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1004, 1988; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of

349

Building Technologies Office: Building America Research Teams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Teams Teams Building America research projects are completed by industry consortia (teams) comprised of leading experts from across the country. The research teams design, test, upgrade and build high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Building America research teams are selected through a competitive process initiated by a request for proposals. Team members are experts in the field of residential building science, and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. This page provides a brief description of the teams, areas of focus, and key team members. Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Alliance for Residential Building Innovation

350

IMPACT OF REDUCED INFILTRATION AND VENTILATION ON INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical Analysis of Nitrogen Dioxide Air Quality Standards.contaminants-. ;--- ---- nitrogen dioxide from gas stoves,buildings: nitrogen dioxide (N02), formaldehyde (HCHO), and

Hollowell, Craig D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbines, and micro- hydro, PV dominates building-sitedgrid-integrated), 3% micro-hydro, and 2% micro-wind. Grid-

Garbesi, Karina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate For buildings with permits received on or before January 31, 2013: $562,792 maximum improved market value for residential buildings except no limitation with LEED Platinum certification (the maximum incentive increases by 3% every year) For buildings with permits received after January 31, 2013:

353

Funding Opportunity Webinar Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar provides an overview of the Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovations Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0001117.

354

Funding Opportunity Webinar Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovations (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the Funding Opportunity Webinar, Building America Industry Partnerships for High Performance Housing Innovations, presented in November 2014.

355

Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DRAFT ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Better Buildings, Better Plants: How You Can Benefit, plus New Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency Advanced Manufacturing Office October 9, 2012 Andre de Fontaine Katrina Pielli 2 Today * Better Buildings, Better Plants Overview - Better Buildings, Better Plants Program - Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge * Looking Ahead to 2013 - In-Plant Trainings - Enhanced energy intensity baselining and tracking tool - New communication materials * Executive Order on Industrial Energy Efficiency and Combined Heat and Power - DOE Activities in Support of Executive Order * Regional Industrial Energy Efficiency & Combined Heat and Power Dialogue Meetings * Better Buildings, Better Plants * "CHP as a Clean Energy Resource" new report

356

Forecasting energy consumption of multi-family residential buildings using support vector regression: Investigating the impact of temporal and spatial monitoring granularity on performance accuracy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Buildings are the dominant source of energy consumption and environmental emissions in urban areas. Therefore, the ability to forecast and characterize building energy consumption is vital to implementing urban energy management and efficiency initiatives required to curb emissions. Advances in smart metering technology have enabled researchers to develop sensor based approaches to forecast building energy consumption that necessitate less input data than traditional methods. Sensor-based forecasting utilizes machine learning techniques to infer the complex relationships between consumption and influencing variables (e.g., weather, time of day, previous consumption). While sensor-based forecasting has been studied extensively for commercial buildings, there is a paucity of research applying this data-driven approach to the multi-family residential sector. In this paper, we build a sensor-based forecasting model using Support Vector Regression (SVR), a commonly used machine learning technique, and apply it to an empirical data-set from a multi-family residential building in New York City. We expand our study to examine the impact of temporal (i.e., daily, hourly, 10min intervals) and spatial (i.e., whole building, by floor, by unit) granularity have on the predictive power of our single-step model. Results indicate that sensor based forecasting models can be extended to multi-family residential buildings and that the optimal monitoring granularity occurs at the by floor level in hourly intervals. In addition to implications for the development of residential energy forecasting models, our results have practical significance for the deployment and installation of advanced smart metering devices. Ultimately, accurate and cost effective wide-scale energy prediction is a vital step towards next-generation energy efficiency initiatives, which will require not only consideration of the methods, but the scales for which data can be distilled into meaningful information.

Rishee K. Jain; Kevin M. Smith; Patricia J. Culligan; John E. Taylor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Residential Efficiency Measures Database National Residential Efficiency Measures Database This photo shows a man in a white hazardous materials suit blowing insulation inside of an attic. He is wearing a headlamp on his head and the beam shines in the general direction of the insulation tube he is holding. Home improvement can be expensive. The good news is that many energy efficiency improvements quickly pay for themselves in energy savings. Having accurate and consistent performance and cost data for energy efficiency measures enables researchers and the building industry to determine the most cost-effective means of improving existing homes all across the nation. The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and associated estimated

358

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

window related primary energy consumption of the US building= 1.056 EJ. Primary energy consumption includes a site-to-the amount of primary energy consumption required by space

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughly 2.7% of total US energy consumption. The final tworoughly 1.5% of total US energy consumption. The final twoSpace Conditioning Energy Consumption in US Buildings Annual

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

EnergyGauge USA: A Residential Building Energy Simulation Design Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation in less than 20 seconds. A simplified user interface allows buildings to be quickly defined while bringing the computing power and accuracy of an hourly computer simulation to builders, designers and raters....

Fairey, P.; Vieira, R. K.; Parker, D. S.; Hanson, B.; Broman, P. A.; Grant, J. B.; Fuehrlein, B.; Gu, L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cost-effective retrofitting of Swedish residential buildings: effects of energy price developments and discount rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates how the cost-effectiveness of different energy-saving measures (ESMs) in buildings is dependent upon energy prices and discount rates. A bottom-up ... different ESMs for Swedish residentia...

rika Mata; Angela Sasic Kalagasidis; Filip Johnsson

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

363

Buildings Technologies Deployment | Clean energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Technologies Deployment Building Technologies Deployment SHARE Building Technologies Deployment benchmarking commercial buildings Once building technologies emerge and become commercially available, only in exceptional cases does robust market uptake automatically follow. Additional efforts remain to ensure that emerging and under-utilized technologies are successfully deployed to the fullest extent possible. ORNL helps optimize the energy performance of buildings and industrial processes by moving technologies to full use in residential, commercial, and industrial sectors through applications research, technical assistance, and a variety of deployment strategies. The team's comprehensive knowledge of buildings and energy use spans multi-building sites, whole-buildings, systems, components, and multi-level

364

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Residential Water Billing Rate Structures for Community Water Systems Rate Structure Uniform Rates Declining Block Rate Increasing Block Rate Peak Period or Seasonal Rate Separate Flat Fee Annual Connection Fee Combined Flat Fee Other Rate Structures Note(s): Source(s): 3.0% 9.0% 1) Systems serving more than 10,000 users provide service to 82% of the population served by community water systems. Columns do not sum to 100% because some systems use more than one rate structure. 2) Uniform rates charge a set price for each unit of water. Block rates charge a different price for each additional increment of usage. The prices for each increment is higher for increasing block rates and lower for decreasing block rates. Peak rates and seasonal rates charge higher prices when demand is highest. Flat fees charge a set price for

365

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.3 Efficiency Standards for Residential HVAC  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Efficiency Standards for Residential Boilers Effective for products manufactured before September 1, 2012 AFUE(%) (1) Boilers (excluding gas steam) Gas Steam Boilers Effective for products manufactured on or after September 1, 2012 (2) AFUE (%) (1) No Constant Burning Pilot Automatic Means for Adjusting Water Temperature Gas Steam No Constant Burning Pilot Oil Hot Water Automatic Means for Adjusting Water Temperature Oil Steam None Electric Hot water Automatic Means for Adjusting Water Temperature Electric Steam None Note(s): Source(s): 84 82 None None 1) Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency. 2) Boilers manufactured to operate without any need for electricity, an electric connection, electric gauges, electric pumps, electric wires, or electric devices are not required to comply with the revised standards that take effect September 1,

366

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Efficiency Standards for Residential Refrigerators and Freezers (1) 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) Note(s): Source(s): Refrigerator-freezers, automatic defrost with side-mounted freezer with through-the-door ice service 10.10AV + 406.0 1) Effective for products manufactured on or after July 1, 2001. Standards do not apply to refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with total refrigerated volume exceeding 39 cubic feet or freezers with total refrigerated volume exceeding 30 cubic feet. AV = total adjusted volume (ft^3). Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 430 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products, Subpart C - Energy and Water Conservation Standards and Their Effective Dates. January 1, 2010. Refrigerator-freezers, automatic defrost with side-mounted freezer without through-the-

367

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Efficiency Standards for Residential Water Heaters (1) Effective for products manufactured from January 20, 2004 through April 15, 2015 Gas-Fired Storage Water Heaters Oil-Fired Water Heaters EF = 0.67 - (0.0019 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons) EF = 0.59 - (0.0019 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons) Instantaneous Gas-Fired Water Heaters Instantaneous Electric and Table Top Water Heaters EF = 0.62 - (0.0019 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons) EF = 0.93 - (0.00132 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons) Electric Storage Water Heaters EF = 0.97 - (0.00132 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons) Effective for products manufactured on or after April 16, 2015 Gas-Fired Storage Water Heaters Rated Storage Volume ≤ 55 gallons EF = 0.675 - (0.0015 x Rated Storage Volume in gallons)

368

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Building Americas Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building America program and its teams of building science experts continue to have a transforming impact, leading our nation's home building industry to high-performance homes. The U.S. home building industry represents a significant opportunity for energy savings, accounting for nearly one-fourth of U.S. energy consumption, but the industry as a whole has been slow to adopt new energy-saving technologies. This is largely due to the industry's unique disaggregation, with thousands of small business owners lacking adequate resources and capabilities to invest in research and development. DOE established the Building America program in 1995 to address both the huge energy-saving opportunity and the critical research gap

369

Assessing the Potential of Developing a Tool for Residential Facility Management Using Building Information Modeling Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, maintenance and management data for the Sydney Opera House (Sabol, 2008). BIM integrated with gaming has proved to be a simple means through which to provide safety training in the construction industry (Nidhi Jain, 2010). BIM integrated with 13..., maintenance and management data for the Sydney Opera House (Sabol, 2008). BIM integrated with gaming has proved to be a simple means through which to provide safety training in the construction industry (Nidhi Jain, 2010). BIM integrated with 13...

Madhani, Himanshu 1986-

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Name National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Tool Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Regional Focus National Focus Area Building Energy Efficiency Implementation Phase Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Type CommunityEnergyToolType Modeling Tool Cost Free User Interface Website, Other Website http://www.nrel.gov/ap/retrofits/index.cfm Tool Users The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry.

372

[Your Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Industrial Plant] Earns the ENERGY STAR Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories

373

SPP sales flyer for manufacturing and industry | ENERGY STAR Buildings &  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

manufacturing and industry manufacturing and industry Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

374

An Analysis of Building Envelope Upgrades for Residential Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and exterior walls, and windows. A DOE-2 simulation model of a 2000/2001 IECC code-compliant house in Houston, Texas, was used for the analysis. The results demonstrated the effect of incremental changes in these properties on the building's energy use...

Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

375

Experimental Investigation of Direct Expansion Dynamic Ice-on-coil Storage System Used in Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduction in electricity consumption of an ice-storage system in the daytime leads to financial savings for building owners and extension savings for a power plant and national economy. Great advancements have been made in domestic ice-storage...

Zheng, M.; Kong, F.; Han, Z.; Liu, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy retrofit of residential building envelopes in Israel: A cost-benefit analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract It is often taken for granted that thermal renovation of building envelopes not only conserves operational energy and reduces the environmental impact of generating electricity, but is also economically beneficial to the individual homeowner. While this may be true in cold climates, it may not necessarily be true in the case of Israel, most of which has a relatively mild Mediterranean climate but parts of which are hot and arid. This study, which sought to address this question, comprised two stages: a) Analysis of the direct economic benefits to the individual homeowner of different strategies for refurbishing the envelope of an existing building; and b) Examination of other (external) benefits to society arising from electricity conservation resulting from such retrofit. The analysis demonstrates that in Israel, given current electricity prices and building construction costs, insulating the roof is a cost-effective strategy but the payback period is 1530 years, making it unattractive to most homeowners. Insulating the external walls of a typical apartment results in electricity savings comparable to only one third of the retrofit cost, and is thus not economically viable. Accounting for the external benefits to society does make some marginal retrofits more attractive, but not sufficiently to justify most envelope retrofit options. This highlights the importance of adopting stringent standards for new construction, since the marginal cost of additional thermal insulation in new buildings is far lower than the cost of renovating them.

Chanoch Friedman; Nir Becker; Evyatar Erell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Buildings, by Fuel and Region (Thousand BtuSF) Region Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Total Northeast 27.7 45.9 39.9 71.5 Midwest 22.5 49.9 N.A. 70.3 South 53.5 27.9 N.A....

378

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 2010 Five Largest Residential Homebuilders Homebuilder PulteGroup 5.3% D.R. Horton 5.9% NVR 3.1% Lennar Corporation 3.4% KB Home 2.3% Top Five Total 19.9% Habitat for Humanity (3) 0.1% Note(s): Source(s): 6,032 402 1) 2010 total U.S. new home closings were 323,000 (only single-family). 2) Total share of closings of top 20 builders was 35%. Total share of the top 100 builders was 54%. 3) Habitat for Humanity built more than 400 homes during the week of May 31, 2007; Habitat for Humanity has built over 1,000 homes in the New Orleans area since Hurricane Katrina. Habitat for Humanity's 2,100 worldwide affiliates have completed more than 200,000 homes since 1976, providing more than 1,000,000 with housing. Housing Giants Magazine, May 2011, Professional Builder's 2011 Housing Giants Rankings.

379

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

0 0 Region (1) Northeast 73.5 122.2 47.7 24% New England 77.0 129.4 55.3 7% Middle Atlantic 72.2 119.7 45.3 17% Midwest 58.9 113.5 46.0 28% East North Central 61.1 117.7 47.3 20% West North Central 54.0 104.1 42.9 8% South 51.5 79.8 31.6 31% South Atlantic 47.4 76.1 30.4 16% East South Central 56.6 87.3 36.1 6% West South Central 56.6 82.4 31.4 9% West 56.6 77.4 28.1 18% Mountain 54.4 89.8 33.7 6% Pacific 58.0 71.8 25.7 11% U.S. Average 58.7 94.9 37.0 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy consumption per square foot was calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet.

380

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.2 Residential Sector Water Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 1999 Single-Family Home Daily Water Consumption by End Use (Gallons per Capita) (1) Fixture/End Use Toilet 18.5 18.3% Clothes Washer 15 14.9% Shower 11.6 11.5% Faucet 10.9 10.8% Other Domestic 1.6 1.6% Bath 1.2 1.2% Dishwasher 1 1.0% Leaks 9.5 9.4% Outdoor Use (2) 31.7 31.4% Total (2) 101 100% Note(s): Source(s): Average gallons Total Use per capita per day Percent 1) Based analysis of 1,188 single-family homes at 12 study locations. 2) Total Water use derived from USGS. Outdoor use is the difference between total and indoor uses. American Water Works Association Research Foundation, Residential End Uses of Water, 1999; U.S. Geological Survey, Estimated Use of Water in the U.S. in 2000, U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1268, 2004, Table 6, p. 17; and Vickers, Amy, Handbook of Water Use and Conservation, June 2002, p. 15.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Construction Statistics of New Homes Completed/Placed Year Thousand Units Average SF Thousand Units Average SF 1980 234 1981 229 1982 234 1983 278 1984 288 1985 283 1986 256 1987 239 1988 224 1989 203 1990 195 1991 174 1992 212 1993 243 1994 291 1995 319 1996 338 1997 336 1998 374 1999 338 2000 281 2001 196 2002 174 2003 140 2004 124 2005 123 2006 112 2007 95 2008 81 2009 55 2010 50 Source(s): 496 2,392 155 1,172 701 DOC, 2010 Characteristics of New Housing, 2010, "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in New Single-Family Houses Completed by Location", "Presence of Air-Conditioning in New Single Family Houses", "Number of Multifamily Units Completed by Number of Units Per Building", "Median and Average Square Feet of Floor Area in Units in New Multifamily Buildings Completed", "Placements of New Manufactured Homes by Region and Size of Home, 1980-

382

Workshop Proceedings of the Industrial Building Energy Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollution-control or other environmental conditioning requirements, and therefore higher inten- sity of energy use for building

Akbari, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Building Code Compliance and Enforcement: The Experience of SanFrancisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinanace and California'sBuildign Standards for New Construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) technical assistance to the Sustainable City Project, compliance and enforcement activities related to local and state building codes for existing and new construction were evaluated in two case studies. The analysis of the City of San Francisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance (RECO) showed that a limited, prescriptive energy conservation ordinance for existing residential construction can be enforced relatively easily with little administrative costs, and that compliance with such ordinances can be quite high. Compliance with the code was facilitated by extensive publicity, an informed public concerned with the cost of energy and knowledgeable about energy efficiency, the threat of punishment (Order of Abatement), the use of private inspectors, and training workshops for City and private inspectors. The analysis of California's Title 24 Standards for new residential and commercial construction showed that enforcement of this type of code for many climate zones is more complex and requires extensive administrative support for education and training of inspectors, architects, engineers, and builders. Under this code, prescriptive and performance approaches for compliance are permitted, resulting in the demand for alternative methods of enforcement: technical assistance, plan review, field inspection, and computer analysis. In contrast to existing construction, building design and new materials and construction practices are of critical importance in new construction, creating a need for extensive technical assistance and extensive interaction between enforcement personnel and the building community. Compliance problems associated with building design and installation did occur in both residential and nonresidential buildings. Because statewide codes are enforced by local officials, these problems may increase over time as energy standards change and become more complex and as other standards (eg, health and safety codes) remain a higher priority. The California Energy Commission realizes that code enforcement by itself is insufficient and expects that additional educational and technical assistance efforts (eg, manuals, training programs, and toll-free telephone lines) will ameliorate these problems.

Vine, E.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Building Science Education | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Education Building Science Education The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to: Increase awareness of high performance home benefits Build a solid infrastructure for delivering building science

385

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

5 5 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.50 0.53 0.30 0.04 0.43 0.44 5.23 44.7% | 1.35 6.15 27.8% Water Heating 1.29 0.10 0.07 0.01 0.45 1.92 16.4% | 1.38 2.86 12.9% Space Cooling 0.00 1.08 1.08 9.2% | 3.34 3.34 15.1% Lighting 0.69 0.69 5.9% | 2.13 2.13 9.7% Refrigeration (6) 0.45 0.45 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 6.4% Electronics (5) 0.54 0.54 4.7% | 1.68 1.68 7.6% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.38 3.3% | 1.01 1.06 4.8% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.18 0.43 3.7% | 0.57 0.81 3.7% Computers 0.17 0.17 1.5% | 0.53 0.53 2.4% Other (8) 0.00 0.16 0.01 0.20 0.37 3.2% | 0.63 0.80 3.6% Adjust to SEDS (9) 0.42 0.42 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.8% Total 5.06 0.63 0.56 0.04 0.45 4.95 11.69 100% | 15.34 22.07 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2010 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.42 quad), solar water heating (0.01

386

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.20 0.31 0.22 0.03 0.46 0.49 4.72 38.9% | 1.45 5.67 23.9% Water Heating 1.27 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.54 1.90 15.6% | 1.60 2.96 12.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.25 1.25 10.3% | 3.68 3.68 15.5% Lighting 0.48 0.48 3.9% | 1.41 1.41 5.9% Refrigeration (5) 0.52 0.52 4.3% | 1.54 1.54 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.44 0.44 3.6% | 1.29 1.29 5.4% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.07 0.32 0.39 3.2% | 0.95 1.01 4.3% Cooking 0.23 0.02 0.15 0.40 3.3% | 0.44 0.69 2.9% Computers 0.27 0.27 2.2% | 0.79 0.79 3.3% Other (8) 0.00 0.22 0.07 1.48 1.77 14.6% | 4.35 4.64 19.6% Total 4.76 0.35 0.51 0.03 0.55 5.94 12.14 100% | 17.50 23.69 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2035 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.44 quad), solar water heating (0.02

387

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.28 0.38 0.24 0.03 0.46 0.46 4.85 41.5% | 1.40 5.78 25.8% Water Heating 1.32 0.05 0.04 0.02 0.53 1.96 16.8% | 1.60 3.03 13.5% Space Cooling 0.00 1.12 1.12 9.6% | 3.38 3.38 15.1% Lighting 0.47 0.47 4.0% | 1.42 1.42 6.3% Refrigeration (5) 0.48 0.48 4.1% | 1.45 1.45 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.37 0.37 3.2% | 1.12 1.12 5.0% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.30 0.37 3.1% | 0.91 0.98 4.4% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.13 0.38 3.2% | 0.40 0.64 2.9% Computers 0.24 0.24 2.0% | 0.72 0.72 3.2% Other (8) 0.00 0.20 0.07 1.20 1.46 12.5% | 3.61 3.87 17.3% Total 4.88 0.43 0.50 0.03 1.00 5.30 11.69 100% | 16.00 22.39 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2025 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

388

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 Natural Fuel Other Renw. Site Site Primary Gas Oil LPG Fuel(1) En.(2) Electric Total Percent Electric (3) Total Percent Space Heating (4) 3.40 0.48 0.26 0.03 0.44 0.42 5.03 44.2% | 1.27 5.88 27.9% Water Heating 1.31 0.07 0.05 0.02 0.48 1.92 16.9% | 1.44 2.88 13.7% Space Cooling 0.00 1.02 1.02 8.9% | 3.07 3.07 14.6% Lighting 0.53 0.53 4.6% | 1.60 1.60 7.6% Refrigeration (5) 0.45 0.45 4.0% | 1.37 1.37 6.5% Electronics (6) 0.33 0.33 2.9% | 0.99 0.99 4.7% Wet Cleaning (7) 0.06 0.33 0.39 3.4% | 0.98 1.04 5.0% Cooking 0.22 0.03 0.11 0.36 3.1% | 0.34 0.59 2.8% Computers 0.19 0.19 1.7% | 0.57 0.57 2.7% Other (8) 0.00 0.17 0.05 0.94 1.17 10.2% | 2.85 3.07 14.6% Total 4.99 0.55 0.51 0.03 0.51 4.79 11.38 100% | 14.47 21.06 100% Note(s): Source(s): 2015 Residential Energy End-Use Splits, by Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu) Primary 1) Kerosene and coal are assumed attributable to space heating. 2) Comprised of wood space heating (0.43 quad), solar water heating (0.02

389

Construction cost impact analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy mandatory performance standards for new federal commercial and multi-family, high-rise residential buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with federal legislation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted a project to demonstrate use of its Energy Conservation Voluntary Performance Standards for Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings; Mandatory for New Federal Buildings; Interim Rule (referred to in this report as DOE-1993). A key requisite of the legislation requires DOE to develop commercial building energy standards that are cost effective. During the demonstration project, DOE specifically addressed this issue by assessing the impacts of the standards on (1) construction costs, (2) builders (and especially small builders) of multi-family, high-rise buildings, and (3) the ability of low-to moderate-income persons to purchase or rent units in such buildings. This document reports on this project.

Di Massa, F.V.; Hadley, D.L.; Halverson, M.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Statistical Analysis of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Policymakers are encouraging the development of standardized and consistent methods to quantify the electric load impacts of demand response programs. For load impacts, an essential part of the analysis is the estimation of the baseline load profile. In this paper, we present a statistical evaluation of the performance of several different models used to calculate baselines for commercial buildings participating in a demand response program in California. In our approach, we use the model to estimate baseline loads for a large set of proxy event days for which the actual load data are also available. Measures of the accuracy and bias of different models, the importance of weather effects, and the effect of applying morning adjustment factors (which use data from the day of the event to adjust the estimated baseline) are presented. Our results suggest that (1) the accuracy of baseline load models can be improved substantially by applying a morning adjustment, (2) the characterization of building loads by variability and weather sensitivity is a useful indicator of which types of baseline models will perform well, and (3) models that incorporate temperature either improve the accuracy of the model fit or do not change it.

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Building America Expert Meeting: Retrofit Implementation- A Neighborhood at a Time  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report provides information about a Building America expert meeting hosted by research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings on October 25, 2011, in New York City. The meeting discussed several community residential retrofit projects underway across the United States, and included representatives from utilities, energy program implementation firms, affordable housing agencies, and the financing industry.

392

April 30 Public Meeting: Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Building End-Use Equipment and Appliances  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These documents contain slide decks presented at the Physical Characterization of Smart and Grid-Connected Commercial and Residential Buildings End-Use Equipment and Appliances public meeting held on April 30, 2014. The first document includes the first presentation from the meeting: DOE Vision and Objectives. The second document includes all other presentations from the meeting: Terminology and Definitions; End-User and Grid Services; Physical Characterization Framework; Value, Benefits & Metrics.

393

Comparison of DOE-2.1E with Energyplus and TRNSYS for Ground Coupled Residential Buildings in Hot anf Humid Climates Stage 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-11-12-08 COMPARISON OF DOE-2.1E WITH ENERGYPLUS AND TRNSYS FOR GROUND COUPLED RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES STAGE 1 Literature Survey on Slab-on-grade Heat Transfer Models of DOE-2, EnergyPlus and TRNSYS... .................................................................................................................... 4 2. Introduction ........................................................................................................................................... 4 3. Literature Survey on Slab-on-grade Models of DOE-2, EnergyPlus and TRNSYS...

Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Others Share Source: Murthy, 2007 3.3.3 Energy data The productionthe World Bank. 4.2.2 Industrial Production Intensity EnergyEnergy) Production Of crude steel Mt SEC GJ/t cs Coal Elect FO LPG Gas SEC World

Sathaye, Jayant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide for Benchmarking Residential Energy Efficiency Program Progress as part of the DOE Better Buildings Program.

396

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

8 8 2009 Sales Price and Construction Cost Breakdown of an Average New Single-Family Home ($2010) (1) Function Finished Lot 20% Construction Cost 59% Financing 2% Overhead & General Expenses 5% Marketing 1% Sales Commission 3% Profit 9% Total 100% Function Building Permit Fees 2% Impact Fees 1% Water and Sewer Inspection 2% Excavation, Foundation, & Backfill 7% Steel 1% Framing and Trusses 16% Sheathing 2% Windows 3% Exterior Doors 1% Interior Doors & Hardware 2% Stairs 1% Roof Shingles 4% Siding 6% Gutters & Downspouts 0% Plumbing 5% Electrical Wiring 4% Lighting Fixtures 1% HVAC 4% Insulation 2% Drywall 5% Painting 3% Cabinets, Countertops 6% Appliances 2% Tiles & Carpet 5% Trim Material 3% Landscaping & Sodding 3% Wood Deck/Patio 1% Asphalt Driveway 1% Other 9% Total 100% Note(s): Source(s): NAHB, Breaking Down House Price and Construction Costs, 2010, Table 1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for price

397

Simplified Prescriptive Options in the Texas Residential Building Energy Code Make Compliance Easy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.65; SHGCs less than 0.40; R-30 or greater insulation in the ceilings; and R-13 or greater insulation in the walls. B. Building Energy Efficiency Requirements for Additions to Existing Homes and Replacement Windows. Even easier than the IRC...,000 ? 2,499 0.65 0.40 R-30 R-13 R-11 R-5 R-0 R-6 2,500 ? 2,999 0.60 0.40 R-30 R-13 R-19 R-6 R-4, 2 ft. R-7 3,000 ? 3,499 0.55 0.40 R-30 R-13 R-19 R-7 R-4, 2 ft. R-8 3,500 ? 3,999 0.50 Any R-30 R-13 R-19 R-8 R-5, 2 ft. R-10 4...

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Maryland-National Capital Building Industry Association Regulatory...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

firms. Final Letter to DOE Regulatory Burden 972012.pdf More Documents & Publications Building America Best Practices Series Volume 16: 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the...

399

Residential Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

400

Residential Weatherization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption 2.2 Residential Sector Characteristics 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures 2.4 Residential Environmental Data 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market 2.6 Residential Home Improvements 2.7 Multi-Family Housing 2.8 Industrialized Housing 2.9 Low-Income Housing 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 2 focuses on energy use in the U.S. residential buildings sector. Section 2.1 provides data on energy consumption by fuel type and end use, as well as energy consumption intensities for different housing categories. Section 2.2 presents characteristics of average households and changes in the U.S. housing stock over time. Sections 2.3 and 2.4 address energy-related expenditures and residential sector emissions, respectively. Section 2.5 contains statistics on housing construction, existing home sales, and mortgages. Section 2.6 presents data on home improvement spending and trends. Section 2.7 describes the industrialized housing industry, including the top manufacturers of various manufactured home products. Section 2.8 presents information on low-income housing and Federal weatherization programs. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

402

NREL: National Residential Efficiency Measures Database Home Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Residential Efficiency Measures Database National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Residential Efficiency Measures Database National Renewable Energy Laboratory The National Residential Efficiency Measures Database is a publicly available, centralized resource of residential building retrofit measures and costs for the U.S. building industry. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy, NREL developed this tool to help users determine the most cost-effective retrofit measures for improving energy efficiency of existing homes. Learn more about the database. By accessing the database, the user agrees to the terms and conditions of use. View Data Now Supporting Resources The following resources provide more information about the data and allow you to download the data. Data dictionary XML file download Simulation Protocols Glossary

403

Viability of exterior shading devices for high-rise residential buildings: Case study for cooling energy saving and economic feasibility analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Proper use of building shading devices can only improve the thermal comfort in indoor environment, but also reduce cooling energy consumption effectively. Researches on this topic have been mostly conducted for office buildings, but were limited for exterior shading devices of high-rise buildings, where cooling is a major energy consumer. This paper presents an integrated approach for exterior shading design analysis about energy performance and economic feasibility in a high-rise residential building (Seoul, Korea) by both numerical simulations and field mock-up test for possibility of installing. The sun-shading/daylighting performance analysis of the 48 exterior shading devices was measured with 4.0mנ3.2m window module size during the period of MaySeptember. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the cooling energy saving potential of solar radiation controls was conducted with DOE-2.1E simulation program. The cooling energy saving potential was about 20%, while the reducing of solar heat gain by the two exterior shading devices (the horizontal overhang and the vertical panel) would lead to a decrease of the cooling energy demand 19.7% and 17.3%, respectively. Cost benefit and economic feasibility was also analyzed, in consideration of the OPEX and CAPEX, depending on the shading type. The significance of this study lies in providing basic information for rational exterior shading planning, when designing high-rise residential buildings.

Jinkyun Cho; Changwoo Yoo; Yundeok Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or CBECS, covers a wide variety of building types—office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and fire stations, to name just a few. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial. For an overview of definitions and examples of the CBECS building types, see Description of Building Types. Compare Activities by... Number of Buildings Building size Employees Building Age Energy Conservation Number of Computers Electricity Generation Capability

405

Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World July 11, 2012 - 1:34pm Addthis Mfix is open-source, virtual modeling software that makes coal gasification processes more efficient than was ever possible through lab tests. Modeling reduces the cost and time of testing and building actual systems and ultimately results in lower costs, improved power plant efficiency, and new energy systems that meet or even exceed current or proposed environmental regulations. View the entire Lab Breakthrough playlist. Michael Hess Michael Hess Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What is the future of MFiX? Ultimately, we see MFiX being used to solve industrial-scale

406

City of Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program City of Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info Start Date 08/01/2010 State Indiana Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Indianapolis The Indianapolis Office of Sustainability and the Department of Code

407

Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

AN OVERVIEW OF BUILDING AMERICA INDUSTRIALIZED HOUSING PARTNERSHIP (BAIHP) ACTIVITIES IN HOT-HUMID CLIMATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assistance resulting in the construction of extremely energy efficient homes. One BA research team is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). This team, called the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP) is staffed by FSEC... assistance resulting in the construction of extremely energy efficient homes. One BA research team is led by the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC). This team, called the Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP) is staffed by FSEC...

Chandra, S.; Parker, D.; Sherwin, J.; Colon, C.; Fonorow, K.; Stroer, D.; Martin, E.; McIlvaine, J.; Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Thomas-Rees, S.; Hoak, D.; Beal, D.; Gil, C.

409

Structure, energy and cost efficiency evaluation of three different lightweight construction systems used in low-rise residential buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the analysis of the structure, energy and cost efficiency of three lightweight structural systems wood light frames (WLF), lightweight steel frames (LGSF) and 3D sandwich (3DSP) panels during their useful life. The structural systems focussed upon in this study are commonly used in Eastern Europe with specific reference to Turkey. The structural analysis and design was carried out using ETABS while EnergyPlus was used in the analysis of the energy consumption of the buildings. The results of the structural analysis of the three alternative construction systems show that 3DSP has better structural behaviour in terms of resistance against lateral loads. The thermal performance evaluation of the walls and ceilings shows that the WLF and LGSF walls have better insulation values (12.5% lower U-value) while the roof construction of the 3DSP has much better insulation performance (70% lower U-value). Moreover, the building designed with 3DSP requires 11% less energy for total heating and cooling during one year. The information for the building industry in Turkey shows that the cost of construction for 3DSP construction is 34.6% lower than for WLF and 27.7% lower than LGSF.

Sareh Naji; O?uz Cem elik; U. Johnson Alengaram; Mohd Zamin Jumaat; Shahaboddin Shamshirband

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Application and development of solar energy in building industry and its prospects in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China is the second largest country in energy consumption. More and more energy demand pressures cause the Chinese government to review its economy and energy policies in order to support the sustainable development. In China, the building sector amounts to 27.8% total energy consumption, which is only behind the industry sector. China has abundant solar energy resource, which is extensively applied to buildings. Therefore, solar energy utilization in buildings has become one of the most important issues to help China optimize the energy proportion, increasing energy efficiency and protecting the environment. Solar energy resource and its district distribution in China are introduced in detail in this paper, and the representative solar energy application to the building sector is highlighted as well. The solar energy utilization obstacles, especially policy disadvantages in building sector in China, are reviewed. Moreover, the application prospects of solar energy in building sector are presented in combination with the China economic and household industry growth.

Zhi-Sheng Li; Guo-Qiang Zhang; Dong-Mei Li; Jin Zhou; Li-Juan Li; Li-Xin Li

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Look at Principal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Home > Commercial Buildings Home> Special Topics > 1995 Principal Building Activities Office Education Health Care Retail and Service Food Service Food Sales Lodging Religious Worship Public Assembly Public Order and Safety Warehouse and Storage Vacant Other Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) More information on the: Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey A Look at ... Principal Building Activities in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) When you look at a city skyline, most of the buildings you see are commercial buildings. In the CBECS, commercial buildings include office buildings, shopping malls, hospitals, churches, and many other types of buildings. Some of these buildings might not traditionally be considered "commercial," but the CBECS includes all buildings that are not residential, agricultural, or industrial.

412

Industrial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

413

Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of BaselineLoad Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both Federal and California state policymakers areincreasingly interested in developing more standardized and consistentapproaches to estimate and verify the load impacts of demand responseprograms and dynamic pricing tariffs. This study describes a statisticalanalysis of the performance of different models used to calculate thebaseline electric load for commercial buildings participating in ademand-response (DR) program, with emphasis onthe importance of weathereffects. During a DR event, a variety of adjustments may be made tobuilding operation, with the goal of reducing the building peak electricload. In order to determine the actual peak load reduction, an estimateof what the load would have been on the day of the event without any DRactions is needed. This baseline load profile (BLP) is key to accuratelyassessing the load impacts from event-based DR programs and may alsoimpact payment settlements for certain types of DR programs. We testedseven baseline models on a sample of 33 buildings located in California.These models can be loosely categorized into two groups: (1) averagingmethods, which use some linear combination of hourly load values fromprevious days to predict the load on the event, and (2) explicit weathermodels, which use a formula based on local hourly temperature to predictthe load. The models were tested both with and without morningadjustments, which use data from the day of the event to adjust theestimated BLP up or down.Key findings from this study are: - The accuracyof the BLP model currently used by California utilities to estimate loadreductions in several DR programs (i.e., hourly usage in highest 3 out of10 previous days) could be improved substantially if a morning adjustmentfactor were applied for weather-sensitive commercial and institutionalbuildings. - Applying a morning adjustment factor significantly reducesthe bias and improves the accuracy of all BLP models examined in oursample of buildings. - For buildings with low load variability, all BLPmodels perform reasonably well in accuracy. - For customer accounts withhighly variable loads, we found that no BLP model produced satisfactoryresults, although averaging methods perform best in accuracy (but notbias). These types of customers are difficult to characterize withstandard BLP models that rely on historic loads and weather data.Implications of these results for DR program administrators andpolicymakersare: - Most DR programs apply similar DR BLP methods tocommercial and industrial sector customers. The results of our study whencombined with other recent studies (Quantum 2004 and 2006, Buege et al.,2006) suggests that DR program administrators should have flexibility andmultiple options for suggesting the most appropriate BLP method forspecific types of customers.

Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote,Sila

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Focus Series: MaineResidential Direct Install Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Focus Series: MaineResidential Direct Install Program: Residential Air Sealing Program Drives Maine Home Energy Savings Through the Roof.

415

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

4 4 2004 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Fabricated Components (1) Company Carpenter Contractors 175.0 1,130 Automated Building Company 102.5 702 Landmark Truss 45.0 425 Southern Building Products 25.9 180 Dolan Lumber & Truss 25.1 260 Note(s): Source(s): Automated Builder Magazine, Sept. 2005, p. 40-41. 26% 15% 7% 4% 4% 1) Factory-fabricated components include trusses, wall panels, and doors. Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of producers of only components included in the list of the top 26 IH producers responding to the survey. In 2004, surveyed component sales was estimated at $665.1 million. 3) The top 26 companies employ over 4,970 people at their plants. Gross Sales

416

Solarnorth '81 by Tymura Solardesigns: diverse residential, commercial and industrial projects at and above the 48th parallel in Ontario, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar Energy Heating Applications are On the Rise in and above the Northwestern City of Thunder Bay, on the northern shore of Lake Superior. Unique in their diversifications, the architectural commissions range from pure passive residential design thru hybrid systems; residential Greenhouse-Solarium active swimming pool and commercial hotel pool to inexpensive hybrid system for Canada's First Commercial Solar Lumber Drying Kiln; as well as combined earth sheltered with solar system design for a dormitory complex and shopping center. By May 1981, 7 buildings designed by Tymura Solardesigns in the Thunder Bay area will have been subjected to the Extreme Canadian climate (10,500/sup 0/F degree days, yearly temperature maximums from -41/sup 0/F to 90/sup 0/F, and solar fractions vary from 50% to 75%, with economic payback periods ranging between 7 and 10 years.

Tymura, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of solar thermal energy to buildings and industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flat plate collectors and evacuated tube collectors are described, as are parabolic troughs, Fresnel lenses, and compound parabolic concentrators. Use of solar energy for domestic hot water and for space heating and cooling are discussed. Some useful references and methods of system design and sizing are given. This includes mention of the importance of economic analysis. The suitability of solar energy for industrial use is discussed, and solar ponds, point-focus receivers and central receivers are briefly described. The use of solar energy for process hot water, drying and dehydration, and process steam are examined, industrial process heat field tests by the Department of Energy are discussed, and a solar total energy system in Shenandoah, GA is briefly described. (LEW)

Kutscher, C. F.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comparison of DOE-2.1E with Energyplus and TRNSYS for Ground Coupled Residential Buildings in Hot anf Humid Climates Stage 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-12-02-02 COMPARISON OF DOE-2.1E WITH ENERGYPLUS AND TRNSYS FOR GROUND COUPLED RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES STAGE 4 Fully Loaded IECC Compliant Slab-on-grade Houses in the Four U.S. Climates A Report...F/Btu) Rfic resistance of the fictitious insulation layer (hr-ft2-oF/Btu) GI ground isolated EP modeled with EnergyPlus D2 modeled with DOE-2 TR modeled with TRNSYS GCW ground coupled with Winkelmanns slab-on-grade model GCS ground coupled with Slab...

Andolsun, S.; Culp, C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects (Connecticut) Local Option - Building Permit Fee Waivers for Renewable Energy Projects (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection As of July 2011, Connecticut authorizes municipalities to pass a local

420

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Average Residential Price Residential Price - Local Distribution Companies Residential Price - Marketers Residential % Sold by Local Distribution Companies Average...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Meetings Meetings Photo of people watching a presentation on a screen; the foreground shows a person's hands taking notes on a notepad. The Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program hosts open meetings and webinars for industry partners and stakeholders that provide a forum to exchange information about various aspects of residential building research. Upcoming Meetings Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Webinars Expert Meetings Upcoming Meetings There are no Building America meetings scheduled at this time. Please subscribe to Building America news and updates to receive notification of future meetings. Past Technical and Stakeholder Meetings Building America 2013 Technical Update Meeting: April 2013 This meeting showcased world-class building science research for high performance homes in a dynamic new format. Researchers from Building America teams and national laboratories presented on key issues that must be resolved to deliver homes that reduce whole house energy use by 30%-50%. View the presentations.

422

Building America Research Tools | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tools Tools Building America Research Tools Building America provides technical tools to support researchers and building industry professionals in ensuring consistent research results for new and existing homes. The following resources can be used to evaluate optimal building designs, access performance and cost data, execute field tests, and track research progress. Image is a rendering of a two-story residential building with an entrance on the front. To the right of this building is another large building shaded in gray, and to the left is a smaller structure shaded in gray. Building Energy Optimization Software (BEopt): This software provides capabilities to evaluate residential building designs and identify cost-optimal efficiency packages at various levels of whole-house energy

423

Residential Lighting: Title 24 and Technology Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Lighting: Title 24 and Technology Update Best practices in lighting design to comply the development and deployment of energy-efficient lighting and daylighting technologies in partnership. Effectively apply the residential Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards requirements specific

California at Davis, University of

424

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

425

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

426

NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety stan- dards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice--and sometimes maintain separate product

427

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Community Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Community Partners reEnergize Industry in Nebraska on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network

428

Florida Solar Energy Center (Building America Partnership for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Improved Residential Construction Jump to: navigation, search Name: Florida Solar Energy Center (Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction...

429

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Efficient Economy Washington, DC Anna Chittum Industry Associate ABSTRACT Energy efficiency provides an unequaled opportunity for manufacturing companies to reduce operating costs. Energy efficiency improvements not only lead to reduced energy costs..., they can lead to even greater improved productivity and decreased waste. However, many cost-effective projects are not being implemented. Manufacturing companies have indicated that this is often due not to a lack of funds but rather to a lack...

Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

431

Industrial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Industrial 8,870,422 44.3% Commercial 3,158,244 15.8% Electric Utilities 2,732,496 13.7% Residential 5,241,414 26.2% Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters I l l i n o i s C a l i f o r n i a N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1996 Figure Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Energy Information Administration

432

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures on Implementing Houston Amendments to Multifamily Residential Buildings in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

categories were then chosen to form group measures whose combined energy savings is above 15%. Six group measures were simulated for the electric/gas base case building and five group measures for the all-electric base case building. The cost of implementing...

Mukhopadhyay, Jaya; Liu, Zi; Malhotra, Mini; Kota, Sandeep; Blake, Sheila; Haberl, Jeff; Culp, Charles; Yazdani, Bahman

433

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures on Implementing Houston Amendments to Multifamily Residential Buildings in Houston Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

categories were then chosen to form group measures whose combined energy savings is above 15%. Six group measures were simulated for the electric/gas base case building and five group measures for the all-electric base case building. The cost of implementing...

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, Z.; Malhotra, M.; Kota, S.; Blake, S.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

434

Better Buildings Challenge | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Challenge Better Buildings Challenge: Leadership, Transparency and Results Read more Partners Recognized at Industrial Energy Technology Conference Read more Jones Lang LaSalle's Showcase Project: Moscone Convention Center Read more Portland Public Schools' Showcase Project: Benson Polytechnic High School Read more Delaware's Showcase Project: Carvel State Office Building Read more Challenge Partners & Allies Represent 2 Billion Square Feet Committed $2 Billion in Financing through Allies 300+ Manufacturing Facilities Highlights Program Expansion: Multifamily Residential Better Buildings Challenge: Progress Update - Spring 2013 Partner Solutions: Implementation Models Partner Progress Against Energy Performance Goals Demonstrating Results: Showcase Projects

435

Energy End-Use Flow Maps for the Buildings Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical presentations of energy flows are widely used within the industrial sector to depict energy production and use. PNNL developed two energy flow maps, one each for the residential and commercial buildings sectors, in response to a need for a clear, concise, graphical depiction of the flows of energy from source to end-use in the building sector.

Belzer, David B.

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia) Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider District Department of the Environment

437

Technical and economical assessment of the utilization of photovoltaic systems in residential buildings: The case of Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies the feasibility of utilizing photovoltaic systems in a standard residential apartment in Amman city in Jordan. Data on solar radiation, sunshine duration and the ambient temperature has been recorded in Amman city. An apartment in Amman was chosen as a case study to conduct energy and economic calculations. The electrical power needs and cost were calculated for the apartment. The component design and cost of PV system required to supply required energy was calculated and the payback period for the suggested stand-alone PV system in this paper was estimated in a constant inflation rate in electricity price similar to that of interest rate. The calculated payback period was high in a stand-alone system, to decrease payback period a grid-connected PV system is suggested. Considering an annual increase of 3% in electricity price, 15% of payback period was decreased in a stand-alone PV system and 21% in a grid-connected PV system. The output results of this study show that installation of PV system in a residential flat in Jordan may not be economically rewarding owing to the high cost of PV system compared to the cost of grid electricity. A feed-in tariff law of solar electricity may help to reduce PV system cost like the case of Germany. Additional conclusions are PV systems may be economically rewarding in Jordan if applied in locations far from electrical grid or in remote large scale PV power installations to overcome economical limitations of PV technology.

A. Al-Salaymeh; Z. Al-Hamamre; F. Sharaf; M.R. Abdelkader

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

439

Los Angeles County - Green Building Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Los Angeles County - Green Building Program Los Angeles County - Green Building Program Los Angeles County - Green Building Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Los Angeles County Department of Regional Planning '''''Note: The Regional Planning Commission is considering amendments to the requirements outlined here. See the website above for the most recent

440

Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) Certified Sites (Ready! Set! Build!) (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Developer General Public/Consumer Institutional Low-Income Residential Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Training/Technical Assistance Siting and Permitting Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation WEDC has created, in partnership with Deloitte Consulting (Site Selector Consultant) and community partners, the Ready! Set! Build! Program, which provides consistent standards for industrial site certification in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

442

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

443

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Residential: $750 Commercial: $60,000 Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Residential''' Residential Construction: $750 '''Commercial/Industrial''' 10% to 20% to 30% above code, $40/MMBtu first-year savings Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) provides incentives to developers, home

444

The Trade-off between Solar Reflectance and Above-Sheathing Ventilation for Metal Roofs on Residential and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alternative to white and cool-color roofs that meets prescriptive requirements for steep-slope (residential and non-residential) and low-slope (non-residential) roofing has been documented. Roofs fitted with an inclined air space above the sheathing (herein termed above-sheathing ventilation, or ASV), performed as well as if not better than high-reflectance, high-emittance roofs fastened directly to the deck. Field measurements demonstrated the benefit of roofs designed with ASV. A computer tool was benchmarked against the field data. Testing and benchmarks were conducted at roofs inclined at 18.34 ; the roof span from soffit to ridge was 18.7 ft (5.7 m). The tool was then exercised to compute the solar reflectance needed by a roof equipped with ASV to exhibit the same annual cooling load as that for a direct-to-deck cool-color roof. A painted metal roof with an air space height of 0.75 in. (0.019 m) and spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) up the roof incline of 18.34 needed only a 0.10 solar reflectance to exhibit the same annual cooling load as a direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof (solar reflectance of 0.25). This held for all eight ASHRAE climate zones complying with ASHRAE 90.1 (2007a). A dark heat-absorbing roof fitted with 1.5 in. (0.038 m) air space spanning 18.7 ft (5.7 m) and inclined at 18.34 was shown to have a seasonal cooling load equivalent to that of a conventional direct-to-deck cool-color metal roof. Computations for retrofit application based on ASHRAE 90.1 (1980) showed that ASV air spaces of either 0.75 or 1.5 in. (0.019 and 0.038 m) would permit black roofs to have annual cooling loads equivalent to the direct-to-deck cool roof. Results are encouraging, and a parametric study of roof slope and ASV aspect ratio is needed for developing guidelines applicable to all steep- and low-slope roof applications.

Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL] [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL] [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Elaboration of energy saving renovation measures for urban existing residential buildings in north China based on simulation and site investigations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is necessary to determine whether to implement a retrofit measure or not based on its energy saving and economic benefits, when conducting a retrofit ... up a building simulation model and calculate its energy

Shuqin Chen; Jun Guan; Mark D. Levine; Linna Xie; P. Yowargana

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Progress in Residential Retrofit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit A geographic representation of saturations of ceiling fans based on data from the RASSes. White areas indicate a lack of data for that region. Many utilities survey their customers to learn more about the buildings and the occupants in their service areas. These surveys-usually called "residential appliance saturation surveys," or RASSes-ask for the number and types of appliances present, the number of people living in the home, and sometimes personal information. The RASSes are also used to collect information about the presence of conservation measures such as wall and ceiling insulation, weatherstripping, multipane windows, and water flow restrictors. Building Energy Analysis Group researchers Alan Meier and Brian Pon gathered RASSes

447

Better Buildings Network View | November 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

448

Better Buildings Network View | October 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

449

Better Buildings Network View | September 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

450

Better Buildings Network View | January 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

451

Better Buildings Network View | December 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

452

Better Buildings Network View | February 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

453

Better Buildings Network View | April 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

454

Better Buildings Network View | May 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

455

Better Buildings Network View | March 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

456

Better Buildings Network View | June 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

457

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Savings Potential and RD&D Opportunities for Residential...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Building HVAC Systems This report assesses 135 different heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) technologies for U.S. residential buildings to identify and...

459

Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better. We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

Shen, Weidian

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

460

Residential Mechanical Precooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research conducted by the Alliance for Residential Building Innovation team evaluated mechanical air conditioner pre-cooling strategies in homes throughout the United States. EnergyPlus modeling evaluated two homes with different performance characteristics in seven climates. Results are applicable to new construction homes and most existing homes built in the last 10 years, as well as fairly efficient retrofitted homes.

German, A.; Hoeschele, M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Advancing Building Energy Codes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings

462

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Commercial and Residential Building Site Energy Usagecommercial and residential prototype buildings discussed in the previous section is simulated in EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building TechnologiesEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Miami-Dade Permitting and Inspection Center In an effort to promote environmentally sensitive design and construction, the Miami-Dade County Commissioners passed an ordinance in June 2005 to expedite the permitting process for "green" buildings certified by a recognized environmental rating agency. Commercial, industrial, and

466

Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infrastructures. EPA - Region 6's ENERGY STAR and Green Building Program assistance has led to some unique solutions and the beginning workups for the integrated expansion of effort to support State Implementation Plans in new innovative voluntary approaches...

Patrick, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Research utilization in the building industry: decision model and preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Research Utilization Program was conceived as a far-reaching means for managing the interactions of the private sector and the federal research sector as they deal with energy conservation in buildings. The program emphasizes a private-public partnership in planning a research agenda and in applying the results of ongoing and completed research. The results of this task support the hypothesis that the transfer of R and D results to the buildings industry can be accomplished more efficiently and quickly by a systematic approach to technology transfer. This systematic approach involves targeting decision makers, assessing research and information needs, properly formating information, and then transmitting the information through trusted channels. The purpose of this report is to introduce elements of a market-oriented knowledge base, which would be useful to the Building Systems Division, the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and their associated laboratories in managing a private-public research partnership on a rational systematic basis. This report presents conceptual models and data bases that can be used in formulating a technology transfer strategy and in planning technology transfer programs.

Watts, R.L.; Johnson, D.R.; Smith, S.A.; Westergard, E.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Encouraging PV Adoption in New Market-Rate Residential Construction: A Critical Review of Program Experiences to Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on new multi-family buildings State Organization Standard PVmulti- family residential construction projects with PV and other green building

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Buildings p , p g , Luminaire Power, etc. for Nonresidential Buildings 4 #12;What is New for 2008? R d l B ld What is New for 2008? R d l B ldResidential BuildingsResidential Buildings Mandatory Measures2008 Building Energy2008 Building Energyg gy Efficiency Standards g gy Efficiency Standardsfficie

470

Development of a New ASHRAE Protocol for Measuring and Reporting the On-Site Performance of Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that includes descriptions and installation instructions for sensors needed for measuring, procedures for retrieving data from remote buildings, and an overview of analysis methods in the Texas LoanSTAR program. ORNL Report Measuring Energy...-Saving Retrofits: Experiences from the Texas LoanSTAR Program (1996). This ORNL Report contains a complete description of the measurement and verification methods developed for the Texas LoanSTAR program. Sustainability Assessment of the Robert E. Johnson...

Haberl, Jeff; Case, Mark; Kettler, Herald; Hunn, Bruce; Owens, Brendan

471

Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting Report: Austin, Texas; February 29- March 2, 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder Meeting was held on February 29-March 2, 2012, in Austin, Texas, and outlined stakeholder needs, collaboration opportunities, and research results as they relate to the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Residential Buildings Program. Presenters represented key industry stakeholders, as well as the 10 DOE Building America teams. Attendees represented a variety of industries, including manufacturing, government, nonprofit, and private sector programs.

472

Analysis of energy use in building services of the industrial sector in California: A literature review and a preliminary characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy use patterns in many of California's fastest-growing industries are not typical of those in the mix of industries elsewhere in the US. Many California firms operate small and medium-sized facilities, often in buildings used simultaneously or interchangeably for commercial (office, retail, warehouse) and industrial activities. In these industrial subsectors, the energy required for building services'' to provide occupant comfort and necessities (lighting, HVAC, office equipment, computers, etc.) may be at least as important as the more familiar process energy requirements -- especially for electricity and on-peak demand. In this report, published or unpublished information on energy use for building services in the industrial sector have been compiled and analyzed. Seven different sources of information and data relevant to California have been identified. Most of these are studies and/or projects sponsored by the Department of Energy, the California Energy Commission, and local utilities. The objectives of these studies were diverse: most focused on industrial energy use in general, and, in one case, the objective was to analyze energy use in commercial buildings. Only one of these studies focused directly on non-process energy use in industrial buildings. Our analysis of Northern California data for five selected industries shows that the contribution of total electricity consumption for lighting ranges from 9.5% in frozen fruits to 29.1% in instruments; for air-conditioning, it ranges from nonexistent in frozen fruits to 35% in instrument manufacturing. None of the five industries selected had significant electrical space heating. Gas space heating ranges from 5% in motor vehicles facilities to more than 58% in the instrument manufacturing industry. 15 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Akbari, H.; Borgers, T.; Gadgil, A.; Sezgen, O.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial and residential buildings, appliances and equipment, and the vali- dation of computational tools for estimating energy usage.

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Kansas | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas Last updated on 2013-06-03 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The State has adopted the 2006 IECC as the applicable EE standard for commercial and industrial buildings in Kansas (KSA 66-1227). The same law also states that "the state corporation commission has no authority to adopt or enforce energy efficiency standards for residential, commercial, or industrial structures." Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Kansas (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Effective Date 04/10/2007 Code Enforcement Voluntary DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Kansas DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

475

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs and Financial Benefits of Green Buildings A Report toEvidence on the Green Building Rent and Price Premium, (Properties. San Rafael: Green Building Finance Consortium.

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Diffusion of Energy Efficiency in Building. Americanlevel of energy efficiency in new buildings. Furthermore, asIncorporating Energy Efficiency into Commercial Buildings

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Green Buildings in Green Cities: Integrating Energy Efficiency into the Real Estate Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doing Good? Green Office Buildings. American Economic ReviewEnergy Effriciency in Commercial Buildings in Operation.Energy and Buildings. 43(11): 3106-3111. Ezovski, Derek.

Bardhan, Ashok; Kroll, Cynthia A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Building America Research Teams | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Teams Teams Building America Research Teams Building America research projects are completed by industry consortia (teams) comprised of leading experts from across the country. The research teams design, test, upgrade and build high performance homes using strategies that significantly cut energy use. Building America research teams are selected through a competitive process initiated by a request for proposals. Team members are experts in the field of residential building science, and have access to world-class research facilities, partners, and key personnel, ensuring successful progress toward U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goals. This page provides a brief description of the teams, areas of focus, and key team members. Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions

479

Demo: BACChat: A Building Automation Control Client for Sensor Data Collection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of the total energy usage in the United States while the rest goes to transportation and industry [1]. In some and residential buildings in energy consumption is even higher (in Hong Kong 2008, the figure is 65% [2]). As such (BMS), which plays a key role in maintaining the operation, energy efficiency, and safety of a building

Wang, Dan

480

Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades during 2013 as part of the Residential Networks first reporting cycle. In addition, 13 Better...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential building industry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Solar access of residential rooftops in four California cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. Akbari. Shade trees reduce building energy use and CO 2uence of tree shading on residential energy use for heatingestimates of tree-shade e?ects on residential energy use.

Levinson, Ronnen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Building Americas Top Innovations Propel the Home Building Industry toward Higher Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes the concept for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Americas Top Innovations.

483

Trends in Commercial Buildings--Introduction  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Home > Commercial > Commercial Buildings Home > Special Reports > Trends in Commercial Buildings Trends: Buildings and Floorspace Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Overview: The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Trends in the Commercial Buildings Sector Since 1978, the Energy Information Administration has collected basic statistical information from three of the major end-use sectors— residential, and industrial— periodic energy consumption surveys. Each survey is a snapshot of how energy is used in the year of the survey; the series of surveys in each sector reveals the trends in energy use for the sector. Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects data from a sample of buildings representative of the commercial buildings

484

San Diego County - Green Building Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Green Building Program Green Building Program San Diego County - Green Building Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider County of San Diego The County of San Diego has a Green Building Incentive Program designed to promote the use of resource efficient construction materials, water conservation and energy efficiency in new and remodeled residential and commercial buildings. As part of the program, the County will waive the fee for the building permit and plan check for a photovoltaic system. In addition, for qualifying resource conservation measures, the County will

485

Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commercial and residential prototype buildings was simulated in EnergyPlus [15]. The commercial and residential energy usage

Mendes, Goncalo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings Local Option - Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Virginia Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Virginia Department of Taxation In March 2008, Virginia enacted legislation that would allow local jurisdictions to assess the property tax of energy efficient buildings at a reduced rate. Under this law, eligible energy-efficient buildings, not including the real property on which they are located, may be considered a

487

Better Buildings Network View | July-August 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Better Buildings Network View monthly newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Residential Network.

488

Better Buildings Partners: Kansas City, Missouri  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kansas City, Missouri Kansas City, Missouri Kansas City, Missouri Kansas City, Missouri, Makes an Impact With Energy Efficiency Photo of a large white home with a wrought iron fence in front of it. An image of a map of the United States with the state for this page highlighted. Progress Within 2.7 Years of Program Launch* 2,664 residential evaluations completed 1,327 residential energy upgrades completed 150 commercial evaluations completed 106 commercial upgrades completed 686 workers trained 279 workers certified *Progress is reported through June 2013. EnergyWorks KC Location: Kansas City, Missouri Seed Funding: $20 million Target Building Type: Residential, commercial, and industrial (primarily residential) Website: www.energyworkskc.org Learn More: Read about innovative approaches Watch program video

489

Building America Standing Technical Committee - Water Heating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Heating Standing Technical Committee Strategic Plan, v2012a Revised: January 2012 Committee Chair: 2011, 2012 Marc Hoeschele mhoesch@davisenergy.com 530-753-1100 x23 ARBI Page 2 Background on Residential Water Heating According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), annual residential water heating totals 2.11 quads of energy annually, or 20% of the energy delivered to residential buildings 1 . Over the past 70 years, gas and electric storage water heaters have been the predominant water heater type in the United States 2 . Recently, gas tankless water heaters have made inroads in market share with current industry projected gas tankless sales estimated at 400,000+ annually, and an

490

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

491

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

492

Building Technologies Program: Building America Publications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Program HOME ABOUT ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE » Building Technologies Program » Residential Buildings About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Feature featured product thumbnail Building America Best Practices Series Volume 14 - HVAC: A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners Details Bookmark &

493

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy (USDOE/EERE). 2009. U. S. Buildings EnergyRenewable Energy (USDOE/EERE), 2010. States activities andin the manufacturing sector (USDOE/EERE, 2010). Industry (

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z