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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential ACM Manual, Section  3.12.5 Duct/Air Handler Residential ACM Manual, Section 3.12.5 Duct/Air  Handler leakage of air handlers for the purposes of the ACM.  Based 

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

3

AIR LEAKAGE OF NEWLY INSTALLED RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through Sash/Frame Cracks . Window Operation Types . . . . .Window Operation Types . . . . .Air Leakage of Installed Windows Scattergram of Field

Weidt, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA.   CEC (2008b).  Residential Alternative Calculation Standard for Air Handlers in Residential Space Conditioning of Standards Options for Residential Air Handler Fans.   

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database  

SciTech Connect

The air leakage of a building envelope can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. More than 70,000 air leakage measurements have been compiled into a database. In addition to air leakage, the database includes other important characteristics of the dwellings tested, such as floor area, year built, and location. There are also data for some houses on the presence of heating ducts, and floor/basement construction type. The purpose of this work is to identify house characteristics that can be used to predict air leakage. We found that the distribution of leakage normalized with floor area of the house is roughly lognormal. Year built and floor area are the two most significant factors to consider when predicting air leakage: older and smaller houses tend to have higher normalized leakage areas compared to newer and larger ones. Results from multiple linear regression of normalized leakage with respect to these two factors are presented for three types of houses: low-income, energy-efficient, and conventional. We demonstrate a method of using the regression model in conjunction with housing characteristics published by the US Census Bureau to derive a distribution that describes the air leakage of the single-family detached housing stock. Comparison of our estimates with published datasets of air exchange rates suggests that the regression model generates accurate estimates of air leakage distribution.

Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Title Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database v.2011 Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5552E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., and Max H. Sherman Conference Name 2011 32nd AIVC Conference and 1st TightVent Conference: Towards Optimal Airtightness Performance Date Published 10/2011 Conference Location Brussels, Belgium. Keywords air leakage, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, infiltration Abstract Air leakage and other diagnostic measurements are being added to LBNL's Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB). We describe the sources of data that amount to more than 80,000 blower door measurements. We present summary statistics of selected parameters, such as floor area and year built. We compare the house characteristics of new additions to ResDB with prior data. Distributions of normalized leakage are computed for income-qualified homes that were weatherized, homes that were participants of various residential energy efficiency programs, and new constructions built between 2006 and 2011. Further work is underway to relate air leakage to house characteristics utilizing the full database for predictive modeling of air infiltration and to support studies of energy efficiency. Current status of ResDB can be found at http://resdb.lbl.gov/.

8

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Residential Space Conditioning  Systems.   Canadian in residential space conditioning systems”.   Keywords: in residential space conditioning systems”. This standard

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

duct leakage testing”.   ASHRAE Transactions, June 2008.   ASHRAE, Atlanta, GA.    LBNL 62262.   Walker, I.S.  (Institute, Arlington, VA.   ASHRAE Standard 103.  (2007).  

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Analysis of U.S. residential air leakage database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installing air and vapor barriers, and sealing ducts.that will reduce air in?ltration such as sealing air leaks,

Chan, Wanyu R.; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

easy air sealing .such that the efficacy of air sealing is  determined by the inlet that prevents easy air sealing DeltaQ The DeltaQ test 

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting the Air Leakage Meeting the Air Leakage Requirements of the 2012 IECC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The newest edition of the International Energy Conservation Code ® (IECC) (2012) sets the bar higher for energy efficiency, and new air sealing requirements are one of the key new provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the new air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these new measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, Best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code (IRC) requirements are referenced throughout the guide.

13

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

14

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Air-leakage control manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the ``how and why`` of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the ``Simple Caulk and Seal`` (SIMPLE{center_dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center_dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, J. [Washington State Energy Office, Olympia, WA (United States)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Air-Leakage Control Manual.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual is for builders and designers who are interested in building energy-efficient homes. The purpose of the manual is to provide the how and why'' of controlling air leakage by means of a system called the Simple Caulk and Seal'' (SIMPLE{center dot}CS) system. This manual provides an overview of the purpose and contents of the manual; It discusses the forces that affect air leakage in homes and the benefits of controlling air leakage. Also discussed are two earlier approaches for controlling air leakage and the problems with these approaches. It describes the SIMPLE-{center dot}CS system. It outlines the standard components of the building envelope that require sealing and provides guidelines for sealing them. It outlines a step-by-step procedure for analyzing and planning the sealing effort. The procedure includes (1) identifying areas to be sealed, (2) determining the most effective and convenient stage of construction in which to do the sealing, and (3) designating the appropriate crew member or trade to be responsible for the sealing.

Maloney, Jim; Washington State Energy Office; United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Residential Duct Leakage Case Study on 'Good Cents' Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The “Good Cents” program has been adopted by many cities across the United States and has encouraged builders to employ aggressive energy conservation building techniques in residential applications. The program is well established and has been recognized for the added value it brings to homeowners. The primary energy using system in a residence is the heating and cooling system and in the hot and humid Southeast Texas climate, cooling is the predominant mode of operation for the HVAC system. This makes the system particularly susceptible to degraded performance if there are leaks in the air distribution system. Nine Good Cents homes in the College Station, Texas area were chosen for a study to determine the extent of HVAC air distribution leakage in the HVAC system. It was found that all the homes had significant measured leakage for the return-air side of the system. Houses with vertical sheet-rock lined plenums had significantly higher rates of return air leakage than homes with ducted returns.

Bryant, J. A.; Perez, R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

19

Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Barriers for Residential and Air Barriers for Residential and Commercial Buildings Diana Hun, PhD Oak Ridge National Laboratory dehun@ornl.gov 865-574-5139 April 4, 2013 BTO Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Problem Statement & Project Focus - Air leakage is a significant contributor to HVAC loads - ~50% in residential buildings (Sherman and Matson 1997) - ~33% of heating loads in office buildings (Emmerich et al. 2005) - Airtightness of buildings listed in BTO prioritization tool

20

Effect of Return Air Leakage on Air Conditioner Performance in Hot/Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of return air leakage from hot/humid attic spaces on the performance of a residential air conditioner. Tests were conducted in psychrometric facilities where temperatures and humidities could be controlled closely. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and Energy Efficiency Ratio both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed one of the most detrimental effects of return air leakage on performance.

O'Neal, D. L.; Rodriguez, A.; Davis, M.; Kondepudi, S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Building Energy Code Resource Guide: Air Leakage Guide | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Guide Air Leakage Guide The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) sets the bar for energy efficiency, and air sealing requirements are one of the key provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code requirements are referenced throughout the guide. Publication Date: Friday, September 30, 2011 BECP_Buidling Energy Code Resource Guide Air Leakage

22

Air leakage of Insulated Concrete Form houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air leakage has been shown to increase building energy use due to additional heating and cooling loads. Although many construction types have been examined for leakage, an exploration of a large number of Insulated Concrete ...

Durschlag, Hannah (Hanna Rebekah)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air tightness is an important property of building envelopes. It is a key factor in determining infiltration and related wall-performance properties such as indoor air quality, maintainability and moisture balance. Air leakage in U.S. houses consumes roughly 1/3 of the HVAC energy but provides most of the ventilation used to control IAQ. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been gathering residential air leakage data from many sources and now has a database of more than 100,000 raw measurements. This paper uses a model developed from that database in conjunction with US Census Bureau data for estimating air leakage as a function of location throughout the US.

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Title Analysis of Air Leakage Measurements of US Houses Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Journal Energy and Buildings Start Page 616 Pagination 616-625 Date Published 08/2013 Abstract Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. Weanalyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalizedleakage (NL) as the metric. Weatherization assistance programs (WAPs) and residential energy efficiencyprograms contributed most of the data. We performed regression analyses to examine the relationshipbetween NL and various house characteristics. Explanatory variables that are correlated with NL includeyear built, climate zone, floor area, house height, and whether homes participated in WAPs or if theyare energy efficiency rated homes. Foundation type and whether ducts are located outside or inside theconditioned space are also found to be useful parameters for predicting NL. We developed a regressionmodel that explains approximately 68% of the observed variability across US homes. Of these variablesconsidered, year built and climate zone are the two that have the largest influence on NL. The regressionmodel can be used to predict air leakage values for individual homes, and distributions for groups ofhomes, based on their characteristics. Using RECS 2009 data, the regression model predicts 90% of UShouses have NL between 0.22 and 1.95, with a median of 0.67.

25

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Title Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5887E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hult, Erin L., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and Phillip N. Price Date Published 09/2012 Keywords infiltration, leakage, residential ventilation Abstract Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage.In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate inter- zone leakage. The best of the measurement and analysis methods was a method that uses two blower doors simultaneously based on the methods of Herrlin and Modera (1988) to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 16% of the inter-zone leakage flow at 4Pa, over the range of expected conditions for a house and attached garage. Methods were also identified that use a single blower door to determine the inter-zone leakage to within 30% of its value. The test configuration selected can have a large impact on the uncertainty of the results and there are testing configurations and methods that should definitely be avoided. The most rigorous calculation method identified assumes a fixed value for the pressure exponent for the interface between the two zones (rather than determining the interface pressure exponent from the measured data) and then uses an optimization routine to fit a single set of air leakage coefficients and pressure exponents for each of three wall interfaces using both pressurization and depressurization data. Multiple pressure station tests have much less uncertainty than single pressure station approaches. Analyses of field data sets confirm a similar level of variation between test methods as was expected from the analysis of synthesized data sets and confirm the selection of specific test methods to reduce experimental uncertainty.

26

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Buildings 66 (2013) 616-625 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Energy and Buildings j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / e n b u i l d Analysis of air leakage measurements of US houses Wanyu R. Chan ∗ , Jeffrey Joh, Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 90R3058, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 November 2012 Received in revised form 4 March 2013 Accepted 16 July 2013 Keywords: Blower door Fan pressurization test Normalized leakage Air infiltration Building envelope airtightness a b s t r a c t Building envelope airtightness is important for residential energy use, occupant health and comfort. We analyzed the air leakage measurements of 134,000 single-family detached homes in US, using normalized

28

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Title Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5966E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Chan, Wanyu R., Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Date Published 08/2012 Keywords air infiltration, blower door, fan pressurization measurements, retrofit, weatherization Abstract LBNL Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB) contains blower door measurements and other diagnostic test results of homes in United States. Of these, approximately 134,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation to a number of housing characteristics. We performed regression analysis to consider the correlation between normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built, foundation type, duct location, and other characteristics. The regression model explains 68% of the observed variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements of approximately 23,000 homes that participated in weatherization assistant programs (WAPs) or residential energy efficiency programs. The two types of programs achieve rather similar reductions in normalized leakage: 30% for WAPs and 20% for other energy programs.

29

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMSof Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit Wanyu R. Chan, Jeffrey Joh, and Max H. Sherman Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 August 2012 LBNL-5966E 2 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the

31

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Location, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakageinsulation

Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Troubleshooting the residential air conditioning system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to effectively diagnose problems in a residential air conditioning system, the technician should develop and follow a logical step-by-step troubleshooting procedure. A list of problems, along with possible causes and solutions, that a technician may encounter when servicing a residential air conditioner is presented.

Puzio, H. [Sussex County Vocational Technical School, Sparta, NJ (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing a database of residential air leakage in theTechnical Note AIVC 57: Residential Ventilation. Brussels,in personal samples and residential indoor, outdoor and

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal...

36

Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and...

37

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Title Indoor-outdoor air leakage of apartments and commercial buildings. Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2006 Authors Price, Phillip N., Arman Shehabi, Wanyu R. Chan, and Ashok J. Gadgil Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Abstract We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

38

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

Investigation of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-52235 Investigation of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS Kristina Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;#12;LBNL-52235 Investigation of Residential Central Air;#12;Investigation of Residential Central Air Conditioning Load Shapes in NEMS i Table of Contents Acronyms

40

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Leakage, and Heat Conduction Gains William 1. Fisk,0.75 to 0.90; thus, heat conduction decreased the coolingby air leakage or heat conduction, because these ducts are

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residential Indoor Air Background Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor intrusion, the migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated soil or groundwater into overlying buildings, has become one of the primary exposure pathways of concern for state and federal environmental agencies regulating contaminated sites in the USA. Regulators are requesting comprehensive evaluation of the subsurface vapor-to-indoor air pathway for currently occupied buildings, areas which may be developed in the future, and closed sites for which this pathway was not previously evaluat...

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Duct Systems in large commercial buildings: Physical characterization, air leakage, and heat conduction gains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A variety of methods of sealing supply-air registers wereand sealing practices when leakage at connections to duct-mounted equipment is not considered. The measured air-

Fisk, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Residential HVAC Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) Tav Commins #12;Contact Information · Energy construction, Additions /Alterations · Nonresidential and Residential #12;Residential HVAC && Indoor Air Quality(ASHRAE 62.2) ·HVAC EfficiencyHVAC Efficiency ·Quality Installation (HERS Measures) S li b HERS R t

44

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

We compiled and analyzed available data concerning indoor-outdoor air leakage rates and building leakiness parameters for commercial buildings and apartments. We analyzed the data, and reviewed the related literature, to determine the current state of knowledge of the statistical distribution of air exchange rates and related parameters for California buildings, and to identify significant gaps in the current knowledge and data. Very few data were found from California buildings, so we compiled data from other states and some other countries. Even when data from other developed countries were included, data were sparse and few conclusive statements were possible. Little systematic variation in building leakage with construction type, building activity type, height, size, or location within the u.s. was observed. Commercial buildings and apartments seem to be about twice as leaky as single-family houses, per unit of building envelope area. Although further work collecting and analyzing leakage data might be useful, we suggest that a more important issue may be the transport of pollutants between units in apartments and mixed-use buildings, an under-studied phenomenon that may expose occupants to high levels of pollutants such as tobacco smoke or dry cleaning fumes.

Price, P.N.; Shehabi, A.; Chan, R.W.; Gadgil, A.J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Rating of Mixed Split Residential Air Conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology is presented for rating the performance of mixed, split residential air conditioners. The method accounts for the impact on system performance of the indoor evaporator, expansion device and fan; three major components that are likely to be substituted for the matched components in a mixed system. The method allows calculation of capacity at 95°F rating point and seasonal energy efficiency ratio, SEER, without performing laboratory test of the complete system. Limitations of the procedure, present work, and anticipated improvements are also discussed.

Domanski, P. A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Passive ventilation for residential air quality control  

SciTech Connect

Infiltration has long served the residential ventilation needs in North America. In Northern Europe it has been augmented by purpose-provided natural ventilation systems--so-called passive ventilation systems--to better control moisture problems in dwellings smaller than their North American counterparts and in a generally wetter climate. The growing concern for energy consumption, and the environmental impacts associated with it, has however led to tighter residential construction standards on both continents and as a result problems associated with insufficient background ventilation have surfaced. Can European passive ventilation systems be adapted for use in North American dwellings to provide general background ventilation for air quality control? This paper attempts to answer this question. The configuration, specifications and performance of the preferred European passive ventilation system--the passive stack ventilation (PSV) system--will be reviewed; innovative components and system design strategies recently developed to improve the traditional PSV system performance will be outlined; and alternative system configurations will be presented that may better serve the climatic extremes and more urban contexts of North America. While these innovative and alternative passive ventilation systems hold great promise for the future, a rational method to size the components of these systems to achieve the control and precision needed to meet the conflicting constraints of new ventilation and air tightness standards has not been forthcoming. Such a method will be introduced in this paper and an application of this method will be presented.

Axley, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008?004?CMF.   California Energy  Commission, Sacramento, 2008?002?CMF.   California Energy Commission,  Sacramento, was supported by the California Energy Commission    Public 

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution Systems Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: March 7, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Duo Wang An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop of residential air distribution system components that are either not available or poorly described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests apparatus followed ASHRAE Standard 120P - Methods of Testing to Determine Flow

50

Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis sets forth a novel intelligent residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that provides optimal thermal comfort and electricity cost trade-offs for a household resident… (more)

Thomas, Auswin George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners Go Into Effect Today Stronger Manufacturers' Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential Air Conditioners Go Into Effect Today January 23, 2006 - 11:09am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- To increase the energy efficiency of residential air conditioners, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has issued new manufacturing standards that go into effect today, January 23, 2006, for products manufactured in, or imported into, the United States. "Homeowners who choose to buy more energy-efficient air conditioning systems after today will realize significant savings in their energy bills and greatly reduce their energy use," said Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. "These new energy efficiency standards are the first of several

52

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

53

Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Air Conditioners Central Air Conditioners Covered Product Category: Residential Central Air Conditioners October 7, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential central air conditioners (CACs), which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases

54

Sensitivity of forced air distribution system efficiency to climate, duct location, air leakage and insulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to find suitable efficiency and leakage specifications for Energy Star duct systems and provide recommendations on duct insulation specifications. This analysis looks at a typical house, with a selection of duct locations, climates, duct insulation (R-value), and duct leakage. A set of calculations were performed with reduced capacity and airflow to look at the effect of variable capacity systems. This was done to address concerns regarding the increased efficiency of multi-capacity equipment due to good part load performance and how these efficiency gains may be offset by increased duct losses. The duct system efficiencies were calculated using the procedures in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P ''Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems'' (ASHRAE 1999). This proposed ASHRAE Standard can be used to calculate duct efficiency for both design and seasonal weather conditions. In this report, the seasonal efficiencies are used for most of the analysis because they are the most appropriate for estimating energy consumption in buildings. The effects at peak conditions are examined for changing duct insulation in order to provide preliminary estimates of the potential responses to time of use pricing. The study was performed in two parts. The first part focused on duct leakage and the second part on duct insulation. The HVAC systems in the two parts share many attributes, however, they differ in detail and so are treated separately here. All the calculation results are summarized in tables in the Appendix, and specific results are given in the text.

Walker, Iain

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 2366 OZONE REMOVAL BY RESIDENTIAL HVAC FILTERS P Zhao1,2 , JA Siegel1, Austin, Texas 78758, USA ABSTRACT HVAC filters have a significant influence on indoor air quality% for Filter #2 at a face velocity of 0.81 cm/s. The potential for HVAC filters to affect ozone concentrations

Siegel, Jeffrey

56

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mitigating the Impacts of Uncontrolled Air Flow on Indoor Environmental Quality and Energy Demand in Non-Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This multi-faceted study evaluated several aspects of uncontrolled air flows in commercial buildings in both Northern and Southern climates. Field data were collected from 25 small commercial buildings in New York State to understand baseline conditions for Northern buildings. Laboratory wall assembly testing was completed at Syracuse University to understand the impact of typical air leakage pathways on heat and moisture transport within wall assemblies for both Northern and Southern building applications. The experimental data from the laboratory tests were used to verify detailed heat and moisture (HAM) simulation models that could be used to evaluate a wider array of building applications and situations. Whole building testing at FSEC's Building Science Laboratory (BSL) systematically evaluated the energy and IAQ impacts of duct leakage with various attic and ceiling configurations. This systematic test carefully controlled all aspects of building performance to quantify the impact of duct leakage and unbalanced flow. The newest features of the EnergyPlus building simulation tool were used to model the combined impacts of duct leakage, ceiling leakage, unbalanced flows, and air conditioner performance. The experimental data provided the basis to validate the simulation model so it could be used to study the impact of duct leakage over a wide range of climates and applications. The overall objective of this project was to transfer work and knowledge that has been done on uncontrolled air flow in non-residential buildings in Florida to a national basis. This objective was implemented by means of four tasks: (1) Field testing and monitoring of uncontrolled air flow in a sample of New York buildings; (2) Detailed wall assembly laboratory measurements and modeling; (3) Whole building experiments and simulation of uncontrolled air flows; and (4) Develop and implement training on uncontrolled air flows for Practitioners in New York State.

Hugh I. Henderson; Jensen Zhang; James B. Cummings; Terry Brennan

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

1995-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Residential Duct Sealing Cost-Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential air duct leakage can account for as much as 15 percent of a utility bill. Research has shown that houses with supply leakage fractions of 10 percent or greater are viable candidates for air duct sealing or retrofit. This report details the development of a regional program designed to measure and improve residential heating system distribution efficiency via air duct sealing and retrofits. The program consolidates the efforts of several utilities and coordinates a region-wide assessment of th...

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

RESIDENTIAL AIR CONDITIONER FINNED-TUBE CONDENSER HEAT EXCHANGER OPTIMIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the upcoming ban on the production of R-22 in 2010, residential air-conditioning equipment will need to be redesigned with a more environmentally benign working fluid. R-410a is a strong candidate for replacing R-22. A model of an air-conditioning system with a focus on the finned-tube condenser design details using R-410a as the working fluid is developed. An optimization algorithm is implemented to find the optimal condenser design with various constraints for an efficiency figure of merit. The software developed is appropriate for engineering design use in the air-conditioning industry.

Susan W. Stewart; Kristinn A. Aspelund; Monifa F. Wright; Emma M. Sadler; Sam V. Shelton, Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling Units Speaker(s): Clifford Federspiel Date: December 3, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Nance Matson Fans for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply duct pressure. The standard way to reset duct pressure is by controlling the most-open terminal damper to a nearly open position. Most systems can't measure terminal damper positions, so pressures are either not reset at all or use ad hoc resetting strategies that are configured sub-optimally. In this seminar I will describe a new method of determining the critical supply duct pressure for VAV systems.

64

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners  

SciTech Connect

Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Investigation of residential central air conditioning load shapes in NEMS  

SciTech Connect

This memo explains what Berkeley Lab has learned about how the residential central air-conditioning (CAC) end use is represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS is an energy model maintained by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) that is routinely used in analysis of energy efficiency standards for residential appliances. As part of analyzing utility and environmental impacts related to the federal rulemaking for residential CAC, lower-than-expected peak utility results prompted Berkeley Lab to investigate the input load shapes that characterize the peaky CAC end use and the submodule that treats load demand response. Investigations enabled a through understanding of the methodology by which hourly load profiles are input to the model and how the model is structured to respond to peak demand. Notably, it was discovered that NEMS was using an October-peaking load shape to represent residential space cooling, which suppressed peak effects to levels lower than expected. An apparent scaling down of the annual load within the load-demand submodule was found, another significant suppressor of the peak impacts. EIA promptly responded to Berkeley Lab's discoveries by updating numerous load shapes for the AEO2002 version of NEMS; EIA is still studying the scaling issue. As a result of this work, it was concluded that Berkeley Lab's customary end-use decrement approach was the most defensible way for Berkeley Lab to perform the recent CAC utility impact analysis. This approach was applied in conjunction with the updated AEO2002 load shapes to perform last year's published rulemaking analysis. Berkeley Lab experimented with several alternative approaches, including modifying the CAC efficiency level, but determined that these did not sufficiently improve the robustness of the method or results to warrant their implementation. Work in this area will continue in preparation for upcoming rulemakings for the other peak coincident end uses, commercial air conditioning and distribution transformers.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Marnay, Chris; Gumerman, Etan; Chan, Peter; Rosenquist, Greg; Osborn, Julie

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The Effect of Reduced Evaporator Air Flow on the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under reduced evaporator air flow. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 three-ton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion device. Results are presented here for a series of tests in which the evaporator air flow was reduced from 25 to 90% below what is normally recommended for this air conditioner. At present, very little information is available which quantifies the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions such as reduced evaporator air flow. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of system-wide maintenance programs.

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D.; Haberl, J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A study of pressure losses in residential air distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop characteristics of residential duct system components that are either not available or not thoroughly (sometimes incorrectly) described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P--''Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings''. The flexible duct study covered compressibility and bending effects on the total pressure drop, and the results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression in flexible ducts that can increase pressure drops by up to a factor of nine. The supply boots were tested under different configurations including a setup where a flexible duct elbow connection was considered as an integral part of the supply boot. The supply boots results showed that diffusers can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of two in exit fittings, and the installation configuration can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of five. The results showed that it is crucial for designers and contractors to be aware of the compressibility effects of the flexible duct, and the installation of supply boots and diffusers.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality Auswin George residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that has smart grid functionality. The qualifier, conditional on anticipated retail energy prices. The term "smart- grid functionality" means that retail energy

Tesfatsion, Leigh

71

Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program Kosciusko REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Maximum of two rebates per household Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal System: $250 Air-Source Heat Pump: $150 Electric Water Heater: $75 - $125 Provider Kosciusko REMC Kosciusko REMC offers rebates (as bill credits) to residential members for the purchase and installation of high efficiency air-source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, and electric water heaters. For each purchase of an

72

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Mounted Air Conditioners Jon Winkler Chuck Booten Dane Christensen Jeff Tomerlin April 29, 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Why should we care? * Window AC unit sales dominate US market o 7.5 million units sold in 2011 - 36% more than ducted systems - Approx. 30% of installed capacity o Inexpensive relative to central units o Easy installation o Attractive for retrofits * Need accurate models in whole-building tools o Costs/savings relative to other solutions can be quantified o Spot cooling can reduce energy use, but when, where and by

73

Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only to control the migration of vapor, if at all. Small amounts of water leakage/penetration, may cause mold growth or catastrophic corrosion in current roofs systems. In a recent paper by the authors the effect of exterior surface emissive and absorptive properties was found to have a significant effect on the moisture performance of a roof that had a leak. Depending on the surface characteristics, roof systems can be designed to effectively manage water penetration, but at an energy cost. In the roofs system examined previously, air leakage was not included. In the present study, the authors reinvestigated the effect of water penetration and the influence of air leakage on the hygrothermal performance of a few selected roofs. The drying potential of a groove ventilated roof is examined. The performance concept is based on the fact that warming up of air in the groove increases it's ability to transport moisture to the outside. Solar radiation raises the temperature of air in the grooves and on average, during a sunny summer day 0.5 L of water can be ventilated out of the roof per 1m width of the roof. In this paper, one climatic condition was investigated; a hot and humid Climate representative of Houston, TX. The specific questions that the paper addresses are: What are the vapor and liquid control dynamic involved in the moisture migration of a roof in Houston TX? and how does airflow influence the performance of a roof that is initially wet ? A state-of-the-art numerical model was used to address these issues. Results showed that the drying potential depends on the ventilation rates. The roof system with ventilation grooves dried out faster from the initially wet stage than the roof without the ventilation grooves. The total increase in heat loss of the roof was found to be between 0 - 5 % depending on the thickness of the insulation. The ventilation can cool down the temperature of the roof in the middle of a hot and sunny day thus reducing the heat load to the inside.

Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program Wabash County REMC - Residential Geothermal and Air-source Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal: $750 Air Source Heat Pumps: $625 One rebate per house Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pumps: $125 - $625/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $150 - $750/ton Water Heater: $100 Provider Wabash County REMC Wabash Rural Electric Membership Cooperative (REMC) is a member-owned electric distribution organization that provides service to customers in north-central Indiana. To encourage energy efficiency, Wabash County REMC

75

Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps October 7, 2013 - 10:35am Addthis ENERGY STAR logo FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential air-source heat pumps (ASHPs), which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases

76

Improved Modeling of Residential Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps for Energy Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This report presents improved air conditioner and heat pump modeling methods in the context of whole-building simulation tools, with the goal of enabling more accurate evaluation of cost effective equipment upgrade opportunities and efficiency improvements in residential buildings.

Cutler, D.; Winkler, J.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.; Brendemuehl, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Residential Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning Research Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residential HVAC load contributes $23 billion to electric utility energy sales and significantly to peak demands. Participants at this 1986 workshop identified fifteen areas of research needed to improve HVAC components, systems, and applications.

1987-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Effect of refrigerant charge, duct leakage, and evaporator air flow on the high temerature performance of air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80'F (27.8'C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95'F (350C) all the way up to 120'F (48.9'C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from-36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Effect of Refrigerant Charge, Duct Leakage, and Evaporator Air Flow on the High Temperature Performance of Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to quantify the effect of several installation items on the high outdoor ambient temperature performance of air conditioners. These installation items were: improper amount of refrigerant charge, reduced evaporator airflow, and return air leakage from hot attic spaces. There were five sets of tests used for this research: two of them for the charging tests, two for the reduced evaporator airflow, and one for the return air leakage tests. For the charging tests, the indoor room conditions were 80°F (27.8°C) dry-bulb and 50% relative humidity. The outdoor conditions ranged from 95°F (35°C) all the way up to 120°F (48.9°C). Charge levels ranged from 30% undercharged to 40% overcharged for the short-tube orifice unit. For the thermal expansion valve (TXV) unit, charge levels ranged from -36% charging to +27% charging. Performance was quantified with the following variables: total capacity, energy efficiency ratio (EER), and power. The performance of the orifice unit was more sensitive to charge than it was for the TXV unit. For the TXV unit on the -27% to +27% charging range, the capacity and EER changed little with charge. A TXV unit and a short-tube orifice unit were also tested for reduced evaporator airflow. As evaporator airflow decreased, the capacity and EER both decreased as expected. However, the drop was not as significant as with the charging tests. For the extreme case of 50% reduced evaporator airflow, neither unit's capacity or EER dropped more than 25%. Return air leakage from hot attic spaces was simulated by assuming adiabatic mixing of the indoor air at normal conditions with the attic air at high temperatures. Effective capacity and EER both decreased with increased return air leakage. However, power consumption was relatively constant for all variables except outdoor temperature, which meant that for the same power consumption, the unit delivered much lower performance when there was return air leakage. The increase in sensible heat ratio (SHR) with increasing leakage showed perhaps the most detrimental effect of return air leakage on performance, which was the inability of the unit to absorb moisture from the environment.

Rodriguez, Angel Gerardo

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning units in residential buildings, and are using the central air-conditioning system in residential buildings. To determine the best air conditioning mode, a residential tower building with 22 layers was chosen for analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the central air-conditioning system and the residential multi-unit air-conditioning equipment system and the LiBr absorption chiller were compared based on calculating the first-cost and the annual cost (according to providing cooling 90 days annually). The predicted results show the economical feasibility of using the refrigerating units in air-conditioning systems in Beijing region, and point out the developing directions for the future.

Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Preliminary Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database V.2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roughly mapped to 19 climate zones [3] by state-line. The1 shows that most of the climate zones are represented inv2011) ResDB organized by climate zones. Many climate zones

Sherman, Wanyu R Chan, Max H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of U.S. Residential Air Leakage Database Wanyu R. Chan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· CRADA with SEPRADYNE: $300K · Non-Proliferation: $250K · Pu Vitrification System: $80K · Space Power Vitrification System - Hg Recuperation from the Copper Industry: CRADA - Uranium Conversion Process: Non-Proliferation

83

Air-Source Heat Pumps for Residential and Light Commercial Space Conditioning Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technology brief provides the latest information on current and emerging air-source heat pump technologies for space heating and space cooling of residential and light commercial buildings. Air-source heat pumps provide important options that can reduce ownership costs while reducing noise and enhancing reliability and customer comfort. The tech brief also describes new air-source heat pumps with an important load shaping and demand response option.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system--Rankine air conditioner redesign  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single-family heating and cooling system. The objectives discussed are the interim design and schedule status of the Residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Inverter control systems in the residential heat pump air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A compressor capacity control with an inverter has been considered from the viewpoint of high energy saving in a refrigerating cycle. However, the system has not been put into practical use because of high initial cost, technical problems of electronic parts, and complexity of system control. In this connection, we developed the new inverter-controlled heat-pump air conditioner by using the latest electronics and refrigeration technology. This paper discusses the trend of energy saving in air conditioners in Japan and the objectives of developing the inverter controlled air conditioner. It also discusses the following items with respect to the inverter controlled air conditioner and the effects of employing an inverter: 1. Inverter for air conditioning; 2. Refrigeration cycle; 3. Air conditioner control with inverter.

Shimma, Y.; Tateuchi, T.; Suglura, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Improving air handler efficiency in residential HVAC applications  

SciTech Connect

In continuing the development of energy efficiency standards, consideration has turned to air handlers used for heating and air conditioning of consumer residences. These air handlers have typical efficiencies of about 10% to 15% due to poor electric motor performance and aerodynamically poor fans and fan housings. This study was undertaken to examine some of these performance issues, under carefully controlled laboratory conditions, to support potential regulatory changes. In addition, this study examined the performance of a prototype air handler fan assembly that offers the potential for substantial increases in performance. This prototype and a standard production fan were tested in a full-scale duct system and test chamber at LBNL which was specifically designed for testing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. The laboratory tests compared efficiency, total airflow, sensitivity to duct system flow resistance, and the effects of installation in a smaller cabinet. The test results showed that, averaged over a wide range of operating conditions, the prototype air handler had about twice the efficiency of the standard air handler and was less sensitive to duct system flow resistance changes. The performance of both air handlers was significantly reduced by reducing the space between the air handler and the cabinet it was installed in. Therefore any fan rating needs to be performed using the actual cabinet it will be used in.

Walker, Iain S.; Mingee, Michael D.; Brenner, Douglas E.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Source Heat Pumps Air-Source Heat Pumps Covered Product Category: Residential Air-Source Heat Pumps October 7, 2013 - 10:35am Addthis ENERGY STAR logo FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including residential air-source heat pumps (ASHPs), which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

89

Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) Investigation for Residential and Small Commercial Air-Source Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities frequently use the seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) in air conditioning–based incentive programs to categorize energy efficiency and to quantify financial value. For residential and small commercial unitary air conditioners and heat pumps, SEER is determined by the procedures outlined in ANSI/AHRI Standard 210/240. Within Standard 210/240, SEER is calculated based on laboratory test results and equations that follow specific assumptions regarding indoor temperature, ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Condenser In-Leakage Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Condenser In-Leakage Guideline will assist engineers and chemists in identifying and locating air and water in-leakage leaks. It outlines the principles of operation of common condenser air-removal equipment. By keeping the air in-leakage within the capability of the air-removal equipment, condenser back pressure can be maintained. By keeping the water in-leakage as low as possible, condensate chemistry can be maintained.

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Residential Humidity Control: Exciting New Opportunities with Air Flow Modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews psychrometric principles and shows how to formulate a psychrometric chart from a single equation. The chart is used to demonstrate the manner in which a conventional single-speed air conditioner adjusts its operating point in an attempt to control humidity over a range of conditions. The system performance with an electronically commutated motor (ECM) driving the blower is then presented. With ECM blower speed control, it is possible to raise the sensible capacity, reduce the sensible capacity, and boost the efficiency of an otherwise conventional air conditioner. This makes such systems ideal to respond to the changing loads in a hot and humid climate.

Crawford, J. G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Determining Critical Pressure and Duct Leakage in VAV Air-Handling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for moving air in buildings use a significant amount of energy. It is well known that fan energy use in variable-air-volume (VAV) systems can be reduced by resetting the supply...

94

Monitoring the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner under Degraded Conditions on a Test Bench  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under degraded conditions. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 threeton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion device. Results are presented here for a series of tests in which the various commonly occurring degraded conditions were simulated on a test bench. At present, very little information is available which quantifies the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of systemwide maintenance programs. This report also discuss the development of a diagnostic procedure based on measurement of refrigerant and air side temperatures.

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Haberl, J. S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Energy and air quality implications of passive stack ventilation in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Ventilation requires energy to transport and condition the incoming air. The energy consumption for ventilation in residential buildings depends on the ventilation rate required to maintain an acceptable indoor air quality. Historically, U.S. residential buildings relied on natural infiltration to provide sufficient ventilation, but as homes get tighter, designed ventilation systems are more frequently required particularly for new energy efficient homes and retrofitted homes. ASHRAE Standard 62.2 is used to specify the minimum ventilation rate required in residential buildings and compliance is normally achieved with fully mechanical whole-house systems; however, alternative methods may be used to provide the required ventilation when their air quality equivalency has been proven. One appealing method is the use of passive stack ventilation systems. They have been used for centuries to ventilate buildings and are often used in ventilation regulations in other countries. Passive stacks are appealing because they require no fans or electrical supply (which could lead to lower cost) and do not require maintenance (thus being more robust and reliable). The downside to passive stacks is that there is little control of ventilation air flow rates because they rely on stack and wind effects that depend on local time-varying weather. In this study we looked at how passive stacks might be used in different California climates and investigated control methods that can be used to optimize indoor air quality and energy use. The results showed that passive stacks can be used to provide acceptable indoor air quality per ASHRAE 62.2 with the potential to save energy provided that they are sized appropriately and flow controllers are used to limit over-ventilation.

Mortensen, Dorthe Kragsig; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

An Evaluation of Steady-State Dehumidification Characteristics of Residential Central Air Conditioners, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is the first of two reports on the project "Determination of the Transient Response Characteristics of High Efficiency Commercial Air Conditioners" funded by Houston Lighting and Power Company. The purpose of this report is to present the results from an investigation of the possible relationship between residential central air conditioner efficiency and dehumidification performance. The method used was that of a survey of air conditioners currently manufactured and on the market as of late 1986. Chapter 2 outlines the basic terminology used in evaluating the dehumidification performance of central air conditioners. Chapter 3 provides background to the survey data. Chapter 4 presents results from the survey. Conclusions and recommendations are presented in Chapter 5.

O'Neal, D. L.; Chan, N.; Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Design and implementation of an economic gas leakage detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas leakage is a major concern with residential, commercial premises and gas powered transportation vehicles. One of the preventive measures to avoid the danger associated with gas leakage is to install a gas leakage detector at vulnerable locations. ... Keywords: LPG, audio-visual alarm, gas leakage detection, leakage exposure limits, safety system

A. Mahalingam; R. T. Naayagi; N. E. Mastorakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of residential-conservation-survey methodology for the US Air Force. Interim report. Task two  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A US Air Force (USAF) Residential Energy Conservation Methodology was developed to compare USAF needs and available data to the procedures of the Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program as developed for general use by utility companies serving civilian customers. Attention was given to the data implications related to group housing, climatic data requirements, life-cycle cost analysis, energy saving modifications beyond those covered by RCS, and methods for utilizing existing energy consumption data in approaching the USAF survey program. Detailed information and summaries are given on the five subtasks of the program. Energy conservation alternatives are listed and the basic analysis techniques to be used in evaluating their thermal performane are described. (MCW)

Abrams, D. W.; Hartman, T. L.; Lau, A. S.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

The effects of aircraft noise at Williams Air Force Base Auxiliary Field on residential property values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers the environmental consequences of moving the flight training operations of the US Air Force's 82nd Flying Training Wing from the auxiliary airfield, Coolidge-Florence Municipal Airport (CFMA), to a more remote location in Pinal County, Arizona. It examines how actual noise from touch-and-go flights of T-37 aircraft and perceived (anticipated) noise affect the market value of residential property near CFMA. Noise, measured by a noise index, is correlated with market values through a regression analysis applied to a hedonic price model of the Coolidge-Florence housing market. Prices and characteristics of 42 residential properties sold in 1987 and 1988 were used to estimate a perceived noise effect. The report finds that the coefficient on the measure of perceived noise, based on the noise exposure forecast (NEF) index, is statistically insignificant, even though the sign and value are consistent with those estimated in other studies. It concludes that current flights do not have a significant effect on residential property values, partially because there is no housing near CFMA. This and larger studies indicate that flight operations at a new auxiliary airfield would not affect property values if runways were at least 12,000 feet away from housing. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

Morey, M.J.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

State-of-the-Art in Residential and Small Commercial Air HandlerPerformance  

SciTech Connect

Although furnaces, air conditioners, and heat pumps have become significantly more efficient over the last couple of decades, residential air handlers have typical efficiencies of only 10% to 15% due to poor electric motor and aerodynamic performance. These low efficiencies indicate that there is significant room for improvement of air handler fans. The other 85-90% of the electricity used by air handlers is manifested as heat. This extra heat reduces air conditioning cooling and dehumidification performance and effectively acts as fuel switching for fossil fueled furnaces. For electric furnaces, this heat substitutes directly for the electric resistance heating elements. For heat pumps, this heat substitutes for compressor-based high COP heating and effectively reduces the COP of the heat pump. Using a combination of field observations and engineering judgment they can assemble a list of the problems that lead to low air handler efficiency and potential solutions to these problems, as shown. None of the problems require exotic or complex solutions and there are no technological barriers to adopting them. Some of the solutions are simple equipment swaps (using better electric motors), others require changes to the way the components are built (tighter tolerances) and other relate to HVAC equipment design (not putting large fans in small cabinets).

Walker, Iain S.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Field Study on Residential Air Conditioning Peak Loads During Summer in College Station, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Severe capacity problems are experienced by electric utilities during hot summer afternoons. Several studies have found that, in large part, electric peak loads can be attributed to residential airconditioning use. This air-conditioning peak depends primarily on two factors: (i) the manner in which the homeowner operates his air-conditioner during the hot summer afternoons, and (ii) the amount by which the air-conditioner has been over-designed. Whole-house and air-conditioner electricity use data at 15 minute time intervals have been gathered and analyzed for 8 residences during the summer of 1991, six of which had passed the College Station Good Cents tests. Indoor air temperatures were measured by a mechanical chart recorder, while a weather station located on the main campus of Texas A&M university provided the necessary climatic data, especially ambient temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation. The data were analysed to determine the extent to which air-conditioning over-sizing and homeowner intervention contributes to peak electricity use for newer houses in College Station, Texas.

Reddy, T. A.; Vaidya, S.; Griffith, L.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Air emissions from residential heating: The wood heating option put into environmental perspective. Report for June 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect

The paper compares the national scale (rather than local) air quality impacts of the various residential space heating options. Specifically, it compares the relative contributions of the space heating options to fine particulate emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and acid precipitation impacts. The major space heating energy options are natural gas, fuel oil, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), electricity, coal, and wood. Residential wood combustion (RWC) meets 9% of the Nation`s space heating energy needs and utilizes a renewable resource. Wood is burned regularly in about 30 million homes. Residential wood combustion is often perceived as environmentally dirty due to emissions from older wood burners.

Houck, J.E.; Tiegs, P.E.; McCrillis, R.C.; Keithley, C.; Crouch, J.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

The Impact of Residential Air Conditioner Charging and Sizing on Peak Electrical Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities have had a number of air conditioner rebate and maintenance programs for many years. The purpose of these programs was to improve the efficiency of the stock of air conditioning equipment and provide better demand-side management. This paper examines the effect of refrigerant charging (proper servicing of the equipment), system sizing, and efficiency on the steady-state, coincident peak utility demand of a residential central air conditioning system. The study is based on the results of laboratory tests of a three-ton, capillary tube expansion, split-system air conditioner, system capacity and efficiency data available from manufacturer's literature, and assumptions about relative sizing of the equipment to cooling load on a residence. A qualitative discussion is provided concerning the possible impacts of transient operation and total energy use on utility program decisions. The analysis indicates that proper sizing of the unit is the largest factor affecting energy demand of the three factors (sizing, charging, and efficiency) studied in this paper. For typical oversizing of units to cooling loads in houses, both overcharging and undercharging showed significant negative impact on peak demand. The impacts of SEER changes in utility peak demand were found to be virtually independent of oversizing. For properly sized units, there was a small peak benefit to higher efficiency air conditioners.

Neal, L.; O'Neal, D. L.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Analysis of historical residential air-conditioning equipment sizing using monitored data  

SciTech Connect

Monitored data were analyzed to determine whether residential air conditioners in the Pacific Northwest historically have been sized properly to meet or slightly exceed actual cooling requirements. Oversizing air-conditioning equipment results in a loss of efficiency because of increased cycling and also lowers humidity control. On the other hand, the penalty of undersizing air-conditioning equipment may be some loss of comfort during extremely hot weather. The monitored data consist of hourly space-conditioning electrical energy use and internal air temperature data collected during the past 7 years from 75 residences in the Pacific Northwest. These residences are equipped with central air conditioners or heat pumps. The periods with the highest cooling energy use were analyzed for each site. A standard industry sizing methodology was used for each site to determine a sizing estimate. Both the sizing recommendation based on Manual J and peak monitored loads are compared to the capacity of the installed equipment for each site to study how the actual capacity differed from both the estimate of proper sizing and from actual demands. Characteristics of the maximum cooling loads are analyzed here to determine which conditions put the highest demand on the air conditioner. Specifically, internal air temperature data are used to determine when the highest cooling loads occur, at constant thermostat settings or when the thermostat was set down. This analysis of monitored data also provides insight into the extent that occupant comfort may be affected by undersizing air conditioners. The findings of this research indicate that cooling equipment historically has often but not always been oversized beyond industry-recommended levels. However, some occupants in homes with undersized, properly sized, and, in rare occasions, even oversized cooling equipment appear to suffer because the cooling equipment cannot always provide adequate cooling. Key findings are summarized.

Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

108

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Building Envelope Application: New and retrofit; Multi-family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All POTENTIAl BENEFITs Requires substantially fewer resources in the field-equipment, personnel, and time Does not require simultaneous access to multiple housing units-extremely difficult in occupied housing Provides a more appropriate assessment of envelope leakage and the potential energy benefits of air sealing than the commonly used total leakage test The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached hous-

109

NW Natural (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NW Natural (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $275 Duct Sealing: $325 Duct Insulation: $100 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air/Duct Leakage Test: $35 Air/Duct Sealing: 50% of cost Duct Insulation: 50% of cost Windows: $2.25 (U-Value 0.26 - 0.30) or $3.50/sq. ft. (U-Value 0.25 or less) Window Installation Bonus: $100 Attic/Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

110

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Insulating with ENERGY STAR. EPA, May 2008. http: www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex www.energystar.govindex.cfm?cdiy.diyindex EPA - 2008b. ENERGY STAR...

111

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on Applicability of Residential Ventilation StandardsCharacterization of Residential New Construction PracticesJ - Load Calculation for Residential Winter and Summer Air

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advancing Residential Energy Retrofits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To advance the market penetration of residential retrofits, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Southface Energy Institute (Southface) partnered to provide technical assistance on nine home energy retrofits in metropolitan Atlanta with simulated source energy savings of 30% to 50%. Retrofit measures included duct sealing, air infiltration reductions, attic sealing and roofline insulation, crawlspace sealing, HVAC and water heating equipment replacement, and lighting and appliance upgrades. This paper will present a summary of these measures and their associated impacts on important home performance metrics, such as air infiltration and duct leakage. The average estimated source energy savings for the homes is 33%, and the actual heating season average savings is 32%. Additionally, a case study describing expected and realized energy savings of completed retrofit measures of one of the homes is described in this paper.

Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Kim, Eyu-Jin [Southface Energy Institute; Roberts, Sydney [Southface Energy Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Measuring Airflows at Registers in Residential Buildings Speaker(s): Cyril Guillot Date: August 29, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Measuring airflows at registers is a central issue in all HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning) studies. It is a basic measurement that is required in many Cooling/Heating systems tests and in air conditioner performance diagnostics. These measurements can, for instance, be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow in terms of comfort, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. First, I calibrated the Minneapolis Duct Blasters, useful in the most accurate flow hood we have, then I worked on an existing project: measuring airflows with laundry baskets. Finally, I

114

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

SciTech Connect

The development of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L) began in earnest in India in 2001 with the Energy Conservation Act and the establishment of the Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE). The first main residential appliance to be targeted was refrigerators, soon to be followed by room air conditioners. Both of these appliances are of critical importance to India's residential electricity demand. About 15percent of Indian households own a refrigerator, and sales total about 4 million per year, but are growing. At the same time, the Indian refrigerator market has seen a strong trend towards larger and more consumptive frost-free units. Room air conditioners in India have traditionally been sold to commercial sector customers, but an increasing number are going to the residential sector. Room air conditioner sales growth in India peaked in the last few years at 20percent per year. In this paper, we perform an engineering-based analysis using data specific to Indian appliances. We evaluate costs and benefits to residential and commercial sector consumers from increased equipment costs and utility bill savings. The analysis finds that, while the BEE scheme presents net benefits to consumers, there remain opportunities for efficiency improvement that would optimize consumer benefits, according to Life Cycle Cost analysis. Due to the large and growing market for refrigerators and air conditioners in India, we forecast large impacts from the standards and labeling program as scheduled. By 2030, this program, if fully implemented would reduce Indian residential electricity consumption by 55 TWh. Overall savings through 2030 totals 385 TWh. Finally, while efficiency levels have been set for several years for refrigerators, labels and MEPS for these products remain voluntary. We therefore consider the negative impact of this delay of implementation to energy and financial savings achievable by 2030.

McNeil, Michael A.; Iyer, Maithili

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discount Rates Residential electricity rates are much lowerrates in India. Residential electricity rates are subsidizedand electricity rates between commercial and residential

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part 2: Case Demonstration for a Typical Climate System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this paper, the theoretical models, integrating the fan airflow, fan head, air leakage factors, are developed to analyze the impacts of the static pressure reset on both pressure dependent and pressure independent terminal boxes. In this part, a simulated air handling unit (AHU) system in Omaha NE is used to demonstrate the energy savings performance in one typical climate year. This AHU system has a static pressure reset system and two constant static pressure systems, one having pressure dependent terminal boxes and one having pressure independent terminal boxes. These simulated systems were compared mainly on the basis of fan power energy consumption and thermal energy consumption in totally a year. The example presents a good agreement with the theoretical model and simulation results. It was also shown that static pressure reset provides a promising and challenging way for the energy performance in VAV system.

Liu, M.; Zheng, K.; Wu, L.; Wang, Z.; Johnson, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Impacts of Static Pressure Reset on VAV System Air Leakage, Fan Power and Thermal Energy - Part I: Theoretical Model and Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As for a variable air volume (VAV) system, the air duct static pressure is a typical control variable maintained by modulating supply fan speed. The static pressure equals to the summation of the duct pressure loss downstream of the sensor to the terminal box and box inlet static pressure. Typically, the air duct static pressure is set as a constant set point based on the system design information and sensor location. However, under partial load conditions, the terminal box dampers have to be closed more since either required airflow is less than the design airflow which directly leads to much less pressure loss. Thus the static pressure set point should be reset lower in order to reduce fan power, avoid noise at terminal box dampers and box damper malfunction due to excessive pressure. Different static pressure reset schedules are reviewed and compared, considering the influence of outside air temperature on the building load, availability of the VAV box damper positions, the airflow ratio based static pressure reset has also applicable advantages over the existing constant static pressure set point and two typical reset methods. This paper present the theoretical models to express the impacts of static pressure reset on fan airflow, fan head, air leakage, fan power and thermal energy for both pressure independent and pressure dependent boxes. The impacts are also demonstrated using the parametric analysis and numerical results to show the benefits of the static pressure reset including reducing fan power, cooling energy and heating energy.

Liu, M.; Feng, J.; Wang, Z.; Wu, L.; Zheng, K.; Pang, W.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ASHRAE and residential ventilation  

SciTech Connect

In the last quarter of a century, the western world has become increasingly aware of environmental threats to health and safety. During this period, people psychologically retreated away from outdoors hazards such as pesticides, smog, lead, oil spills, and dioxin to the seeming security of their homes. However, the indoor environment may not be healthier than the outdoor environment, as has become more apparent over the past few years with issues such as mold, formaldehyde, and sick-building syndrome. While the built human environment has changed substantially over the past 10,000 years, human biology has not; poor indoor air quality creates health risks and can be uncomfortable. The human race has found, over time, that it is essential to manage the indoor environments of their homes. ASHRAE has long been in the business of ventilation, but most of the focus of that effort has been in the area of commercial and institutional buildings. Residential ventilation was traditionally not a major concern because it was felt that, between operable windows and envelope leakage, people were getting enough outside air in their homes. In the quarter of a century since the first oil shock, houses have gotten much more energy efficient. At the same time, the kinds of materials and functions in houses changed in character in response to people's needs. People became more environmentally conscious and aware not only about the resources they were consuming but about the environment in which they lived. All of these factors contributed to an increasing level of public concern about residential indoor air quality and ventilation. Where once there was an easy feeling about the residential indoor environment, there is now a desire to define levels of acceptability and performance. Many institutions--both public and private--have interests in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), but ASHRAE, as the professional society that has had ventilation as part of its mission for over 100 years, is the logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

Sherman, Max H.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Simulation of Dehumidification Characteristics of High Efficiency Residential Central Air-Conditioners in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the dehumidifying performance of the high efficiency residential central air conditioners (CAC) in hot/humid climates typified by that of Houston and Galveston. The performance study is based on such factors as: (i) weather (ii) thermostat set point and dead band, and (ill) sizing of unit relative to the design load of the residence. The units are evaluated on their ability to maintain conditions in the ASHRAE comfort zone in a typical residence in Houston area. The units, the thermostat, and the residence are simulated on a minute-by-minute basis using a commercial software (TRNSYS) after making certain modifications to it.

Katipamula, S.; O'Neal, D.; Somasundram, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Residential Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements Studies show that duct air leakage results in major energy losses. A ll versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) require ducts, air handlers, filter boxes, and air cavities used as ducts to be sealed, and reference Chapter 16 of the International Residential Code for details on air sealing. This sealing is required on all ducts and other air distribution components regardless of whether they are located inside or outside the conditioned living space. For single-family homes and other low-rise residential buildings, the 2009 and 2012 IECC have duct insulation and sealing requirements in Section 403.2. Both codes require insulation

122

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in use patterns and electricity rates between commercial andRates Residential electricity rates are much lower thanin India. Residential electricity rates are subsidized to a

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

124

DOE/EA-1352: Environmental Assessment for Proposed Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (12/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52 52 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR PROPOSED ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR RESIDENTIAL CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS December 2000 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Office of Building Research and Standards Washington, DC 20585 EA-i ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR RESIDENTIAL CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONERS AND HEAT PUMPS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 2.0 PURPOSE AND NEED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-1 3.0 ALTERNATIVES INCLUDING THE PROPOSED ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.1 No Action Alternative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-2 3.2 Proposed Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EA-3 3.3 Alternative Standards

125

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

SciTech Connect

The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Moya, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cylinder Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

128

Assessment of Advanced Air Purification Technologies: Filtration and Hybrid Systems for Residential and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air contaminants, such as microorganisms, allergens, environmental tobacco smoke, and volatile organic compounds, can cause health- and productivity-related problems for the occupants of the indoor space. Children, elderly adults, and people with deficient immune systems are especially likely to be affected by contaminated air. There are three primary measures to control indoor air contamination. The first is to eliminate the contaminant source. The second is to control ventilation within the spac...

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Finding of No Significant Impact for Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (01/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 14 / Monday, January 22, 2001 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Energy Conservation Standard for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps. SUMMARY: The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act, and the National Appliance Energy Conservation Amendments, prescribes energy conservation standards for certain major household appliances, and requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to administer an energy conservation program for these products. Based on an

130

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

RESIDENTIAL THERMOSTATS: COMFORT CONTROLS IN CALIFORNIA HOMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Residential Winter and Summer Air Conditioning.Air Conditioning Contractors of America. Washington, DC.refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.

Meier, Alan K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

AIR FLOW DISTRIBUTION IN A HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL Helmut E. Feustel and Richard C. Diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Washington DC, 1996 Feustel, H.E. and A. Raynor-Hooson. 1990. "Fundamentals of the Multizone Air Flow Model, Washington DC, 1992. Shapiro-Baruch, Ian. 1993. "Evaluation of Ventilation in Multifamily Dwellings," New-pane windows and sliding balcony doors. The building has a mechanical ventilation system, with kitchen

Diamond, Richard

134

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The most common method of measuring air leakage is to perform single (or solo) blower door pressurization and/or depressurization test. In detached housing, the single blower door test measures leakage to the outside. In attached housing, however, this "solo" test method measures both air leakage to the outside and air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces. Although minimizing leakage to neighboring units is highly recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly overpredicted if the solo air leakage number is used in the energy analysis. Guarded blower door testing is more appropriate for isolating and measuring leakage to the outside in attached housing. This method uses multiple blower doors to depressurize adjacent spaces to the same level as the unit being tested. Maintaining a neutral pressure across common walls, ceilings, and floors acts as a "guard" against air leakage between units. The resulting measured air leakage in the test unit is only air leakage to the outside. Although preferred for assessing energy impacts, the challenges of performing guarded testing can be daunting.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Accuracy of flow hoods in residential applications  

SciTech Connect

To assess whether houses can meet performance expectations, the new practice of residential commissioning will likely use flow hoods to measure supply and return grille airflows in HVAC systems. Depending on hood accuracy, these measurements can be used to determine if individual rooms receive adequate airflow for heating and cooling, to determine flow imbalances between different building spaces, to estimate total air handler flow and supply/return imbalances, and to assess duct air leakage. This paper discusses these flow hood applications and the accuracy requirements in each case. Laboratory tests of several residential flow hoods showed that these hoods can be inadequate to measure flows in residential systems. Potential errors are about 20% to 30% of measured flow, due to poor calibrations, sensitivity to grille flow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. Active flow hoods equipped with measurement devices that are insensitive to grille airflow patterns have an order of magnitude less error, and are more reliable and consistent in most cases. Our tests also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, a new standard for flow hood calibration needs to be developed, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow hoods. Lastly, field evaluation of a selection of flow hoods showed that it is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement.

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

An Analysis of Price Determination and Markups in the Air-Conditioning and Heating Equipment Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial and Residential Air Conditioning and HeatingOF COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL AIR-CONDITIONING AND HEATINGand residential air-conditioning and heating equipment.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Torchiere Space heating Air conditioning Electric motorsCommercial Space heating Air conditioning Ventilation GasResidential End Use: Air conditioning Product: Room air

Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experimental studies were conducted to quantify the effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential air conditioners. For all studies, the indoor dry-bulb (db) temperature was 80°F (26.7°C) db. The cycling study consisted of twelve transient tests conducted with an outdoor temperature of 95°F (35°C) db for cycle times of 6, 10, 15, and 24 minutes. Indoor relative humidities of 40%, 50%, and 60% were also considered. The evaporator airflow study consisted of twenty-four steady-state tests conducted with an indoor condition of 67°F (19.4°C) wet-bulb (wb) for evaporator airflows ranging from 50% below to 37.5% above rated airflow. Outdoor temperatures of 85°F (29.4°C) db, 95°F (35°C) db, and 105°F (40.6°C) db were also considered. The coil fouling study used a total of six condensers that were exposed to an outdoor environment for predetermined amounts of time and tested periodically. Three of the condensers were cleaned and retested during the periodic testing cycles. Testing consisted of thirty-three steady-state tests conducted with an indoor condition of 67°F (19.4°C) wb for outdoor exposure times of 0, 2000, 4000, and 8000 hours. Outdoor temperatures of 82°F (27.8°C) db and 95°F (35°C) db were also considered.

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Seasonal efficiencies of residential heat pump air conditioners with inverter-driven compressors  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a study to experimentally determine the steady-state characteristics, cyclic effect, and frosting/defrosting effect of a inverter heat pump currently available on the Japanese market and compute its seasonal efficiency based on the local outdoor air temperature data. It has been found that the APF of this heat pump is higher by 15% than that of the conventional fixed-speed heat pump. If cyclic and frosting/defrosting losses are eliminated, the APF of the inverter heat pump will be further improved by 2% to 6%. For the evaluation of an inverter heat pump, APF alone is not sufficient, and an additional parameter such as an annual comfort factor (ACF) is needed.

Hori, M.; Akamine, I.; Sakai, T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings and commercial buildings, characteristics such as the cooling load in summer and the storey height must be considered in the design of the air-conditioning system, and the cold storage equipment and the cold supplying means must be properly selected. The option of establishing centralized air-conditioning equipment with cold storage and supplying unified cold in high-rise residential buildings is analyzed objectively with technical and economical methods in this paper. It is not true that the option of supplying unified cold can save energy all the time. CACS with cold storage will not always be economical. Based on a 27-floor building, the running costs in summer and the first costs are both compared between CACS with and without cold storage refrigeration. The cold storage method selected will significantly impact the residents.

Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air conditioning units in psychrometric rooms at Texas A&M University. All units were tested using ARI Standard 210/240 (1989) test procedures. Tests were conducted at indoor conditions of 80'F (26.7'C) db and 67'F (19.4'C) wb, and outdoor db temperatures of 82'F (27.8'C), 95-F (35-C), 100-F (37.8-C), 105-F (40.6-C), 1 10-F (43.3-C), and 120-F (48.90C). The second phase of the research involved the analysis of manufacturers' published cooling performance data for various hardware configurations. For the experimental work, measurements were taken to determine total capacity, system power, EER, and power factor. These results were then compared to manufacturers' predicted values. For the capacity, the experimental results were an average of 2.6% below the manufacturers' published values for outdoor temperatures from 85'F (29.4'C) to 115'F (46.l'C). Experimental power measurements were on average 0.4% above manufacturers' listed results. For the EER, experimental results were an average of 2.9% less than the manufacturers' predicted values. The power factors of all units were above 0.95 for the tested outdoor temperatures. In the analysis of manufacturers' published data, relationships between steady-state performance, cyclic performance, and hardware configuration were investigated for a variety of air conditioning units. A statistical relationship was found between the SEER of a unit and its corresponding EER. The split-system units possessed greater increases in EER for a given increase in SEER than the package or two-speed units. Averages values of EER/SEER for EER's at 95F (350C) were highest for the split-system units, followed by the package and two-speed units, respectively. Normalized capacity, power, and EER curves were investigated at outdoor temperatures from 85F (29.40C) to 115OF (46.1"C). On average, the two-speed units showed the smallest decrease in capacity with an increase in outdoor temperature, followed by the split-system and package-system units. The smallest power increase and smallest EER decrease with an increase in outdoor temperature were exhibited by the split-system units, followed by the two-speed and package-system units.

Bain, Joel Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Regression analysis of residential air-conditioning energy consumption at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy consumption of a house air conditioner located at Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, is modeled as a function of weather parameters and total (global) solar radiation on a horizontal surface. The selection of effective parameters that significantly influence energy consumption is carried out using general stepping regression methods. The problem of collinearity between the regressors is also investigated. The final model involves parameters of total solar radiation on a horizontal surface, wind speed, and temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. However, the model coefficients are functions of relative humidity and/or temperature difference between the indoor and outdoor condition. Model adequacy is examined by the residual analysis technique. Model validation is carried out by the data-splitting technique. The sensitivity of the model indicates that relative humidity and temperature difference strongly influence the cooling energy consumption. It was found that an increase in relative humidity from 20% to 100% can cause a 100% increase in cooling energy consumption during the high cooling season.

Abdel-Nabi, D.Y.; Zubair, S.M.; Abdelrahman, M.A.; Bahel, V. (Energy Systems Group, Div. of Energy Resources, Research Inst., King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (SA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Simulation of residential HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this paper were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic--which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance.

Walker, I.S.; Siegel, J.A.; Degenetais, G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

In support of the federal government's efforts to raise the minimum energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps, a consumer life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis was conducted to demonstrate the economic impacts on individual consumers from revisions to the standards. LCC is the consumer's cost of purchasing and installing an air conditioner or heat pump and operating the unit over its lifetime. The LCC analysis is conducted on a nationally representative sample of air conditioner and heat pump consumers resulting in a distribution of LCC impacts showing the percentage of consumers that are either benefiting or being burdened by increased standards. Relative to the existing minimum efficiency standard of 10 SEER, the results show that a majority of split system air conditioner and heat pump consumers will either benefit or be insignificantly impacted by increased efficiency standards of up to 13 SEER.

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rebates to residential customers for energy audits, weatherization measures, central air conditioning systems, and energy efficient home appliances. Eligible air conditioning...

148

CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system. Quarterly report, January 22, 1987--April 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a coal water slurry burning residential furnace. A literature survey has been performed. Also, the preliminary testing of prototype components was carried out. Design criteria and specifications are discussed.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; McPeak, M.A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Title Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3525E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Max H. Sherman Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow, building, duct, energy, energy performance of buildings group, fan, hvac, indoor environment department, other, power, retrofits, simulation, system Abstract This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology.A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10% upstream and 10% downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30% on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5% upstream and 2.5% downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that "ceiling regain" issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30%). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

150

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

151

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air leakage rate, then proposed buildings will be rewarded for sealingduct sealing even more cost-effective. Table 5. TRNSYS Air-

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $35 Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $250 - $1,500/unit (Power Moves rebate), $200 (REMC Bill Credit) Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: $1,500/unit Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,500/unit (Power Moves rebate), $500 (REMC Bill Credit) Provider Jasper County REMC Jasper County REMC, in conjunction with Wabash Valley Power Association's Power Moves programs, offers a range of rebates to its residential

153

Energy Impact of Residential Ventilation Norms in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers, Atlanta, GA.for Residential Winter and Summer Air Conditioning.Air Conditioning Contractors of America, Washington, DC. 10.

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

IMPROVING THE ENERGY PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL CLOTHES DRYERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Residential Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers: Test Methods andoptional air-to-air heat exchanger . I I Preheat Damper~ • Iof using an air-to-air heat exchanger for heat recovery were

Hekmat, D.; Fisk, W.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Residential Humidity Control Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Humidity Control Strategies Residential Humidity Control Strategies Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control goals  Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality  Control indoor humidity year-around, just like we do temperature  Durability and customer satisfaction  Reduce builder risk and warranty/service costs 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control challenges 1. In humid cooling climates, there will always be times of the year when there is little sensible cooling load to create thermostat demand but humidity remains high * Cooling systems that modify fan speed and temperature set point based on humidity can help but are still limited

156

Building Technologies Office: About Residential Building Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equivalent to taking 225 million cars off the road. Additionally, homeowners find energy efficient homes to be more comfortable because less air leakage and more insulation...

157

Edmond Electric- Residential Heat Pump Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Edmond Electric offers rebates to residential customers who install energy-efficient heat pumps. This program applies to installations in both new and existing residential homes and complexes. Air...

158

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ A New Diagnostic for Duct Leakage: DeltaQ Speaker(s): Iain Walker Date: February 21, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Cynthia Tast Duct leakage has been identified as a major contributor to HVAC energy use and building infiltration, particularly in residences. In order to make good estimates of HVAC system energy performance, we need to know how much air leaks between the ducts and outside the building during system operation. Existing methods for determining duct leakage do not perform well due to experimental procedures that produce imprecise results or they require many assumptions to convert measurements into the desired leakage flows. The DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL to determine duct leakage flows by

159

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Experimental Evaluation of Indoor Air Distribution in High-Performance Residential Buildings: Part I. General Descriptions and Qualification Tests  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to experimentally characterize an air distribution system in heating mode during a period of recovery from setback. The specific air distribution system under evaluation incorporates a high sidewall supply-air register/diffuser and a near-floor wall return air grille directly below. With this arrangement, the highest temperature difference between the supply air and the room can occur during the recovery period and create a favorable condition for stratification. The experimental approach will provide realistic input data and results for verification of computational fluid dynamics modeling.

Jalalzadeh, A. A.; Hancock, E.; Powell, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Practical Diagnostics for Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we identify and describe 24 practical diagnostics that are ready now to evaluate residential commissioning metrics, and that we expect to include in the commissioning guide. Our discussion in the main body of this report is limited to existing diagnostics in areas of particular concern with significant interactions: envelope and HVAC systems. These areas include insulation quality, windows, airtightness, envelope moisture, fan and duct system airflows, duct leakage, cooling equipment charge, and combustion appliance backdrafting with spillage. Appendix C describes the 83 other diagnostics that we have examined in the course of this project, but that are not ready or are inappropriate for residential commissioning. Combined with Appendix B, Table 1 in the main body of the report summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of all 107 diagnostics. We first describe what residential commissioning is, its characteristic elements, and how one might structure its process. Our intent in this discussion is to formulate and clarify these issues, but is largely preliminary because such a practice does not yet exist. Subsequent sections of the report describe metrics one can use in residential commissioning, along with the consolidated set of 24 practical diagnostics that the building industry can use now to evaluate them. Where possible, we also discuss the accuracy and usability of diagnostics, based on recent laboratory work and field studies by LBNL staff and others in more than 100 houses. These studies concentrate on evaluating diagnostics in the following four areas: the DeltaQ duct leakage test, air-handler airflow tests, supply and return grille airflow tests, and refrigerant charge tests. Appendix A describes those efforts in detail. In addition, where possible, we identify the costs to purchase diagnostic equipment and the amount of time required to conduct the diagnostics. Table 1 summarizes these data. Individual equipment costs for the 24 practical diagnostics range from a few hundred dollars to many thousands of dollars. The higher costs are associated with infrared thermography and state-of-the-art automated diagnostic systems. Most tests can be performed in one hour or less, using equipment priced toward the lower end of the cost spectrum.

Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Siegel, Jeff; Sherman, Max

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

162

North Arkansas Electric Cooperative, Inc - Residential Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Residential Eligible Technologies Doors, DuctAir sealing, Heat pumps, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

163

Chelan County PUD - Residential Weatherization Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

164

Clark Public Utilities - Residential Weatherization Loan Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Residential Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, DuctAir sealing, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

165

Kentucky Utilities Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. Rebates are offered for refrigerators and freezers, clothes...

166

Black Hills Power- Residential Customer Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Black Hills Power offers cash rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment in their homes. Incentives exist for water heaters, demand control units, air...

167

Clallam County PUD- Residential Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Clallam County PUD offers a variety of rebates for residential customers for energy efficiency improvements. Eligible measures and incentives include window upgrades, insulation, air and duct...

168

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lube Oil System Leakage Mitigation is the second in a series of training modules addressing leakage in nuclear power plants. The first planned modules in the leakage reduction series include leakage reduction program management, bolted joints with flat gaskets, valve packing, threaded joints, compression fittings, mechanical seals, and miscellaneous bolting issues.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

169

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

170

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

SciTech Connect

The thermal distribution system couples the HVAC components to the building envelope, and shares many properties of the buildings envelope including moisture, conduction and most especially air leakage performance. Duct leakage has a strong influence on air flow rates through building envelopes (usually resulting in much greater flows than those due to natural infiltration) because unbalanced duct air flows and leaks result in building pressurization and depressurization. As a tool to estimate this effect, the DeltaQ duct leakage test has been developed over the past several years as an improvement to existing duct pressurization tests. It focuses on measuring the air leakage flows to outside at operating conditions that are required for envelope infiltration impacts and energy loss calculations for duct systems. The DeltaQ test builds on the standard envelope tightness blower door measurement techniques by repeating the tests with the system air handler off and on. The DeltaQ test requires several assumptions to be made about duct leakage and its interaction with the duct system and building envelope in order to convert the blower door results into duct leakage at system operating conditions. This study examined improvements to the DeltaQ test that account for some of these assumptions using a duct system and building envelope in a test laboratory. The laboratory measurements used a purpose-built test chamber coupled to a duct system typical of forced air systems in US homes. Special duct leaks with controlled air-flow were designed and installed into an airtight duct system. This test apparatus allowed the systematic variation of the duct and envelope leakage and accurate measurement of the duct leakage flows for comparison to DeltaQ test results. This paper will discuss the laboratory test apparatus design, construction and operation, the various analysis techniques applied to the calculation procedure and present estimates of uncertainty in measured duct leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

172

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioner: $50 Electric Water Heaters: $50 - $199 Geothermal Heat Pumps (new): $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (replacement): $150/ton Air-source/Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative (VVEC) offers rebates for residential customers who purchase energy efficient home equipment. Rebates are

173

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $800 Air Source Heat Pump: $500 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $250 Electric Water Heater: $100-$300 HVAC Controls: $100 Provider Firelands Electric Cooperative Firelands Electric Cooperative (FEC) is offering rebates on energy efficient equipment to residential customers receiving electric service from FEC. Eligible equipment includes new Geothermal Heat Pumps, Air-Source

174

Crow Wing Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Crow Wing Power offers several different incentives for residential customers to increase the energy efficiency of homes. Rebates are available on air conditioners, air source heat pumps,...

175

Consumer life-cycle cost impacts of energy-efficiency standards for residential-type central air conditioners and heat pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used to forecast electricity prices into the future (Case forecasts residential electricity prices to decline to

Rosenquist, Gregory; Chan, Peter; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James; Van Buskirk, Robert

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

177

Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practices for Residential HVAC Systems”. Boston, MA. Jump,techniques for measuring HVAC grille air flows". ASHRAEPractices Guide for Residential HVAC Retrofits. LBNL 53592.

Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44: 525- Page | 39 Chemical Emissions of ResidentialHazard Assessment of Chemical Air Contaminants Measured intoxicity Page | 37 Chemical Emissions of Residential

Willem, Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ductwork: not specified Thermostats: not specified Ductless Heat Pump: $4,000 Air Source Heat Pump: $7,000 Geothermal Heat Pump: $8,000 Air Sealing: up to $800 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Windows and Insulation: not specified Ductwork: not specified

180

NREL Solves Residential Window Air Conditioner Performance Limitations (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13 Denver West Parkway 13 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 303-275-3000 | www.nrel.gov Printed with a renewable-source ink on paper containing at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Comprehensive performance tests lead to enhanced modeling capability and affordable methods to increase energy efficiency. Window air conditioners are inexpensive, portable, and can be installed by home occupants, making them a good solution for supplemental cooling, for installing air conditioning into homes that lack ductwork, and for renters. As a result, 7.5 million window air conditioners are purchased each year in the United States-more than all other home cooling equipment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate and air leakage tests under reductive sealing for anfor subsequent sealing, the openings of air infiltrationreductive sealing between the reductions in measured air

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Energy Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: 5 ton CFL Bulbs: 12 bulbs per year Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: $2/bulb Geothermal Heat Pumps (New Construction): $350/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Upgrade): $700/ton Air Source Heat Pumps (New Construction): $800 Air Source Heat Pumps (Upgrade): $400 Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $400

183

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Hutchinson Utilities Commission - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 500 Program Info Expiration Date program offered until expiration of funding State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnaces: $150-$250, depending on efficiency Natural Gas Furnace Tune-up: $25 ECM Motor: $75 Natural Gas Boilers: $200 Central Air Conditioners: $250 Central Air Conditioner Tune-up: $25 Tankless Gas Water Heaters: $150 Storage Gas Water Heaters: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $75/ton

184

Evaluation of a residential solar air heating system. Interim progress report, August 1976--May 1977. [Comparison of air-type and liquid-type collectors  

SciTech Connect

The comparative performance of Solar House II collectors (air heater) and Solar House I collectors (liquid heater) is presented. In the 1976 comparison year, there is no conclusive evidence that either system provides a greater fraction of the seasonal load. Both systems were designed to provide approximately 75 percent of the annual space and water heating load, and the design targets are reasonably achieved. In February, 1976, the air system provided 65 percent of the total requirement while the liquid system provided 76 percent. In March, based on a few days of data, the performance was substantially the same. In April the air system provided a greater fraction of solar heat to the total need, but the use of the heat was different, more being used for domestic water heating in Solar House I than in Solar House II. The data for 1977 have not yet been fully analyzed for both solar houses and therefore, a complete comparison cannot be made. At this stage in the evaluations, it can be stated that either system can be designed to achieve the target fraction of the total annual heat requirements. (WHK)

Karaki, S.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Home Performance Retrofit: 400 ENERGY STAR Qualified Home Designation: 800 Air Conditioner: 400 - 500; varies depending on SEER rating Provider Empire District Electric Company The Empire District Electric Company offers rebates for customers who

186

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ceiling Fans: 4 Smart Power Strip: 2 Pipe Wrap: 10 ln. ft. CFL Bulbs: 12 Refrigerator Recycling: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Varies by retailer Ceiling Fan: $15 CFL Fixture: $15 LED Fixture/Downlight Kit: $20 LED Light Bulbs: $10 Smart Power Strip: $20 Room Air Conditioners: $20

187

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM  

SciTech Connect

This project addressed two significant deficiencies in air-handling systems for large commercial building: duct leakage and duct static pressure reset. Both constitute significant energy reduction opportunities for these buildings. The overall project goal is to bridge the gaps in current duct performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of air-handling system performance in California large commercial buildings. The purpose of this project is to provide technical support for the implementation of a duct leakage modeling capability in EnergyPlus, to demonstrate the capabilities of the new model, and to carry out analyses of field measurements intended to demonstrate the energy saving potential of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset (SPR) technology. A new duct leakage model has been successfully implemented in EnergyPlus, which will enable simulation users to assess the impacts of leakage on whole-building energy use and operation in a coupled manner. This feature also provides a foundation to support code change proposals and compliance analyses related to Title 24 where duct leakage is an issue. Our example simulations continue to show that leaky ducts substantially increase fan power: 10percent upstream and 10percent downstream leakage increases supply fan power 30percent on average compared to a tight duct system (2.5percent upstream and 2.5percent downstream leakage). Much of this increase is related to the upstream leakage rather than to the downstream leakage. This does not mean, however, that downstream leakage is unimportant. Our simulations also demonstrate that ceiling heat transfer is a significant effect that needs to be included when assessing the impacts of duct leakage in large commercial buildings. This is not particularly surprising, given that ?ceiling regain? issues have already been included in residential analyses as long as a decade ago (e.g., ASHRAE Standard 152); mainstream simulation programs that are used for large commercial building energy analyses have not had this capability until now. Our analyses of data that we collected during our 2005 tests of the SAV with InCITeTM duct static pressure reset technology show that this technology can substantially reduce fan power (in this case, by about 25 to 30percent). Tempering this assessment, however, is that cooling and heating coil loads were observed to increase or decrease significantly depending on the time window used. Their impact on cooling and heating plant power needs to be addressed in future studies; without translating the coil loads to plant equipment energy use, it is not possible to judge the net impact of this SPR technology on whole-building energy use. If all of the loads had decreased, such a step would not be as necessary.

Wray, Craig; Sherman, Max

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches Title Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3978E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Sherman, Max H., Jennifer M. Logue, and Brett C. Singer Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 17 Issue 2 Pagination 159 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords resave Abstract The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

189

Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Duct Repair: $300 Ceiling Fan: 3 fans Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room A/C: $50 Central A/C: $100/ton High Performance windows: $1/sq ft Air Duct Repair: 50% of repair cost Ceiling Fan: $20 Whole House Fan: $100

190

Ashland Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Air Leakage Test and a Duct System Analysis all performed for free. Customers with gas heat can have these tests conducted, but have to pay 50 to 100 for each one. Rebates...

191

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Electric Water Heater: $25 - $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $25 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 - $1,500 Air Source Heat Pump: $1,000

192

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $25 Dishwashers: $25 Refrigerators: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer/Room AC Recycling: $25 Central Air Conditioner/Mini Split: $40 - $80/Ton Air Source Heat Pump/Mini-Split Heat Pumps: $150/Ton Package Terminal Heat Pump: $150/Ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $300/Ton

193

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

194

Guidelines for residential commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes”.Delp. 2000. “Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics” Lawrence

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualitatively during air-sealing work to assess progresssealing or for separation of the supply and return systems at the airby poor sealing or seal failure during the test. Air leakage

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical existing house. Designed passive ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."House Ventilation Rates Local Exhaust Rates Air Distribution and Duct Leakage Infiltration Windows and Passive

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development of a new duct leakage test: DeltaQ  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a key factor in determining energy losses from forced air heating and cooling systems. Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard.

Walker,I.S.; Sherman,M.H.; Wempen, J.; Wang, D.; McWilliams, J.A.; Dickerhoff, D.J.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Louisville Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. Rebates are offered for refrigerators and freezers, clothes...

199

Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisville Gas & Electric's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

200

Labyrinth Seal Leakage Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seals are basic mechanical devices commonly used in machinery to avoid undesired flow losses of working fluids. To understand the working of these seals specifically those placed between relatively moving parts is still one of the major engineering challenges for the scientific community. Particularly Annular seals are one of the most widely used in rotating machinery comprising turbines, compressors and pumps. They are mounted on the shaft that rotates within a stationary case. These seal designs make an impact on (i) machinery energy conversion efficiency and (ii) rotor dynamic stability due to the interaction between rotor and stator through fluid flow leakage. Among all annular seals straight through rectangular labyrinth seals are the most commonly used ones. Their designs have not changed much a lot since its inception by C.J. Parsons [1] back in 1901. These seals provide resistance to the fluid flow through tortuous path comprising of series of cavities and clearances. The sharp tooth converts the pressure energy to the kinetic which is dissipated through turbulence viscosity interaction in the cavity. To understand the accurate amount of leakage the flow is modeled using the discharge coefficient and for each tooth and the kinetic energy carry over coefficients. This research work is aimed at understanding the fluid flow though labyrinth seals with tooth mounted on the rotor. A matrix of fluid flow simulations has been carried out using commercially available CFD software Fluent® where all parameters effecting the flow field has been studied to understand their effect on the coefficients defining the seal losses. Also the rotor surface speed has been used varied in a step by step manner to understand the fluid flow behavior in high speed turbo-machinery. The carry over coefficient is found to be the function of all the geometric elements defining the labyrinth tooth configuration. A relation between the flow parameters and the carry over coefficient has also been established. The discharge coefficient of the first tooth has been found to be lower and varying in a different manner as compared to a tooth from a multiple cavity seal. Its dependence upon flow parameters and dimensionless geometric constants has been established. The discharge coefficient of the first teeth is found to be increasing with increasing tooth width. Further the compressibility factor has been defined to incorporate the deviation of the performance of seals with compressible fluid to that with the incompressible flow. Its dependence upon pressure ratio and shaft speed has also been established. Using all the above the mentioned relations it would be easy decide upon the tooth configuration for a given rotating machinery or understand the behavior of the seal currently in use.

Chaudhary, Gaurav

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

What are the requirements for duct leakage testing? | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

requirements for duct leakage testing? requirements for duct leakage testing? Both the 2009 and 2012 IECC require duct tightness to be verified. Verification can take place via either a post-construction test or a rough-in test. For the post-construction test, leakage measurement must be made across the entire system, including the manufacturer's air handler enclosure, with all register boots taped or sealed at a test pressure of 0.1 inches w.g. (25 Pa). The 2009 IECC limits the leakage to outdoors to less than or equal to 8 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area or total leakage less than or equal to 12 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. The 2012 IECC only contains a requirement for total leakage of less than or equal to 4 cfm per 100 ft2 of conditioned floor area. For the rough-in test, leakage measurement is made across the system, with

202

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Title Duct Leakage Impacts on VAV System Performance in Large Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-53605 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Wray, Craig P., and Nance Matson Abstract The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the air-handler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

203

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate $100 limit per customer account for appliances purchased in the same calendar year. Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2014 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $100 Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washing Machines: $100 Dishwashers: $75 Dehumidifiers: $50 Window Air Conditioners: $50 Provider Mansfield Municipal Electric Department Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency

205

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Georgia Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Oglethorpe Power Corporation: $5,500 Electric Cities of Georgia: up to $5,000 Municipal Gas Authority of Georgia: up to $5,000 Estes Heating and Air (Statewide): $10,000 The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) encourages Georgians to

206

Connexus Energy- Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Connexus Energy offers rebates for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of homes. Rebates are available for air source heat pumps, ductless heat pumps and ground-source heat pumps...

207

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: $4,000 Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Clothes Washer: $30 Refrigerator: $30 Room Air Conditioner: $20 Room Purifier: $15 CFLs: In-store discounts Provider Unitil Energy Systems

208

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs City Water Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Refrigerator Recycling: 2 units Insulation: $1,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $150 Central Air Conditioner: $9 per kBTUh Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 per appliance Insulation: 30% Provider Energy Services Office City Water Light and Power (CWLP) offers rebates to Springfield residential

209

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Appliance Recycling: 2 rebates per residential account, per appliance type annually Ceiling Fan Light Kits: $20 per light kit; 6 per account per year Central A/C: $400 Air Source Heat Pump: $600 Attic/Ceiling Insulation: $1,000 Air Sealing/Caulking/Weather Stripping: $200 CFL: 50% of cost, up to $5 (10 per customer per year)

210

Clark Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clark Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Clark Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Clark Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 - $1000 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $500 - $1000 Weatherization Measures: Varies Touchstone Energy Home with Air-Source/Geothermal Heat Pump: $250 - $750 Provider Clark Energy Clark Energy offers a free energy audit to provide residential customers with suggestions on ways to improve the energy efficiency of participating

211

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $300/ton + $50/EER/ton Fan Motors: $50/unit Programmable Thermostats: $25 Tank Water Heater: $50

212

NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator/freezer Recycling: $50 Air Conditioners: Up to $1000 Variable Speed Pool Pump: $200 '''Pool Pump and duct system rebates are temporarily suspended. Contact NV Energy for additional information on funding and program availability.''' NV Energy offers rebates for the installation of high efficiency A/C units, air source heat pumps, and pool pumps for residential customers in southern

213

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Henderson (2005) Home air conditioning in Europe – how muchA.A. Pavlova ( 2003). Air conditioning market saturation and+ paper 6,306 Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trends in residential space conditioning are affected byinto space heating, air conditioning, appliances, cookingSpace heating North Transition Ordinary efficient Highly efficient Incandescent Florescent CFL Air conditioning

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $100/ton or $500/unit Air Source Heat Pump: $250/unit Water Heater: $100 Provider Northeastern REMC Northeastern Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) is a consumer-owned corporation that supplies electric power to more than 25,000 members in Northeastern Indiana. Northeastern REMC offers rebates to its residential customers for the purchase of geothermal heat pumps, air-source

216

Power Quality for Satisfied Commercial and Residential Customers Field Test Plan: Monitoring Residential Power Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential customers are purchasing more and more microprocessor-based appliances. Many of the traditional residential loads, such as heating and air-conditioning equipment, washers and dryers, stoves and cook tops, and audio/video equipment, now have microprocessor technology incorporated into their designs. These appliances tend to be more sensitive than their predecessors, and it is of interest to understand the level of power quality that is experienced at the residential level. EPRI's three-year st...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Water Heaters: $50 Room Air Conditioning Unit: $40 Central Air Conditioning: $150 - $1625 Air-to-Air Heat Pumps: $150 - $1700 Add-on Heat Pumps: $150 - $1700 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers a variety of incentives for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of their homes. Eligible customers are eligible for rebates on water heaters, air conditioners, air-source heat

218

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Carolina) North Carolina) Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New homes can qualify for either equipment incentives or whole house incentives, not both Equipment Incentives Heat Pump Water Heaters: $350 High Efficiency HVAC; air-to-air heat pumps: $300 High Efficiency HVAC; central air conditioning: $300 Whole House Incentives $1,000 - $4,000 Provider Progress Energy Progress Energy's residential new construction program provides cash

219

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct sealing and replacement: 50% of cost, up to $190 Air sealing and upgrading insulation: $0.375/Sq Ft, up to $500 Heat Pump Water Heater: $350 HVAC Audit: $100 Central Air Conditioner/Heat Pump: $300 Geothermal Replacement: $300 Room Air Conditioners: $25

220

Riverland Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Riverland Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Riverland Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverland Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount General Lighting: $1 - $15 LED Bulbs: $2/unit Occupancy Sensors: $5 Clothes Washers: $25 Dishwashers: $25 Dehumidifiers: $25 Refrigerators: $25 Room Air Conditioners: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $25 Room Air Conditioner Recycling: $25 Central Air Conditioner: $40 - $80/Ton Electric Water Heater: $50 - $300 Water Heater Installation Cost: $20 - $150

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lodi Electric Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Energy Efficient Home Improvement Rebate Program: Maximum total rebate in a 12-month period is $500 per customer service address, PLUS, an additional $250 allowance for air duct repair, or an additional $800 allowance for air duct replacement, if eligible. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Air Duct Testing: $125

222

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina) South Carolina) Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New homes can qualify for either equipment incentives or whole house incentives, not both Equipment Incentives Heat Pump Water Heaters: $350 High Efficiency HVAC; air-to-air heat pumps: $300 High Efficiency HVAC; central air conditioning: $300 Whole House Incentives $1,000 - $4,000 Provider Progress Energy Progress Energy's residential new construction program provides cash

223

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Title Development of a New Duct leakage Test: Delta Q Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-47308 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, J. Wempen, Duo Wang, Jennifer A. McWilliams, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Abstract Several studies (Francisco and Palmiter 1997 and 1999, Andrews et al. 1998, and Siegel et al. 2001) have shown that the duct system efficiency cannot be reliably determined without good estimates of duct leakage. Specifically, for energy calculations, it is the duct leakage air flow to outside at operating conditions that is required. Existing test methods either precisely measure the size of leaks (but not the flow through them at operating conditions), or measure these flows with insufficient accuracy. The DeltaQ duct leakage test method was developed to provide improved estimates of duct leakage during system operation. In this study we developed the analytical calculation methods and the test procedures used in the DeltaQ test. As part of the development process, we have estimated uncertainties in the test method (both analytically and based on field data) and designed automated test procedures to increase accuracy and reduce the contributions of operator errors in performing field tests. In addition, the test has been evaluated in over 100 houses by several research teams to show that it can be used in a wide range of houses and to aid in finding limits or problems in field applications. The test procedure is currently being considered by ASTM as an update of an existing duct leakage standard

224

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Title Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3938E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Willem, Henry, and Brett C. Singer Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords resave Abstract This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

225

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $400 or $600 Central Air Source Heat Pump: $400 or $600 Electric Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Energy Star Thermostats: up to $25 Duct Sealing: $100/hr Air Sealing: $75/hr Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Con Edison is offering the Residential HVAC Electric Rebate Program.

226

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Great Lakes Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air-Source Heat Pumps: $250 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 Provider Great Lakes Energy Great Lakes Energy offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of efficiency air-source heat pumps or geothermal heat pumps. A rebate of $250 is available for air-source heat pumps, and a $500 rebate is available for geothermal heat pumps. View the program website listed above to view program and efficiency specifics. A variety of rebates may also be available to Great Lake Energy residential

227

EA-1892: Direct Final Rule Energy Conservation Standards for Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

92: Direct Final Rule Energy Conservation Standards for 92: Direct Final Rule Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Residential Central Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps EA-1892: Direct Final Rule Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Furnaces and Residential Central Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to adopt energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including residential furnaces and residential air conditioners and heat pumps, as required by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6291 et seq.). Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 27, 2011 EA-1892: Draft Environmental Assessment

228

Modeling study of ventilation, IAQ and energy impacts of residential mechanical ventilation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a simulation study of indoor air quality, ventilation and energy impacts of several mechanical ventilation approaches in a single-family residential building. The study focused on a fictitious two-story house in Spokane, Washington and employed the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal model CONTAM. The model of the house included a number of factors related to airflow including exhaust fan and forced-air system operation, duct leakage and weather effects, as well as factors related to contaminant dispersal including adsorption/desorption of water vapor and volatile organic compounds, surface losses of particles and nitrogen dioxide, outdoor contaminant concentrations, and occupant activities. The contaminants studied include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor, fine and coarse particles, and volatile organic compounds. One-year simulations were performed for four different ventilation approaches: a base case of envelope infiltration only, passive inlet vents in combination with exhaust fan operation, an outdoor intake duct connected to the forced-air system return balanced by exhaust fan operation, and a continuously-operated exhaust fan. Results discussed include whole building air change rates, air distribution within the house, heating and cooling loads, contaminants concentrations, and occupant exposure to contaminants.

Persily, A.K.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Cooling Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: 10 tons for Residential, 50 tons for Commercial Energy Audit Repairs: $500 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump (New Units): $750/ton Geothermal Heat Pump (Replacement Units): $200/ton Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $150/ton Room AC: $50 Energy Audit Repairs: 50% of cost Provider Southwest Electric Cooperative Southwest Electric Cooperative offers rebates to its customers that purchase energy efficient heating and air conditioning equipment . This

230

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Compact Fluorescent Bulbs: Free While Supplies Last Insulation: $0.50/sq ft Heat Pump Water Heater: Up to $500 HVAC Controls: $250/unit Single Package/Split System Unitary AC: $250/ton Air-Source Heat Pump: $250/ton Water-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Home Energy Savings Program: Free for Electric Customers

231

Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

Winkler, J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Columbia Gas of Massachusetts - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation Weatherization: 75% of project cost Energy Star homes: $350 - $8,000, varies by number of units and efficiency Warm Air Furnace: $500 - $800 Gas Boiler: $1,000 - $1,500 Integrated Water Heater/Boiler: $1,200

233

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $150 - $275 Boiler: $300 Storage Water Heater: $125 Tankless Water Heater: $150 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Attic Insulation: Up to $600 Wall Insulation: Up to $700 Air Sealing: Up to $250 Provider Vectren Energy Delivery of Ohio Vectren Energy Delivery offers residential natural gas customers in Ohio

234

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Contact DTE Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: up to $150 Floor Insulation: $50 - $100 Bandjoist Insulation: $50 - $100 Wall Insulation: Up to $250 Ceiling Insulation: Up to $250 Window Replacement: $30 (window); $60 (picture window/sliding glass door)

235

Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program Indianapolis Power & Light - Residential Energy Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: In store discounts A/C Cycling: $20/summer Split System AC: $300 - $400 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $300 Home Energy Evaluation and Energy Efficiency Kit: Free Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30/unit Provider IPL Energy Incentives Program The Indianapolis Power and Light Energy Incentives Programs assist residential customers with reducing energy consumption. The program offers

236

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 5 Utilities) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 5 Utilities) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 5 Utilities) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 5 Utilities) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Decorative Light Strings: $3.50/string Dehumidifier: $10 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Room Air Conditioner: $15 Home Heating and Cooling: Varies Provider Missouri River Energy Services Bright Energy Solutions offers energy efficiency cash incentive programs to residential and business customers of municipal utilities that are members

237

The Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate The Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program The Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: $599 Water Heater (Replacement): $100 Water Heater (New): $250 - $350 Geothermal Heat Pump: $599 Central AC: $100 Provider The Energy Cooperative The Energy Cooperative offers incentives to residential customers for the installation of dual fuel heating systems, water heaters, geothermal heat pumps and central air conditioners. Equipment must be installed in eligible

238

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Avista Utilities (Gas) - Oregon Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced Air Furnaces and Boilers: $200 Programmable Thermostats: $50 Windows: $2.25/sq. ft. Insulation: 50% of cost Provider Avista Utilities Avista Utilities offers a variety of equipment rebates to Oregon residential customers. Rebates are available for boilers, furnaces, insulation measures, windows and programmable thermostats. All equipment must meet certain energy efficiency standards listed on the program web

239

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $140 - $420 Water Boiler: $350 or $700 Steam Boiler: $350 Boiler Reset Control: $70 Indirect Water Heater: $210 Programmable Thermostat: $18 Duct and Air Sealing: up to $420 Provider Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc. Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers

240

Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs Alabama Power - Residential Heat Pump and Weatherization Loan Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Windows: $350 Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Not specified Provider Alabama Power Alabama Power offers low-interest loans to residential customers to purchase and install new heat pumps and a variety of weatherization measures. The loans require no money down and can be used to finance an air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Montana-Dakota Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Montana-Dakota Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Programmable Thermostat: 1 per address Program Info State Montana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Gas''' Furnace: 150 Energy Star Programmable Thermostat: 20 '''Electric''' Air Conditioner Replacement: 175/ton Provider Montana-Dakota Utilities Co. Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient equipment for natural gas and electric customers. Natural gas customers are eligible for rebates on furnaces and programmable thermostats

242

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Energy Select Programmable Thermostat and Time of Use Control: Free HVAC Maintenance: $215 Duct Repair and Air Sealing: $150 - $300 Fan Motor Retrofit: $150 Heat Pump: $100 - $1000; varies by size and efficiency

243

Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Norwich Public Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Energy Star rebate: one rebate per appliance per residential utility customer Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/12 State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators/Freezers: $60 Washing Machines: $60 Room AC: $60 Heat Pump Water Heater: $500 Central AC: $200 - $300/ton Dual Enthalpy Economizer Controls: $250 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $300/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $150/ton

244

Shrewsbury Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shrewsbury Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Shrewsbury Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Shrewsbury Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Dish Washer: $50 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Provider EFI In collaboration with EFI, Shrewsbury Electric offers rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances. Eligible products include washing machines, dishwashers, refrigerators, and room air conditioners. Customers will need to fill out an appliance mail-in rebate form that can be obtained at the Town Hall or on the Town of Shrewsbury web site. Information will be required including

245

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics of Homethe stakes for energy consumption are high, as we hope atAir Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Using Hydrated Salt Phase Change Materials for Residential Air Conditioning Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Coastal and Transitional Climates in the State of California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent rapid economic and population growth in the State of California have led to a significant increase in air conditioning use, especially in areas… (more)

Lee, Kyoung Ok

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Computing leakage current distributions and determination of minimum leakage vectors for combinational designs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Analyzing circuit leakage and minimizing leakage during the standby mode of oper- ation of a circuit are important problems faced during contemporary circuit design. Analysis… (more)

Gulati, Kanupriya

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

SourceGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SourceGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Other Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Hot Water Insulation/Infiltration Measures: minimum purchase of $40 Programmable Thermostats: 2 per account Insulation/Air Sealing: $300 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200 - $300 Boiler: $150 Proper Sizing of Boiler/Furnace: $50 Hot Water Heater (Tank): $50 Hot Water Heater (Tankless): $300 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Hot Water Insulation/Infiltration Measures: $25 Insulation/Air Sealing: 30% of cost

249

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central Hudson Gas and Electric (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $600 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Air-source Heat Pumps: $400 - $600, depending on efficiency Electronically Commutated Motor (ECM) Furnace Fans: $200 Electric Heat Pump Water Heaters: $400 Programmable Thermostats: $25

250

Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Attic Insulation: $500 Wall Insulation: $500 Air Sealing: $300 Program Info Start Date 7/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star New Home: Contact Black Hills Energy Air-Source Heat Pump Split System: $400 Central A/C: $500-$700 Ground Source Heat Pumps: $1,200

251

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Arkansas) Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Maximum Rebate Central Air Conditioner: $500 Weatherization Measures: Total cost of measures eligible for rebate cannot exceed $2,964 Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audits: Varies Weatherization Measures: 25% - 50% of cost Central Air Conditioner: $400 - $500 Programmable Thermostat: $25

252

Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dayton Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $25 Freezer Recycling: $25 HVAC Tune-Up: $25 credit CFL's: $1.40 average off of each bulb purchased at participating stores Air Conditioning: $100 - $300, varies by efficiency and equipment application Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and equipment application Geothermal Heat Pump: $200 - $600, varies by efficiency and equipment

253

Residential market transformation: National and regional indicators  

SciTech Connect

A variety of programs are underway to address market barriers to the adoption of energy-efficient residential technologies and practices. Most are administered by utilities, states, or regions that rely on the Energy Star as a consistent platform for program marketing and messaging. This paper reviews regional and national market transformation activities for three key residential end-uses -- air conditioning, clothes washing, and lighting -- characterizing current and ongoing programs; reporting on progress; identifying market indicators; and discussing implications.

Van Wie McGrory, Laura L.; McNamara, Maureen; Suozzo, Margaret

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dubois REC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 - $400 Central Air Conditioner: $200 - $300 Air-source Heat Pump: $300 - $1,000 Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $300 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 ETS Room Unit: $30/kW ETS Whole House Unit: $300 - $400 Provider Dubois REC Dubois REC offers a variety of rebates for residential customers to save energy in new or existing homes. Rebates are offered for geothermal and air-source heat pumps, central air conditioners, electric water heaters,

255

WIN Energy REMC - Residential Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIN Energy REMC - Residential Rebate Program WIN Energy REMC - Residential Rebate Program WIN Energy REMC - Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Water Heater: $50 - $150 or Free Heat Pump Water Heater: $300-$400 Air Source Heat Pump: $300 - $1,000 Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 Central Air: $200 - $300 Provider WIN Energy REMC WIN Energy REMC offers incentives to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient water heaters, air source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, and central air conditioning systems. All equipment

256

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

258

Comparison between predicted duct effectiveness from proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and measured field data for residential forced air cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Forced Air Systems in Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P.ASHRAE Transactions, 104(1B), 1360-1375. Walker I, ShermanDuct Effectiveness from Proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and

Siegel, Jeffrey A.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Co-Mo Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Cooling Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: 10 ton maximum for Residential, 50 ton maximum for Commercial Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room AC: $50 Water Heater: $50 Air Source Heat Pumps: $150 per ton Dual Fuel Air Source Heat Pumps: $300 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Closed Loop): up to $850 per ton Geothermal Heat Pumps (Open Loop or Replacement): $150 per ton Provider Co-Mo Electric Cooperative Co-Mo Electric Cooperative provides rebates to residential and commercial

260

Leakage Mapping: A Systematic Methodology for Assessing the Side-Channel Information Leakage of Cryptographic Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a generalized framework to evaluate the side-channel information leakage of symmetric block ciphers. The leakage mapping methodology enables the systematic and efficient identification and mitigation of problematic information leakages by ... Keywords: Differential power analysis, advanced encryption standard, block cipher, cryptanalysis, cryptography, encryption, hardware security, information leakage, physical-layer security, side-channel analysis

William E. Cobb; Rusty O. Baldwin; Eric D. Laspe

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Title Reducing Indoor Residential Exposures to Outdoor Pollutants Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-51758 Year of Publication 2003 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Start Page Chapter Abstract Basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks

262

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

263

Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

264

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioners: $25 Central Air Conditioners: $100-$200 Heat Pumps: $100-$400 Ground-source Heat Pumps: $1000-$2000 Desuperheaters: $100 Programmable Thermostat: $20 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers a variety of incentives for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of participating homes. Electric customers of MidAmerican Energy qualify for rebates on programmable thermostats, air

265

Johnson County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Johnson County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Johnson County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) Johnson County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pumps: $200 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $500 - $700 Water Heaters: $50 Heat Pump Water Heater: $200 - $500 Central Air Conditioning: $100 Johnson County Rural Electric Membership Cooperative offers rebates to residential customers who install or replace new water heating and HVAC equipment. Rebates are available on the purchase and installation of air source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, heat pump water

266

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Ground-Source Heat Pump: 5 ton maximum Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $25 Freezer/Refrigerator: $25 Dishwasher: $25 Air-Source Heat Pump: $500 Ground-Source Heat Pump: $200 per ton Electric Resistant Heating Products: $10 per kW Mini-Split Heat Pumps: $75 Central A/C or Heat Pump Tune-Up: $25 Provider Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative (MVEC) offers financial incentives to

267

ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motivations that will affect appliance energy consumption.that target specific appliances, whether air conditioning,California Statewide Residential Appliance Saturation Study.

Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Air Quality (Nova Scotia, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential MunicipalPublic Utility...

269

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

270

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Hawaii Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Instant Rebates Heat Pump Water Heater: $200 Refrigerators: $50 Refrigerators (with Trade-in): $125 Clothes Washers: $50 Ceiling Fans: $40 Variable Refrigerant Flow Air Conditioners: $200 Central AC Maintenance: $50 Whole House Fans: $75 Whole House Energy Monitor: 50% of the purchase price up to $100 Provider Hawaii Energy Efficiency Program As part of the Energy Solutions programs, the Hawaii Energy Efficiency

271

AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP SWEPCO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Home Performance with ENERGY STAR®''' Central AC Replacements: $125 - $800/system Heat Pump Replacements: $125 - $825/system Insulation: $0.12-$0.25/sq. ft. Duct Sealing/Replacement: $175 - $300/home Duct Insulation: $0.50/ln. ft. AC Tune-up: $80 Air Infiltration: $100 - $150

272

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program City of Tallahassee Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Energy Star Home: $2000t Ceiling Insulation: $400 ($500 for income-qualified customers) Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Home: $1/square foot Ceiling Insulation: 80% of installation cost (100% for income-qualified customers) Electric Rebates Refrigerators: $75 Freezers: $40 Clothes Washers: $100 Central Air Conditioner: $100 or $350 Heat Pump: $100 - $350

273

Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Middle Tennessee EMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows (Replacement): $500 Storm Windows: $500 Duct Work: $500 HVAC (Replacement): $250 Building Insulation (Contractor Installed): $500 Building Insulation (Self Installed): $250 Water Heater Insulation: $50 Air Sealing: $500 HVAC Tune-Up: $150 Provider Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation

274

DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Cooling Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: up to $150 Floor Insulation: $50 - $100 Bandjoist Insulation: $50 - $100 Above Grade Wall/Knee Wall Insulation: $250 Crawl Space/Wall/Band Joist Insulation: $100 Ceiling Insulation: $125 - $250 Window Replacement: $30/window; $60/picture window or sliding glass door Programmable Thermostat: $10-$20

275

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: rebate amounts cannot exceed 50% of the total project cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Clothes Washers: $50 Gas, Oil or Propane Clothes Washers: $20 Refrigerators/Freezers: $15 Duct Sealing: $400 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,000 Air-source Heat Pumps: $700 - $1,100

276

Northern Municipal Power Agency - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northern Municipal Power Agency - Residential Energy Efficiency Northern Municipal Power Agency - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) Northern Municipal Power Agency - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate $10,000 per customer per year Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Assessment: discounted price Compact Fluorescent Lights: $2/light bulb LED Screw-In: $7/bulb LED Recessed Downlights: $15 - $25/install Clothes Washers: $50 Water Heaters: $150 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Supplemental Heating Source for Air-Source Heat Pump: $500

277

Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Clallam County PUD - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $15 Freezer: $15 CFL Fixtures: $10 Electric Water Heater: $25 Drain Water Heat Recovery System: $220 Air Sealing: $160 to installer PTCS Duct-Sealing (Manufactured Home): $350 - $500 to installer PTCS Duct-Sealing (Site-Built Home): $500 to installer

278

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost. Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

279

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives will not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Water Heater: $30 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

280

MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Programs MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 75% Heat Pump Water Heater: $750 Income Eligible Customers: free home energy consultation Mulitifamily Incentives: comprehensive energy analysis, lighting upgrades, insulation, air sealing and other energy saving measures.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL/LED Bulbs: Discounted pricing Energy Star CFL/LED Fixtures: $20 Clothes Washers: $50 Refrigerator: up to $35 Dishwasher: $20 Freezer: $20 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Water Heaters: $75 Heat Pump Water Heater: $150 Refrigerator Recycling: $30

282

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Pacific Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $50-$75 Refrigerators: $20 Refrigerator Recycling: $35 Dishwashers: $20 Water Heater: $40 CFL Lamps: Retailer discounts Lighting Fixtures: $20 Ceiling Fans: $20 Room Air Conditioner: $30 Evaporative Coolers: $50-$150 Central A/C Equipment: $100 (homeowner); $25 (contractor)

283

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air duct repair and replacement: Up to $190 Attic insulation upgrade and attic sealing: $500 Geothermal heat pump replacement: $300 HVAC Audit: $100 High-efficiency heat pump replacement: $300 High-efficiency central AC replacement: $300 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50/unit Provider Progress Energy Carolinas

284

Xcel Energy - Residential ENERGY STAR Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential ENERGY STAR Rebate Program Residential ENERGY STAR Rebate Program Xcel Energy - Residential ENERGY STAR Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Ventilation Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Cooling Maximum Rebate Ground Source Heat Pump: $1500 Program Info Funding Source Home Performance with ENERGY STAR State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing and Weatherstripping: $160 Attic Insulation and Bypass Sealing: $350 High Efficiency Lighting: $40 Wall Insulation: $800 Set Back Thermostat: $25 Furnaces: $170 - $200 Boiler: $160 Electric Heat Pump: $550

285

MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Retrofit Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit Programs Retrofit Programs MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Retrofit Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 75% Heat Pump Water Heater: $1,000 Income Eligible Customers: free home energy consultation Mulitifamily Incentives: comprehensive energy analysis, lighting upgrades, insulation, air sealing and other energy saving measures.

286

Ameren Missouri (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Missouri (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Ameren Missouri (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Ameren Missouri (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: 3 units Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL's: In-store discounts, Online Store Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Air Source Heat Pump: $300 - $650 Central AC: $150 - $425 Electronically Commutated Blower Motor: $50 - $100 Geothermal Heat Pump: $600 Diagnostic Tune-Up: $75 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Electric Storage Water Heater: $25

287

AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Homes Program: Contact AEP Ohio In-home Energy Audit: $75 Pin Based CFL Indoor Fixture: $20 Pin Based CFL Outdoor Fixture: $35 CFL Torchieres: $20 Wall Insulation: $75 Air Sealing: $50 Window Film: $45 ENERGY STAR Window Replacement: $75 Attic Insulation: $90 Shower Start/Stop: $25

288

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Idaho Falls Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount General Weatherization: $0.25/kWh Air Source Heat Pumps Upgrade (Ducts Sealed): $850 Air Source Heat Pumps Upgrade (Ducts Not Sealed): $450 Air Source Heat Pumps Conversion (Ducts Sealed): $1,600 Air Source Heat Pumps Conversion (Ducts Not Sealed): $1,200 Ground Source Heat Pumps: $2,500

289

Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Existing Home Air-source Heat Pump: $200 Existing Home Geothermal Heat Pump: $200 Existing Home Air Conditioner: $200 Attic Insulation and Air Sealing: $250 Duct Insulation: $75 Duct Sealing: $100 Heat Pump and Air Conditioner Tune Up: $50 A/C Cycling Power Manager Program: $32 annual bill credits

290

Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Appliances &...

291

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

292

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

293

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

294

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

295

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating &...

296

Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Construction Residential Savings For Other...

297

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Residential...

298

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

299

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial...

300

Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial...

302

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

303

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

304

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

305

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Title Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3048E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Iain S. Walker Journal HVAC & Research Journal Keywords air distribution, indoor air quality, mechanical ventilation, mixing, other, resave, residential ventilation, ventilation effectiveness Abstract Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall

306

PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

307

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate...

308

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling...

309

Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Appliances &...

310

Residential Duct Design: A Practical Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-designed and properly installed air distribution ductwork is essential for optimum performance of residential space-conditioning systems. This handbook is both a practical study guide and a ready reference work that can help students, designers, and installers of ductwork deliver a high level of comfort with trouble-free, low-cost maintenance.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $109 - $384 Heat Pumps: $259 - $701 Heat Pumps Water Heaters: $300 Provider Independence Power and Light Independence Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing new, energy efficient appliances. Rebates are available on central air conditioning systems, heat pumps, and water heaters. Rebates on equipment vary based upon size, capacity, and efficiency of the unit. See

312

Colorado Springs Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Colorado Springs Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Maximum Rebate Visit website for details Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct Sealing: 40% of job up to $100 Dishwasher: $50 Gas Boiler: $250 Gas Furnace: $250 Gas Water Heater: $50 Insulation and Air Sealing: 40% of job up to $200 Irrigation: varies Refrigerator: $50 + $50 recycle bonus Toilets: up to $75 (max 2) Windows: $4.67/sq ft, up to $200 Provider Residential Efficiency Incentives Colorado Springs Utilities offers a variety of energy and water efficiency

313

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Rebate amount cannot exceed the purchase price Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 3/31/2014 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $250 Forced Air Furnace with ECM: $350 Hot Water Boiler: $350 Steam Boiler: $200 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Indirect Water Heater: $250 Provider Energy Federation Incorporated (EFI) National Fuel offers pre-qualified equipment rebates for the installation of certain energy efficiency measures to residential customers in Western

314

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Evaporative Cooling: $200-$1000/unit Saver's Switch A/C Cycling: $20/ton of enrolled air conditioning Refrigerator Recycling: $75 CFLs: $1/bulb LED's: $10/bulb

315

PNM - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNM - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PNM - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PNM - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: 2 units per household Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount +Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50/unit Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs (CFLs): point-of-purchase discounts AC Cycling: $25 sign-up and $25/year Provider Customer Service PNM offers incentives for residential customers to improve the efficiency of eligible homes. PNM will provide a $50 rebate for the proper recycling of old refrigerators or freezers. Customers who agree to cycle the operation of residential air conditioning systems are also eligible for a

316

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Utility Rebate up to $4,000 Home Energy Assistance (Low-income residents): $5,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2011 State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Warm Air Furnace: $500 or $800 Natural Gas Boiler: $1,000 or $1,500

317

APS - Residential Energy Efficient Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APS - Residential Energy Efficient Rebate Program APS - Residential Energy Efficient Rebate Program APS - Residential Energy Efficient Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Duct Repairs: $250 Sealing Air Leaks: $250 Attic Insulation: $250 Pool Pumps: $200 Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pumps/AC Units: $270 Insulation, Duct Repair and Air Sealing: 75% of cost Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Lighting: Store Discounts APS offers a $270 rebate to its residential customers who upgrade their AC units or heat pumps. AC units must meet both the SEER and EER values and be

318

Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Cooling Maximum Rebate Air Source Heat Pump: 4 tons or $600 per metered account Water Heater: $75 per metered account Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $750 per ton per metered account Geothermal Heat Pump Replacement: $150/ton Air Source Heat Pump: $150 per ton per metered account Water Heater: $50 - $75 Room AC: $50 Provider Ozark Border Electric Cooperative Ozark Border Electric Cooperative has made rebates available to residential

319

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative Utilities) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative Utilities) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Window AC Unit: $50 Electric Water Heaters: $50 New Ground-Source Heat Pump: up to $750/ton Replacement Ground-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Air Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Provider Associated Electric Cooperative Associated Electric Cooperative and many of its member cooperatives offer rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment for the home. Eligible equipment includes room air conditioners,

320

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative Utilities) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Several Cooperative Utilities) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Cooling Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room A/C Unit: $50 Electric Water Heaters: $50 - $200 New Geothermal Heat Pump: up to $750/ton Replacement Geothermal Heat Pump: $150/ton Air-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Provider Associated Electric Cooperative Associated Electric Cooperative and many of its member cooperatives offer rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment for the home. Eligible equipment includes room air conditioners,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Connexus Energy - Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connexus Energy - Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program Connexus Energy - Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program Connexus Energy - Residential Efficient HVAC Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pumps: $480 - $630 Ductless Heat Pump: $150 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Provider Connexus Energy Connexus Energy offers rebates for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of homes. Rebates are available for air source heat pumps, ductless heat pumps and ground-source heat pumps. Equipment must meet all efficiency standards listed on the web site, and must be installed by a certified HVAC contractor. Contact Connexus Energy for other program

322

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Farmers Electric Cooperative - Residential/Agricultural Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Water Heaters: $100 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $150 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,000 Provider Farmers Electric Cooperative Farmers Electric Cooperative offers incentives for its residential and agricultural members to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes and facilities. In order to receive rebates, equipment and installation must meet program requirements. Rebates are available for qualifying air

323

PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Effective June 1, 2013: Central A/C: $400 Air-Source Heat Pump: $300-$400 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Storage Tank Electric Water Heater: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35 PECO electric service customers are eligible for rebates on ENERGY STAR qualified appliances and HVAC equipment. Whether eligible technologies are

324

Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $75-$150 Furnace with ECM: $150 Heat Pump Water Heater: $150 Electric Hot Water Heater: $25 Electric Clothes Dryer: $25 Programmable Thermostat: $15 Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner: $15 Energy Star® Refrigerator: $25 Energy Star® Dehumidifier: $15 Intelligent Surge Protector: $10 Energy Star® Personal Computer: $15

325

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Concord Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Electric Heat Weatherization: $1,000 Central Air Conditioners: $1,500 CFLs/LEDs/Exit Signs: 30 bulbs or signs Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Heat Weatherization: $1,000 Central Air Conditioners: $1,500 CFLs/LEDs/Exit Signs: 30 bulbs or signs Provider Customer Service Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers its residential customers

326

Carroll County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carroll County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carroll County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Carroll County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $300 Geothermal Heat Pump: $500/ton Installation (Contractor): $150 Refrigerator Recycling: $35 Provider Carroll County REMC Carroll County REMC offers incentives to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficiency equipment for the home. Rebates are available on geothermal heat pumps, air source heat pumps, and recycled refrigerators. Interested customers can visit the program web site for more

327

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

328

TEP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program TEP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program TEP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Sealing with Attic Insulation: $800 Duct Sealing: $350 (prescriptive); $650 (performance measured) Air Sealing: $250 Shade Screens or Solar Film: $250 Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount BrightSave Home Energy Analysis: Discounted HVAC Replacement: $250 HVAC Equipment Early Retirement and Retrofit: $900

329

Detecting Air Leaks | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detecting Air Leaks Detecting Air Leaks Detecting Air Leaks September 27, 2012 - 6:39pm Addthis For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. You may already know where some air leakage occurs in your home, such as an under-the-door draft, but you'll need to find the less obvious gaps to properly air seal your home. For a thorough and accurate measurement of air leakage in your home, hire a qualified technician to conduct an energy assessment, particularly a blower door test. A blower door test, which depressurizes a home, can

330

OpenEI - Residential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

331

Residential Price - Marketers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential and Commercial Consumers by Local Distribution and Marketers in Selected States (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet ...

332

Essays on residential desegregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many ethnically diverse countries have policies that encourage integration across ethnic groups. This dissertation investigates the impact and welfare implications of a residential desegregation policy in Singapore, the ...

Wong, Maisy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Choosing a Residential Window  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choosing a Residential Window LBNLs Windows and Daylighting Group provides technical support to government and industry efforts to help consumers and builders choose...

334

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Title Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5554E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Walker, Iain S., Max H. Sherman, and Darryl J. Dickerhoff Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20%, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

335

Quantifying information leakage in process calculi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building on simple information-theoretic concepts, we study two quantitative models of information leakage in the pi-calculus. The first model presupposes an attacker with an essentially unlimited computational power. The resulting notion of absolute ... Keywords: Information leakage, Information theory, Process calculi, Secrecy

Michele Boreale

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Title Air Tightness of New U.S. Houses: A Preliminary Report Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-48671 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Sherman, Max H., and Nance Matson Abstract Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

337

Anoka Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anoka Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Anoka Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Anoka Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Room Air Conditioner: limit of 2 units per account Lighting: limit of $15 per customer per year Program Info Expiration Date 03/31/2013 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan: $25 Clothes Washer: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $25 Freezer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 Air Conditioner Tune-Up: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25/unit Central A/C: $225 - $400, varies by efficiency

338

CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CenterPoint Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Air Sealing/Weatherization: $350 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Forced-air furnaces: $150-$400 Natural gas boiler: $300 Natural gas condensing boiler: $500 Natural gas water heater: $70-$100 Storage tank indirect water heater: $200 Attic Air Sealing: 50% of cost, up to $200 Attic/Wall Insulation: 50% of cost, up to $150 Energy Audit: Reduced Cost

339

Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Duke Energy - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Existing Home Air-source Heat Pump: $200 (home owner) Existing Home Geothermal Heat Pump: $200 (home owner) Existing Home Air Conditioner: $200 (home owner) New Building Heat Pump: $300/heat pump installed (contractor) New Building Air Conditioner: $300/unit installed (contractor) New Building Geothermal Heat Pump: $300/heat pump installed (contractor)

340

MMPA - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MMPA - Residential Energy Efficiency Program MMPA - Residential Energy Efficiency Program MMPA - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate CFL Bulbs: $100 Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $25 Dishwasher: $25 Clothes Washer: $25 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Central Air Conditioner: $225 - $400 Air-Source Heat Pump: $225 - $400 Air Conditioner Tune-Up: $25 CFL Bulbs: $2 per bulb Provider Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (MMPA) generates and purchases electricity for 11 member communities in Minnesota. The following eight members participate in the MMPA We Save Program: Arlington, Brownton, Buffalo,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Alexandria Light and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $50 - $75 Refrigerator: $50, with recycling of old, working model Dishwasher: $25 Dehumidifier: $10 Room Air Conditioner: $15 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Central A/C: $200 Mini-Split Ductless A/C: $100 ECM in New Furnace/Air Handler/Fan Coil: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $250 - $350 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton

342

Clark County REMC- Clark County REMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Clark County REMC provides incentives for residential members to upgrade to more efficient household equipment. Rebates are available for air-source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, central air...

343

Model Code for the Prevention of Residential HAC Distribution System Leakage and HAC-Induced Building Leakage, 1994 Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This model code is the 1994 revision of an earlier code published in the Proceedings Of The Seventh Annual Symposium On Improving Building Systems In Hot And Humid Climates, Texas A&M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering in 1990. It contains additional closure systems, application practices, and definitions, and it addresses systems unique to mobile homes.

Wemhoff, P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

345

Reducing Uncertainty for the DeltaQ Duct Leakage Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the DeltaQ duct Leakage Test”. ASHRAE Transactions (inof a new Duct Leakage Test: DeltaQ. LBNL 47308. Walker, I,Uncertainties in the DeltaQ test for Duct Leakage.

Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

Willem, Henry; Singer, Brett

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Minimizing and exploiting leakage in VLSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power consumption of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integrated) circuits has been growing at an alarmingly rapid rate. This increase in power consumption, coupled with the increasing demand for portable/hand-held electronics, has made power consumption a dominant concern in the design of VLSI circuits today. Traditionally dynamic (switching) power has dominated the total power consumption of VLSI circuits. However, due to process scaling trends, leakage power has now become a major component of the total power consumption in VLSI circuits. This dissertation explores techniques to reduce leakage, as well as techniques to exploit leakage currents through the use of sub-threshold circuits. This dissertation consists of two studies. In the first study, techniques to reduce leakage are presented. These include a low leakage ASIC design methodology that uses high VT sleep transistors selectively, a methodology that combines input vector control and circuit modification, and a scheme to find the optimum reverse body bias voltage to minimize leakage. As the minimum feature size of VLSI fabrication processes continues to shrink with each successive process generation (along with the value of supply voltage and therefore the threshold voltage of the devices), leakage currents increase exponentially. Leakage currents are hence seen as a necessary evil in traditional VLSI design methodologies. We present an approach to turn this problem into an opportunity. In the second study in this dissertation, we attempt to exploit leakage currents to perform computation. We use sub-threshold digital circuits and come up with ways to get around some of the pitfalls associated with sub-threshold circuit design. These include a technique that uses body biasing adaptively to compensate for Process, Voltage and Temperature (PVT) variations, a design approach that uses asynchronous micro-pipelined Network of Programmable Logic Arrays (NPLAs) to help improve the throughput of sub-threshold designs, and a method to find the optimum supply voltage that minimizes energy consumption in a circuit.

Jayakumar, Nikhil

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Residential Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rewards Program Rewards Program Residential Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Focus On Energy Program Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (90% AFUE with ECM): $125 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM): $275 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM) and AC (16 SEER): $400 Air Source Heat Pump (16 SEER): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (90% AFUE): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (95% AFUE): $400 Indirect Water Heater (with high efficiency space heating boiler): $100 Tankless Water Heater (0.82 EF or higher): $100 Storage Water Heater (0.67 EF or higher): $50

349

Roseville Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Roseville Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Sunscreens: $150 Shade Tree: 6 trees Program Info Expiration Date 06/30/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Conditioner/Heat Pump: $400 Pool Pump (Variable Speed): $300 Clothes Washer: up to $75 CFLs: Exchange up to 10 bulbs Sunscreens: $0.75/sq. ft. Shade Tree: $25 - $50/tree Roseville Electric offers incentives to its residential customers that encourage energy efficient improvements and equipment upgrades in eligible homes. Rebates of up to $75 are available to customers who install CEE tier

350

Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential rooms residential rooms Title Sorption of organic gases in residential rooms Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-59303 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Singer, Brett C., Alfred T. Hodgson, Toshifumi Hotchi, Katherine Y. Ming, Richard G. Sextro, Emily E. Wood, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 3251-3265 Keywords adsorption, hazardous air pollutants, nerve agents, sink effect, volatile organic compounds Abstract Experiments were conducted to characterize organic gas sorption in residential rooms studied ''as-is'' with furnishings and material surfaces unaltered and in a furnished chamber designed to simulate a residential room. Results are presented for 10 rooms (five bedrooms, two bathrooms, a home office, and two multi-function spaces) and the chamber. Exposed materials were characterized and areas quantified. A mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was rapidly volatilized within each room as it was closed and sealed for a 5-h Adsorb phase; this was followed by 30-min Flush and 2-h closed-room Desorb phases. Included were alkane, aromatic, and oxygenated VOCs representing a range of ambient and indoor air pollutants. Three organophosphorus compounds served as surrogates for Sarin-like nerve agents. Measured gas-phase concentrations were fit to three variations of a mathematical model that considers sorption occurring at a surface sink and potentially a second, embedded sink. The 3-parameter sink-diffusion model provided acceptable fits for most compounds and the 4-parameter two-sink model provided acceptable fits for the others. Initial adsorption rates and sorptive partitioning increased with decreasing vapor pressure for the alkanes, aromatics and oxygenated VOCs. Best-fit sorption parameters obtained from experimental data from the chamber produced best-fit sorption parameters similar to those obtained from the residential rooms

351

Leakage and rotordynamic effects of pocket damper seals and see-through labyrinth seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation discusses research on the leakage and rotordynamic characteristics of pocket damper seals (PDS) and see-through labyrinth seals, presents and evaluates models for labyrinth seal and PDS leakage and PDS force coefficients, and compares these seals to other annular gas seals. Low-pressure experimental results are used alongside previously-published high-pressure labyrinth and PDS data to evaluate the models. Effects of major seal design parameters; blade thickness, blade spacing, blade profile, and cavity depth; on seal leakage, as well as the effect of operating a seal in an off-center position, are examined through a series of non-rotating tests. Two reconfigurable seal designs were used, which enabled testing labyrinth seals and PDS with two to six blades. Leakage and pressure measurements were made with air as the working fluid on twenty-two seal configurations. Increasing seal blade thickness reduced leakage by the largest amount. Blade profile results were more equivocal, indicating that both profile and thickness affected leakage, but that the influence of one factor partially negated the influence of the other. Seal leakage increased with increased eccentricity at lower supply pressures, but that this effect was attenuated for higher pressure drops. While cavity depth effects were minor, reducing depths reduced leakage up to a point beyond which leakage increased, indicating that an optimum cavity depth existed. Changing blade spacing produced results almost as significant as those for blade thickness, showing that reducing spacing can detrimentally affect leakage to the point of negating the benefit of inserting additional blades. Tests to determine the effect of PDS partition walls showed that they reduce axial leakage. The pressure drop was found to be highest across the first blade of a seal for low pressure drops, but the pressure drop distribution became parabolic for high pressure drops with the largest drop across the last blade. Thirteen leakage equations made up of a base equations, a flow factor, and a kinetic energy carryover factor were examined. The importance of the carryover coefficient was made evident and a modified carryover coefficient is suggested. Existing fullypartitioned PDS models were expanded to accommodate seals of various geometries.

Gamal Eldin, Ahmed Mohamed

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Sherman, Max H.; Matson, Nance E.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Predicting Envelope Leakage in Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings Dianne Griffiths April 30, 2013 Presentation Outline * Objectives * What we accomplished last year * What we plan to do this year Why do we do blower door testing? * Compliance to some standard * Identify opportunity for reducing energy use * Identify opportunity for improving IAQ * Measure implementation verification Total (or Solo) Leakage Test P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 50 Pa Open windows, open doors, same test pressure across whole envelope. If pressure across envelope at any point is different from test pressure by less than 5 Pa, not neccessary. "Fully" Guarded Test P = 0 Pa P = 0 Pa P = 50 Pa P = 0 Pa Isolates exterior leakage What's the big deal? * How we measure depends on why we're

354

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Cuivre River Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pumps: Maximum of 10 tons for residential systems and 50 tons for commercial systems Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $750/ton Dual Fuel Air-source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Cuivre River Electric Cuivre River Electric Cooperative, through the Take Control and Save program, offers rebates for cooperative members who purchase efficient geothermal and dual fuel heat pumps, and electric water heaters. Water

355

Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: up to $50 Dishwashers: $20 Refrigerator: $40 Freezer: $20 Electric Water Heaters: $50 CFL/LED Light Fixtures: $20/fixture Insulation: $0.15 - $0.65/sq. ft., plus potential bonus Windows: $0.50 - $2/sq. ft. Room Air Conditioners: $30 Duct Sealing/Insulation/Weatherization (Electric): up to $300

356

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Members of Associated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Members of Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Members of Associated Electric Cooperative) Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate (Offered by Members of Associated Electric Cooperative) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room AC: $50 Electric Water Heaters: $50 New Ground-Source Heat Pump: up to $750/ton Replacement Ground-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Air-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Provider Member Services Specialist Associated Electric Cooperative and many of its associated member cooperatives offer rebates to residential customers who purchase and

357

Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Cooling Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $100 Dishwasher: $50 Room AC Unit: $50 Water Heaters: $50 - $100 CFL Light Bulbs: Free Geothermal Heat Pumps: $250/ton Ground Loop Replacement: $500/ton Dual Fuel Air Source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Provider Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative Missouri Rural Electric Cooperative (MREC) offers a number of rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient

358

ConEd (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Start Date 7/1/2009 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200 - $600 Water Boiler: $500 or $1,000 Steam Boiler: $500 Boiler Reset Control: $100 Programmable thermostat: $25 Indirect Water Heater: $300 Duct Sealing: $100/hr Air Sealing: $75/hr Con Edison is offering the Residential HVAC Gas Rebate Program. Through this program, incentives are offered on energy efficient heating and

359

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioners: $50 Geothermal Heat Pump: $750/ton new installation; $150/ton for replacement Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $150/ton plus $.01 rate reduction (above 200 kWh) Water Heaters: Discounted price Provider Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative offers a variety of rebates to residential and commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Newly installed ground source heat pumps are eligible for a $750 per ton

360

SMECO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SMECO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SMECO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SMECO - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Free Home Performance Weatherization: up to $2,750 Central AC: $150 - $500 Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $500 Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Ductless Mini-Split AC/Heat Pump: $300 Duct Sealing: up to $250 HVAC Performance Tune-Up: $100 Room AC: $25 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 - $100

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Taylor County RECC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Taylor County RECC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Taylor County RECC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Taylor County RECC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation Upgrade: $400 per home Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Insulation Upgrade: $20 for every 1,000 Btu saved by adding insulation Air-source Heat Pumps: $200 Electrical Thermal Storage: Reduced electrical rate Provider Taylor County RECC Taylor County RECC offers rebates to residential customers for upgrading to energy efficient insulation and heat pumps. Under the Button-Up insulation upgrade program, a utility representative will conduct an energy audit of

362

Owen Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Owen Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Owen Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Owen Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Contact Owen Electric Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Button-Up Insulation: $40 per 1,000 BTU reduction Air Source Heat Pump: $500 - $1000 Touchstone Energy Home: Up to $750 Provider Owen Electric Cooperative, Inc. Owen Electric Cooperative, Inc. (OEC) serves over 150,000 customers in nine north-central Kentucky counties: Boone, Campbell, Carroll, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton, Owen, Pendleton and Scott. For residential customers, Owen Electric

363

Guidelines for residential commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in insulation and air sealing, can cause immediate energybetween studs. Extensive air sealing of the envelope, whichqualitatively during air-sealing work to quickly assess

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Leakage from sub-national climate initiatives ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers leakage from sub-national climate policies using California’s capand-trade program as a representative example. Our analysis is built on a global model of economic activity and energy systems that identifies 15 US regions and 15 regions in the rest of the world. As California’s cap-and-trade policy requires electricity importers to surrender emissions allowances, leakage depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure transmission to reduce the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California. If exporters can dispatch carbon-free electricity to California and carbon-intensive electricity is rerouted to other markets, leakage is 47 % of the decrease in emissions in California. If exporters are unable to adjust the carbon intensity of electricity supplied to California, as imported electricity is relatively carbon intensive, there is negative leakage to regions supplying electricity to California and the aggregate leakage rate is 5%. We also observe negative leakage to some regions due to changes in fossil fuel prices and that the impact of the trading of emissions permits between California and the EU depends on the ability of out-of-state generators to reconfigure electricity supply.

Justin Caron; Sebastian Rausch; Niven Winchester

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Unitary and Split Air Conditioning Systems and Air Source Heat Pumps: $25-$45/ton Chillers: $10-$40/ton Ground Source Heat Pumps: $40/ton Hotel Occupancy Sensors: $20-$40 Energy Management Control System: $0.10/sq. ft. or $0.21/sq. ft.

366

Miami-Cass REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miami-Cass REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Miami-Cass REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Miami-Cass REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Water Heater: $400/unit Air-Source Heat Pump: $1,500/unit Air-Source Heat Pump Upgrade/New Construction: $250/unit Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,500/unit Geothermal Heat Pump Upgrade/New Construction: $250/unit Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $1,500/unit Provider Miami-Cass REMC Miami-Cass Rural Electric Membership Cooperative (MCREMC) is a member-owned electric distribution cooperative serving customers in central Indiana.

367

Southern Power District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Power District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Southern Power District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Southern Power District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100- $300 Geothermal Heat Pump: $400 Heat Pump (14 Seer minimum): $50 contractor rebate Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. HVAC Tune-Up: $30 Provider Southern Power District Southern Power District (SPD) offers rebates for the purchase and installation of efficient air source heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, attic insulation, and HVAC tune-ups. Contractors who install 14 Seer or

368

East Central Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

East Central Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program East Central Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program East Central Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount LEDs: $3/bulb (limit 3 bulbs) CFL Recycling: $0.50 per bulb Central AC: $30 - $330 Air-Source Heat Pump: $300 - $630 Heat Pump/AC Tune Up: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer (with recycling of old unit): $75 Ductless Air-Source Heat Pumps: $300 Geothermal Heat Pump: $400/ton HVAC ECM: $100 Storage Water Heating: $100 - $200 Storage Space Heating: $25/KW Provider East Central Energy

369

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioners: $25 Central Air Conditioners: $100-$200 Heat Pumps: $100-$400 Ground-source Heat Pumps: $1000-$2000 Desuperheaters: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $100 Water Heaters: $50 Washer/Dryer: $50/unit Hard-Wired Light Fixture: $20/fixture Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $25 Dishwasher: $20 Appliance Recycling: $25-$50/unit

370

Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ductless Heat Pumps: $750 Clothes washer $50 Refrigerator $30 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Freezer $20 Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Air/Duct Sealing: $0.30/linear foot Air Source Heat Pump: $200 - $250 (Existing Homes); $300 - $400 (New Homes)

371

Lake Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Country Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $400 per ton Central AC: $30 - $630 Air Source Heat Pumps: $330 - $630 Ductless Air-source Heat Pump: $300 ECM Furnace Motor: $100 Off-Peak ETS Heating System: $25/KW Cycled AC/Heat Pump: $100 Off-Peak Water Heater: $100 - $200 Heat Pump Water Heater: $200 Refrigerator/Freezer: $75 (with recycling of old appliance) CFL: $1 per bulb LED holiday lights: $3 per strand

372

LADWP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program LADWP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $65 Recycling Old Refrigerator/Freezer: $50 Clothes Washer: $300 Energy Star Windows: $2.00 per sq ft Cool Roofs: $0.30/sq. ft. Room Air Conditioner: $50 per unit Central Air Conditioner: $100 -$120/ton Heat Pump: $100/ton Whole House Fan $200 Variable/Multi-Speed Pool Pump and Motor: $500/unit Whole House Retrofits: up to $8,000

373

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per appliance Geothermal Heat Pumps: 20 tons Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $75 with recycling of old unit Freezer: $75 with recycling of old unit Ductless Air-Source Heat Pump: $300 Air-Source Heat Pump: $330 - $630 Central AC: $50 - $200 Geothermal Heat Pump: $100 - $400/ton CFLs: Free Recycling Provider Lake Region Electric Cooperative Lake Region Electric Cooperative (LREC) offers a variety of rebates for

374

Bartholomew County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bartholomew County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Bartholomew County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Bartholomew County REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Pump (New Construction/Conversion): $1,000 Geothermal Pump (Upgrade): $400 Air Source Heat Pumps : $300 - $1,000 Central Air Conditioner: $200 - $400 Water Heater (New Construction/Conversion): $150 - $250 Water Heater (Upgrade): $50 - $150 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 - $400 Provider Bartholomew County REMC Bartholomew County Rural Electric Membership (BCREM) Cooperative provides

375

Dakota Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dakota Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Dakota Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Dakota Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL's: $1/bulb LED's: $3/bulb AC/Heat Pump Tune-Up: $25 Central AC/Heat Pump: $30 - $330 depending on SEER rating Air-Source Heat Pump: $330 for off peak control Ductless Air-Source Heat Pump: $300 Furnace Motor: $100 Geothermal Heat Pump: $400/ton Storage Electric Heating: $25 per kW Electric/Heat Pump Water Heater: $100 - $200 Refrigerator: $75 Freezer: $75 Provider Dakota Electric Service

376

Duke Energy (Gas and Electric) - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duke Energy (Gas and Electric) - Residential and Builder Energy Duke Energy (Gas and Electric) - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Duke Energy (Gas and Electric) - Residential and Builder Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heating Heat Pumps Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Existing Home Air-source Heat Pump: $200 (home owner); $100 (dealer) Existing Home Geothermal Heat Pump: $200 (homeowner); $100 (dealer) Existing Home Air Conditioner: $200 (home owner); $100 (dealer) Existing Home Gas Furnace: $200 (home owner); $100 (builder) Heat Pump/AC in New Home: $300/heat pump installed (builder)

377

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

378

Residential Demand Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Residential Demand Module The NEMS Residential Demand Module projects future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the "unit energy consumption" (UEC) by appliance (in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment installed in new units, retires existing housing units, and retires and replaces appliances. The primary exogenous drivers for the module are housing starts by type

379

Residential Energy Disclosure (Hawaii)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A residential property owner is required to disclose electricity costs for the most recent three-month period in which the property was occupied as a condition of selling it. No proof or copies of...

380

Residential propane prices increase  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

from last week to 2.62 per gallon; up 37.4 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The retail price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Residential propane prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

from last week to 2.57 per gallon; up 32.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The retail price...

382

Residential propane prices increase  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a week ago to 2.76 per gallon. That's up 51.2 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices...

383

Residential propane prices increase  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a week ago to 2.71 per gallon. That's up 46.9 cents from a year ago, based on the residential heating fuel survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane prices...

384

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

386

Residential Gateways and Controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy companies are exploring two-way residential communications to help reduce the cost of providing standard energy-related services, such as itemized billing or demand reduction, as well as to provide nontraditional services, such as diagnostic services and e-mail. This report covers the key to development of these services -- residential gateways and controllers. The report was prepared with both technical and financial energy company managers in mind, for use as a reference tool and strategic plann...

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electricity savings potentials in the residential sector of Bahrain  

SciTech Connect

Electricity is the major fuel (over 99%) used in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in Bahrain. In 1992, the total annual electricity consumption in Bahrain was 3.45 terawatt-hours (TWh), of which 1.95 TWh (56%) was used in the residential sector, 0.89 TWh (26%) in the commercial sector, and 0.59 TWh (17%) in the industrial sector. Agricultural energy consumption was 0.02 TWh (less than 1%) of the total energy use. In Bahrain, most residences are air conditioned with window units. The air-conditioning electricity use is at least 50% of total annual residential use. The contribution of residential AC to the peak power consumption is even more significant, approaching 80% of residential peak power demand. Air-conditioning electricity use in the commercial sector is also significant, about 45% of the annual use and over 60% of peak power demand. This paper presents a cost/benefit analysis of energy-efficient technologies in the residential sector. Technologies studied include: energy-efficient air conditioners, insulating houses, improved infiltration, increasing thermostat settings, efficient refrigerators and freezers, efficient water heaters, efficient clothes washers, and compact fluorescent lights. We conservatively estimate a 32% savings in residential electricity use at an average cost of about 4 fils per kWh. (The subsidized cost of residential electricity is about 12 fils per kWh. 1000 fils = 1 Bahrain Dinar = US$ 2.67). We also discuss major policy options needed for implementation of energy-efficiency technologies.

Akbari, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Morsy, M.G.; Al-Baharna, N.S. [Univ. of Bahrain, Manama (Bahrain)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Jasper County REMC - Residential Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for more information. Heat Pump Water Heater: 2.0 EF Air Source Heat Pump (Package): SEER 14, HSPF 8 Air Source Heat Pump (Split): SEER 15, HSPF 8.5 Dual Fuel Heat Pump...

389

National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program National Fuel - Large Non-Residential Conservation Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Other Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Commercial Custom Rebates: $200,000 Industrial Custom Rebates: $5,000,000 Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom Rebates: $15/Mcf x the gas savings or 50% of the total project cost Unit Heater: $1000 Hot Air Furnace: $500 Low Intensity Infrared Heating: $500 Programmable Thermostat: $25

390

Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Riverside Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Maximum allowable rebate for appliances is $500 per customer, per year Central AC/Heat Pumps: $1,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Whole House Program: Up to $7,000 per 12 month period Refrigerators: $100 ($200 w/recycling of old unit) Room Air Conditioner: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Clothes Washer: $75 - $155

391

Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Maximum Rebate One rebate per Energy Star appliance or two rebates on the purchase of programmable thermostats Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Electric Heat Pump Water Heater: $250 Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Central AC: $100 Refrigerator: $50 Washing Machine: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room A/C: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 Programmable Thermostat:$15 (limit 2) Ceiling Fan: $10

392

Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating &...

393

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making...

394

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

395

Membership Criteria: Better Buildings Residential network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criteria BETTER BUILDINGS RESIDENTIAL NETWORK Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.govbbrn Better Buildings Residential Network (BBRN) members must be supportive of residential...

396

Residential Mobility and Latino Political Mobilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brians, Craig Leonard. 1997. “Residential Mobility, VoterHighton, Benjamin. 2000. "Residential Mobility, Community2003. “ Language Choice, Residential Stability and Voting

Ramirez, Ricardo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs JudyEvaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs Judyjdonadee@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract Residential customers in

Lai, Judy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

Margulis, Harry L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Infiltration in ASHRAE's Residential Ventilation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Related  to  Residential  Ventilation  Requirements”.  Rudd,  A.   2005.   “Review  of  Residential  Ventilation and  Matson  N.E. ,  “Residential  Ventilation  and  Energy 

Sherman, Max

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vapor barrier. Active solar heating Sealed combustion woodbarrier. heating systems possible including active solar.

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Indoor-Outdoor Air Leakage of Apartments and Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured Airflows in a Multifamily Building," AirflowPerformance of Building Envelopes, Components, and Systems,APARTMENTS AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS Price, P.N. ; Shehabi,

Price, P.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Air Leakage of U.S. Homes: Model Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 Figure 1: Climate Zones Defined by Building Sciencecoefficient for each climate zone (-) Floor area divided bycoefficients for the four climate zones, NL cz , represent

Sherman, Max H.; McWilliams, Jennifer A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Areas for Air Leakage | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Referenced: 2006 IECC 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S....

404

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 m floorheating system; sealed combustion wood stove back-up. 197 m

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

AIR LEAKAGE, SURFACE PRESSURES AND INFILTRATION RATES IN HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active solar heating Sealed combustion wood stove. 174 mradiant heating system; sealed combustion wood stove back-One story wood frame construction. floor furnace heating. m

Grimsrud, D.T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

About Residential | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » About Residential Residential Buildings » About Residential About Residential The Building Technologies Office (BTO) collaborates with home builders, energy professionals, state and local governments, utilities, product manufacturers, educators, and researchers to improve the energy efficiency of both new and existing homes. Residential Sector Activities Include: Demonstrating to builders and remodelers how to build and renovate for high performance through best practice guides and case studies and continuing to developing innovative whole-house energy efficiency solutions through Building America research projects. We also provide guidelines and tools for researchers conducting building related research projects. Promoting a trusted, whole-house process for upgrading existing homes with

407

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Title Progress towards Managing Residential Electricity Demand: Impacts of Standards and Labeling for Refrigerators and Air Conditioners in India Publication Type Conference Paper Refereed Designation Unknown LBNL Report Number LBNL-2322E Year of Publication 2009 Authors McNeil, Michael A., and Maithili Iyer Date Published 06/2009 Keywords Air Conditioners, Appliance Efficiency, appliance energy efficiency, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, india, Labels, MEPS, refrigerators, Standards and labeling URL https://isswprod.lbl.gov/library/view-docs/public/output/rpt77250.PDF Refereed Designation Unknown Attachment Size

408

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Variable Drives and Compressors: $500 Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $25 Dishwashers: $25 Refrigerators: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer/Room AC Recycling: $25 Central Air Conditioner/Mini Split: $40 - $80/Ton Air Source Heat Pump/Mini-Split Heat Pumps: $150/Ton

409

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.

Staff Scientist; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max; Dickerhoff, Darryl

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Residential Building Code Compliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

411

Progress in Residential Retrofit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit The Cutting Edge: Progress in Residential Retrofit A geographic representation of saturations of ceiling fans based on data from the RASSes. White areas indicate a lack of data for that region. Many utilities survey their customers to learn more about the buildings and the occupants in their service areas. These surveys-usually called "residential appliance saturation surveys," or RASSes-ask for the number and types of appliances present, the number of people living in the home, and sometimes personal information. The RASSes are also used to collect information about the presence of conservation measures such as wall and ceiling insulation, weatherstripping, multipane windows, and water flow restrictors. Building Energy Analysis Group researchers Alan Meier and Brian Pon gathered RASSes

412

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Infiltration Effects on Residential Pollutant Concentrations for Continuous and Intermittent Mechanical Ventilation Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The prevailing residential ventilation standard in North America, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specifies volumetric airflow requirements as a function of the overall size of the home and the number of bedrooms, assumes a fixed, minimal amount of infiltration, and requires mechanical ventilation to achieve the remainder. The standard allows for infiltration credits and intermittent ventilation patterns that can be shown to provide comparable performance. Whole-house ventilation methods have a substantial effect on time-varying indoor pollutant concentrations. If alternatives specified by Standard 62.2, such as intermittent ventilation, are used, short-term pollutant concentrations could exceed acute health standards even if chronic health standards are met.The authors present a methodology for comparing ASHRAE- and non-ASHRAE-specified ventilation scenarios on relative indoor pollutant concentrations. We use numerical modeling to compare the maximum time-averaged concentrations for acute exposure relevant (1-hour, 8-hour, 24-hour ) and chronic exposure relevant (1-year) time periods for four different ventilation scenarios in six climates with a range of normalized leakage values. The results suggest that long-term concentrations are the most important metric for assessing the effectiveness of whole-house ventilation systems in meeting exposure standards and that, if chronic health exposure standards are met, acute standards will also be met.

Sherman, Max; Logue, Jennifer; Singer, Brett

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Design of Air-cooled Microchannel Condensers for Mal-distributed Air Flow Conditions .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air-cooled condensers are routinely designed for a variety of applications, including residential air-conditioning systems. Recent attempts at improving the performance of these heat exchangers have… (more)

Subramaniam, Vishwanath

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion: Final report: Norteast regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a resource document for the Northeastern states when pursuing the analysis of localized problems resulting from residential wood combustion. Specific tasks performed include assigning emission rates for total suspended particulates (TSP) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) from wood burning stoves, estimating the impact on ambient air quality from residential wood combustion and elucidating the policy options available to Northeastern states in their effort to limit any detrimental effects resulting from residential wood combustion. Ancillary tasks included providing a comprehensive review on the relevant health effects, indoor air pollution and toxic air pollutant studies. 77 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

417

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

418

Residential Buildings Integration Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

David Lee David Lee Program Manager David.Lee@ee.doe.gov 202-287-1785 April 2, 2013 Residential Buildings Integration Program Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Sub-Programs for Review Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Building America Challenge Home Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Solar Decathlon 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov How Residential Buildings Fits into BTO Research & Development * Develop technology roadmaps * Prioritize opportunities * Solicit and select innovative technology solutions * Collaborate with researchers

419

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

420

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Firelands Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility...

422

South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program South Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Eligibility...

423

Central Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Central Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central Alabama Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility...

424

Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cookeville Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial...

425

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential and Commercial Weatherization Grant Program Eligibility Commercial Low-Income Residential...

426

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Rebate Program Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization...

427

Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling...

428

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems Title Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation...

429

Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds Title Maximizing Information from Residential Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds...

430

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

431

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southern Pine Electric Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program <...

432

Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) < Back Eligibility...

433

Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Ozark Border Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility...

434

Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Mexico Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility...

435

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates (Offered by 11 Utilities) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Decorative Light String: $3.50/string (6 string limit) Dehumidifier: $10 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Room A/C: $15 Central A/C: $100 Furnace with ECM: $150 Air Handler with ECM: $150 Air-Source Heat Pump: $200 - $350 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Desuperheater: $250 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $300 Provider Missouri River Energy Services Bright Energy Solutions offers energy efficiency cash incentive programs to

436

Tor HTTP usage and information leakage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the web browsing behaviour of Tor users. By collecting HTTP requests we show which websites are of interest to Tor users and we determined an upper bound on how vulnerable Tor users are to sophisticated de-anonymization attacks: up ... Keywords: information leakage, privacy, tor

Markus Huber; Martin Mulazzani; Edgar Weippl

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Side-Channel leakage across borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More and more embedded devices store sensitive information that is protected by means of cryptography. The confidentiality of this data is threatened by information leakage via side channels like the power consumption or the electromagnetic radiation. ... Keywords: I/O pin, microcontroller, optocoupler, power analysis, serial interface

Jörn-Marc Schmidt; Thomas Plos; Mario Kirschbaum; Michael Hutter; Marcel Medwed; Christoph Herbst

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Duct leakage impacts on VAV system performance in California large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the variability of duct leakage impacts on air distribution system performance for typical large commercial buildings in California. Specifically, a hybrid DOE-2/TRNSYS sequential simulation approach was used to model the energy use of a low-pressure terminal-reheat variable-air-volume (VAV) HVAC system with six duct leakage configurations (tight to leaky) in nine prototypical large office buildings (representing three construction eras in three California climates where these types of buildings are common). Combined fan power for the variable-speed-controlled supply and return fans at design conditions was assumed to be 0.8 W/cfm. Based on our analyses of the 54 simulation cases, the increase in annual fan energy is estimated to be 40 to 50% for a system with a total leakage of 19% at design conditions compared to a tight system with 5% leakage. Annual cooling plant energy also increases by about 7 to 10%, but reheat energy decreases (about 3 to 10%). In combination, the increase in total annual HVAC site energy is 2 to 14%. The total HVAC site energy use includes supply and return fan electricity consumption, chiller and cooling tower electricity consumption, boiler electricity consumption, and boiler natural gas consumption. Using year 2000 average commercial sector energy prices for California ($0.0986/kWh and $7.71/Million Btu), the energy increases result in 9 to 18% ($7,400 to $9,500) increases in HVAC system annual operating costs. Normalized by duct surface area, the increases in annual operating costs are 0.14 to 0.18 $/ft{sup 2}. Using a suggested one-time duct sealing cost of $0.20 per square foot of duct surface area, these results indicate that sealing leaky ducts in VAV systems has a simple payback period of about 1.3 years. Even with total leakage rates as low as 10%, duct sealing is still cost effective. This suggests that duct sealing should be considered at least for VAV systems with 10% or more total duct leakage. The VAV system that we simulated had perfectly insulated ducts, and maintained constant static pressure in the ducts upstream of the VAV boxes and a constant supply air temperature at the airhandler. Further evaluations of duct leakage impacts should be carried out in the future after methodologies are developed to deal with duct surface heat transfer effects, to deal with airflows entering VAV boxes from ceiling return plenums (e.g., to model parallel fan-powered VAV boxes), and to deal with static pressure reset and supply air temperature reset strategies.

Wray, Craig P.; Matson, Nance E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Modeling of cryogen leakage through composite laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cryogenic composites ?nd critical application in the manufacture of fuel tanks for reusable launch vehicles due to signi?cant reduction in overall structural weight of the tank. These fuel tanks contain pressurized cryogen such as hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Exposure to varying temperatures and mechanical loads resulting from ?ight cycle, containment of pressurized cryogen causes thermo-mechanical loading of the composite. The thermo-mechanical loading cycles combined with anisotropy of the composite and mismatch in the thermal and mechanical properties of ?bers and matrix lead to transverse matrix cracks (TMC) in each ply. TMC in adjacent plies intersect in localized regions at ply interfaces called crack junctions, which open up due to delamination on application of thermo-mechanical load. TMC and crack junctions usually form a network of leakage paths that assists leakage of cryogen through the composite. In this study, the volumetric ?ow rate of cryogen leaking through a damaged cross-ply composite with ?ve plies is determined by estimating the effective conductance of the leakage paths. For a given damage state and applied load, crack junction and TMC openings are obtained by ?nite element analysis. A computational ?uid dynamics model is ?rst used to estimate the effective conductance of a leakage path to hydrogen leakage and then a simplified analytical model is used to compute the effective conductance from individual conductances of each crack junction and TMC through a series-parallel combination. A single phase ?ow model is considered for the numerical analysis of hydrogen ?ow through TMC and crack junctions. The simulations are carried out using a commercial computational ?uid dynamics software, FLUENT. Parametric studies are carried out to investigate the dependence of leak rate of hydrogen on the irregularities of the TMC geometry and TMC, crack junction openings. The simpli?ed model predictions of the effective conductance for the ?ve ply composite show good comparison with numerical simulations.

Peddiraju, Naga Venkata Satya Pravin Kumar

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Idaho Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Home Builder Incentive: $1500 ENERGY STAR Manufactured Home (Electrically Heated): $500 Air Sealing/Duct Sealing: $0.30/ln ft Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Light Fixtures: Discounts; see program web site Clothes Washers: $50

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "residential air leakage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Louisville Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisville Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Louisville Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Kentucky) Louisville Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Refrigerator: $100 Freezer: $50 Clothes Washer: $75 Dishwasher: $50 Window Film: 50% of material cost, up to $200 Central AC: $100, plus $100 for each SEER above minimum federal high efficiency standard Air-Source Heat Pump: $100, plus $100 for each SEER above minimum federal

442

Saint Peter Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saint Peter Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Saint Peter Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Saint Peter Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

443

Wabash Valley Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wabash Valley Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Wabash Valley Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Indiana) Wabash Valley Power Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Water Heater: $400/unit Air-source Heat Pumps: $250-$1,500/unit Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,500/unit Dual Fuel Heat Pump Rebate: $1,500 Appliance Recycling: $35 Provider Wabash Valley Power Association Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, and Illinois. View the WVPA

444

Grays Harbor PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Grays Harbor PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $20,000 Air-Source Heat Pump: $10,000 Ground Source Heat Pump w/Desuperheater: $15,000 Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump: $8,500 Duct Sealing: $2,500 Insulation: $2 per square foot Windows: $40 per square foot Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $500 - $20,000 Provider Grays Harbor PUD Grays Harbor PUD works with local lending institutions to provide low-interest loans to customers for energy efficiency projects. A

445

AEP Ohio (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AEP Ohio (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP Ohio (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program AEP Ohio (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR New Homes Program: Contact AEP In-home Energy Audit: $100 Pin Based CFL Indoor Fixture: $20 Pin Based CFL-Outdoor Fixture: $35 CFL Torchieres: $20 Wall Insulation: $200 Air Sealing: $200 ENERGY STAR Window Replacement: $200 Attic Insulation: $200 Shower Start/Stop: $25

446

Wells Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wells Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Wells Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Wells Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum required EER Appliances

447

Lassen Municipal Utility District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lassen Municipal Utility District - Residential Energy Efficiency Lassen Municipal Utility District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lassen Municipal Utility District - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Windows: $500 Duct Insulation/Sealing: $500 Radiant Barrier: $1,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Freezer: $50 Clothes Washer: $35 Dishwasher: $35 Room AC: $75 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 per ton Ground Source Heat Pump: $1,000 per ton Central A/C: $25 - $150 per ton Evaporative Cooled A/C: $175 per ton Evaporative Coolers: $75 - $200 per 1,000 sq. ft.

448

Richland Energy Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Energy Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Richland Energy Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Richland Energy Services - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $20 - $30 Refrigerators: $15 Freezers: $15 Water Heaters: $25 Duct Sealing: $400 Controls: $300 Air-source Heat Pumps: $500 - $1,000 Ductless Heat Pumps: $1,500 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $2,000 Insulation: $0.05 - $0.85 per sq ft Windows: $6 per sq ft Richland Energy Services (RES) provides a number of rebates encouraging

449

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Blooming Prairie Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump:$100 - $200, plus additional rebate for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump:$200/ton, plus $25/ton for every 1 EER above minimum

450

Otter Tail Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Otter Tail Power Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Refrigeration/Cooking/Lighting: rebate will not exceed 75% of project cost Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heaters: $150 - $300 Thermal Storage Units: $20 - $40/KW Insulation: up to $300 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Air-Source Heat Pumps: $240/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $600/ton Lighting: In-store discount Provider Customer Service Otter Tail Power Company Rebate Program offers rebates to qualifying

451

Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates Mason County PUD 3 - Residential Energy Rebates < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Clothes Washer: $30 - $70 Refrigerator/Freezer: $15 Decommissioned Refrigerator/Freezer: $30 Storage Water Heater: $25 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 - $500 PTSC Duct Sealing: $400 - $500 Insulation: Varies based on R-Value increase and location Air Source Heat Pump (conversion): $1,400 - $1,900 Ductless Heat Pump System: $1,500

452

Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Redwood Falls Public Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See program website Room A/C: $25, plus $25 for recycling an old, working unit Central A/C: $100 - $200, plus bonus for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Air Source Heat Pump: $100 - $200, plus bonus for efficiency ratings above 14.5 SEER Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton, plus $25/ton for each 1 EER above minimum requirement Refrigerators: $25, plus $50 for recycling an old, working unit

453

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential and Non-Profit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential and Non-Profit Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program (Massachusetts) Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Nonprofit Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Maximum Rebate General: $500 Each customer will be eligible for one rebate per the three year project window. Program Info Start Date 1/1/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to 50% of total cost: Attic insulation Wall insulation Rim joist insulation Air-sealing measures Window treatments Pipe/duct insulation Provider Customer Care Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) offers the 'House N Home' Thermal

454

Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Delta-Montrose Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dishwasher: $30 Clothes Washer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer: $40 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $60 Water Heaters: $150; additional $25 for the installation of a timer Heat Pumps: $150/ton; plus additional $100 - $150 for Energy Star qualified systems Split System Air Conditioner: $150; plus additional $100 - $150 for Energy Star qualified systems Provider Delta-Montrose Electric Association Delta-Montrose Electric Association (DMEA) offers a variety of rebates for

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Marshall Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marshall Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Marshall Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marshall Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: $0.20/watt Holiday Light String: $3.50/string Clothes Washer: $100 Dishwasher: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer: $50 Room A/C: $25 Dehumidifier: $10 Central A/C: $100/ton Air-source Heat Pump: $150/ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Electric Water Heater: $50; $100 (new construction