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1

The Synoptic Decomposition of Cool-Season Rainfall in the Southeastern Australian Cropping Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily rainfall during the April–October growing season in a major cropping region of southeastern Australia has been related to particular types of synoptic weather systems over a period of 33 yr. The analysis reveals that cutoff lows were ...

Michael J. Pook; Peter C. McIntosh; Gary A. Meyers

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Environmental technology and policy development in a regional system : transboundary water management and pollution prevention in southeastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to surmount the barriers to transboundary integration and coordination of environmental technology and regulatory policy in Southeastern Europe, the environmental capabilities and needs of the region are discussed, ...

Electris, Christi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Facies, depositional environments, and reservoir properties of the Shattuck sandstone, Mesa Queen Field and surrounding areas, southeastern New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Guadalupian age Queen Formation was deposited in back-reef environments on a carbonate platform of the Northwest Shelf (Permian Basin, New Mexico, USA) during a lowstand of sea level. At Mesa Queen Field, the Shattuck Sandstone is a sheet-like sand body that averages 30 ft (9.1 m) in thickness. The Shattuck Sandstone includes deposits of four major siliciclastic environments: (1) fluvial sandflats, (2) eolian sand sheets, (3) inland sabkhas, and (4) marine-reworked eolian sands. Fluvial sandflat deposits are further subdivided into sheetflood, wadi plain, and river-mouth deposits. Dolomites, evaporites, and siliciclastics that formed in adjacent coastal sabkha and lagoonal environments bound the Shattuck Sandstone from above and below. The Shattuck Sandstone is moderately- to well-sorted, very fine-grained subarkose, with a mean grain size of 98 ?m (3.55?). Eolian sand sheet, wadi plain, and marine-reworked eolian facies comprise the productive reservoir intervals. Reservoir quality reflects intragranular and intergranular secondary porosity formed by partial dissolution of labile feldspar grains, and pore-filling anhydrite and dolomite cements. Vertical successions and regional facies patterns support previous interpretations that these deposits formed during a sea-level lowstand and early stages of the subsequent transgression. Facies patterns across the shelf indicate fluvial sandflats prograded over coastal and continental sabkhas, and eolian sand deposition became more common during sea-level fall and lowstand. During subsequent transgression, eolian sediments in the upper portion of the Shattuck Sandstone were reworked as coastal and lagoon environments became reestablished on the inner carbonate platform.

Haight, Jared

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Determining the Sources of Regional Haze in the Southeastern United States Using the CMAQ Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed sensitivity analysis was conducted to help to quantify the impacts of various emission control options in terms of potential visibility improvements at class I national parks and wilderness areas in the southeastern United States. ...

M. Talat Odman; Yongtao Hu; Alper Unal; Armistead G. Russell; James W. Boylan

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reservoir Simulation Used to Plan Diatomite Developement in Mountainous Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Santa Barbara County, Santa Maria Pacific (an exploration and production company) is expanding their cyclic steam project in a diatomite reservoir. The hilly or mountainous topography and cut and fill restrictions have interfered with the company's ideal development plan. The steep hillsides prevent well pad development for about 22 vertical well locations in the 110 well expansion plan. Conventional production performs poorly in the area because the combination of relatively low permeability (1-10 md) and high viscosity (~220 cp) at the reservoir temperature. Cyclic steam injection has been widely used in diatomite reservoirs to take advantage of the diatomite rocks unique properties and lower the viscosity of the oil. Some companies used deviated wells for cyclic steam injection, but Santa Maria Pacific prefers the use only vertical wells for the expansion. Currently, the inability to create well pads above 22 vertical well target locations will result in an estimated $60,000,000 of lost revenue over a five year period. The target locations could be developed with unstimulated deviated or horizontal wells, but expected well rates and expenses have not been estimated. In this work, I use a thermal reservoir simulator to estimate production based on five potential development cases. The first case represents no development other than the cyclic wells. This case is used to calibrate the model based on the pilot program performance and serves as a reference point for the other cases. Two of the cases simulate a deviated well with and without artificial lift next to a cyclic well, and the final two cases simulate a horizontal well segment with and without artificial lift next to a cyclic well. The deviated well with artificial lift results in the highest NPV and profit after five years. The well experienced pressure support from the neighboring cyclic well and performed better with the cyclic well than without it. Adding 22 deviated wells with artificial lift will increase the project's net profit by an estimated $7,326,000 and NPV by $2,838,000 after five years.

Powell, Richard

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An integrated study of the reservoir performance in the Area Central Norte (ACN) region of the Tordillo Field (Argentina)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tordillo Field is located within the San Jorge Basin of southern Argentina. The field is located within a small, dominantly extension basin, and is operated by Tecpetrol S.A., a domestic private oil company. The field produces from the El TreboL Comodoro Rivadavia, and Mina El Carmen Formations and is estimated to contain approximately 1,800 MMSTB of in-place oil. The Area Central Norte (ACN) region is a designated portion of the TordiHo Field in which a pilot waterflood was initiated in September 1993. There are immediate plans for expanding the pilot waterflood, and therefore, it is imperative that we evaluate the reservoir properties, as well as the reservoir production potential in order to design the most effective field development plan. Our integrated study of reservoir performance in the ACN pilot area, combining the geological, engineering, and reservoir performance data, is utilized to characterize the reservoir and to develop an appropriate reservoir management plan. This study win be used to determine the feasibility of expanding secondary recovery efforts throughout the Tordiflo Field by developing a reservoir description that includes the reservoir structure, rock and fluid properties, and the performance potential of the reservoir. The main focus of this work is to evaluate primary and secondary well performance in a highly stratified sequence of oil producing sands. In this study, we use rigorous methods to analyze and interpret production rate, injection rate, and pressure data from oil and water injection wells using decline type curves and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) analysis. These methods are shown to yield excellent results for a variety of field conditions, without regard to the structure of the reservoir (shape and size), or the reservoir drive mechanism(s). Results of these analyses include the following: eservo rties: 0 Fonnation permeability, k ³Skin factor, s, for near-well damage or stimulation In-pplace fluid volumes: ³Original oil-in-place, N ³ Reservoir drainage area, A ³Movable oil at current conditions, Np,,,,,, We examined the available core and modem well log data to develop an understanding for the petrophysical (k and 0) properties of the reservoir. These results will help us determine if reservoir performance is directly influenced by the geologic structure and flow characteristics of the reservoir. By combing the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data in this manner, we are able to develop an integrated reservoir description for future developments as well as production optimization.

Tuvio, Raul

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Establishing the Southeastern Regional Alliance (SRA) program in development of technology commercialization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

SRA was formed to create a proactive network of public and private leaders for invigorating economic development on a regional basis. This Cooperative R&D Agreement (CRADA) was established to evaluate various activities of potential cooperation and support the development of SRA. This was to cultivate partnerships between Oak Ridge and the stakeholders involved in SRA`s creation. Job creation has been attributed to smaller enterprises than to growth of large industry, so to insure that smaller enterprises share the benefits of technological advances in DOE laboratories and other regional resources, technology transfer endeavors must be made. This project was created to address these issues and develop a model of collaboration between the public sector stakeholders that affect the smaller business` life.

Tornatzky, L.G. [Southern Technology Council, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Jamison, D.K. [Lockheed Martin Energy Research, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Southeastern visits local high school | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern visits local high school Southeastern visits local high school Southeastern visits local high school May 10, 2013 - 11:54am Addthis Southeastern employee, Dale Jett, uses a power system mockup to explain how power is distributed to homes. Southeastern employee, Dale Jett, uses a power system mockup to explain how power is distributed to homes. Southeastern employee, Sonya Hulme, describes the Power Marketing Administations and the ares that each one supports. Southeastern employee, Sonya Hulme, describes the Power Marketing Administations and the ares that each one supports. Southeastern's Assistant Administrator for Finance and Marketing, Virgil Hobbs, describes the 22 different hydroelectric projects in Southeastern's region. Southeastern's Assistant Administrator for Finance and Marketing, Virgil

9

A History of the Southeastern Power Administration (1990 - 2010) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » A History of the Southeastern Power Administration About Us » A History of the Southeastern Power Administration (1990 - 2010) A History of the Southeastern Power Administration (1990 - 2010) Southeastern Power Administration was established in 1950 by the Secretary of the Interior to carry out the functions assigned to the Secretary by the Flood Control Act of 1944. In 1977, Southeastern was transferred to the newly created United States Department of Energy. Southeastern, headquartered in Elberton, Georgia, is responsible for marketing electric power and energy generated at reservoirs operated by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. This power is marketed to more than 491 preference customers in the states of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, southern Illinois, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, North Carolina, and South

10

Geothermal Data for the Eastern and Southeastern United States from the Regional Geophysics Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Other resources available on this web page (below the list of maps) provide information about hot springs in the southeastern U.S., temperatures for Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments, and deep fracture permeability in crystalline rocks in the eastern and southeastern U.S.

11

Southeastern Federal Power Alliance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sensing a need for a shared vision to accomplish Southeastern's mission, Southeastern formed a partnership with the South Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and Georgia-Alabama-South...

12

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also...

13

Modeling CO2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Sequestration in a Saline Reservoir and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate The Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of The Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial,

14

Southeastern | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

15

Southeastern United States Biomass Resource Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent financial incentives for renewable energy have stimulated interest in potential uses of biomass. In the southeastern United States, acquisition and integration of wood waste generated by sawmills and other wood processing companies is of specific interest to fossil plants. In this study, two biomass resource surveys were conducted and combined to assess cost implications of and potential for biomass cofiring in this region.

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

16

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Groundwater Constraints on Simulated Transpiration Variability over Southeastern Australian Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A land surface scheme with and without groundwater–vegetation interactions is used to explore the impact of rainfall variability on transpiration over drought-vulnerable regions of southeastern Australia. The authors demonstrate that if ...

M. Decker; A. J. Pitman; J. P. Evans

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Springtime Precipitation and Water Vapor Flux over Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical mechanisms associated with precipitation in southeastern South America during spring are investigated using short-term integrations with the regional mesoscale Eta Model. An evaluation of the model’s performance using in situ ...

Ernesto H. Berbery; Estela A. Collini

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium  

SciTech Connect

This conference covers four main topics: (1) Southeastern Labor Market and its Impact on Corporate/Industry Development; (2) New Issues for Science and Technology in the Year 2000 and Beyond; (3) The Role of Academia in Developing the Labor Force of the Southeast; and (4) K-12 Education: Challenges for the 21st Century.

Humphries, F.

1995-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

22

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

23

Reservoir Modeling for Production Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, Donald W.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis This report covers the states that largely fall into the Southeastern Reliability...

25

Linear and Nonlinear Statistical Downscaling for Rainfall Forecasting over Southeastern Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work linear and nonlinear downscaling are developed to establish empirical relationships between the synoptic-scale circulation and observed rainfall over southeastern Brazil. The methodology uses outputs from the regional Eta Model; ...

María CleoféValverde Ramírez; Nelson Jesus Ferreira; Haroldo Fragade Campos Velho

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

On the Decline of Wintertime Precipitation in the Snowy Mountains of Southeastern Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from a precipitation gauge network in the Snowy Mountains of southeastern Australia have been analyzed to produce a new climatology of wintertime precipitation and airmass history for the region in the period 1990–2009. Precipitation amounts ...

Thomas H. Chubb; Steven T. Siems; Michael J. Manton

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Modelling the propagation of turbid density inflows into a stratified lake: Daecheong Reservoir, Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many reservoirs and associated downstream ecosystems located in the Asian monsoon climate region are under increased pressure from the long-term negative effects of turbid flood runoff. Despite the ubiquitous use of turbidity (C"T) as a barometer of ... Keywords: Daecheong Reservoir, ELCOM-CAEDYM, Real-time reservoir management, Reservoir density flow, Stratified reservoir, Turbidity modelling

S. W. Chung; M. R. Hipsey; J. Imberger

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE- October 9, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southeastern Federal Power Alliance meeting was held on October 9, 2013 at the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia

29

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

31

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Search Search form Search Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Services Services Home Rate Schedules Acquisition Program Competitive Resource Strategies Annual Reports SEPA FOIA Power Operations Power Operations Home How it Works Generation Quick Facts Mission About Us About Us Home News News Home Press Releases Career Opportunities SEPA History SEPA Video Offices Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-1-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke On-System System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina

33

Status of Norris Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Southeastern Indiana REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REMC Southeastern Indiana REMC (SIREMC) offers residential customers various heating and cooling rebates to improve the energy efficiency of participating homes. Rebates are...

35

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

36

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Drought in the Southeastern United States: Causes, Variability over the Last Millennium, and the Potential for Future Hydroclimate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of the nature and causes of drought in the southeastern United States is conducted as well as an assessment of model projections of anthropogenically forced hydroclimate change in this region. The study uses observations of ...

Richard Seager; Alexandrina Tzanova; Jennifer Nakamura

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Diurnal Cycle of Cloud-Top Height and Cloud Cover over the Southeastern Pacific as Observed by GOES-10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diurnal cycles in cloud-top height Htop and cloud fraction (CF) in the southeastern Pacific stratocumulus region were determined for October–November 2008 by analyzing data from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-10 (GOES-10) ...

David Painemal; Patrick Minnis; Larry O'Neill

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Surface Flux Observations on the Southeastern Tropical Pacific Ocean and Attribution of SST Errors in Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new dataset synthesizes in situ and remote sensing observations from research ships deployed to the southeastern tropical Pacific stratocumulus region for 7 years in boreal fall. Surface meteorology, turbulent and radiative fluxes, aerosols, ...

Simon P. de Szoeke; Christopher W. Fairall; Daniel E. Wolfe; Ludovic Bariteau; Paquita Zuidema

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A combined saline formation and gas reservoir CO2 injection pilot in Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasfeasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gass WESTCARB, Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership. The

Trautz, Robert; Myer, Larry; Benson, Sally; Oldenburg, Curt; Daley, Thomas; Seeman, Ed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A History of the Southeastern Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration 1990-2010 SERVING SOUTHEAST the Distribu teD by us Department of energy southeastern Power Administration 2012 A History of the Southeastern Power Administration 1990-2010 SERVING SOUTHEAST the ii Project contribu tors Sponsor us Department of energy, southeastern Power Administration Contracting Agency us Army corps of engineers, Mobile District Author Patricia stallings, brockington and Associates, inc. Design and Editing john cason and Alicia sullivan, brockington and Associates, inc. iii AcknowleDgeMents The author gratefully acknowledges the efforts of many individuals who contributed to make this history possible. Mrs. Melissa chastain sease initiated the project and worked tirelessly to facilitate an excellent research environment and also established an efficient

42

Status of Wheeler Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling of Summertime Flow and Dispersion in the Coastal Terrain of Southeastern Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Latrobe Valley is situated in a coastal region of complex terrain in southeastern Australia. During typical summertime conditions of light synoptic winds and clear skies, the low-level regional wind field is dominated by sea-breeze and slope-...

William L. Physick; Deborah J. Abbs

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

46

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

47

ASEAN-GIZ Regional Environmentally Sustainable Cities Programme...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change...

48

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Calif--Coastal Region Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

50

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Southeastern Power Administration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Power Operations Click to view a map of SEPA power operations. Latest Rate Schedules October 1, 2012 ALA-1-N Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: PowerSouth Energy Cooperative System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-1-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Duke On-System System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina October 1, 2012 Duke-2-E Wholesale Power Rate Schedule Area: Central System: Georgia-Alabama-South Carolina More schedules Annual Reports December 28, 2012 Southeastern Power Administration 2012 Annual Report This report reflects our agency's programs,accomplishments, operational, and financial activities for the 12-month period beginning October 1, 2011, and ending September 30, 2012.

52

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Geysers reservoir studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Tectonic history of southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Recurrent movements on the northeast-trending Reelfoot rift and west-trending Rough Creek fault zone dominated southeastern Illinois tectonic history. Early Cambrian rifting along both zones created deep trenches that began to fill with sediments. Intermittent movements continued, but faults were quiescent by the Mississippian. Then renewed extension on the Reelfoot rift in the Early Permian produced high-angle normal faults in the Wabash Valley fault system and fluorspar area fault complex, and the right-lateral Cottage Grove fault system. Igneous intrusions accompanied this action: upwelling magma formed Omaha dome; Hicks dome and associated concentric and radial faults appear to have been formed by explosive igneous activity. After the Early Permian, recurrent up-and-down movements of several thousand feet reactivated the fluorspar area fault complex and created the present day Rough Creek and Shawneetown fault zones. Blocks bordering faults returned roughly to their original positions by the Late Cretaceous, leaving narrow slices of rock upthrown and downthrown along faults. Faults in Illinois probably have been inactive since the Cretaceous Period, although the Reelfoot rift south of Cairo has been reactivated. Earthquakes in Illinois today apparently are caused by local east-west horizontal compressional stresses not related to known bedrock faults.

Nelson, W.J.; Lumm, D.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

56

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

Kelkar, M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

58

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

59

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

60

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

62

Session: Reservoir Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood  

SciTech Connect

Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and res

Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Careers in Aging Annual Southeastern Student  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Careers in Aging The 23rd Annual Southeastern Student Mentoring Conference in Gerontology and Geriatrics Keynote Addresses and Poster Abstracts Edited by Christina Barmon #12;2 Careers in Aging The 23rd. This year's conference theme, "Careers in Aging," attracted one of the largest most diverse groups

Arnold, Jonathan

67

HERRING SPAWNING SURVEYS IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Fisheries No. 321 Washington, D. C. December 1959 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Methods of aerial survey and Wildlife Service Galveston, Texas ABSTRACT Aerial surveys to observe milt herring in Southeastern Alaska that intensive ground surveys to assess spawn deposition are not feasible. There- fore, a method of aerial

68

A petrophysics and reservoir performance-based reservoir characterization of Womack Hill (Upper Smackover) Field (Alabama)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Womack Hill is one of the 57 Smackover fields throughout the Gulf Coast region. Since its discovery in 1970, Womack Hill Field has produced 30 million STB from the Upper Smackover sequence of carbonate reservoirs. Since production reached its peak in 1977, oil and gas rates have declined substantially. During the last ten years, the production decline has accelerated despite an increase in the water injection rate. This production decline along with the increase in the operating costs has caused a considerable drop in profitability of the field. The field currently produces 640 STB/D of oil and 330 MSCF/D of gas, along with 6,700 STB/D of water, which implies a water cut of over 90 percent. In order to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Womack Hill Field, we need to develop an integrated reservoir study. This thesis addresses the creation of an integrated reservoir study and specifically provides a detailed reservoir description that represents the high level of heterogeneity that exists within this field. Such levels of heterogeneity are characteristic of carbonate reservoirs. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. We used a non-parametric regression algorithm (ACE) to develop correlations between the core and well log data. These correlations allow us to estimate reservoir permeability at the "flow unit" scale. We note that our efforts to reach an overall correlation were unsuccessful. We generated distributions of porosity and permeability throughout the reservoir area using statistically derived estimates of porosity and permeability. The resulting reservoir description indicates a clear contrast in reservoir permeability between the western and eastern areas - and in particular, significant variability in the reservoir. We do note that we observed an essentially homogenous porosity distribution. We provided analysis of the production and injection data using various techniques (history plots, EUR plots, and decline type curve analysis) and we note this effort yielded a remaining recoverable oil of 1.9 MMSTB (under the current operating conditions). This analysis suggests a moderate flow separation between the western and eastern areas and raised some questions regarding the suitability of the hydraulic "jet pumps" (the water rate increased coincidentally with the installation of the jet pumps).

Avila Urbaneja, Juan Carlos

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

70

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Real natural gas reservoir data Vs. natural gas reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas reservoir per se model is an exceedingly simple model of a natural gas reservoir designed to develop the physical relationship between ultimate recovery and rate(s) of withdrawal for production regulation policy assessment. To be responsive, ...

Ellis A. Monash; John Lohrenz

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA). This research provides a full-field numerical simulation that predicts performance and aids in planning future development with infill wells for a reservoir located at the south of Block V, Lamar in Lake Maracaibo. The simulation is especially promising for the eastern region, which has the current highest oil production behavior. The final model achieved an acceptable history match for pressure and fluids for the entire reservoir, especially for the eastern area. On the basis of this model and an opportunity index, the best six infill wells should be located in the eastern area of the reservoir, which would increased the cumulated production in 44.5 MMSTB. This work is important because it provides the first numerical simulation for the entire reservoir that considers the new geological model developed during reservoir description. Furthermore, it provides PDVSA with a powerful tool for planning and reservoir management decisions, especially in the eastern area of the reservoir. Predictions resulting from this area show an important increment in the final reservoir recovery over the base case, production depletion under current conditions without any change. On the basis of these results, I strongly recommend starting a new infill drilling campaign in the eastern area as indicated by the simulation results to increase the oil rate reservoir productions and to improve total ultimate recovery.

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Physical model of a fractured reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model of a fractured reservoir model of a fractured reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Physical model of a fractured reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The objectives of the physical modeling effort are to: (1) evaluate injection-backflow testing for fractured reservoirs under conditions of known reservoir parameters (porosity, fracture width, etc.); (2) study the mechanisms controlling solute transport in fracture systems; and (3) provide data for validation of numerical models that explicitly simulate solute migration in fracture systems. The fracture network is 0.57-m wide, 1.7-m long, and consists of two sets of fractures at right angles to one another with a fracture spacing of 10.2 cm. A series of

75

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

76

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

77

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

78

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

79

Heterogeneous deep-sea fan reservoirs, Shackelford and Preston waterflood units, Spraberry Trend, West Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book discusses the geological characterization of reservoir and production attributes of the Shackelford and Preston waterflood units, southeastern Midland County, West Texas. These two units, which are operated by Mobil Producing Texas and New Mexico, are part of the Permian Spraberry Trend. Conventional reserves in the Spraberry are estimated to be almost 60 million barrels of oil, and more than 4 billion barrels of unproduced mobile oil remain, making the Spraberry a prime target for extended conventional recovery from untapped or poorly drained reservoir compartments. The authors determine the stratigraphy of the formation, map sand distribution trends, and determine from cores and logs the extent and composition of facies that compose the principal reservoir units.

Tyler, N.; Gholston, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program Southeastern Electric - Electric Equipment Loan Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Heat Pumps/Electric Heat: up to $10,000 Weatherization/Insulation: $3,000 Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Heat Pumps/Electric Heat: up to $10,000 Weatherization/Insulation loans: up to $3,000 Provider Southeastern Electric Cooperative Southeastern Electric Cooperative is a member-owned electric cooperative that serves customers in the southeastern part of South Dakota.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reservoir quality studies, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir quality studies are part of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska. Petrographic analyses have been carried out of samples collected from surface exposures in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska, to evaluate surface materials as to their potential reservoir rock qualities in the subsurface. This entails characterization of relevant petrologic-petrophysical properties, integration with regional geological-geophysical relationships, and synthesis in terms of likely diagenetic, structural, and stratigraphic conditions in the subsurface. There is a paucity of relevant data in this region. Inferences must be predicated largely on general principles and known relationships elsewhere. A spectrum of lithologies were studied, representing a substantial portion of the regional stratigraphic column. In a number of cases, particularly among the pre-Brookian samples, the rocks appear to have low reservoir potential, based on their present high degree of diagenetic maturity. There is always the possibility - deemed somewhat unlikely here - of subsurface equivalents with more favorable characteristics, due to different original compositions, textures, and/or geologic histories. Brookian sandstones and conglomerates feature samples with fair-good reservoir characteristics, with prospects of being equally good or better in the subsurface. The samples studied suggest the likelihood of horizons with viable reservoir qualities in the subsurface within the ANWR region.

Mowatt, T.C.; Banet, A. (U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Anchorage, AK (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

File:Federal Hydropower - Southeastern Power Administration.pdf...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon File:Federal Hydropower - Southeastern Power Administration.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File...

83

Fatal Crash Trends and Analysis in Southeastern States .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Southeastern states have about 26 percent of the nations total fatalities, and are about 24 percent above the national mean over recent years. Descriptive statistics,… (more)

Wang, Chunyan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A study on nocturnal surface wind speed over-prediction by the WRF-ARW model in Southeastern Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The over-prediction of surface wind speed during nighttime by the WRF-ARW model was investigated for a period of the Second Texas Air Quality Study (May 28 – July 3, 2006). In coastal regions of southeastern Texas, the model had significant ...

Fong Ngan; Hyuncheol Kim; Pius Lee; Khalid Al-Wali; Bright Dornblaser

85

Modeling of reservoir compaction and surface subsidence at South Belridge  

SciTech Connect

Finite-element models of depletion-induced reservoir compaction and surface subsidence have been calibrated with observed subsidence, locations of surface fissures, and regions of subsurface casing damage at South Belridge and used predictively for the evaluation of alternative reservoir-development plans. Pressure maintenance through diatomite waterflooding appears to be a beneficial means of minimizing additional subsidence and fissuring as well as reducing axial-compressive-type casing damage.

Hansen, K.S. [Shell Western E and P Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Chan, C.K. [Shell Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States); Prats, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Final report of the Department of Energy Reservoir Definition Review Team for the Baca Geothermal Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baca project was terminated due to inability to find sufficient steam production to support the power plant. The following aspects of the project are discussed: regional geology; structure, stratigraphy, and permeability in the Redondo Creek; geophysics; geochemical indicators of reservoir conditions; drilling problems; fracture stimulation experiments; reservoir definition and conceptual model; and prediction of reservoir performance.

Goldstein, N.E.; Holman, W.R.; Molloy, M.W. (eds.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A critical evaluation of the deviation time method to calculate discontinuity radias from well tests in composite reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Reservoirs with a fluid bank, or a burning front, reservoirs with a reduced or an increased permeability region around the wellbore, and geothermal reservoirs are often modeled as composite reservoirs. Reservoirs with a fluid bank include reservoirs undergoing waterflood, chemical flood, polymer flood, CO/sub 2/ flood, and steam injection. Eight well tests reported in the literature exhibiting composite reservoir behavior have been analyzed using the deviation time method. The dimensionless deviation times obtained from pressure and pressure derivative responses for a well in a composite reservoir are used for analyzing the well tests. Analysis shows the estimate of discontinuity radius to be sensitive to both the real and the dimensionless deviation times used. The estimate discontinuity radius from the deviation time method may represent a lower bound for discontinuity radius, if the swept region is not cylindrical. Also, obtaining an accurate deviation time for small mobility contrasts may be difficult.

Ambastha, A.K.; Ramey, H.J., Jr. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced reservoir simulation using soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir simulation is a challenging problem for the oil and gas industry. A correctly calibrated reservoir simulator provides an effective tool for reservoir evaluation that can be used to obtain essential reservoir information. A long-standing problem ... Keywords: fuzzy control, history matching, parallel processing, reservoir simulation

G. Janoski; F.-S. Li; M. Pietrzyk; A. H. Sung; S.-H. Chang; R. B. Grigg

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Session 4: Geothermal Reservoir Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of geothermal reservoir behavior is presently in a state of change brought about by the discovery that reservoir heterogeneity--fractures in particular--is responsible for large scale effects during production. On the other hand, some parts of a reservoir, or some portions of its behavior. may be unaffected by fractures and behave, instead, as if the reservoir were a homogeneous porous medium. Drilling has for many years been guided by geologists prospecting for fractures (which have been recognized as the source of production), but until recently reservoir engineers have not studied the behavior of fractured systems under production. In the last three years research efforts, funded by the Department of Energy and others, have made significant progress in the study of fractures. The investigations into simulation of fracture flow, tracer analysis of fractured systems, and well test analysis of double porosity reservoirs are all advancing. However, presently we are at something of a conceptual impasse in defining a reservoir as fractured or porous. It seems likely that future directions will not continue to attempt to distinguish two separate reservoir types, but will focus instead on defining behavior types. That is, certain aspects of reservoir behavior may be considered to be generally of the porous medium type (for example, field wide decline), while others may be more frequently fracture type (for example, breakthrough of reinjected water). In short, our overall view of geothermal reservoir definition is becoming a little more complex, thereby better accommodating the complexities of the reservoirs themselves. Recent research results already enable us to understand some previously contradictory results, and recognition of the difficulties is encouraging for future progress in the correct direction.

Horne, Roland N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with the geology of the area, which is well known. An east-west trending Bouguer gravity profile was constructed through the center of the heat flow anomaly described by Combs (1976). The best fit model for the observed gravity at

94

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

95

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

96

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper aims to improve current understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in east-central California. The Coso reservoir is in active economic development, so that knowledge of the subsurface fracture system is of vital importance for an accurate evaluation of its geothermal potential and day-to-day production. To detect the geometry and density of fracture systems we applied the shear-wave splitting technique to a large number of

97

EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California 404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California Summary This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

98

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

99

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

100

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

102

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

Cox, J.P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NETL: Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, a fractured reservoir modeling software developed by the...

106

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Coal bed methane reservoir simulation studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to perform simulation studies for a specific coal bed methane reservoir. First, the theory and reservoir engineering aspects of… (more)

Karimi, Kaveh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Greenhouse gas cycling in experimental boreal reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydroelectric reservoirs account for 59% of the installed electricity generating capacity in Canada and 26% in Ontario. Reservoirs also provide irrigation capacity, drinking water, and… (more)

Venkiteswaran, Jason James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

113

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may

114

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews the use of earthquake studies in the field of geothermal exploration. Local, regional and teleseismic events can all provide useful information about a geothermal area on various scales. It is imperative that data collection is conducted in properly designed, realistic experiments. Ground noise is still of limited usefulness as a prospecting tool. The utility of the method cannot yet be assessed because of its undeveloped methodology and the paucity of case histories.

115

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

116

A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data, geologic data, well completion data and the production data. A reservoir simulation model was built to forecast reservoir performance for a variety of exploitation and well completion strategies. Reserve forecasts have been made using the reservoir model. The methodology applied in this research consists of eight tasks: 1) build a data base with existing data, 2) analyze the log and core data, 3) analyze the pressure and production data, 4) analyze the PVT data, 5) analyze the hydraulic fracture treatments, 6) build the reservoir model, 7) determine the possible reservoir management strategies, and 8) perform economic evaluations for the management strategies. While much of the data for the field studied was supplied by PDVSA, we did not receive all of the data we requested. For example, no pressure buildup data were available. When necessary, we used correlations to determine values for reservoir data that we were not supplied. In this research four formations were studied and characterized, determining porosity and permeability values. Also, fracture treatments were analyzed and a reservoir model was developed. Runs for black oil and volatile oil were performed. The results show that the upper zones are the most prospective areas, but fracture treatments must be performed to reduce the damage on the sand face. Lower formations (Cretaceous) have a lower permeability value, but high OOIP that justify performing fracture treatments and completing this zone. Economics were developed to support this conclusion. Optimum well spacing was calculated showing that 960 acres is the optimum well spacing, but also that 640 acres can be maintained for all the reservoirs and dual completions can be performed, first hydraulic fracturing and completing the Cretaceous formation, and then, completing any upper zone. Reservoir simulation results show that up to 31% of OOIP may be incrementally recovered by hydraulic fracturing the Cretaceous formation and 10 or less from the upper zones.

Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Numerical modeling of boiling due to production in a fractured reservoir and its field application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were carried out to characterize the behaviors of fractured reservoirs under production which causes in-situ boiling. A radial flow model with a single production well, and a two-dimensional geothermal reservoir model with several production and injection wells were used to study the two-phase reservoir behavior. The behavior can be characterized mainly by the parameters such as the fracture spacing and matrix permeability. However, heterogeneous distribution of the steam saturation in the fracture and matrix regions brings about another complicated feature to problems of fractured two-phase reservoirs.

Yusaku Yano; Tsuneo Ishido

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

The 1980–81 Drought in Southeastern New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines moisture conditions in southeastern New York during 1980 and early 1981. precipitation and moisture budget calculations indicate that a net water deficit did exist at that time, but it was not severe enough to account for the ...

Robert A. Weisman

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ENSO Influences on Agriculture in the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on crop production in the southeastern United States was studied to identify crops that are vulnerable to ENSO-related weather variability and therefore likely to benefit from application of ...

James W. Hansen; Alan W. Hodges; James W. Jones

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Seasonal Characteristics of Circulation in the Southeastern Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The circulation in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean is studied using historical temperature and salinity data. A southward shift of the subtropical gyre at increasing depth dominates the structure of the annual mean circulation. Near the ...

Tangdong Qu; Gary Meyers

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Study of Intraseasonal Temperature Variability in Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this work was to conduct an intraseasonal climate variability analysis using wavelet and principal component analysis over a southeastern South American daily maximum and minimum temperature series from the end of the nineteenth ...

Gustavo Naumann; Walter M. Vargas

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Study of Historical Droughts in Southeastern Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalog containing an unprecedented amount of historical data in the southeastern part of Mexico covering almost four centuries (1502–1899) is used to construct a drought time series. The catalog records information of agricultural disasters ...

Blanca Mendoza; Victor Velasco; Ernesto Jáuregui

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spatiotemporal Variability of Summer Precipitation in Southeastern Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) in Southeastern Arizona covers ~150 km2 and receives the majority of its annual precipitation from highly variable and intermittent summer storms during the North American monsoon. In this study the ...

Susan Stillman; Xubin Zeng; William J. Shuttleworth; David C. Goodrich; Carl L. Unkrich; Marek Zreda

124

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A two-dimensional numerical model of coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and rock mechanics in naturally fractured rock is developed. The model is applicable to assessments of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir characterisation experiments, and to the study of hydraulic stimulations and the heat extraction potential of HDR reservoirs. Modelling assumptions are based on the characteristics of the experimental HDR reservoir in the Carnmenellis granite in Cornwall, S. W. England. In

125

Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the Raft River 5 MW Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the Raft River 5 MW Power Plant Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River 5 MW power plant will be on-line some time this spring. During testing of the supply and injection system prior to plant start-up and during testing of the plant itself, data can be collected and used to calibrate computer models, refine predicted drawdowns and interference effects, monitor changing temperatures, and recalculate reservoir parameters. Analytic methods have been used during reservoir testing at Raft River to calculate reservoir coefficients. However,

126

Alternate Methods in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As time progresses, more and more oil fields and reservoirs are reaching maturity; consequently, secondary and tertiary methods of oil recovery have become increasingly important in the petroleum industry. This significance has added to the industry's ...

Guadalupe I. Janoski; Andrew H. Sung

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fracture characterization of multilayered reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture treatment optimization techniques have been developed using Long-Spaced-Digital-Sonic (LSDS) log, pumpin-flowback, mini-frac, and downhole treating pressure data. These analysis techniques have been successfully applied in massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) of ''tight gas'' wells. Massive hydraulic fracture stimulations have been used to make many tight gas reservoirs commercially attractive. However, studies have shown that short highly conductive fractures are optimum for the successful stimulation of wells in moderate permeability reservoirs. As a result, the ability to design and place optimal fractures in these reservoirs is critical. This paper illustrates the application of fracture analysis techniques to a moderate permeability multi-layered reservoir. These techniques were used to identify large zonal variations in rock properties and pore pressure which result from the complex geology. The inclusion of geologic factors in fracture treatment design allowed the placement of short highly conductive fractures which were used to improve injectivity and vertical sweep, and therefore, ultimate recovery.

Britt, L.K.; Larsen, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important, but often ignored, factors affecting the transport and the seismic properties of hydrocarbon reservoir is pore shape. Transport properties depend on the dimensions, geometry, and distribution of pores and cracks. Knowledge of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge of reservoir pore shape distribution is very limited. This dissertation employs a pore structure parameter via a rock physics model to characterize mean reservoir pore shape. The parameter was used to develop a new physical concept of critical clay content in the context of pore compressibility as a function of pore aspect ratio for a better understanding of seismic velocity as a function of porosity. This study makes use of well log dataset from offshore Norway and from North Viking Graben in the North Sea. In the studied North Sea reservoir, porosity and measured horizontal permeability was found to increase with increasing pore aspect ratio (PAR). PAR is relatively constant at 0.23 for volumes of clay (V_cl) less than 32% with a significant decrease to 0.04 for V_cl above 32%. The point of inflexion at 32% in the PAR –V_cl plane is defined as the critical clay volume. Much of the scatters in the compressional velocity-porosity cross-plots are observed where V_cl is above this critical value. For clay content higher than the critical value, Hertz-Mindlin (HM) contact theory over-predicts compressional velocity (V_p) by about 69%. This was reduced to 4% when PAR distribution was accounted for in the original HM formulation. The pore structure parameter was also used to study a fractured carbonate reservoir in the Sichuan basin, China. Using the parameter, the reservoir interval can be distinguished from those with no fracture. The former has a pore structure parameter value that is ? 3.8 whereas it was < 3.8 for the latter. This finding was consistent with the result of fracture analysis, which was based on FMI image. The results from this dissertation will find application in reservoir characterization as the industry target more complex, deeper, and unconventional reservoirs.

Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Potential Effects of Long-Lead Hydrologic Predictability on Missouri River Main-Stem Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the links between remote conditions, such as tropical sea surface temperatures, and regional climate has the potential to improve streamflow predictions, with associated economic benefits for reservoir operation. Better definition ...

Edwin P. Maurer; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Gas injection techniques for condensate recovery and remediation of liquid banking in gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In gas-condensate reservoirs, gas productivity declines due to the increasing accumulation of liquids in the near wellbore region as the bottom-hole pressure declines below the… (more)

Hwang, Jongsoo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

P. K. Pande

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

136

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The authors have analyzed the splitting of shear waves from microearthquakes recorded by a 16-station three-component seismic network at the Northwest Geysers geothermal field, Geysers, California, to determine the preferred orientation of subsurface fractures and cracks. Average polarization crack directions with standard deviation were computed for each station. Also, graphical fracture characterizations in the form of equal-area projections and rose diagrams were created to depict the

137

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noble gas isotope abundances in steam from the Coldwater Creek field of the Northwest Geysers, California, show mixing between a nearly pure mid-ocean ridge (MOR) type magmatic gas with high 3He/4He and low radiogenic 40*Ar (R/Ra > 8.3 and 40*Ar/4He < 0.07), and a magmatic gas diluted with crustal gas (R/Ra 0.25). The

138

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents the results of analysis of a state of the art set of wireline petrophysical and wellbore image logs recorded in the Alum 25-29 well, southwestern Nevada. The Alum well penetrated nearly 2000 ft (610 m) of volcano-clastic rocks and more than 1000 ft of basement, separated from the sediments by a shallowly dipping detachment fault. The logs were acquired both to characterize the site and also to select the

139

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

140

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to tidal and barometric effects to tidal and barometric effects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

142

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

143

Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate both point and non-point mercury sources. Replicate XANES analyses on largemouth bass and hybrid striped bass from Guadalupe Reservoir (GUA), California and Lahontan Reservoir (LAH), Nevada, were performed to determine predominant chemical species of mercury accumulated by high-trophic-level piscivores that are exposed to elevated mercury in both solution and particulate phases in the water column.

144

Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

Anderson, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of Grid e-Infrastructure in South-Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the period of 6 years and three phases, the SEE-GRID programme has established a strong regional human network in the area of distributed scientific computing and has set up a powerful regional Grid infrastructure. It attracted a number of user communities and applications from diverse fields from countries throughout the South-Eastern Europe. From the infrastructure point view, the first project phase has established a pilot Grid infrastructure with more than 20 resource centers in 11 countries. During the subsequent two phases of the project, the infrastructure has grown to currently 55 resource centers with more than 6600 CPUs and 750 TBs of disk storage, distributed in 16 participating countries. Inclusion of new resource centers to the existing infrastructure, as well as a support to new user communities, has demanded setup of regionally distributed core services, development of new monitoring and operational tools, and close collaboration of all partner institution in managing such a complex infras...

Balaz, Antun; Vudragovic, Dusan; Slavnic, Vladimir; Liabotis, Ioannis; Atanassov, Emanouil; Jakimovski, Boro; Savic, Mihajlo; 10.1007/s10723-011-9185-0

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

149

Reservoir technology research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research being carried out at LBL as part of DOE/GTD's Reservoir Technology Program includes field, theoretical and modeling activities. The purpose is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters, (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries, and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of this work is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal reservoirs and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation. LBL's FY1986 accomplishments, FY1987 progress to date, and possible future activities under DOE's Reservoir Technology Program are discussed.

Lippmann, M.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geometry and reservoir heterogeneity of tertiary sandstones: a guide to reservoir continuity and geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

External and internal continuity of Tertiary sandstones are controlled by various factors including structural trends, sand body geometry, and the distribution of mineral framework, matrix, and intersticies within the sand body. Except for the limits imposed by faults, these factors are largely inherited from the depositional environment and modified during sandstone compaction and cementation. Sandstone continuity affects energy exploration and production strategies. The strategies range in scope from regional to site-specific and closely parallel a sandstone hierarchy. The hierarchy includes subdivisions ranking from genetically related aquifer systems down to individual reservoirs within a fault-bounded sandstone. Volumes of individual reservoirs are 50% less to 200% more than estimated from conventional geologic mapping. In general, mapped volumes under-estimate actual volumes where faults are nonsealing and overestimate actual volumes where laterally continuous shale breaks cause reductions in porosity and permeability. Gross variations in these pore properties can be predicted on the basis of internal stratification and sandstone facies. Preliminary analyses indicate that large aquifers are found where barrier and strandplain sandstones parallel regional faults or where fluvial (meandering) channels trend normal to regional faults. Within these sand bodies, porosity and permeability are highest in large-scale crossbedded intervals and lowest in contorted, bioturbated, and small-scale ripple cross-laminated intervals.

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia 1470 Riveredge Parkway NW, Atlanta, Georgia October 9, 2013 October 8, 2013: Meet in Wyndham Hotel lobby at 6:30 p.m. to travel to Dutch-treat dinner at Copeland's October 9, 2013: Meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. in the offices of the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia. *************************************** 1. Welcome, Announcements & MEAG 101 ................................................... Chart Bonham 2. Opening Comments ......................................... BG Ed Jackson, Alan Williford, Ken Legg 3. Washington Update ....................................................................................... Kamau Sadiki 4. American Public Power Association ............................................................. Will Coffman

153

Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

154

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss ...

156

Prevention of Reservoir Interior Discoloration  

SciTech Connect

Contamination is anathema in reservoir production. Some of the contamination is a result of welding and some appears after welding but existed before. Oxygen was documented to be a major contributor to discoloration in welding. This study demonstrates that it can be controlled and that some of the informal cleaning processes contribute to contamination.

Arnold, K.F.

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

157

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Resource were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each of the three existing wells at Raft River were also constructed to describe the

159

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Three-Dimensional Seismic Imaging Of The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada), to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The seismic survey covered an area of 3.03 square miles and was designed with 12 north-south receiver lines and 25 east-west source lines. The receiver group interval was 100 feet and the receiver line spacing was 800 feet. The

160

Nutrient transport model in CHAHNIMEH manmade reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Model for predicting nutrient transport to CHAHNIMEH reservoir is developed in this paper. Nitrogen and phosphorous have been simulated as the important parameters in evaluating water quality in the reservoir. Solar radiation and wind flow are considered ... Keywords: CHAHNIMEH, modeling, nutrient, reservoir, transport, water movement

Seyyed Ahmad Mirbagheri; Seyyed Arman Hashemi Monfared

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Eutrophication modelling of reservoirs in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two reservoirs in Taiwan were modeled to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality in the water column. The modelling effort was supported with data collected in the field for a 2-year period for both reservoirs. Spatial and temporal distributions ... Keywords: CE-QUAL-W2, Reservoir Eutrophication Modelling, Water quality

Jan-Tai Kuo; Wu-Seng Lung; Chou-Ping Yang; Wen-Cheng Liu; Ming-Der Yang; Tai-Shan Tang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Microphysical Characteristics of a Well-Developed Weak Echo Region in a High Plains Supercell Thunderstorm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical measurements in and near the weak echo region of a supercell thunderstorm are discussed. The observations were made in southeastern Montana with an armored T-28 aircraft, which has the capability to measure hydrometeors over almost ...

Dennis J. Musil; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul L. Smith

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Local-Scale Variability of Solar Radiation in a Mountainous Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of horizontal global solar irradiance and other meteorological parameters have been taken over three years at a dense radiometric network. The network is located on a mountainous region in southeastern Spain (37°N, 3°W) ...

J. Tovar; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Numerical Analysis of a Mediterranean “Hurricane” over Southeastern Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of a subsynoptic-scale vortex over the Mediterranean Sea in southeastern Italy on 26 September 2006 has been recently documented by the authors. The transit of the cyclone over land allowed an accurate diagnosis of the structure of ...

Agata Moscatello; Mario Marcello Miglietta; Richard Rotunno

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

171

Influence of coarse woody debris on the soricid community in southeastern Coastal Plain pine stands.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shrew abundance has been linked to the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD), especially downed logs, in many regions in the United States. We investigated the importance of CWD to shrew communities in managed upland pine stands in the southeastern United States Coastal Plain. Using a randomized complete block design, 1 of the following treatments was assigned to twelve 9.3-ha plots: removal (n 5 3; all downed CWD _10 cm in diameter and _60 cm long removed), downed (n 5 3; 5-fold increase in volume of downed CWD), snag (n 5 3; 10-fold increase in volume of standing dead CWD), and control (n 5 3; unmanipulated). Shrews (Blarina carolinensis, Sorex longirostris, and Cryptotis parva) were captured over 7 seasons from January 2007 to August 2008 using drift-fence pitfall trapping arrays within treatment plots. Topographic variables were measured and included as treatment covariates. More captures of B. carolinensis were made in the downed treatment compared to removal, and captures of S. longirostris were greater in downed and snag compared to removal. Captures of C. parva did not differ among treatments. Captures of S. longirostris were positively correlated with slope. Our results suggest that abundance of 2 of the 3 common shrew species of the southeastern Coastal Plain examined in our study is influenced by the presence of CWD.

Davis, Justin, C.; Castleberry, Steven, B.; Kilgo, John, C.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Some Interior Observations of Southeastern Montana Hailstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates some of the characteristics or the interior regions of several hailstorms penetrated by the armored T-28 aircraft during the 1981 CCOPE field project. The vertical wind data were analyzed to identify updraft and downdraft ...

Dennis J. Musil; Sundar A. Christopher; Regina A. Deola; Paul L. Smith

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Georgia/Alabama regional seismographic network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to contribute data and analyses conducive to the development of criteria for establishing earthquake hazard potential in the southeastern United States. The first task is to install and maintain the Georgia/Alabama seismic network. The seismic network consists of about 21 stations in Alabama, Georgia, and adjoining regions of southeastern Tennessee and South Carolina. The seismic net includes three three-component short period stations and operates completely on solar power. The second task is to monitor the seismic activity in southeastern Tennessee, northern Alabama, and Georgia. The data are to be used in appropriate topical studies. Five topical studies achieved notable conclusions or were completed during the reporting period of July 1986 to June 1987. The principal conclusions are summarized and presented in this paper. 11 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

Long, L.T. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA). School of Geophysical Sciences)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems  

SciTech Connect

Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Field selection consumed nearly the first four months of the project. The choice was the Hambert Field area which is the field area being studied. During the remainder of the year, a significant portion of the data was gathered and entered into a data base. Cores have been described, log analysis performed on over 100 wells, and regional mapping and correlation of sedimentary packages completed. Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocity data was measured on 8 core plugs at various conditions and lithologies. The analysis of the 3D seismic data has been started and supports the interpretation that the structural component will be a significant factor for reservoir compartmentalization in this reservoir. The experimental permeability work completed includes the pressure decay profile permeability measurements on the cores. Relationships of porosity and permeability with net confining stress were developed. Core relative permeability measurements were also completed during the year. Additional experimental measurements completed include Young`s Modulus, Shear Modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and the bulk compressibility as a function of the effective stress. Preliminary engineering analysis of the pressure build-up data from two wells supports the conclusion that sealing faults may act as barriers to flow.

Van Kirk, C.W.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

A virtual company concept for reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how reservoir management problems were pursued with a virtual company concept via the Internet and World Wide Web. The focus of the paper is on the implementation of virtual asset management teams that were assembled with small independent oil companies. The paper highlights the mechanics of how the virtual team transferred data and interpretations, evaluated geological models of complex reservoirs, and used results of simulation studies to analyze various reservoir management strategies.

Martin, F.D. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc. (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Southeastern Indiana R E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Indiana R E M C Southeastern Indiana R E M C Place Indiana Utility Id 17599 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Ornamental Lighting Service(100 W HPS) Lighting SCHEDULE A-5 Multi Phase NON-COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Residential SCHEDULE A-5 Single Phase NON-COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Residential SCHEDULE B-5 SMALL COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Multi Phase Commercial SCHEDULE B-5 SMALL COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC SERVICE Single Phase Commercial SCHEDULE BD-5 SMALL POWER MULTI-PHASE ELECTRIC SERVICE Commercial

184

US Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation. Final report (Year 3)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several reservoir model improvements incorporated into the UTA model are described. The most significant modification to the model was the inclusion of semiimplicit treatment of transmissibilities so as to better handle two-phase flow problems associated with flow near the wellbore. A description of the reservoir mechanics presumed operative in geopressured-geothermal reservoirs is included. A mathematical model describing two-dimensional flow in compacting porous media is developed from the Lagrangian point of view. A description of the way the differential equations are approximated by finite differences and subsequently solved by means of numerical procedures is presented. Various sensitivity studies made with the reservoir model are described. Particular emphasis was given to the study of potential shale dewatering effects on reservoir depletion and the effects of compaction on fluid recovery. To study shale dewatering, the shale thickness and the shale vertical permeability were treated as variables in several simulation experiments. The effects of compaction were modeled with optimistic and pessimistic values for the uniaxial compaction coefficient in an attempt to define a region of expected reservoir performance. Laboratory analysis of core samples obtained from the geopressured-geothermal test well was completed by the end of year 3. These data indicate that the uniaxial compaction coefficient is of the same order of magnitude as the pessimistic value used on the sensitivity studies. Because of this the expected fluid recovery from geopressured reservoirs has been reduced to a nominal 5% of the in-place volumes rather than the previously reported 10%.

MacDonald, R.C.; Ohkuma, H.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Chang, M.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

1995 verification flow testing of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent flow testing of the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir has demonstrated that engineered geothermal systems can be shut-in for extended periods of d= with apparently no adverse effects. However, when this particular reservoir at Venton Hill was shut-in for 2 years in a pressurized condition, natural convection within the open-jointed reservoir region appears to have leveled out the preexisting temperature gradient so that the gradient has now approached a condition more typical of liquid-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs which air invariably almost isothermal due to natural convection. As a result of the sudden flow impedance reduction that led to an almost 50% increase in Production flow new the end of the Second Phase of the LTFR in May 1993, we were uncertain as to the state of the reservoir after being shut-in for 2 years. The flow performance observed during the current testing was found to be intermediate between that at-the end of the Second Phase of the LTFT and that following, the subsequent sudden flow increase, implying that whatever caused the sudden reduction in impedance in the first place is probably somehow associated with the cooldown of the reservoir near the injection interval, since temperature recovery at the surfaces of the surrounding open joints is the most obvious phenomenon expected to occur over time within the reservoir.

Brown, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Slimholes for geothermal reservoir evaluation - An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topics covered in this session include: slimhole testing and data acquisition, theoretical and numerical models for slimholes, and an overview of the analysis of slimhole data acquired by the Japanese. The fundamental issues discussed are concerned with assessing the efficacy of slimhole testing for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. the term reservoir evaluation is here taken to mean the assessment of the potential of the geothermal reservoir for the profitable production of electrical power. As an introduction to the subsequent presentations and discussions, a brief summary of the more important aspects of the use of slimholes in reservoir evaluation is given.

Hickox, C.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

188

Nonisothermal injection tests in fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper extends the analysis of nonisothermal pressure transient data to fractured reservoirs. Two cases are considered: reservoirs with predominantly horzontal fractures and reservoirs with predominantly vertical fractures. Effects of conductive heat transfer between the fractures and the rock matrix are modeled, and the resulting pressure transients evaluated. Thermal conduction tends to retard the movement of the thermal front in the fractures, which significantly affects the pressure transient data. The purpose of the numerical simulation studies is to provide methods for analyzing nonisothermal injection/falloff data for fractured reservoirs.

Cox, B.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

190

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

192

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Reservoir Fracturing in the Geysers Hydrothermal System: Fact or Fallacy?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proper application of proven worldwide fracture determination analyses adequately aids in the detection and enhanced exploitation of reservoir fractures in The Geysers steam field. Obsolete, superficial ideas concerning fracturing in this resource have guided various malformed judgements of the actual elusive trends. Utilizing regional/local tectonics with theoretical rack mechanics and drilling statistics, offers the most favorable method of fracture comprehension. Exploitation philosophies should favor lateral drilling trends along local tensional components and under specific profound drainage/faulting manifestations to enhance high productivities. Drill core observations demonstrate various degrees of fracture filling, brecciation, strain responses, and rock fracture properties, giving the most favorable impression of subsurface reservoir conditions. Considerably more work utilizing current fracturing principles and geologic thought is required to adequately comprehend and economically exploit this huge complex resource.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

197

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose an integrated study method for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. This method combines analyses of geology, seismology, and geochemistry. First, geological analysis is made using data of material sources, structures, sediments, and geothermal regimes to determine the hydrocarbon-formation conditions of gas hydrate in marine areas. Then analyses of seismic attributes,such as BSR, AVO, and BZ as well as forward modeling are conducted to predict the potential

198

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

North Pacific right whale calling behavior and habitat characterization in the southeastern Bering Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

included the eastern Aleutian islands and southeasternAlaskan peninsula and Aleutian Island archipelago formingnumerous passes along the Aleutian chain and to the Arctic

Munger, Lisa Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Water coning in porous media reservoirs for compressed air energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general purpose of this work is to define the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of a CAES porous media reservoir subjected to simulated air mass cycling. This research will assist in providing design guidelines for the efficient and stable operation of the air storage reservoir. This report presents the analysis and results for the two-phase (air-water), two-dimensional, numerical modeling of CAES porous media reservoirs. The effects of capillary pressure and relative permeability were included. The fluids were considered to be immisicible; there was no phase change; and the system was isothermal. The specific purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the reservoir parameters that were believed to be important to water coning. This phenomenon may occur in reservoirs in which water underlies the air storage zone. It involves the possible intrusion of water into the wellbore or near-wellbore region. The water movement is in response to pressure gradients created during a reservoir discharge cycle. Potential adverse effects due to this water movement are associated with the pressure response of the reservoir and the geochemical stability of the near-wellbore region. The results obtained for the simulated operation of a CAES reservoir suggest that water coning should not be a severe problem, due to the slow response of the water to the pressure gradients and the relatively short duration in which those gradients exist. However, water coning will depend on site-specific conditions, particularly the fluid distributions following bubble development, and, therefore, a water coning analysis should be included as part of site evaluation.

Wiles, L.E.; McCann, R.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

River Flow Forecasting for Reservoir management through Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In utilities using a mixture of hydroelectric and nonhydroelectric power, the economics of the hydroelectric plants depend upon the reservoir height and the inflow into the reservoir for several months into the future. Accurate forecasts of reservoir ...

Meuser Valenca; Teresa Ludermir; Anelle Valenca

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Unsteady Flow Model for Fractured Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing low permeability reservoirs is currently a big challenge to the industry. Because low permeability reservoirs are of low quality and are easily damaged, production from a single well is low, and there is unlikely to be any primary recovery. ... Keywords: Low permeability, Fractured well, Orthogonal transformation, Unsteady, Productivity

Li Yongming; Zhao Jinzhou; Gong Yang; Yao Fengsheng; Jiang Youshi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

Not Available

1981-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate oojective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization--determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis--source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. This report presents a summary of technical progress of the well log analysis of Kuparuk Field, Northslope, Alaska.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization -- determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis -- source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils.

Sharma, G.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The ultimate objective of this cooperative research project is to characterize Alaskan petroleum reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration in relation to lithofacies and structure, and development potential. The project has two tasks: Task 1 is a geological description of the reservoirs including petrophysical properties, i.e., porosity, permeability, permeability variation, formation depth, temperature, and net pay, facies changes and reservoir structures as drawn from cores, well logs, and other geological data. Task 2 is reservoir fluid characterization-determination of physical properties of reservoir fluids including density, viscosity, phase distributions and composition as well as petrogenesis-source rock identification; and the study of asphaltene precipitation for Alaskan crude oils. Results are discussed.

Sharma, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

210

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

211

Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Nonassociated Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

212

A New Method for Treating Wells in Reservoir Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new method for formulating finite difference equations for reservoir simulation has been developed. It can be applied throughout the entire simulated reservoir or to… (more)

Gessel, Gregory M 1980-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

214

The Influence of Reservoir Heterogeneity on Geothermal Fluid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. THE INFLUENCE OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY ON GEOTHERMAL FLUID AND METHANE RECOVERY FROM A GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Ariel Esposito...

215

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

216

Wyoming Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Wyoming Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

217

Illinois Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Illinois Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

218

Arkansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Arkansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

219

Florida Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Florida Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

220

Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Montana Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Kentucky Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

222

Michigan Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Michigan Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

223

Pennsylvania Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Pennsylvania Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

224

Oklahoma Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Oklahoma Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

225

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

226

Louisiana--South Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--South Onshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

227

Effect of matrix shrinkage on permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dynamic nature of coalbed methane reservoir permeability makes the continuous modeling of the flow process difficult. Knowledge of conventional reservoir modeling is of little… (more)

Tandon, Rohit, 1966-

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details...

229

California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

230

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California...

231

Lower 48 States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Lower 48 States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

232

Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

233

New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

234

New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

235

Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

236

An Optimization-Based Algorithm for Scheduling Hydrothermal Power Systems with Cascaded Reservoirs and Discrete Hydro Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An optimization-based algorithm is presented for the short-term scheduling of hydrothermal power systems using the Lagrangian relaxation technique. This paper concentrates on the solution methodology for hydro subproblems with cascaded reservoirs and discrete hydro constraints. Continuous reservoir dynamics and constraints, discontinuous operating regions, discrete operating states, and hydraulic coupling of cascaded reservoirs are considered in an integrated fashion. The key idea is to substitute out the reservoir dynamics and to relax the reservoir level constraints by using another set of multipliers, making a hydro subproblem unit-wise and stage-wise decomposable. The optimal generation level for each operating state at each hour can be obtained simply by minimizing a single variable function. Dynamic programming is then applied to optimize the operating states across the planning horizon with a small number of well-structured transitions. A modified subgradient algorithm is used...

Xiaohong Guan; Ernan Ni; Renhou Li; Peter B. Luh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations have decreased in 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. These results indicate that the surface waters in Arrow Lakes Reservoir were approaching nitrogen limitation. Results from the 2003 discrete profile series indicate nitrate concentrations decreased significantly below 25 {micro}g/L (which is the concentration where nitrate is considered limiting to phytoplankton) between June and July at stations in Upper Arrow and Lower Arrow. Nitrogen to phosphorus ratios (weight:weight) were also low during these months indicating that the surface waters were nitrogen deficient. These results indicated that the nitrogen to phosphorus blends of fertilizer added to the reservoir need to be fine tuned and closely monitored on a weekly basis in future years of nutrient addition. Phytoplankton results shifted during 2002 and 2003 compared to previous years. During 2002, there was a co-dominance of potentially 'inedible' diatoms (Fragilaria spp. and Diatoma) and 'greens' (Ulothrix). Large diatom populations occurred in 2003 and these results indicate it may be necessary to alter the frequency and amounts of weekly loads of nitrogen and phosphorus in future years to prevent the growth of inedible diatoms. Zooplankton density in 2002 and 2003, as in previous years, indicated higher densities in Lower Arrow than in Upper Arrow. Copepods and other Cladocera (mainly tiny specimens such as Bosmina sp.) had distinct peaks, higher than in previous years, while Daphnia was not present in higher numbers particularly in Upper Arrow. This density shift in favor to smaller cladocerans was mirrored in a weak biomass increase. In Upper Arrow, total zooplankton biomass decreased from 1999 to 2002, and in 2003 increased slightly, while in Lower Arrow the biomass decreased from 2000-2002. In Lower Arrow the majority of biomass was comprised of Daphnia throughout the study period except in 2002, while in Upper Arrow the total biomass was comprised of copepods from 2000-2003.

Schindler, E.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a field study performed on the Mazari oil field located in Sind province, Pakistan. We used an integrated reservoir characterization technique to incorporate the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data to interpret historical reservoir performance, to assess and refine reservoir management activities, and to make plans for future reservoir developments. We used a modified approach to characterize within the mappable geological facies. Our approach is based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation and uses the concept of mean hydraulic radius. As part of our objective to characterize the reservoir, we tabulated reservoir characteristics for each hydraulic flow unit, and we presented estimates of in-place reserves. We evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail. Finally, we give recommendations for activities in reservoir development particularly infill drilling considerations and secondary recovery efforts.

Ashraf, Ejaz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Optimizing reservoir management through fracture modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture flow will become increasingly important to optimal reservoir management as exploration of geothermal reservoirs continues and as injection of spent fluid increases. The Department of Energy conducts research focused on locating and characterizing fractures, modeling the effects of fractures on movement of fluid, solutes, and heat throughout a reservoir, and determining the effects of injection on long-term reservoir production characteristics in order to increase the ability to predict with greater certainty the long-term performance of geothermal reservoirs. Improvements in interpreting and modeling geophysical techniques such as gravity, self potential, and aeromagnetics are yielding new information for the delineation of active major conduits for fluid flow. Vertical seismic profiling and cross-borehole electromagnetic techniques also show promise for delineating fracture zones. DOE funds several efforts for simulating geothermal reservoirs. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has adopted a continuum treatment for reservoirs with a fracture component. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has developed simulation techniques which utilize discrete fractures and interchange of fluid between permeable matrix and fractures. Results of these research projects will be presented to industry through publications and appropriate public meetings. 9 refs.

Renner, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SBOT GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GEORGIA GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Office Administrative Services 561110 Facilities Support Services 561210 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Locksmiths 561622 Exterminating and Pest Control Services 561710 Janitorial Services 561720 Landscaping Services 561730 Other Nonhazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562219 Remediation Services 562910 CONSTRUCTION Industrial Building Construction 236210 Commercial and Institutional Building Construction 236220 Water and Sewer Line and Related Structures Construction 237110 Power and Communication Line and Related Structures Construction 237130 Other Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction 237990 Other Foundation, Structure, and Building Exterior Contractors

243

Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas, Near-term. Third quarterly report, January 1, 1994--April 1, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflooding on both field demonstration sites. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: engineering and geological analysis; water plant development; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; field operations; laboratory testing; and utilization.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Seventh quarterly report, February 1, 1995--April 1, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflood: on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Eighth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration, of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicopter Electromagnetic Survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012­1176, 77 p. Any use of Environmental Resources Management (Miami-Dade County, Florida) DOI depth of investigation DRG digital raster

248

Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September August 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Jal, N.M., City Manager Curtis Schrader talks with RSIP members about roadway safety needs in his community. Jal, N.M., City Manager Curtis Schrader talks with RSIP members about roadway safety needs in his community. CARLSBAD, N.M. - The first SafetyFest of southeastern New Mexico will be held in Carlsbad next month as a result of the efforts of the Southeastern N.M. Roadway Safety Integrated Project (RSIP). SafetyFest will be held Sept. 11 to 13. The conference is geared to the oil and gas, mining, construction and transportation industries, offering safety related training and information. SafetyFest was organized by RSIP, whose purpose is to develop a strategic

251

Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September Southeastern New Mexico's First SafetyFest Set for September August 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Jal, N.M., City Manager Curtis Schrader talks with RSIP members about roadway safety needs in his community. Jal, N.M., City Manager Curtis Schrader talks with RSIP members about roadway safety needs in his community. CARLSBAD, N.M. - The first SafetyFest of southeastern New Mexico will be held in Carlsbad next month as a result of the efforts of the Southeastern N.M. Roadway Safety Integrated Project (RSIP). SafetyFest will be held Sept. 11 to 13. The conference is geared to the oil and gas, mining, construction and transportation industries, offering safety related training and information. SafetyFest was organized by RSIP, whose purpose is to develop a strategic

252

Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Germania Unit is located in Midland County, 12 miles east of Midland, Texas and is part of the Spraberry Formation in the Midland Basin which is one of the largest known oil reservoirs in the world bearing between 8.9 billion barrels and 10.5 billion barrels of oil originally in place. The field is considered geologically complex since it comprises typically low porosity, low permeability fine sandstones, and siltstones that are interbedded with shaly non-reservoir rocks. Natural fractures existing over a regional area have long been known to dominate all aspects of performance in the Spraberry Trend Area. Two stages of depletion have taken place over 46 years of production: Primary production under solution gas drive and secondary recovery via water injection through two different injection patterns. The cumulative production and injection in Germania as of July 2003 were 3.24 million barrels and 3.44 million barrels respectively and the production level is 470 BOPD through 64 active wells with an average rate per well of 7.3 BOPD and average water cut of 60 percent. This performance is considered very low and along with the low amount of water injected, waterflood recovery has never been thoroughly understood. In this research, production and injection data were analyzed and integrated to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study addresses reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflood project with the aim of proposing alternatives development, taking into account current and future conditions of the reservoir. Consequently, this project will be performed to provide a significant reservoir characterization in an uncharacterized area of Spraberry and evaluate the performance of the waterflooding to provide facts, information and knowledge to obtain the maximum economic recovery from this reservoir and finally understand waterflood management in Spraberry. Thus, this research describes the reservoir, and comprises the performance of the reservoir under waterflooding, and controlled surveillance to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and reservoir management and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. This incremental is based in both extrapolations and numerical simulation studies conducted in Spraberry.

Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A structurally complex and dynamic reservoir description for reservoir simulation, Kuparuk River Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kupanuk River Field is a structurally complex giant oil field adjacent to the Prudhoe Bay Field on Alaska`s North Slope. Oil is reservoired within two Early Cretaceous shallow marine sandstone formations, separated stratigraphically by an erosionally truncated marine silt/shale. Subjected to several phases of tectonism, this highly compartmentalized reservoir has been developed on regular 160 acre direct line drive patterns. An integrated team of geoscientists and engineers from BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. and ARCO Alaska Inc. is presently quantifying the benefits of infill drilling at Kuparuk, and identifying the best locations for well placement. The two primary reservoir characteristics believed to impact the effectiveness of infill drilling are large-scale reservoir heterogeneity, and reservoir comparmentation due to faulting. Multiple thin pay zones within the two reservoir intervals are isolated laterally by faults with magnitudes greater than pay zone thickness. A process and tools designed to construct and maintain a structurally complex reservoir description, shared by the geoscientists and reservoir engineers, are described. Cross-discipline integration is aided by the use of Tech*Logic`s IREX 3-D reservoir modeling and visualization application. The unique architecture of the IREX model allows for representation of very complex structural geometries, and facilitates iteration between reservoir description and simulation, along the seismic to simulation continuum. Modifications to the reservoir description are guided by well-level history matching within the constraints of all available geoscience information. The techniques described will be of particular interest to those working on reservoir description and simulation of structurally complex fields.

Walsh, T.P. [Alaska Petrotechnical Services Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Leander, M.H.; Wilcox, T.C. [BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

High rates of nonbreeding adult bald eagles in southeastern Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Present knowledge of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) demography is derived primarily from populations in environments that have been drastically altered by man. Most reproductive studies were done in the 1960's and 1970's when chemical toxins were inhibiting bald eagle productivity. Earlier, the removal of old-growth forests and decimation of anadromous fish runs by Euro-Americans may have greatly reduced bald eagle abundance from presettlement levels. Historical trends in this species are of interest because fundamental differences may exist between populations in pristine and man-altered environments. One difference may be breeding rate. Surpluses of nonbreeding adult bald eagles during the nesting season are rarely mentioned in the literature. Most surveys of reproductive success focus exclusively on eagles at nest sites, which assumes nearly all adults attempt to breed each year. The authors report that a majority of adults in the relatively pristine habitats of southeastern Alaska do not breed annually. This finding is important because if surpluses of non-breeding adults are a natural feature of the population, then hypotheses on density dependent population regulation and the evolution of delayed maturation are suggested. If, on the other hand, the abundance of nonbreeders is an artifact of recent environmental perturbations, serious population declines may occur in southeastern Alaska.

Hansen, A.J.; Hodges, J.I. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Low-to-moderate-temperature hydrothermal reservoir engineering handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guidelines are provided for evaluating reservoir characteristics containing setions on reservoir classification, conceptual modeling, testing during drilling, current theory of testing, test planning and methodology, instrumentation, and a sample computer program. Sections on test planning and methodology, geochemistry, reservoir monitoring, and the appendixes, containing technical detail, are included. Background information needed to monitor the program of reservoir evaluation is provided.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Improved energy recovery from geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulation methods are used to study how the exploitation of different horizons affects the behavior of a liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir. The reservoir model is a schematic representation of the Olkaria field in Kenya. The model consists of a two-phase vapor-dominated zone overlying the main liquid dominated reservoir. Four different cases were studied, with fluid produced from: 1) the vapor zone only, 2) the liquid zone only, 3) both zones and 4) both zones, but assuming lower values for vertical permeability and porosity. The results indicate that production from the shallow two-phase zone, although resulting in higher enthalpy fluids, may not be advantageous in the long run. Shallow production gives rise to a rather localized depletion of the reservoir, whereas production from deeper horizons may yield a more uniform depletion proces, if vertical permeability is sufficiently large.

Boedvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.; Bjoernsson, S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Definition: Hydrothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made.1 References x Ret LikeLike...

260

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River, Geothermal Field (RRGF), Idaho. Porosity-total compressibility product evaluation based on tidal strain response compares favorably with results based on conventional pumping techniques. Analysis of reservoir response to barometric loading using Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) stochastic modeling appears also to have potential use for the evaluation of reservoir parameters.

Hanson, J.M.

1980-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reservoir performance characterized in mature steam pattern  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed reservoir description provided new insight in an investigation of a ten-year-old steam flood. Mobil Oil Corporation conducted this study of the Pleistocene upper Tulare sands in South Belridge field, located in the San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. The study area is on the gently dipping (6/degrees/) southwestern flank of the South Belridge anticline. Wireline logs from 19 wells in a 10-ac (660 ft x 660 ft) pattern were correlated in detail. Seven post-steam conventional cores (1523 ft) aided (1) the evaluation of vertical and lateral steam-sweep efficiency, (2) evaluation of reservoir and fluid changes due to steam, (3) influence of lithofacies in reservoir quality, and (4) provided insight to the three-dimensional reservoir flow-unit geometries.

Miller, D.D.; McPherson, J.G.; Covington, T.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

PROCEEDINGS TWENTIETH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a global reservoir value of the amount of adsorbed liquid water per kg of rock (called ADS in the present paper). We simulated the natural state with different values of ADS,...

265

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics,...

266

Reservoir screening criteria for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properly designed and executed underbalanced drilling operations can eliminate or significantly reduce formation damage, mud or drill solids invasion, lost circulation, fluid entrainment and trapping effects, and potential adverse reactions of drilling fluids with the reservoir matrix or in-situ reservoir fluids. The key to selecting appropriate reservoir candidates is achieving a balance of technical, safety and economic factors. Not every reservoir is an ideal candidate for an underbalanced drilling operation and in some cases distinct disadvantages may exist in trying to execute an underbalanced drilling operation in comparison to a simpler more conventional overbalanced application. Extensive field experience has played an important role in determining the following key criteria and design considerations that should be examined when evaluating a well. Screening criteria are also provided to help operators ascertain if a given formation is, in fact, a viable underbalanced drilling candidate.

Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a method whereby oil may be completely displaced from the reservoir, leaving no residual volume. Field results have demonstrated that solvent floods suffer from early solvent breakthrough and considerable oil by-passing owing to high solvent mobility. The injection of both water and solvent has been demonstrated to offer advantages. Water partially mitigates both the adverse mobility and high cost of solvent floods, while solvent mobilizes oil which would be left in the reservoir by water alone. The process is equally applicable to reservoirs currently at residual oil saturation (tertiary floods) and to reservoirs at maximum oil saturation (secondary floods). In stratified reservoirs high permeability layers may be preferentially swept by solvent floods, while low permeability layers may be scarcely swept at all. Presence or absence of transverse communication between layers can modify overall sweep efficiency. This work is a study of water-solvent injection in stratified reservoirs based on computer simulation results. Fractional oil recovery as a function of injected solvent fraction, permeability contrast between layers, initial oil saturation, and presence or absence of transverse communication between strata has been determined. Results are presented as a series of optimization curves. Permeability contrast between layers is shown to be the dominant control on fractional oil recovery. Transverse communicating reservoirs are shown to require a higher solvent-water ratio in order to attain recoveries comparable to transverse noncommunicating reservoirs. In actual field projects, water and solvent are injected alternately as discrete slugs. This process is known as "WAG" for "water-alternating-gas". In the simulations used in this study, continuous water-solvent injection at a fixed fraction rather than true WAG was employed. It is demonstrated that the two methods give equivalent results. In summary, this work is the first comprehensive study of the behavior of stratified reservoirs undergoing water-solvent injection.

Moon, Gary Michael

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The LBL geothermal reservoir technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the DOE/GD-funded Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is the development and testing of new and improved methods and tools needed by industry in its effort to delineate, characterize, evaluate, and exploit hydrothermal systems for geothermal energy. This paper summarizes the recent and ongoing field, laboratory, and theoretical research activities being conducted as part of the Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program. 28 refs., 4 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Reservoir assessment of The Geysers Geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Sulphur Creek fault zone, in The Geysers Geothermal field, may be part of a deep-seated, wrench-style fault system. Hydrothermal fluid in the field reservoir may rise through conduits beneath the five main anomalies associated with the Big Sulphur Creek wrench trend. Some geophysical anomalies (electrical resistivity and audio-magnetotelluric) evidently are caused by the hot water geothermal field or zones of altered rocks; others (gravity, P-wave delays, and possibly electrical resistivity) probably respresent the underlying heat source, a possible magma chamber; and others (microearthquake activity) may be related to the steam reservoir. A large negative gravity anomaly and a few low-resistivity anomalies suggest areas generally favorable for the presence of steam zones, but these anomalies apparently do not directly indicate the known steam reservoir. At the current generating capacity of 930 MWe, the estimated life of The Geysers Geothermal field reservoir is 129 years. The estimated reservoir life is 60 years for the anticipated maximum generating capacity of 2000 MWe as of 1990. Wells at The Geysers are drilled with conventional drilling fluid (mud) until the top of the steam reservoir is reached; then, they are drilled with air. Usually, mud, temperature, caliper, dual induction, and cement bond logs are run on the wells.

Thomas, R.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Dykstra, H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 86, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into electric power sector, cumulative planned additions,cumulative unplanned additions,cumulative retirements, end-use sector, electricity sales, net energy for load, generation by fuel type and price by service category. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electric Power projections Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electric Power Projections for EMM Region - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 259.3 KiB)

272

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has provided useful information about the behavior and characteristics of a typical unconsolidated, overpressured, fine-grained, turbidite reservoir, which constitutes the majority of the reservoirs present in the Outer Continental Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. Reservoirs in the Green Canyon 18 (GC 18) field constitute part of a turbidite package with reservoir quality typically increasing with depth. Characterization of the relatively shallow 8 reservoir had hitherto been hindered by the difficulty in resolving its complex architecture and stratigraphy. Furthermore, the combination of its unconsolidated rock matrix and abnormal pore pressure has resulted in severe production-induced compaction. The reservoir's complex geology had previously obfuscated the delineation of its hydrocarbon accumulation and determination of its different resource volumes. Geological and architectural alterations caused by post-accumulation salt tectonic activities had previously undermined the determination of the reservoir's active drive mechanisms and their chronology. Seismic interpretation has provided the reservoir geometry and topography. The reservoir stratigraphy has been defined using log, core and seismic data. With well data as pilot points, the spatial distribution of the reservoir properties has been defined using geostatistics. The resulting geological model was used to construct a dynamic flow model that matched historical production and pressure data.. The reservoir's pressure and production behavior indicates a dominant compaction drive mechanism. The results of this work show that the reservoir performance is influenced not only by the available drive energy, but also by the spatial distribution of the different facies relative to well locations. The study has delineated the hydrocarbon bearing reservoir, quantified the different resource categories as STOIIP/GIIP = 19.8/26.2 mmstb/Bscf, ultimate recovery = 9.92/16.01 mmstb/Bscf, and reserves (as of 9/2001) = 1.74/5.99 mmstb/Bscf of oil and gas, respectively. There does not appear to be significant benefit to infill drilling or enhanced recovery operations.

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geothermal reservoir categorization and stimulation study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of the fraction of geothermal wells that are dry (dry-hole fraction) indicate that geothermal reservoirs can be fitted into four basic categories: (i) Quaternary to late Tertiary sediments (almost no dry holes); (ii) Quaternary to late Tertiary extrusives (approximately 20 percent dry holes); (iii) Mesozoic or older metamorphic rocks (approximately 25-30 percent dry holes); and (iv) Precambrian or younger rocks (data limited to Roosevelt Springs where 33 percent of the wells were dry). Failure of geothermal wells to flow economically is due mainly to low-permeability formations in unfractured regions. Generally the permeability correlates inversely with the temperature-age product and directly with the original rock porosity and pore size. However, this correlation fails whenever high-stress fields provide vertical fracturing or faulting, and it is the high-stress/low-permeability category that is most amenable to artificial stimulation by hydraulic fracturing, propellant fracturing, or chemical explosive fracturing. Category (i) geothermal fields (e.g., Cerro Prieto, Mexico; Niland, CA; East Mesa, CA) are not recommended for artificial stimulation because these younger sediments almost always produce warm or hot water. Most geothermal fields fit into category (ii) (e.g., Wairakei, New Zealand; Matsukawa, Japan; Ahuachapan, El Salvador) and in the case of Mt. Home, ID, and Chandler, AZ, possess some potential for stimulation. The Geysers is a category (iii) field, and its highly stressed brittle rocks should make this site amenable to stimulation by explosive fracturing techniques. Roosevelt Springs, UT, well 9-1 is in category (iv) and is a flow failure. It represents a prime candidate for stimulation by hydraulic fracturing because it has a measured temperature of 227/sup 0/C, is cased and available for experimentation, and is within 900 m of an excellent geothermal producing well.

Overton, H.L.; Hanold, R.J.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Southeastern Federal Power Program. Combined financial statements, September 30, 1996 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Southeastern Federal Power Program (SEFPP) consists of all activities associated with the production, transmission and disposition of Federal power marketed under Section 5 of the Flood Control Act of 1944 from projects in the ten southeastern states. The ten states are: Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Power is marketed to customers in 11 states - the above ten plus Illinois. SEFPP includes the accounts of two separate Federal government agencies- the Southeastern Power Administration (Southeastern) of the Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps). Southeastern purchases, transmits, and markets power within four separate power systems (each including one or more Corps generating projects for which rates are set). Specific and joint-use costs allocated to power are included in the attached statements of assets. Federal investment and liabilities under utility plant and cash. The accounts of SEFPP are maintained in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles and the Uniform System of Accounts prescribed for electric utilities by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). SEFPP`s accounting policies also reflect requirements of specific legislation and executive directives issued by the applicable government agencies. Southeastern and Corps properties and income are exempt from taxation. Southeastern and the Corps receive Congressional appropriations through the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of Defense to finance their operations. The Corps also receives Congressional appropriations to finance construction of its hydroelectric projects.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Analysis of injection tests in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective was to develop procedures for analyzing nonisothermal injection test data during the early phases of injection. In particular, methods for determining the permeability-thickness of the formation, skin factor of the well and tracking the movement of the thermal front have been developed. The techniques developed for interpreting injection pressure transients are closely akin to conventional groundwater and petroleum techniques for evaluating these parameters. The approach taken was to numerically simulate injection with a variety of temperatures, reservoir parameters and flowrates, in order to determine the characteristic responses due to nonisothermal injection. Two characteristic responses were identified: moving front dominated behavior and composite reservoir behavior. Analysis procedures for calculating the permeability-thickness of the formation and the skin factor of the well have been developed for each of these cases. In order to interpret the composite reservior behavior, a new concept has been developed; that of a ''fluid skin factor'', which accounts for the steady-state pressure buildup due to the region inside the thermal front. Based on this same concept, a procedure for tracking the movement of the thermal front has been established. The results also identify the dangers of not accounting the nonisothermal effects when analyzing injection test data. Both the permeability-thickness and skin factor of the well can be grossly miscalculated if the effects of the cold-region around the well are not taken into consideration. 47 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Benson, S.M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Third workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 14, 1977, with 104 attendees from six nations. In keeping with the recommendations expressed by the participants at the Second Workshop, the format of the Workshop was retained, with three days of technical sessions devoted to reservoir physics, well and reservoir testing, field development, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The program presented 33 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. Although the format of the Workshop has remained constant, it is clear from a perusal of the Table of Contents that considerable advances have occurred in all phases of geothermal reservoir engineering over the past three years. Greater understanding of reservoir physics and mathematical representations of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated reservoirs are evident; new techniques for their analysis are being developed, and significant field data from a number of newer reservoirs are analyzed. The objectives of these workshops have been to bring together researchers active in the various physical and mathematical disciplines comprising the field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give the participants a forum for review of progress and exchange of new ideas in this rapidly developing field, and to summarize the effective state of the art of geothermal reservoir engineering in a form readily useful to the many government and private agencies involved in the development of geothermal energy. To these objectives, the Third Workshop and these Proceedings have been successfully directed. Several important events in this field have occurred since the Second Workshop in December 1976. The first among these was the incorporation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) into the newly formed Department of Energy (DOE) which continues as the leading Federal agency in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The Third Workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from DOE through a subcontract with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. A second significant event was the first conference under the ERDA (DOE)-ENEL cooperative program where many of the results of well testing in both nations were discussed. The Proceedings of that conference should be an important contribution to the literature. These Proceedings of the Third Workshop should also make an important contribution to the literature on geothermal reservoir engineering. Much of the data presented at the Workshop were given for the first time, and full technical papers on these subjects will appear in the professional journals. The results of these studies will assist markedly in developing the research programs to be supported by the Federal agencies, and in reducing the costs of research for individual developers and utilities. It is expected that future workshops of the Stanford Geothermal Program will be as successful as this third one. Planning and execution of the Workshop... [see file; ljd, 10/3/2005] The Program Committee recommended two novel sessions for the Third Workshop, both of which were included in the program. The first was the three overviews given at the Workshop by George Pinder (Princeton) on the Academic aspect, James Bresee (DOE-DGE) on the Government aspect, and Charles Morris (Phillips Petroleum) on the Industry aspect. These constituted the invited slate of presentations from the several sectors of the geothermal community. The Program Committee acknowledges their contributions with gratitude. Recognition of the importance of reservoir assurance in opting for geothermal resources as an alternate energy source for electric energy generation resulted in a Panel Session on Various Definitions of Geothermal Reservoirs. Special acknowledgments are offered to Jack Howard and Werner Schwarz (LBL) and to Jack Howard as moderator; to the panelists: James Leigh (Lloyd's Bank of California), Stephen Lipman (Union Oil), Mark Mathisen (PG&E), Patrick M

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1977-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Using fine-scale fuel measurements to assess wildland fuels, potential fire behavior and hazard mitigation treatments in the southeastern USA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity of fuelbeds in forests of the southeastern United States may require fine scale fuel measurements for providing reliable fire hazard and fuel treatment effectiveness estimates. In a series of five papers, an intensive, fine scale fuel inventory from the Savanna River Site in the southeastern United States is used for building fuelbeds and mapping fire behavior potential, evaluating fuel treatment options for effectiveness, and providing a comparative analysis of landscape modeled fire behavior using three different data sources including the Fuel Characteristic Classification System, LANDFIRE, and the Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment. The research demonstrates that fine scale fuel measurements associated with fuel inventories repeated over time can be used to assess broad scale wildland fire potential and hazard mitigation treatment effectiveness in the southeastern USA and similar fire prone regions. Additional investigations will be needed to modify and improve these processes and capture the true potential of these fine scale data sets for fire and fuel management planning.

Ottmar, Roger, D.; Blake, John, I.; Crolly, William, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The design of a modern steamflood in a thick, dipping, heavy oil reservoir  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, Mobil completed the design phase of a new steamflood project. This project is in a thick, moderately dipping, unconsolidated heavy oil reservoir. The design takes advantage of the gravity drainage recovery mechanism in the thick reservoir, allowing vertical steam zone expansion with minimal steam breakthrough. The steamflood was designed to be economic in the late 1980's period of low oil prices. The design was completed with an interdisciplinary teamwork approach using concurrent studies for expediency. This paper was first presented at the 1989 California Regional Meeting in Bakersfield. The presentation for this meeting will conclude with an update of project performance since 1989.

Atkinson, D.S.; Clayton, C.A.; Baldwin, J.O.; Smith, R.C. (Mobile E and P US, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II  

SciTech Connect

The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill; Bezant, Bryce

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability  

SciTech Connect

Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

283

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity are diffuse and appear unsuitable for defining the areal extent of the reservoir. However, from the temporal characteristics of the seismicity associated with these regions a general discriminant was constructed that combines several physical parameters for identifying the presence of a geothermal system.

Hadley, D.M.; Cavit, D.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy and Environment Partnership Programme for Mekong Region | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programme for Mekong Region Programme for Mekong Region Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy and Environment Partnership Programme for Mekong Region Name Energy and Environment Partnership Programme for Mekong Region Agency/Company /Organization Government of Finland, Nordic Development Fund Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Finance, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.eepmekong.org/ Country Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand UN Region South-Eastern Asia References EEP Mekong[1] Overview "Energy and Environment Partnership (EEP) with Mekong region countries is a grant offering program to promote the use of renewable energy, energy efficiency and clean technologies, financed by the Ministry for Foreign

286

Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Gas network model allows full reservoir coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas-network flow model (Gasnet) developed for and added to an existing Qatar General Petroleum Corp. (OGPC) in-house reservoir simulator, allows improved modeling of the interaction among the reservoir, wells, and pipeline networks. Gasnet is a three-phase model that is modified to handle gas-condensate systems. The numerical solution is based on a control volume scheme that uses the concept of cells and junctions, whereby pressure and phase densities are defined in cells, while phase flows are defined at junction links. The model features common numerical equations for the reservoir, the well, and the pipeline components and an efficient state-variable solution method in which all primary variables including phase flows are solved directly. Both steady-state and transient flow events can be simulated with the same tool. Three test cases show how the model runs. One case simulates flow redistribution in a simple two-branch gas network. The second simulates a horizontal gas well in a waterflooded gas reservoir. The third involves an export gas pipeline coupled to a producing reservoir.

Methnani, M.M. [Qatar General Petroleum Corp., Doha (Qatar)

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

289

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

290

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collect, organize and analyze all available data conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. Activities were focused primarily on technology transfer elements of the project. This included regional play analysis and mapping, geologic field studies, and reservoir modeling for secondary water flood simulations as used in publication folios and workshops. The computer laboratory was fully operational for operator use. Computer systems design and database development activities were ongoing.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

Producing Gas-Oil Ratio Performance of Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study presents a detailed analysis of producing gas-oil ratio performance characteristics from conventional reservoir to unconventional reservoir. Numerical simulations of various reservoir fluid… (more)

Lei, Guowen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal stress cracking and the enhancement of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Given sufficient time, the extraction of heat from geothermal reservoirs formed by the hydraulic fracturing of competent rock will eventually result in the formation of thermal stress cracks in the reservoir. These cracks penetrate the rock in a manner such that the penetration-to-spacing ratio is approximately one. The penetration depends upon the extent of cooling and the square root of time. Initially then, the cracks are closely spaced and penetrate but little, so that a crazing pattern is apparent; but with increasing time some of these cracks, now more widely spaced, grow deeper. Eventually these larger cracks attain a critical aperture such that significant rates of water flow can be established within them and thus the newly created heat transfer area becomes useful for heat extraction. At the same time that cracks are forming within the main reservoir, thermal cracking also occurs in the wellbores that communicate with the reservoir. These cracks eventually convey water to and from the reservoir, thus leading to a decrease in the flow impedances that are often concentrated in the wellbore regions.

Murphy, H.D.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Numerical investigations into the formation of a high temperature reservoir''  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an ongoing numerical modeling effort aimed at describing some of the thermodynamic conditions observed in vapor- dominated reservoirs, including the formation of a high temperature reservoir (HTR) beneath the typical'' reservoir. The modeled system begins as a hot water geothermal reservoir, and evolves through time into a vapor-dominated reservoir with a HTR at depth. This approach taken here to develop a vapor-dominated system is similar to that of Pruess (1985), and involves induced boiling through venting. The reservoir description is intentionally generic, but serves to describe a means of evolution of conditions observed (in particular) The Geysers.

Shook, M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Numerical investigations into the formation of a ``high temperature reservoir``  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an ongoing numerical modeling effort aimed at describing some of the thermodynamic conditions observed in vapor- dominated reservoirs, including the formation of a high temperature reservoir (HTR) beneath the ``typical`` reservoir. The modeled system begins as a hot water geothermal reservoir, and evolves through time into a vapor-dominated reservoir with a HTR at depth. This approach taken here to develop a vapor-dominated system is similar to that of Pruess (1985), and involves induced boiling through venting. The reservoir description is intentionally generic, but serves to describe a means of evolution of conditions observed (in particular) The Geysers.

Shook, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Alaska Open-File Report 127 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites in Southern Southeastern Alaska - Preliminary Results and Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information has been gathered on 13 reported thermal-spring sites, 12 in southern Southeastern Alaska and one in western British Columbia. Five of the reported sites could not be substantiated by DGGS. The eight known thermal spring sites are associated with grainitic terrain and, except for Baker Island Hot Springs, occur within or near intensively fractured Cretaceous-age pluons of the Coast Range Batholith. Thermal-spring surface temperatures range from 21 C (Twin Lakes) to 91.5 C (Bailey Bay). The greatest discharge occurs at Chief Shakes hot springs (450 1pm). Bell Island Hot Springs, which has about a 100-1 pm discharge and a 70 C temperature, has had the most development. Two previously unreported thermal-spring sites, Barnes Lake warm springs and Bradfield hot springs, have a low rate of discharge and respective surface temperatures of about 25 and 54 C. The known thermal springs probably originate from circulation of meteoric waters through deep-seated fracture and fault systems. The chemical constituents of the alkali-sulfate to alkali-chloride thermal waters are probably derived from interaction of the deeply circulating meteoric waters with the granitic wall rocks. Chemical geothermometry suggests subsurface temperatures of 55 to 151 C. If waters are being heated solely by conduction from wall rocks, circulation depths must be about 1.5 to 5 km, assuming geothermal gradients of 30 to 50 C/km. Variations in temperature, discharge, and chemistry were noted at several thermal springs for which previous records are available. A major decrease in silica and potassium concentrations at Chief Shakes hot springs is suggested by comparing recent analyses of water chemistry to Waring's (1917) original analysis. The rate of discharge at Bell Island Hot Springs may have increased by a factor of two since Waring's visit to the springs. Subsurface reservoirs associated with thermal springs in southern Southeastern Alaska are of low temperature and are probably limited in extent, compared to geothermal fields now being used elsewhere in the world. Only the Bell Island and Bailey Bay sites now offer any potential for generation of electricity; these sites could also be used for a variety of direct uses such as space heating, wood or lumber processing, and perhaps aquaculture. The other sites have less potential but could be used locally for space heating or agriculture enhancement.

Motyka, Roman J.; Moorman, Mary A.; Reeder, John W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

298

Prediction of reservoir compaction and surface subsidence  

SciTech Connect

A new loading-rate-dependent compaction model for unconsolidated clastic reservoirs is presented that considerably improves the accuracy of predicting reservoir rock compaction and surface subsidence resulting from pressure depletion in oil and gas fields. The model has been developed on the basis of extensive laboratory studies and can be derived from a theory relating compaction to time-dependent intergranular friction. The procedure for calculating reservoir compaction from laboratory measurements with the new model is outlined. Both field and laboratory compaction behaviors appear to be described by one single normalized, nonlinear compaction curve. With the new model, the large discrepancies usually observed between predictions based on linear compaction models and actual (nonlinear) field behavior can be explained.

De Waal, J.A.; Smits, R.M.M.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Shale Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Characterization Shale Reservoir Characterization Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Gas-producing shales are predominantly composed of consolidated clay-sized particles with a high organic content. High subsurface pressures and temperatures convert the organic matter to oil and gas, which may migrate to conventional petroleum traps and also remains within the shale. However, the clay content severely limits gas and fluid flow within the shales. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the mineral and organic content, occurrence of natural fractures, thermal maturity, shale volumes, porosity

300

Second workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 focused national attention on energy problems. A national focus on development of energy sources alternative to consumption of hydrocarbons led to the initiation of research studies of reservoir engineering of geothermal systems, funded by the National Science Foundation. At that time it appeared that only two significant reservoir engineering studies of geothermal reservoirs had been completed. Many meetings concerning development of geothermal resources were held from 1973 through the date of the first Stanford Geothermal Reservoir Engineering workshop December 15-17, 1975. These meetings were similar in that many reports dealt with the objectives of planned research projects rather than with results. The first reservoir engineering workshop held under the Stanford Geothermal Program was singular in that for the first time most participants were reporting on progress inactive research programs rather than on work planned. This was true for both laboratory experimental studies and for field experiments in producing geothermal systems. The Proceedings of the December 1975 workshop (SGP-TR-12) is a remarkable document in that results of both field operations and laboratory studies were freely presented and exchanged by all participants. With this in mind the second reservoir engineering workshop was planned for December 1976. The objectives were again two-fold. First, the workshop was designed as a forum to bring together researchers active in various physical and mathematical branches of the developing field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give participants a current and updated view of progress being made in the field. The second purpose was to prepare this Proceedings of Summaries documenting the state of the art as of December 1976. The proceedings will be distributed to all interested members of the geothermal community involved in the development and utilization of the geothermal resources in the world. Many notable occurrences took place between the first workshop in December 1975 and this present workshop in December 1976. For one thing, the newly formed Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has assumed the lead role in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The second workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from ERDA. In addition, two significant meetings on geothermal energy were held in Rotarua, New Zealand and Taupo, New Zealand. These meetings concerned geothermal reservoir engineering, and the reinjection of cooled geothermal fluids back into a geothermal system. It was clear to attendees of both the New Zealand and the December workshop meetings that a great deal of new information had been developed between August and December 1976. Another exciting report made at the meeting was a successful completion of a new geothermal well on the big island of Hawaii which produces a geothermal fluid that is mainly steam at a temperature in excess of 600 degrees F. Although the total developed electrical power generating capacity due to all geothermal field developments in 1976 is on the order of 1200 megawatts, it was reported that rapid development in geothermal field expansion is taking place in many parts of the world. Approximately 400 megawatts of geothermal power were being developed in the Philippine Islands, and planning for expansion in production in Cerro Prieto, Mexico was also announced. The Geysers in the United States continued the planned expansion toward the level of more than 1000 megawatts. The Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford December 1976 with 93 attendees from 4 nations, and resulted in the presentation of 44 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. The major areas included in the program consisted of reservoir physics, well testing, field development, well stimulation, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The planning forth is year's workshop and the preparation of the proceedings was carried out mainly by my associate Paul

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Review of potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal in the southeastern United States. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The geology of the southeastern United States was studied to recommend areas that should be considered for field exploration in order to select a site for a radioactive waste repository. The region studied included the Piedmont Province, the Triassic Basins, and the Atlantic Coastal Plain in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. This study was entirely a review of literature and existing knowledge from a geotechnical point of view and was performed by subcontractors whose individual reports are listed in the bibliography. No field work was involved. The entire study was geotechnical in nature, and no consideration was given to socioeconomic or demographic factors. These factors need to be addressed in a separate study. For all areas, field study is needed before any area is further considered. A total of 29 areas are recommended for further consideration in the Piedmont Province subregion: one area in Maryland, 8 areas in Virginia, 4 areas in North Carolina, 6 areas in South Carolina, and 10 areas in Georgia. Of the 14 exposed and 5 buried or hypothesized basins identified in the Triassic basin subregion, 6 are recommended for further study: one basin in Virginia, 3 basins in North Carolina, and 2 basins in South Carolina. Four potential candidate areas are identified within the Atlantic Coastal Plain subregion: one in Maryland, one in North Carolina, and 2 in Georgia.

Bledsoe, H.W. Jr.; Marine, I.W.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Interactions in the Southeastern Pacific: The VOCALS Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper describes the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study (VOCALS), an international research program focused on the improved understanding and modeling of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) climate system on diurnal to interannual timescales. ...

C. R. Mechoso; R. Wood; R. Weller; C. S. Bretherton; A. D. Clarke; H. Coe; C. Fairall; J. T. Farrar; G. Feingold; R. Garreaud; C. Grados; J. McWilliams; S. P. de Szoeke; S. E. Yuter; P. Zuidema

303

Serial Upstream-Propagating Mesoscale Convective System Events over Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serial mesoscale convective system (MCS) events with lifetimes over 18 h and up to nearly 70 h are routinely observed over southeastern South America from infrared satellite imagery during the spring and summer. These events begin over the ...

Vagner Anabor; David J. Stensrud; Osvaldo L. L. de Moraes

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Foehn-Like Winds and Elevated Fire Danger Conditions in Southeastern Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bushfires in southeastern Australia are a serious environmental problem, and consistently cause loss of life and damage to property and other assets. Understanding synoptic processes that can lead to dangerous fire weather conditions throughout ...

Jason J. Sharples; Graham A. Mills; Richard H. D. McRae; Rodney O. Weber

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reconciling the Spatial Distribution of the Surface Temperature Trends in the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to explain the considerable spatial heterogeneity in the observed linear trends of monthly mean maximum and minimum temperatures (Tmax and Tmin) from station observations in the southeastern (SE) United States (specifically ...

V. Misra; J.-P. Michael; R. Boyles; E. P. Chassignet; M. Griffin; J. J. O’Brien

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Latent Heat Release in an Extratropical Cyclone that Developed Explosively over the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres FGGE Level III-b analyses, the latent heat release (LHR) associated with an extratropical cyclone that deepened explosively over the southeastern United States is investigated. Parameterized LUR was ...

Earl K. Fosdick; Phillip J. Smith

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeled and Observed Variations in Storm Divergence and Stratiform Rain Production in Southeastern Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Storm divergence profiles observed by an S-band Doppler radar are compared to ensemble simulations of 10 disparate precipitating systems occurring in warm-season, weakly baroclinic, and strongly baroclinic environments in southeastern Texas. Eight ...

Larry J. Hopper Jr.; Courtney Schumacher

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tropical cyclones and drought amelioration in the Gulf and Southeastern Coastal United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation from land-falling tropical cyclones (TCs) has a significant hydroclimatic influence in the southeastern United States, particularly during drought years. The frequency with which TCs ended drought conditions was examined for ...

Justin T. Maxwell; Jason T. Ortegren; Paul A. Knapp; Peter T. Soulé

309

Downstream Amplification: A Possible Precursor to Major Freeze Events over Southeastern Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many frost events over southeastern Brazil are accompanied by a large-amplitude upper trough of the middle latitudes that extends well into the Tropics. This paper first illustrates that a mechanism of downstream amplification across the Pacific ...

T. N. Krishnamurti; Mukul Tewari; D. R. Chakraborty; Jose Marengo; Pedro L. Silva Dias; P. Satyamurty

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radar Observations of the Diurnally Forced Offshore Convective Lines along the Southeastern Coast of Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study documents offshore convective lines along the southeastern coast of Taiwan, a frequent but poorly understood mesoscale phenomenon that influences coastal weather during the Taiwan mei-yu season. Doppler radar and surface observations ...

Cheng-Ku Yu; Ben Jong-Dao Jou

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sensitivity of Hydrological Simulations of Southeastern United States Watersheds to Temporal Aggregation of Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the sensitivity of the performance of hydrological models to certain temporal variations of precipitation over the southeastern United States (SEUS). Because of observational uncertainty in the estimates of rainfall ...

Satish Bastola; Vasubandhu Misra

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

"Hideous architecture" : mimicry, feint and resistance in turn of the century southeastern Nigerian building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation reconstructs the histories of some exceptional, hitherto unstudied buildings, erected in southeastern Nigeria between 1889 and 1939; they are part of a larger group, dispersed over the African Atlantic ...

Okoye, Ikemefuna Stanley Ifejika

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Interannual and Decadal Cycles in River Flows of Southeastern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time series of annual streamflow of four rivers in southeastern and south-central South America (the Negro, Paraguay, Paraná, and Uruguay Rivers) for the period 1911–93 are analyzed. Application of the multitaper method shows that the ...

Andrew W. Robertson; Carlos R. Mechoso

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Synoptic-Scale Features Associated with Warm Season Heavy Rainfall over the Interior Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research has established links between heavy rainfall and a wide variety of synoptic features and parameters. In this study, 312 heavy rainfall events are identified over the southeastern United States and used to construct a synoptic ...

Charles E. Konrad II

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Satellite-Based Summer Convective Cloud Frequency Analysis over the Southeastern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A convective cloud (CC) analysis is performed over the southeastern United States (SEUS) during June, July, and August 2006 and 2007, using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible and infrared sensors as ...

Laci D. Gambill; John R. Mecikalski

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modeling the Barrier-Layer Formation in the Southeastern Arabian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of salinity on the formation of the barrier layer (BL) in the southeastern Arabian Sea (SEAS) is investigated using an ocean general circulation model. In accordance with previous studies, the runoff distribution and the India–Sri ...

F. Durand; D. Shankar; C. de Boyer Montégut; S. S. C. Shenoi; B. Blanke; G. Madec

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual report, August 1, 1990-July 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The research work, during the period of the report, can be divided into three main categories, the first category being the NE Hitchcock reservoir characterization review task. NE Hitchcock field production and log data were acquired. Well by well review of production was performed and cross-correlated with geologic interpretations. The second category is the reservoir selection task. In the process of selecting two water-drive gas reservoir candidates, over 150 fields located in the Rockies, New Mexico, West Texas, Mid Continent, Michigan and offshore Louisiana were searched. The reservoir selection criteria is: water-drive gas reservoir, location near a geologic outcrop (if possible), field size of 5-40 wells, and availability of core and modern well logs. Accordingly, the Vermejo/Moore-Hooper Fusselman and the Grand Isle PD sand fields were selected to be studied. The third category is the laboratory investigations. The task includes rock mechanical properties, phase behavior and sand control portions. In the rock mechanical properties segment, laboratory measurements were made on several Berea Core plugs. The equation of state and an empirical approach are being used to predict initial reservoir gas composition from current production data for the phase behavior part. The sand control part was completed with conclusions regarding the ability to predict the existence of plastic failure region of an unconsolidated sand near a wellbore. The project is continuing to accomplish its goals to evaluate different production management strategies on the two chosen water-drive gas reservoirs through reservoir engineering, geologic interpretation, experimental work and reservoir simulation studies.

Crafton, J.W.; Davis, D.; Graves, R.; Poettmann, F.; Thompson, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Water Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first six months of the fishery investigations in Libby Reservoir were aimed at developing suitable methodology for sampling physical-chemical limnology, fish food availability, fish food habits, and seasonal distribution and abundance of fish populations. Appropriate methods have been developed for all aspects with minor modification of original proposed methodologies. Purse seining has yet to be tested. Physical-chemical limnologic sampling could be reduced or subcontracted with the U.S. Geologic Survey to allow for more intensive sampling of fish food or fish distribution portions of the investigation. Final sample design will be determined during 1983-84. Future directions of the study revolve around two central issues, the potential for flexibility in reservoir operation and determination of how reservoir operation affects fish populations. Simulated maximum drawdown levels during a 40-year period were controlled by power in seven out of eight years. Drawdowns were generally within 10 feet of the flood control rule curve, however. There may be more flexibility with regards to timing of refill and evacuation. This aspect needs to be evaluated further. Production and availability of fish food, suitability of reservoir habitat, and accessibility of off-reservoir spawning and rearing habitat were identified as components of fish ecology which reservoir operation could potentially impact. Two models based on trophic dynamics and habitat suitabilities were suggested as a framework for exploring the relationship of reservoir operation on the fish community.

Shepard, Bradley B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the cooperative research program is to characterize Alaskan reservoirs in terms of their reserves, physical and chemical properties, geologic configuration and structure, and the development potential. The tasks completed during this period include: (1) geologic reservoir description of Endicott Field; (2) petrographic characterization of core samples taken from selected stratigraphic horizons of the West Sak and Ugnu (Brookian) wells; (3) development of a polydispersed thermodynamic model for predicting asphaltene equilibria and asphaltene precipitation from crude oil-solvent mixtures, and (4) preliminary geologic description of the Milne Point Unit.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Factors of paleosol formation in a Late Cretaceous eolian sand sheet paleoenvironment, Marlia Formation, Southeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, Southeastern Brazil Patrick Francisco Führ Dal' Bó a, , Giorgio Basilici a , Rômulo Simões), Brazil b IG ­ Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110, Belém (PA), Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i Late Cretaceous The Marília Formation, which crops out in southeastern Brazil, is interpreted as a Late

Ahmad, Sajjad

322

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

southeastern geographer, 44(1) 2004: pp. 814 Rethinking the Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-runners, allow- ing for the sale of cotton to European mar- kets and the purchase of all-important guns and steel

Gamble, Douglas W.

324

Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

Pritchett, J.W.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY; APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study is performed at West Coalinga Field in California. We continued our investigation on the nature of seismic reactions from heterogeneous reservoirs. We began testing our algorithm to infer parameters of object-based reservoir models from seismic data. We began integration of seismic and geologic data to determine the deterministic limits of conventional seismic data interpretation. Lastly, we began integration of seismic and geologic heterogeneity using stochastic models conditioned both on wireline and seismic data.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

328

Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

330

Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

331

Utah Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Utah Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

332

New Mexico--East Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) New Mexico--East Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

333

Ohio Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Ohio Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

334

Kansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Kansas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

335

Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

336

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

337

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

338

New Mexico Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) New Mexico Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

339

West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

340

North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

342

Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the first stage of planning field development, the simulation model is calibrated to dynamic data (history matching). One of the aims of the research is to extend the streamline based generalized travel time inversion method for full field models with multimillion cells through the use of grid coarsening. This makes the streamline based inversion suitable for high resolution simulation models with decades long production history and numerous wells by significantly reducing the computational effort. In addition, a novel workflow is proposed to integrate well bottom-hole pressure data during model calibration and the approach is illustrated via application to the CO2 sequestration. In the second stage, field development strategies are optimized. The strategies are primarily focused on rate optimization followed by infill well drilling. A method is proposed to modify the streamline-based rate optimization approach which previously focused on maximizing sweep efficiency by equalizing arrival time of the waterfront to producers, to account for accelerated production for improving the net present value (NPV). Optimum compromise between maximizing sweep efficiency and maximizing NPV can be selected based on a 'trade-off curve.' The proposed method is demonstrated on field scale application considering geological uncertainty. Finally, a novel method for well placement optimization is proposed that relies on streamlines and time of flight to first locate the potential regions of poorly swept and drained oil. Specifically, the proposed approach utilizes a dynamic measure based on the total streamline time of flight combined with static and dynamic parameters to identify "Sweet-Spots" for infill drilling. The "Sweet-Spots" can be either used directly as potential well-placement locations or as starting points during application of a formal optimization technique. The main advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency in calculating dynamic measure map. The complete workflow was also demonstrated on a multimillion cell reservoir model of a mature carbonate field with notable success. The infill locations based on dynamic measure map have been verified by subsequent drilling.

Taware, Satyajit Vijay

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Platform for Asia Platform for Asia Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia Name Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme, Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, Stockholm Environment Institute, Asian Institute of Technology/UNEP Regional Resource Centre for Asia and the Pacific Topics Adaptation, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.climateadapt.asia/ Country Cambodia, China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines UN Region Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References Regional Climate Change Adaptation Platform for Asia[1] Overview "This initiative supports research and capacity building on climate change

344

Geolocation of man-made reservoirs across terrains of varying complexity using GIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) is one of the world's most comprehensive databases of reservoir sedimentation rates, comprising nearly 6000 surveys for 1819 reservoirs across the continental United States. Sediment surveys ... Keywords: DEM, GIS, Reservoir sedimentation, Terrain complexity

David M. Mixon; David A. Kinner; Robert F. Stallard; James P. M. Syvitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fractured reservoir characterization through injection, falloff, and flowback tests  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the development of a multiphase pressure-transient-analysis technique for naturally fractured reservoirs and the analysis of a series of field tests performed to evaluate the water injection potential and the reservoir characteristics of a naturally fractured reservoir. These included step-rate, water-injectivity, pressure-falloff, and flowback tests. Through these tests, a description of the reservoir was obtained.

Peng, C.P.; Singh, P.K. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (United States)); Halvorsen, H. (Amoco Norway Oil Co., Stavanger (NO)); York, S.D. (Amoco Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

347

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Intake Operation for Deep Cooling Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a submerged intake, rather than a conventional surface intake, would improve the thermal performance of most cooling reservoirs in the United States. Projected operating cost savings at a typical plant would range from $1 million to $10 million because of decreased intake temperatures during the summer.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Hydroelectric reservoir optimization in a pool market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a price-taking generator operating a hydro-electric reservoir in a pool electricity market, the optimal stack to offer in each trading period over a planning horizon can be computed using dynamic programming. However, the market trading period (usually ...

G. Pritchard; A. B. Philpott; P. J. Neame

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Physical processes of subsidence in geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to acquire core and fluid from producing geothermal reservoirs (East Mesa, United States, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico); to test specimens of this core for their short-term and long-term (creep) compaction response; and to develop a compaction constitutive model that would allow future analysis of reservoir compaction and a surface subsidence. A total of approximately two hundred feet of core was obtained from eleven wells in the two geothermal fields. Depths and porosities ranged from 3500 to 11,000 feet and 15 to 40 percent, respectively. Several samples of geothermal fluids were also obtained. After geologically and geochemically describing the materials obtained, selected specimens were tested for their response to the pressures and temperatures of the geothermal environment and to simulated changes in those conditions that would be caused by production. Short-term tests (for example, tests for compressibility extending over a time interval of an hour or less in the laboratory) indicated that these sedimentary materials behaved normally with respect to the expected behavior of reservoir sandstones of these depths and porosities. Compressibilities were of the order 1 x 10/sup 6/ psi. Long-term tests, extending up to several weeks in duration, indicated that pore pressure reduction, simulating reservoir production, tended to cause creep compaction at an initial rate of about 1 x 10/sup -7/ percent porosity reduction per second.

Schatz, J.F.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

Waterflood surveillance techniques; A reservoir management approach  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir management aspects of waterflooding span the time before the start of waterflood to the time when the secondary recovery either is uneconomic or is changed to an enhanced recovery. This paper reviews waterflood techniques and reports on surveillance techniques in the management of waterflooding of oil wells.

Thakur, G.C. (Chevron USA Inc. (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a 3-D representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project.

Allison, M.L. [Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1994-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study was performed at West Coalinga Field in California.

Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Automatic history matching in petroleum reservoirs using the TSVD method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

History matching is an important inverse problem extensively used to estimate petrophysical properties of an oil reservoir by matching a numerical simulation to the reservoir's history of oil production. In this work, we present a method for the ... Keywords: TSVD, adjoint formulation, history matching, optimization, reservoir simulation

Elisa Portes dos Santos Amorim; Paulo Goldfeld; Flavio Dickstein; Rodrigo Weber dos Santos; Carolina Ribeiro Xavier

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Intelligent seismic inversion workflow for high-resolution reservoir characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing a geological model is the first and a very important step during the reservoir simulation and modeling process. The geological model usually represents our best interpretation of the reservoir characteristics that extends beyond the well where ... Keywords: Buffalo Valley Field, Neural networks, Reservoir characterization, Seismic inversion

E. Artun; S. Mohaghegh

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Radon as an In Situ Tracer in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By measuring trace amounts of radon in geothermal steam, utilities can estimate changes in the properties of the fluid produced from a reservoir. These measurements provide a method to monitor the transition from a liquid-dominated reservoir to a boiling reservoir.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

360

EOR (enhanced oil recovery): the reservoir and its contents  

SciTech Connect

Factors in commitment to enhanced oil recovery of any type are discussed with relation to reservoir characteristics. Core analysis, well logging, reservoir engineering studies, well transient testing, and chemical tracer testing are recommended in order to ascertain the dimensions and conditions of the potentially hydrocarbon bearing reservoir. The calculated risk that is necessary even after conducting the recommended practices is emphasized.

Frederick, R.O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO(2) Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Progress has been made in the area of laboratory analysis of Spraberry oil/brine/rock interactions during this quarter. Water imbibition experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, using cleaned Spraberry cores, synthetic Spraberry reservoir brine, and Spraberry oil. It has been concluded that the Spraberry reservoir cores are weakly water-wet. The average Amott wettability index to water is about 0.55. The average oil recovery due to spontaneous water imbibition is about 50% of original oil in place.

Schechter, David

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

James Rutledge

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Basin offers the greatest near-term potential for reducing the future decline in domestic oil and gas production. The Basin is less mature than productive on-shore areas, large unexplored areas remain, and there is great potential for reducing bypassed oil in known fields. Much of the remaining oil in the offshore is trapped in formations that are extremely complex due to intrusions Of salt domes. Recently, however, significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University (the Prime Contractor) with two technical subcontractors, BDNL Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt dornes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and a South Pelto reservoir operated by Mobil. This data will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. Geologic data is being compiled; extraction research has not begun.

Schenewerk, P.

1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Load-shape modeling in southeastern utility systems  

SciTech Connect

Load models are tools which have a wide range of application in the electric-utility industry. Some uses include monitoring load-management policies and helping with on-line commitment problems. The output from a load model can be placed in a suitable software environment where daily load curves are computed and displayed. Also, load models can be extended to perform forecasting functions. A weather sensitive load model that takes into account both weekdays and weekends on an hourly basis has been developed and applied to load shape modeling and short term forecasting on three southeastern electric utilities. A software package associated with the load modeling theory was developed and tested. This load-modeling program computes the daily load curve in terms of identifiable components. The program uses historical hourly load data to compute coefficients related to load components including base, growth, seasonal and weather. These coefficients can be used in a mathematical model to compute an estimate of the daily load curve with load values for each hour of the day. The load-modeling procedure described employs a linear least squares method for computing coefficients in the mathematical model.

Lebby, G.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) of southeastern Indiana, in Proceedings, 1989 Eastern Oil Shale Symposium

Mohaghegh, Shahab

367

The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

SciTech Connect

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend parallel to Ï?1, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal wells are drilled perpendicular to the Ï?1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Frederick Sarg

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar effective stress as the Middle Bakken suggesting that the shale will not contain induced fractures, and will contribute hydrocarbons from interconnected micro-fractures. Organic-rich shale impedance increases with a reduction in porosity and an increase in kerogen stiffness during the burial maturation process. Maturation can be directly related to impedance, and should be seismically mappable. Fractures enhance permeability and production. Regional fractures form an orthogonal set with a dominant NE-SW trend, and a less prominent NW-SE trend. Many horizontal 1 direction to intersect these fractures. Local structures formed by basement tectonics or salt dissolution generate both hinge parallel and hinge oblique fractures that may overprint and dominate the regional fracture signature. Horizontal microfractures formed by oil expulsion in the Bakken shales, and connected and opened by hydrofracturing provide permeability pathways for oil flow into wells that have been hydro-fractured in the Middle Bakken lithofacies. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

Sarg, J.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step in the reservoir development process. Determining the optimal well location is a complex problem involving many factors including geological considerations, reservoir and fluid properties, economic costs, lateral direction, and technical ability. The most thorough approach to this problem is that of an exhaustive search, in which a simulation is run for every conceivable well position in the reservoir. Although thorough and accurate, this approach is typically not used in real world applications due to the time constraints from the excessive number of simulations. This project suggests the use of a genetic algorithm applied to the horizontal well placement problem in a gas reservoir to reduce the required number of simulations. This research aims to first determine if well placement optimization is even necessary in a gas reservoir, and if so, to determine the benefit of optimization. Performance of the genetic algorithm was analyzed through five different case scenarios, one involving a vertical well and four involving horizontal wells. The genetic algorithm approach is used to evaluate the effect of well placement in heterogeneous and anisotropic reservoirs on reservoir recovery. The wells are constrained by surface gas rate and bottom-hole pressure for each case. This project's main new contribution is its application of using genetic algorithms to study the effect of well placement optimization in gas reservoirs. Two fundamental questions have been answered in this research. First, does well placement in a gas reservoir affect the reservoir performance? If so, what is an efficient method to find the optimal well location based on reservoir performance? The research provides evidence that well placement optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely efficient and robust tool to find the optimal location.

Gibbs, Trevor Howard

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

1974-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reservoir technology research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting geothermal reservoir research and testing sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1983. The INEL research program is primarily aimed at the development of reservoir engineering techniques for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Numerical methods have been developed which allow the simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex fractured reservoirs. Sensitivity studies have illustrated the importance of incorporating the influence of fractures in reservoir simulations. Related efforts include fracture characterization, geochemical reaction kinetics and field testing.

Stiger, S.G.; Renner, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1995-96, the third year of the project. Most work consisted of interpreting the large quantity of data collected over two field seasons. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies. The primary objective of the regional stratigraphic analysis is to provide a more detailed interpretation of the stratigraphy and gross reservoir characteristics of the Ferron Sandstone as exposed in outcrop. The primary objective of the case-studies work is to develop a detailed geological and petrophysical characterization, at well-sweep scale or smaller, of the primary reservoir lithofacies typically found in a fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoir.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Reducing long-term reservoir performance uncertainty  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir performance is one of the key issues that have to be addressed before going ahead with the development of a geothermal field. In order to select the type and size of the power plant and design other surface installations, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the production wells and of the produced fluids, and to predict the changes over a 10--30 year period. This is not a straightforward task, as in most cases the calculations have to be made on the basis of data collected before significant fluid volumes have been extracted from the reservoir. The paper describes the methodology used in predicting the long-term performance of hydrothermal systems, as well as DOE/GTD-sponsored research aimed at reducing the uncertainties associated with these predictions. 27 refs., 1 fig.

Lippmann, M.J.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Thermodynamic behaviour of simplified geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Starting from the basic laws of conservation of mass and energy, the differential equations that represent the thermodynamic behavior of a simplified geothermal reservoir are derived. Its application is limited to a reservoir of high permeability as it usually occurs in the central zone of a geothermal field. A very practical method to solve numerically the equations is presented, based on the direct use of the steam tables. The method, based in one general equation, is extended and illustrated with a numerical example to the case of segregated mass extraction, variable influx and heat exchange between rock and fluid. As it is explained, the method can be easily coupled to several influx models already developed somewhere else. The proposed model can become an important tool to solve practical problems, where like in Los Azufres Mexico, the geothermal field can be divided in an inner part where flashing occurs and an exterior field where storage of water plays the main role.

Hiriart, G.; Sanchez, E.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Enhancing Reservoir Management in the Appalach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Barrier and Preferred Practices Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: September 1, 2001 Reporting Period End Date: September 15, 2003 Principal Author(s): Ronald R. McDowell Khashayar Aminian Katharine L. Avary John M. Bocan Michael Ed. Hohn Douglas G. Patchen September 2003 DE-FC26-01BC15273 West Virginia University Research Corporation West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (subcontractor) ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

379

Injection into a fractured geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed study is made on the movement of the thermal fronts in the fracture and in the porous medium when 100{sup 0}C water is injected into a 300{sup 0}C geothermal reservoir with equally spaced horizontal fractures. Numerical modeling calculations were made for a number of thermal conductivity values, as well as different values of the ratio of fracture and rock medium permeabilities. One important result is an indication that although initially, the thermal front in the fracture moves very fast relative to the front in the porous medium as commonly expected, its speed rapidly decreases. At some distance from the injection well the thermal fronts in the fracture and the porous medium coincide, and from that point they advance together. The implication of this result on the effects of fractures on reinjection into geothermal reservoirs is discussed.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Tsang, C.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Application of stress corrosion to geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are several alternative equations which describe slow crack growth by stress corrosion. Presently available data suggest that an alternative form may be preferable to the form which is most often used, but the issue cannot be clearly decided. Presently available stress corrosion data on glasses and ceramics suggest that rocks in a proposed geothermal reservoir will crack readily over long time periods, thus seriously limiting the operation of this type of power source. However, in situ hydrofracturing measurements together with a theoretical treatment suggest that such a reservoir will contain a relatively high pressure over a long period of time without further cracking. Further experimentation is desirable to measure directly the critical stresses for crack growth rates on the order of 10/sup -7/ m/sec.

Demarest, H.H. Jr.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pressure transient analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New ideas are presented for the interpretation of pressure transient tests for wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. This work is based on the transient matrix flow model formulated by de Swaan. The differences between this model and the Warren and Root model occur during the transition flow period. It is demonstrated that the behavior of a naturally fractured reservoir can be correlated by using three dimensionless parameters. It is established that regardless of matrix geometry the transition period might exhibit a straight line whose slope is equal to half the slope of the classical parallel semilog straight lines, provided the transient matrix linear flow is present. In addition, information is provided on the estimation of fracture area per unit matrix volume or matrix parameters from the transition period semilog straight line. It is shown that matrix geometry might be identified when pressure data are smooth. Field examples are included to illustrate the application and the validity of the theoretical results of this study.

Cinco-ley, H.; Samaniego, F.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Structural geology of Shawneetown fault zone, Southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Vertical movements of crustal blocks along the narrow east-west-trending Shawneetown fault zone in southeastern Illinois occurred between Early Permian and Late Cretaceous. The main blocks moved vertically and retured to roughly their orignal positions so that strata now show little relative offset across the fault zone. However, individual faults with displacements up to 3,500 ft (1,070 m) bound narrow slices of steeply tilted or overturned strata resulting in a juxtaposition of Kinderhookian (Lower Mississippian) and Upper Devonian strata with Lower Pennsylvanina strata. The bedrock is intensely fractured, commonly brecciated, and cemented with either silica or calcite. Slickensides and mullion display various orientations within the zone and on individual outcrops. The dominant movement, however, appears to be vertical with no evidence for significant strike-slip movements. Pleistocene deposits do not exhibit offsets across the fault zone, indicating that no tectonic activity has occurred since the beginning of that epoch. The trend of the fault zone changes abruptly from east-west in southern Gallatin and easternmost Saline Counties to south-southwest in southern Saline and northeastern Pope Counties, where it joins the Fluorspar area fault complex. Here the zone widens and develops a braided pattern as the amount of displacement along individual faults decreases. The Shawneetown fault zone and Flourspar area fault complex in part are younger than the Cottage Grove fault system to the northwest and the Wabash Valley fault system to the north. The hope of finding structural traps near the junctions of the fuel systems has spurred recent oil exploration in the area.

Lumm, D.K.; Nelson, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents  

SciTech Connect

This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

Chisholm, Ian

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Green River Formation is located in the Uinta basin of northeastern Utah. It contains several reservoirs that can be classified as lacustrine such as the Altamont-Bluebell and Red Wash. Lacustrine reservoirs are abundant in other provinces in the world such as China, Southeast Asia, Brazil, West Africa, and the Caspian Sea. Even though they can contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons, our understanding of the primary controls on fluid flow within these systems is still not clear. This ambiguity leads in some cases to inefficient recovery of hydrocarbons in such reservoirs. This study is aimed at clarifying the effects of heterogeneities in channelized reservoirs on fluid flow. It uses a multidisciplinary approach combining geologic knowledge with reservoir engineering. It involves the geologic modeling and fluid flow simulation of a channelized outcrop of the Green River formation. The study of this outcrop provides insights for modeling, understanding, and possibly predicting the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine the recovery efficiency. Other findings include the effect on performance of vertical anisotropy in a channelized reservoir. We discovered that an isotropic reservoir performs better than an anisotropic one and that the well perforation interval is extremely important when comparing the performance of several anisotropic cases. Finally, we investigated the effects of the recovery strategy on performance in a channelized setting. We found that waterflooding yields better results than any of the other recovery techniques analyzed. Sensitivity runs with different waterflood patterns indicated that a staggered line drive results in the best performance in the analog channelized reservoir we modeled, as it allows for the best recovery factor in the least amount of time. The results of this work can be used qualitatively to predict performance in a channelized setting but their use is limited quantitatively because of the issue of scale, i.e. the outcrop width is much less than typical interwell scale.

Robbana, Enis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

General screening criteria for shale gas reservoirs and production data analysis of Barnett shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas reservoirs are gaining importance in United States as conventional oil and gas resources are dwindling at a very fast pace. The purpose of this study is twofold. First aim is to help operators with simple screening criteria which can help them in making certain decisions while going after shale gas reservoirs. A guideline chart has been created with the help of available literature published so far on different shale gas basins across the US. For evaluating potential of a productive shale gas play, one has to be able to answer the following questions: 1. What are the parameters affecting the decision to drill a horizontal well or a vertical well in shale gas reservoirs? 2. Will the shale gas well flow naturally or is an artificial lift required post stimulation? 3. What are the considerations for stimulation treatment design in shale gas reservoirs? A comprehensive analysis is presented about different properties of shale gas reservoirs and how these properties can affect the completion decisions. A decision chart presents which decision best answers the above mentioned questions. Secondly, research focuses on production data analysis of Barnett Shale Gas reservoir. The purpose of this study is to better understand production mechanisms in Barnett shale. Barnett Shale core producing region is chosen for the study as it best represents behavior of Barnett Shale. A field wide moving domain analysis is performed over Wise, Denton and Tarrant County wells for understanding decline behavior of the field. It is found that in all of these three counties, Barnett shale field wells could be said to have established pressure communication within the reservoir. We have also studied the effect of thermal maturity (Ro %), thickness, horizontal well completion and vertical well completion on production of Barnett Shale wells. Thermal maturity is found to have more importance than thickness of shale. Areas with more thermal maturity and less shale thickness are performing better than areas with less thermal maturity and more shale thickness. An interactive tool is developed to access the production data according to the leases in the region and some suggestions are made regarding the selection of the sample for future studies on Barnett Shale.

Deshpande, Vaibhav Prakashrao

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

History match simulation of Serrazzano geothermal reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The simulator SHAFT79 of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been applied to field-wide distributed parameter simulation of the vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at Serrazzano, Italy. Using a three-dimensional geologically accurate mesh and detailed flow rate data from 19 producing wells, a period of 15.5 years (from 1959 to 1975) has been simulated. The reservoir model used is based on field measurements of temperatures and pressures, laboratory data for core samples, and available geological and hydrological information. The main parameters determined (adjusted) during development of the simulation are permeabilities and much of the initial conditions. Simulated patterns of pressure decline show semi-quantitative agreement with field observations. The simulation suggests that there is cold water recharge and/or incomplete heat transfer from he rock due to fractures in the margins of the reservoir, and some steam flowing to the main well field originates from deep fractures rather than from boiling in the two-phase zones modeled. Simulation methodology and ambiguity of parameter determination is discussed.

Pruess, K.; Weres, O.; Schroeder, R.; Marconcini, R.; Neri, G.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are to: (1) assist producers in locating and producing petroleum not currently produced because of technological problems or the inability to identify details of reservoir compartmentalization, (2) to decrease risk in field development, and (3) accelerate the retrieval and analysis of baseline geoscience information for initial reservoir description. The interdisciplinary data sought in this research will be used to resolve specific problems in correlation of strata and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the Upper Pennsylvanian stratigraphic architecture in the Midcontinent. The data will better constrain ancillary problems related to the validation of depositional sequence and subsequence correlation, subsidence patterns, sedimentation rates, sea-level changes, and the relationship of sedimentary sequences to basement terrains. The geoscientific information, including data from field studies, surface and near-surface reservoir analogues, and regional database development, will also be used for development of geologic computer process-based simulation models tailored to specific depositional sequences for use in improving prediction of reservoir characteristics. 4 refs.

Watney, W.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Giant weathering pits in the Entrada Sandstone, southeastern Utah: Preliminary findings  

SciTech Connect

Giant weathering pits formed in outcrops of the lower Entrada Sandstone slickrock of Jurassic age are present in two areas in the Glen Canyon region of arid southeastern Utah. The pits are far larger than any previously described in the geologic literature. The pits near Cookie Jar Butte are commonly cylindrical, typically have low width-to-depth ratios (1.5--3.6), and have a depth of closure of as much as 18 m. There are no obvious lithologic or structural controls that determine their shape or location. Many of the pits at Rock Creek Bay are elongate; several of them have long axes in excess of 53 m, and the longest one is 74 m. Many of the pit walls are breached at the top, and the depth of closure is generally less than 6 m. The shapes of these pits are influenced by point orientation and pit coalescence. Thin-section analyses of near-surface sandstone cores taken near Cookie Jar Butte from pit walls, floors, and rims reveal no significant diagenetic alteration of the fine-grained to very fine frained quartzose sandstone (quartz arenite). Quartz grains appear fresh, and feldspar grains are only slightly weathered. The cement between the grains is mostly CaCO[sub 3]. In several of the pits in both areas sandy sediment veneers the bedrock floor. This sediment is similar in character to the adjacent sandstone and is probably locally derived. Possible origins of the giant pits include various physical, chemical, and biological weathering processes that initiate pit development, followed by excavation by plunge-pool action, wind deflation, dissolution, and piping. Preliminary field and laboratory data do not clearly identify and single process of group of processes that account for pit development.

Netoff, D.I. (Sam Houston State Univ., Huntsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Geography and Geology); Shroba, R.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. Throughout the project, however, we learned that this strategy was impractical because the different data and model are complementary instead of competitive. For the complex Coalinga field, we found that a thorough understanding of the reservoir evolution through geologic times provides the necessary framework which ultimately allows integration of the different data and techniques.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geological and petrophysical characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 29, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be collected. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1993-94, the first year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also developed preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) development of reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

Allison, M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal was to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery in Libby. This report summarizes data collected from July 1984 through July 1985, and, where appropriate, presents data collected since 1983. The Canada, Rexford, and Tenmile areas of the reservoir are differentially affected by drawdown. Relative changes in water volume and surface area are greatest in the Canada area and smallest in the Tenmile area. Reservoir morphology and hydraulics probably play a major role in fish distribution through their influence on water temperature. Greatest areas of habitat with optimum water temperature for Salmo spp. and kokanee occurred during the spring and fall months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were not limiting during any sampling period. Habitat enhancement work was largely unsuccessful. Littoral zone vegetation plantings did not survive well, primarily the result of extreme water level fluctuations. Relative abundances of fish species varied seasonally within and between the three areas. Water temperature is thought to be the major influence in fish distribution patterns. Other factors, such as food availability and turbidity, may mitigate its influence. Sampling since 1975 illustrates a continued increase in kokanee numbers and a dramatic decline in redside shiners. Salmo spp., bull trout, and burbot abundances are relatively low while peamouth and coarsescale sucker numbers remain high. A thermal dynamics model and a trophic level components model will be used to quantify the impact of reservoir operation on the reservoir habitat, primary production, secondary production and fish populations. Particulate carbon will be used to track energy flow through trophic levels. A growth-driven population dynamics simulation model that will estimate the impacts of reservoir operation on fish population dynamics is also being considered.

Chisholm, Ian

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Reservoir and injection technology: Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford: Third annual report for the period October 1, 1986 through September 30, 1987: (Final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of geothermal reservoir engineering. General topics covered are: reinjection technology, reservoir technology, and heat extraction. (LSP)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Rainfall Regime of a Mountainous Mediterranean Region: Statistical Analysis at Short Time Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of the rainfall regime of a Mediterranean mountainous region of southeastern France. The rainfall regime is studied on temporal scales from hourly to yearly using daily and hourly rain gauge data of 43 and 16 years, ...

Gilles Molinié; Davide Ceresetti; Sandrine Anquetin; Jean Dominique Creutin; Brice Boudevillain

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Regional Maps  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) 1 East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) 2 Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) 3 Mid-Atlantic Area Council (MAAC) 4 Mid-America Interconnected Network (MAIN) 5 Mid-Continent Area Power Pool (MAPP) 6. New York (NY) Southern Nevada (RA) 7. New England (NE) 8 Florida Reliability Coordinating Council (FL) 9 Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) 10 Southwest Power Pool (SPP) 11 Northwest Power Pool (NWP) 12. Rocky Mountain Power Area, Arizona, New Mexico, and 13 California (CA) Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Figure 3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts Source: Energy Information Administration. Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting AK WA NV

403

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optimizing Fracture Treatments in a Mississippian "Chat" Reservoir, South-Central Kansas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is a collaboration of Woolsey Petroleum Corporation (a small independent operator) and the Kansas Geological Survey. The project will investigate geologic and engineering factors critical for designing hydraulic fracture treatments in Mississippian ''chat'' reservoirs. Mississippian reservoirs, including the chat, account for 159 million m3 (1 billion barrels) of the cumulative oil produced in Kansas. Mississippian reservoirs presently represent {approx}40% of the state's 5.6*106m3 (35 million barrels) annual production. Although geographically widespread, the ''chat'' is a heterogeneous reservoir composed of chert, cherty dolomite, and argillaceous limestone. Fractured chert with micro-moldic porosity is the best reservoir in this 18- to 30-m-thick (60- to 100-ft) unit. The chat will be cored in an infill well in the Medicine Lodge North field (417,638 m3 [2,626,858 bbls] oil; 217,811,000 m3 [7,692,010 mcf] gas cumulative production; discovered 1954). The core and modern wireline logs will provide geological and petrophysical data for designing a fracture treatment. Optimum hydraulic fracturing design is poorly defined in the chat, with poor correlation of treatment size to production increase. To establish new geologic and petrophysical guidelines for these treatments, data from core petrophysics, wireline logs, and oil-field maps will be input to a fracture-treatment simulation program. Parameters will be established for optimal size of the treatment and geologic characteristics of the predicted fracturing. The fracturing will be performed and subsequent wellsite tests will ascertain the results for comparison to predictions. A reservoir simulation program will then predict the rate and volumetric increase in production. Comparison of the predicted increase in production with that of reality, and the hypothetical fracturing behavior of the reservoir with that of its actual behavior, will serve as tests of the geologic and petrophysical characterization of the oil field. After this feedback, a second well will be cored and logged, and procedure will be repeated to test characteristics determined to be critical for designing cost-effective fracture treatments. Most oil and gas production in Kansas, and that of the Midcontinent oil industry, is dominated by small companies. The overwhelming majority of these independent operators employ less than 20 people. These companies have limited scientific and engineering expertise and they are increasingly needing guidelines and technical examples that will help them to not be wasteful of their limited financial resources and petroleum reserves. To aid these operators, the technology transfer capabilities of the Kansas Geological Survey will disseminate the results of this study to the local, regional, and national oil industry. Internet access, seminars, presentations, and publications by Woolsey Petroleum Company and Kansas Geological Survey geologists and engineers are anticipated.

K. David Newell; Saibal Bhattacharya; Alan Byrnes; W. Lynn Watney; Willard Guy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fractured geothermal reservoir growth induced by heat extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Field testing of a hydraulically-stimulated, hot dry rock geothermal system at the Fenton Hill site in northern New Mexico has indicated that significant reservoir growth occurred as energy was extracted. Tracer, microseismic, and geochemical measurements provided the primary quantitative evidence for documenting the increases in accessible reservoir volume and fractured rock surface area that were observed during energy extraction operations which caused substantial thermal drawdown in portions of the reservoir. These temporal increases suggest that augmentation of reservoir heat production capacity in hot dry rock systems may be possible.

Tester, J.W.; Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Robinson, B.A.; Potter, R.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir testing: 1978 to 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental results and re-evaluation of the Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site are summarized. This report traces reservoir growth as demonstrated during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m/sup 2/ and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m/sup 3/. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure conditions, the flow impedance (a measure of the resistance to circulation of water through the reservoir) remained essentially unchanged, and if reproduced in the Phase II reservoir under development, could result in self pumping. Geochemical and seismic hazards have been nonexistent in the Phase I reservoirs. The produced water is relatively low in total dissolved solids and shows little tendency for corrosion or scaling. The largest microearthquake associated with heat extraction measures less than -1 on the extrapolated Richter scale.

Dash, Z.V.; Murphy, H.D.; Cremer, G.M. (eds.)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

Pruess, K.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

,"Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ",36,"Annual",2011,"6302009"...

410

Miscellaneous States Shale Gas Proved Reserves New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 812013 Next Release Date: 812014 Referring Pages: Shale Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

411

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pruess, K. , Analysis of injection testing of geothermalreservoirs: Geothermal Resoures Council, Vol. 4. , (into a fractured geothermal reservoir: Transactions, Vol. 4,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

,"West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

413

,"North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

414

,"New Mexico Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

415

,"New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

416

,"Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release...

417

FRACSTIM/I: An Integrated Fracture Stimulation and Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An Integrated Fracture Stimulation and Reservoir Flow and Transport Simulator Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

418

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs In Marine Areas Jump to:...

419

Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations. Despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae continue to present problems. Cost effective,… (more)

Stephens, Ryan A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Project Type Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modeling Of Hydraulic Fracture Network Propagation In Shale Gas Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The most effective method for stimulating shale gas reservoirs is massive hydraulic fracture treatments. Recent fracture diagnostic technologies such as microseismic technology have shown that… (more)

Ahn, Chong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ever increasing energy demand brings about widespread interest to rapidly, profitably and efficiently develop unconventional resources, among which tight gas sands hold a significant portion. However, optimization of development strategies in tight gas fields is challenging, not only because of the wide range of depositional environments and large variability in reservoir properties, but also because the evaluation often has to deal with a multitude of wells, limited reservoir information, and time and budget constraints. Unfortunately, classical full-scale reservoir evaluation cannot be routinely employed by small- to medium-sized operators, given its timeconsuming and expensive nature. In addition, the full-scale evaluation is generally built on deterministic principles and produces a single realization of the reservoir, despite the significant uncertainty faced by operators. This work addresses the need for rapid and cost-efficient technologies to help operators determine optimal well spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast, approximate reservoir simulation model to match and predict production performance in unconventional gas reservoirs. Simulation results were then fit with decline curves to enable direct integration of the reservoir model into a Bayesian decision model. These integrated tools were applied to the tight gas assets of Unconventional Gas Resources Inc. in the Berland River area, Alberta, Canada.

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide/ Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to:...

424

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings:...

425

Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the Raft River 5 MW Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference...

426

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range...

427

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Citation...

428

Numerical Modeling of Gas Recovery from Methane Hydrate Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACTClass 1 hydrate deposits are characterized by a hydrate bearing layer underlain by a two phase, free-gas and water, zone. A Class 1 hydrate reservoir… (more)

Silpngarmlert, Suntichai

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

AN ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF UNCONVENTIONAL GAS RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With the rapidly increasing demand for energy and the increasing prices for oil and gas, the role of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) as energy sources… (more)

Wei, Yunan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation...

431

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

432

Evaluation of Fluid Transport Properties of Coal Bed Methane Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Determination of petro-physical properties of coal bed methane (CBM) reservoirs is essential in evaluating a potential prospect for commercial exploitation. In particular, permeability is the… (more)

Alexis, Dennis Arun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of...

434

Steamflooding as an alternative EOR process for light oil reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper seeks to stimulate consideration of steamflooding as a viable alternative to chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques in shallow, light-oil reservoirs. A highly implicit steamflood reservoir simulator was used to predict steamflood performance of a typical shallow oil reservoir. For this study, non-uniform oil saturations were created by simulating a waterflood prior to initiating each steam injection case. The effects of final waterflood water-oil ratio, reservoir thickness, and amount of distillable component in the crude were examined. 10 refs.

Hanzlik, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

,"California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

436

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

437

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground...

438

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production...

439

,"Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

440

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The reservoir simulation model reflects the response of a reservoir system and the relationship among coalbed methane reservoir properties, operation procedures, and gas production. This work presents a procedure to select the optimum well spacing scenario by using a reservoir simulation. This work uses a two-phase compositional simulator with a dual porosity model to investigate well-spacing effects on coalbed methane production performance and methane recovery. Because of reservoir parameters uncertainty, a sensitivity and parametric study are required to investigate the effects of parameter variability on coalbed methane reservoir production performance and methane recovery. This thesis includes a reservoir parameter screening procedures based on a sensitivity and parametric study. Considering the tremendous amounts of simulation runs required, this work uses a regression analysis to replace the numerical simulation model for each wellspacing scenario. A Monte Carlo simulation has been applied to present the probability function. Incorporated with the Monte Carlo simulation approach, this thesis proposes a well-spacing study procedure to determine the optimum coalbed methane development scenario. The study workflow is applied in a North America basin resulting in distinct Net Present Value predictions between each well-spacing design and an optimum range of well-spacing for a particular basin area.

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir region southeastern" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

,"New Mexico--West Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

442

,"New Mexico--East Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

443

,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

444

,"Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...

445

Transient pressure analysis in composite reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of fluid flow in a radially composite reservoir is discussed. Recently published was the most general analytic solution available thus far. That analytic solution is analyzed, and the results are presented. The solution is dependent upon the following dimensionless parameters (if well-bore storage and skin effect are neglected): (1) dimensionless time based on the discontinuity radius, (2) the dimensionless discontinuity radius, (3) the mobility ratio, and (4) the diffusivity ratio. The range of parameters used in generating the results include dimensionless radius time of 0.01 t

Tang, R.W.K.; Brigham, W.E.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.

Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

449

Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey formation siliceous shales. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996 - June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and modeling studies in the Antelope Shale reservoir. Characterization studies will be used to determine the technical feasibility of implementing a CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery project in the Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills pilot CO{sub 2} project will demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability Of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured siliceous shales reservoirs of the San Joaquin Valley. The research consists of four primary work processes: Reservoir Matrix and Fluid Characterization; Fracture Characterization; Reservoir Modeling and Simulation; and, CO{sub 2} Pilot Flood and Evaluation. Work done in these areas can be subdivided into two phases or budget periods. The first phase of the project will focus on the application of a variety of advanced reservoir characterization techniques to determine the production characteristics of the Antelope Shale reservoir. Reservoir models based on the results of the characterization work will be used to evaluate how the reservoir will respond to secondary recovery and EOR processes. The second phase of the project will include the implementation and evaluation of an advanced EOR pilot in the West Dome of the Buena Vista Hills field. The Buena Vista Hills project realized it`s first major milestone in the second quarter of 1996 with the pending drilling of proposed project injection well. Regional fracture characterization work was also initiated in the second quarter. This report summarizes the status of those efforts.

Smith, S.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry on Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic Strength Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be close to the produced reservoir water without surfaceof directly using the produced reservoir water, the Pitzerusing the produced reservoir and the mixing waters for each

Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

DESCRIPTION OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL TWO-PHASE SIMULATOR SHAFT78 FOR USE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n Vapor-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs, I' Report No. 76-G. : Three- . Dimensional Geothermal Reservoir Simulation,f1161. Coats, K. H. : "Geothermal Reservoir Modeling," paper

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reserv