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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Oil reservoir properties estimation using neural networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the applicability as well as the accuracy of artificial neural networks for estimating specific parameters that describe reservoir properties based on seismic data. This approach relies on JPL`s adjoint operators general purpose neural network code to determine the best suited architecture. The authors believe that results presented in this work demonstrate that artificial neural networks produce surprisingly accurate estimates of the reservoir parameters.

Toomarian, N.B. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Barhen, J.; Glover, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research; Aminzadeh, F. [UNOCAL Corp., Sugarland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

3

Submarine fan lobe models: Implications for reservoir properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multitude of submarine fan lobe models, advocating widely different reservoir properties, has been introduced into the sedimentologic literature. Four of these models are compared to show their differences in reservoir properties. Braided suprafan lobes are characterized by stacked sand bodies with good lateral and vertical communication, and they constitute excellent reservoir facies. The unchanneled depositional lobes, composed of sheetlike sand bodies with good lateral and moderate vertical communication, exhibit properties of good reservoir facies. Fanlobes, which refer to meandering channels and associated levee facies of large mud-rich submarine fans such as the Mississippi Fan in the Gulf of Mexico, are characterized by offset stacked sand bodies with poor lateral and vertical communication. These lenticular sands have the potential to be moderately good reservoir facies. Ponded lobes, which represent mud-rich slump facies of slope environments, comprise poor reservoir facies because of poor sand content and poor sand-body connectivity caused by chaotic bedding. Furthermore, the presence of slumped mud layers in ponded lobes is expected to hinder fluid flow. Because different lobe models vary significantly from one another in terms of reservoir properties, caution must be exercised to apply the proper lobe model to ancient fan sequences in hydrocarbon exploration and production.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Property:SanyalTempReservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SanyalTempReservoir SanyalTempReservoir Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SanyalTempReservoir Property Type Page Description see Sanyal_Temperature_Classification Allows Values Extremely Low Temperature;Very Low Temperature;Low Temperature;Moderate Temperature;High Temperature;Ultra High Temperature;Steam Field Pages using the property "SanyalTempReservoir" Showing 16 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + High Temperature + C Chena Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + High Temperature + L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area + High Temperature +

5

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrologic Properties of the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Reservoir from Well-Test Analyses Abstract Temperature, pressure, and spinner (TPS) logs have been recorded in several wells from the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir in west central Nevada. A variety of well-test analyses has been performed with these data to quantify the hydrologic properties of this fault-dominated geothermal resource. Four complementary analytical techniques were employed, their individual application depending upon availability and quality of data and validity of scientific assumptions. In some instances, redundancy in

6

Property:MeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanReservoirTemp MeanReservoirTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanReservoirTemp Property Type Temperature Description Mean estimated reservoir temperature at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Pages using the property "MeanReservoirTemp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 363.15 K90 °C 194 °F 653.67 °R + Adak Geothermal Area + 428.15 K155 °C 311 °F 770.67 °R + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + 353.15 K80 °C 176 °F 635.67 °R + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + 523.15 K250 °C 482 °F 941.67 °R + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 408.15 K135 °C 275 °F 734.67 °R + Amedee Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C 239 °F 698.67 °R + Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C

7

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.

Vasco, Don W.

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Property:EstReservoirVol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EstReservoirVol EstReservoirVol Jump to: navigation, search Property Name EstReservoirVol Property Type Quantity Description Mean estimated reservoir volume at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Use this type to express a quantity of three-dimensional space. The default unit is the cubic meter (m³). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Cubic Meters - 1 m³,m3,m^3,cubic meter,cubic meters,Cubic Meter,Cubic Meters,CUBIC METERS Cubic Kilometers - 0.000000001 km³,km3,km^3,cubic kilometer,cubic kilometers,cubic km,Cubic Kilometers,CUBIC KILOMETERS Cubic Miles - 0.000000000239912759 mi³,mi3,mi^3,mile³,cubic mile,cubic miles,cubic mi,Cubic Miles,CUBIC MILES Cubic Feet - 35.314666721 ft³,ft3,ft^3,cubic feet,cubic foot,FT³,FT3,FT^3,Cubic Feet, Cubic Foot

10

Prediction of reservoir properties of the N-sand, vermilion block 50, Gulf of Mexico, from multivariate seismic attributes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantitative estimation of reservoir properties directly from seismic data is a major goal of reservoir characterization. Integrated reservoir characterization makes use of different varieties of well and seismic data to construct detailed...

Jaradat, Rasheed Abdelkareem

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

12

Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N. [Univ. of Newcastle (Australia); Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Application of reservoir models to Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Cherokee Reservoir Project hydrodynamic-temperature models and water quality models hav

Kim, B.R.; Bruggink, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. But while the volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade, it is not yet possible to make use of all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. The goal of this project is to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management. Facies (defined here as regions of relatively uniform petrophysical properties) are common features of all reservoirs. Because the flow properties of the various facies can vary greatly, knowledge of the location of facies boundaries is of utmost importance for the prediction of reservoir performance and for the optimization of reservoir management. When the boundaries between facies are fairly well known, but flow properties are poorly known, the average properties for all facies can be determined using traditional techniques. Traditional history matching honors dynamic data by adjusting petrophysical properties in large areas, but in the process of adjusting the reservoir model ignores the static data and often results in implausible reservoir models. In general, boundary locations, average permeability and porosity, relative permeability curves, and local flow properties may all need to be adjusted to achieve a plausible reservoir model that honors all data. In this project, we will characterize the distribution of geologic facies as an indicator random field, making use of the tools of geostatistics as well as the tools of inverse and probability theory for data integration.

Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Fengjun Zhang; Yannong Dong; Jan Arild Skjervheim; Ning Liu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Reservoir Characterization.

17

Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. The volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade. The techniques developed in this research will make it easier to use all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. In this project, we have developed computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Specifically, we have developed methods for adjusting porosity and permeability fields to match both production and time-lapse seismic data and have also developed a procedure to adjust the locations of boundaries between facies to match production data. In all cases, the history matched rock property fields are consistent with a prior model based on static data and geologic information. Our work also indicates that it is possible to adjust relative permeability curves when history matching production data.

Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Yannong Dong; Ning Liu; Guohua Gao; Fengjun Zhang; Ruijian Li

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Estimation Of Reservoir Properties From Seismic Data By Smooth Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traditional joint inversion methods reqnire an a priori prescribed operator that links the reservoir properties to the observed seismic response. The methods also rely on a linearized approach to the solution that makes ...

Saggaf, Muhammad M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

22

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse amplitude changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asymptotic methods provide an efficient means by which to infer reservoir flow properties, such as permeability, from time-lapse seismic data. A trajectory-based methodology, much like ray-based methods for medical and seismic imaging, is the basis for an iterative inversion of time-lapse amplitude changes. In this approach a single reservoir simulation is required for each iteration of the algorithm. A comparison between purely numerical and the trajectory-based sensitivities demonstrates their accuracy. An application to a set of synthetic amplitude changes indicates that they can recover large-scale reservoir permeability variations from time-lapse data. In an application of actual time-lapse amplitude changes from the Bay Marchand field in the Gulf of Mexico we are able to reduce the misfit by 81% in twelve iterations. The time-lapse observations indicate lower permeabilities are required in the central portion of the reservoir.

Vasco, D.W.; Datta-Gupta, Akhil; Behrens, Ron; Condon, Pat; Rickett, Jame s

2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our analysis and imaging of reservoir properties at the Fullerton Clear Fork field (Figure 1) is in its final stages. Major accomplishments during the past 6 months include: (1) characterization of facies and cyclicity in cores, (2) correlation of cycles and sequences using core-calibrated wireline logs, (3) calculation and modeling of wireline porosity, (4) analysis of new cores for conventional and special core analysis data, (5) construction of full-field reservoir model, and (6) revision of 3D seismic inversion of reservoir porosity and permeability. One activity has been eliminated from the originally proposed tasks. Task 3 (Characterization and Modeling of Rock Mechanics and Fractures) has been deleted because we have determined that fractures are not significant contributing in the reservoir under study. A second project extension has been asked for to extend the project until 7/31/04. Remaining project activities are: (1) interpretation and synthesis of fieldwide data, (2) preparation of 3D virtual reality demonstrations of reservoir model and attributes, (3) transfer of working data sets to the operator for reservoir implementation and decision-making, and (4) preparation and distribution of final reports.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals that are useful to practical petroleum engineers by including basic principles, definitions, and data related to the reservoir engineering. It introduces the topics at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in the field of reservoir engineering. Various correlations are provided in the chapter to understand the functioning of reservoir engineering, and newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-bearing reservoir, movement of those or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize producing rates and to recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The advent of programmable calculators and personal computers has changed the approach that the reservoir engineers use to solve problems. In the chapter, many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used are presented for completeness and for illustrative purposes. In addition, separate sections of the chapter are devoted to the use of equations in some of the more common programs suitable for programmable calculators and personal computers.

F. David Martin; Robert M. Colpitts

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Report Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data Report Type: Annual Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2002 Reporting Period Liu, Guohua Gao & Ruijian Li Date Report Issued: March 2004 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-00BC15309

Reynolds, Albert C.

26

Report Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Title: Mapping of Reservoir Properties and Facies Through Integration of Static and Dynamic Data Report Type: Annual Technical Report Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2000 Reporting Period, Ruijian Li, Yafes Abacioglu & Yannong Dong Date Report Issued: December 2001 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26

Reynolds, Albert C.

27

Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

28

Chemistry, Reservoir, and Integrated Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Chemistry, Reservoir and Integrated Models.

29

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

Kelkar, M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals useful to practical petroleum engineers. Topics are introduced at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in this field. Various correlations are provided in the chapter where useful. Newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed in the chapter. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-beating reservoir, movement of those fluids or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize production rates and to ultimately recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The chapter includes many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used. While illustrating enhanced oil recovery methods, estimation of waterflood residual oil saturation, fluid movements, material balance with volumetric analysis, the chapter also discusses pressure transient testing, recovery of hydrocarbons, and decline curve analysis. Decline curve analysis estimates primary oil recovery for an individual reservoir. The conventional analysis of production decline curves for oil or gas production consists of plotting the log of flow rate versus time on semilog paper. In case of a decline in the rate of production, the data are extrapolated into the future to provide an estimate of expected production and reserves.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley-fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell County, Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley- fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell County, Kansas By 2012 Peter J. Senior B.S., Kansas State University, 2009 Submitted.../02/2012 The Thesis Committee for Peter J. Senior certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: Depositional Environment, Reservoir Properties, and EOR Potential of an Incised-valley- fill Sandstone, Pleasant Prairie Oilfield, Haskell...

Senior, Peter

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an opto-electronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

Yvan Paquot; Franois Duport; Anteo Smerieri; Joni Dambre; Benjamin Schrauwen; Marc Haelterman; Serge Massar

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Estimating rock properties in two phase petroleum reservoirs: an error analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 60x10 1. 16x10 4. 16x10 1. 01 9. 13x10 1. 51 2. 07%10 6. 51x10 5. 42x10 8. 18 3. 16x10 26 function approximated in the tt parameter space gives a mean prediction error which is essentially zero. However, using the permeability estimates obtained.... G ver (Mem er) . L. Curry . D. Ho land ( d of Department) December 1983 ABSTRACT Estimating Rock Properties In Two Phase Petroleum Reservoirs: An Error Analysis. (December 1983) Anthony Ian Paul B. Sc. , Imperial College, London University...

Paul, Anthony Ian

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Effect of Cement Mechanical Properties and Reservoir Compaction on HPHT Well Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in maintaining wellbore integrity. During the production process in HPHT wells, the pressure differential inside the casing and the surrounding formation is larger than the conventional wells. The stress induced by fluid withdrawal in highly compact reservoirs...

Yuan, Zhaoguang

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

40

Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation on Production from Shale Formations: Application to New  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 125893 Economic Impact of Reservoir Properties, Horizontal Well Length and Orientation production. Economic analyses are performed to identify and rank the impact of the above parameters. (3) The lack of dense natural fractures does not eliminate the potential for an economic fracture

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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41

Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed-wet rocks. Imbibition measurements will include novel sensitive pressure measurements designed to elucidate the basic mechanisms that determine induction time and drive the very slow rate of spontaneous imbibition commonly observed for mixed-wet rocks. In further demonstration of concepts, three approaches to improved oil recovery from fractured reservoirs will be tested; use of surfactants to promote imbibition in oil wet rocks by wettability alteration: manipulation of injection brine composition: reduction of the capillary back pressure which opposes production of oil at the fracture face.

Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs ... Researchers created reservoirs in Canada to explore the impacts of hydroelectric developments on greenhouse gas and methylmercury production. ...

R. A. Bodaly; Kenneth G. Beaty; Len H. Hendzel; Andrew R. Majewski; Michael J. Paterson; Kristofer R. Rolfhus; Alan F. Penn; Vincent L. St. Louis; Britt D. Hall; Cory J. D. Matthews; Katharine A. Cherewyk; Mariah Mailman; James P. Hurley; Sherry L. Schiff; Jason J. Venkiteswaran

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Understanding the reservoir important to successful stimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In anisotropic Bakken shale reservoirs, fracture treatments serve to extend the well bore radius past a disturbed zone and vertically connect discrete intervals. Natural fractures in the near-well bore area strongly control the well deliverability rate. The Bakken is one of the few shale formations in the world with commercial oil production. This article covers the Bakken reservoir properties that influence production and stimulation treatments. The concluding part will discuss the design and effectiveness of the treatments.

Cramer, D.D. (BJ Services Co., Denver, CO (US))

1991-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

Abbas Firoozabadi

1999-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

47

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

48

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Facies, depositional environments, and reservoir properties of the Shattuck sandstone, Mesa Queen Field and surrounding areas, southeastern New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to the Office... PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Haight, Jared

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

3D Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant volumes of oil and gas occur in reservoirs formed by ancient river deltas. This has implications for the spatial distribution of rock types and the variation of transport properties. A between mudstones and sandstones may form baffles that influence productivity and recovery efficiency. Diagenetic processes such as compaction, dissolution, and cementation can also alter flow properties. A better understanding of these properties and improved methods will allow improved reservoir development planning and increased recovery of oil and gas from deltaic reservoirs. Surface exposures of ancient deltaic rocks provide a high-resolution view of variability. Insights gleaned from these exposures can be used to model analogous reservoirs, for which data is sparser. The Frontier Formation in central Wyoming provides an opportunity for high-resolution models. The same rocks exposed in the Tisdale anticline are productive in nearby oil fields. Kilometers of exposure are accessible, and bedding-plane exposures allow use of high-resolution ground-penetrating radar. This study combined geologic interpretations, maps, vertical sections, core data, and ground-penetrating radar to construct geostatistical and flow models. Strata-conforming grids were use to reproduce the observed geometries. A new Bayesian method integrates outcrop, core, and radar amplitude and phase data. The proposed method propagates measurement uncertainty and yields an ensemble of plausible models for calcite concretions. These concretions affect flow significantly. Models which integrate more have different flow responses from simpler models, as demonstrated an exhaustive two-dimensional reference image and in three dimensions. This method is simple to implement within widely available geostatistics packages. Significant volumes of oil and gas occur in reservoirs that are inferred to have been formed by ancient river deltas. This geologic setting has implications for the spatial distribution of rock types (\\Eg sandstones and mudstones) and the variation of transport properties (\\Eg permeability and porosity) within bodies of a particular rock type. Both basin-wide processes such as sea-level change and the autocyclicity of deltaic processes commonly cause deltaic reservoirs to have large variability in rock properties; in particular, alternations between mudstones and sandstones may form baffles and trends in rock body permeability can influence productivity and recovery efficiency. In addition, diagenetic processes such as compaction, dissolution, and cementation can alter the spatial pattern of flow properties. A better understanding of these properties, and improved methods to model the properties and their effects, will allow improved reservoir development planning and increased recovery of oil and gas from deltaic reservoirs. Surface exposures of ancient deltaic rocks provide a high resolution, low uncertainty view of subsurface variability. Patterns and insights gleaned from these exposures can be used to model analogous reservoirs, for which data is much sparser. This approach is particularly attractive when reservoir formations are exposed at the surface. The Frontier Formation in central Wyoming provides an opportunity for high resolution characterization. The same rocks exposed in the vicinity of the Tisdale anticline are productive in nearby oil fields, including Salt Creek. Many kilometers of good-quality exposure are accessible, and the common bedding-plane exposures allow use of shallow-penetration, high-resolution electromagnetic methods known as ground-penetrating radar. This study combined geologic interpretations, maps, vertical sections, core data, and ground-penetrating radar to construct high-resolution geostatistical and flow models for the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation. Stratal-conforming grids were use to reproduce the progradational and aggradational geometries observed in outcrop and radar data. A new, Bayesian method integrates outcrop--derived statistics, core observations of concretions, and radar amplitude and

Christopher D. White

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

53

PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF CO2 SEPARATION AND STORAGE PROPERTIES OF COAL GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attractive alternative of sequestering CO{sub 2} is to inject it into coalbed methane reservoirs, particularly since it has been shown to enhance the production of methane during near depletion stages. The basis for enhanced coalbed methane recovery and simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep coals is the preferential sorption property of coal, with its affinity for carbon dioxide being significantly higher than that for methane. Yet, the sorption behavior of coal under competitive sorptive environment is not fully understood. Hence, the original objective of this research study was to carry out a laboratory study to investigate the effect of studying the sorption behavior of coal in the presence of multiple gases, primarily methane, CO{sub 2} and nitrogen, in order to understand the mechanisms involved in displacement of methane and its movement in coal. This had to be modified slightly since the PVT property of gas mixtures is still not well understood, and any laboratory work in the area of sorption of gases requires a definite equation of state to calculate the volumes of different gases in free and adsorbed forms. This research study started with establishing gas adsorption isotherms for pure methane and CO{sub 2}. The standard gas expansion technique based on volumetric analysis was used for the experimental work with the additional feature of incorporating a gas chromatograph for analysis of gas composition. The results were analyzed first using the Langmuir theory. As expected, the Langmuir analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} is more than three times as sorptive as methane. This was followed by carrying out a partial desorption isotherm for methane, and then injecting CO{sub 2} to displace methane. The results indicated that CO{sub 2} injection at low pressure displaced all of the sorbed methane, even when the total pressure continued to be high. However, the displacement appeared to be occurring due to a combination of the preferential sorption property of coal and reduction in the partial pressure of methane. As a final step, the Extended Langmuir (EL) model was used to model the coal-methane-CO{sub 2} binary adsorption system. The EL model was found to be very accurate in predicting adsorption of CO{sub 2}, but not so in predicting desorption of methane. The selectivity of CO{sub 2} over methane was calculated to be 4.3:1. This is, of course, not in very good agreement with the measured values which showed the ratio to be 3.5:1. However, the measured results are in good agreement with the field observation at one of the CO{sub 2} injection sites. Based on the findings of this study, it was concluded that low pressure injection of CO{sub 2} can be fairly effective in displacing methane in coalbed reservoirs although this might be difficult to achieve in field conditions. Furthermore, the displacement of methane appears to be not only due to the preferential sorption of methane, but reduction in partial pressure as well. Hence, using a highly adsorbing gas, such as CO{sub 2}, has the advantages of inert gas stripping and non-mixing since the injected gas does not mix with the recovered methane.

John Kemeny; Satya Harpalani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Quantum reservoirs with ion chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion chains are promising platforms for studying and simulating quantum reservoirs. One interesting feature is that their vibrational modes can mediate entanglement between two objects which are coupled through the vibrational modes of the chain. In this work we analyse entanglement between the transverse vibrations of two heavy impurity defects embedded in an ion chain, which is generated by the coupling with the chain vibrations. We verify general scaling properties of the defects dynamics and demonstrate that entanglement between the defects can be a stationary feature of these dynamics. We then analyse entanglement in chains composed of tens of ions and propose a measurement scheme which allows one to verify the existence of the predicted entangled state.

B. G. Taketani; T. Fogarty; E. Kajari; Th. Busch; Giovanna Morigi

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

55

Characterization and reservoir evaluation of a hydraulically fractured, shaly gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Shaly Gas Reservoir. ( December 1991 ) Cesar Alfonso Santiago Molina, Ingeniero de Petroleos, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston Shale content in reservoir rocks affect their petrophysical properties... for their support. The author also wishes to express his deepest appreciation to Dr. H. Chen for all the help and suggestions he made in this study. The author expresses his gratitude to every one in Empresa Colombiana de Petroleos, Ecopetrol, who made possible...

Santiago Molina, Cesar Alfonso

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

58

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

59

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for such complex reservoirs is crucial and necessary to reduce exploration risk. A fast and accurate approach generating synthetic seismograms for such reservoir models combines wavefront construction ray tracing with composite reflection coefficients in a hybrid...

Lai, Hung-Liang

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Simplified methods of modeling multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to develop simplified methods to model multilayer reservoirs. We examined the method to model well responses of multilayer reservoirs with equivalent single layer solutions during transient flow period which Bennett...

Ryou, Sangsoo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

63

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss...

Pierre-Luc Carpentier

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE GEOTHERMAL CHIMNEY MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Current Design of t h e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

Stanford University

67

Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

Fischlin, Andreas

68

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

71

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excellent progress has been made on all project objectives and goals. All tasks have been completed in the Phase 1 study area, the initial area of project focus. Primary elements of this work include the following: The stratigraphic architecture has been established through correlation of wireline logs guided by core and outcrop studies of facies and cyclicity. A porosity model has been developed that creates a basis for calculation of porosity for wells in the study area. Rock fabrics have been defined by sampling, analysis, and description of cores and used to create transforms for calculating permeability and oil saturation from porosity data. Finally, a preliminary 3-D model has been constructed that incorporates stratigraphic architecture, rock-fabric data, and petrophysical data. Reservoir volumetrics calculated from the model show that a very large fraction of the original oil in place remains.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of gas production from the coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is challenging due to the complex interaction of storage and transport mechanisms. The vast majority of the gas in CBM reservoirs is stored by adsorption in the coal matrix which practically has no permeability. The flow to production wells however takes place through the cleats or the natural fracture system which store relatively small amounts of gas. These unique coal characteristics have resulted in classification of CBM as an unconventional gas resource. Gas production from CBM reservoirs is governed by gas diffusion through coal matrix followed by gas desorption into the cleat system through which the gas flows to the wellbore generally under two-phase conditions. As a result, the production profile of the CBM reservoirs greatly differs from conventional gas reservoirs. This precludes the use of common techniques such as decline curves to forecast the recovery, future revenues, and well performance. Numerical reservoir models (simulators) that incorporate the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs are by far the best tools for predicting the gas production from the CBM reservoirs. It is however cumbersome, time consuming, and expensive to use a complex reservoir simulator for evaluating CBM prospects when the required reservoir parameters are not available. Therefore, there is a need for a quick yet reliable tool for predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs. This paper presents a set of production type curves that can be used for predicting gas and water the production from CBM prospects. The type curves are particularly useful for parametric studies when the key characteristics are not well established. A numerical reservoir model that incorporated the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs was employed to develop the type curves. The impact of various reservoir parameters on the type curves was investigated to confirm the uniqueness of the type curves. The application and limitation of the type curves have been also discussed.

K. Aminian; S. Ameri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Depositional environments and reservoir properties of the upper Queen Formation, Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields, Midland basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper Queen Formation (Upper Permian) in Concho Bluff and Concho Bluff North fields (Crane, Upton, and Ector counties, Texas) consists of four thick (6-11 m) clastic members separated by evaporite members, and contains several major sandstone reservoirs. A study of cores and logs from the upper Queen was done to determine its depositional environments and the properties of its sandstone reservoirs. Four facies are present in the upper Queen. Facies 1 consists of planar- and wavy-laminated fine and very fine sandstones and silty sandstones deposited in fluvial sandflats and delta-plains. Facies 2 consists of wavy-laminated siltstones and haloturbated mudstones with anhydrite nodules deposited in subaqueous prodelta environments and subaerial saline mudflats. Facies 3 consists of well-sorted fine to very fine sandstones with horizontal and inclined planar laminae deposited in eolian sand sheets. Facies 4 consists of massive to laminated halite and anhydrite deposited in hypersaline playas. The vertical sequence of these facies indicates that the upper Queen was deposited during four cycles of fan-delta progradation into and retreat from coastal-plain playas during a sea level lowstand in the Midland basin. The sandstones of the fluvial sandflat and eolian sand-sheet facies constitute the reservoirs of the upper Queen in the fields. The average cumulative thickness of these facies is 8 m, and the fields average 16% porosity and 40-50 md of permeability. The remaining facies are all nonproductive with averagge porosities of less than 10% and average permeabilities of less than 1 md.

Mazzullo, J.; Newsom, D.; Harper, J.; McKone, C.; Price, B. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Relation of sedimentologic features and reservoir quality in a shelf ridge sandstone deposit - comparison of outcrop and subsurface properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Energy Ridge Margin (HERM) facies of the Shannon Sandstone in the Salt Creek anticline area of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, is comprised of fine to medium-grained glauconitic sandstone (82%), which is cross-bedded, rippled, and burrowed, and shale and limonitic clay (18%). Histograms of log permeability-to-air values measured from 214 1-in. diameter cores drilled from the face of an outcrop of the HERM facies of the lower Shannon indicate the existence of two major permeability populations. These two permeability populations can be related to cross-bedded sandstone (higher permeabilities), and noncross-bedded, rippled, and burrowed sandstone with clay laminae (lower permeabilities). Examination of the HERM facies in upper Shannon cores from Teapot Dome oil field, located 5 mi from the studied outcrop at a depth of 300 ft, indicate similar sedimentologic features and similar permeability populations related to cross-bedded and noncross-bedded subfacies within the HERM facies. Comparisons of permeability and porosity histograms, cumulative distribution functions, correlation lengths, and natural logarithm of permeability versus porosity plots also indicate a strong similarity in HERM reservoir properties between outcrop and Teapot Dome field. The similarities of outcrop and Teapot Dome permeabilities and porosities, which are from the same geologic facies but from different depositional episodes (upper and lower Shannon), suggest that rocks deposited under similar depositional processes within a given deposystem have similar reservoir properties.

Jackson, S.R.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Tomutsa, L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Environment of deposition and reservoir properties of Teapot sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fossils, and reservoir morphology. Three distinct sandstone facies produce oil and gas at Well Draw field. The main producing zone consists of thicker, channel turbidites. The lower two zones are thinly interbedded with shale and have limited reservoir...) strati- graphically updip (west) of Well Draw field. Structure map of top of Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone. Contour interval is 1, 000 ft (304. 8 m). IIIodified from Berg (1975). Marine shelf sandstones form an important category of oil and gas...

Sullivan, John Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, Hubei (China)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Hydraulic fracturing in a naturally fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing of wells in naturally fractured reservoirs can differ dramatically from fracturing wells in conventional isotropic reservoirs. Fluid leakoff is the primary difference. In conventional reservoirs, fluid leakoff is controlled by reservoir matrix and fracture fluid parameters. The fluid leakoff rate in naturally fractured reservoirs is typically excessive and completely dominated by the natural fractures. This paper presents several field examples of a fracture stimulation program performed on the naturally fractured Devonia carbonate of West Texas. Qualitative pressure decline analysis and net treating pressure interpretation techniques were utilized to evaluate the existence of natural fractures in the Devonian Formation. Quantitative techniques were utilized to assess the importance of the natural fractures to the fracturing process. This paper demonstrates that bottomhole pressure monitoring of fracture stimulations has benefits over conducting minifrac treatments in naturally fractured reservoirs. Finally, the results of this evaluation were used to redesign fracture treatments to ensure maximum productivity and minimize costs.

Britt, L.K.; Hager, C.J.; Thompson, J.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine...

Robbana, Enis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reservoir. Historically, produced and makeup gas was injected to maintain pressure. In today's economy. gas has an increasing market value compared to the price of oil. Therefore, it becomes increasingly difficult to justify economically the injection... of produced gas and the purchase of additional make up gas to maintain reservoir pressure. Accordingly, water injection to maintain pressure becomes more favorable economically. This research investigated water injection into a volatile oil reservoir...

Schuster, Bruce Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has...

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Radioactive Marker Measurements in Heterogeneous Reservoirs ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quence of subsurface fluid water, gas, oil production e.g., Gam- ...... reservoirs.'' J. Pet. Technol., 25, 734744. Gonzalez-Moran, T., Rodriguez, R., and Cortes,...

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

The internal wave field in Sau reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of wind, temperature, and current data from Sau reservoir (Spain) shows that the third vertical mode ..... However, increased computing power.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

89

Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

90

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Reservoir Pressure Management  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reservoir Pressure Management Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot...

91

Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System (EGS) Reservoir; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology...

92

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Templeton David B. Harris Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

93

The internal wave field in Sau reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of wind, temperature, and current data from Sau reservoir (Spain) shows that the ... of the total wind energy input into the lake (West and Lorke.

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

95

Chapter 5 - Coal Composition and Reservoir Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal consists of organic and mineral matter. Fixed carbon from organic matter measures the energy output of coal during combustion. Mineral matter determines how coal responds to combustion and affects reservoir porosity and permeability. Minerals infill pores, cleats, or fractures and replace the organic composition of coal. Organic composition is grouped into maceral association as microlithotypes and macrolithotypes, the latter for megascopic field descriptions (e.g. coal cores and mine face). Coal composition controls reservoir properties such as gas adsorption capacity, gas content, porosity, and permeability. Permeability is important to gas transport from coal matrix pores to the production well. Coal permeability is a function of the width, length, and height of cleats or fractures as well as the aperture, spacing, frequency or density, and connectivity of cleats or fractures. Coal cleats or fractures formed during burial, compaction, and coalification (endogenetic) and after coalification during deformation, uplift, and erosion of the basin of deposition.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Reservoir Characterization with Limited Sample Data using Geostatistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kansas City Formation. The main tool of the study was geostatistics, since only geostatistics can incorporate data from variety of sources to estimate reservoir properties. Three different subjects in geostatistical methods were studied, analyzed...

Ghoraishy, Sayyed Mojtaba

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reservoir characterization using experimental design and response surface methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research combines a statistical tool called experimental design/response surface methodology with reservoir modeling and flow simulation for the purpose of reservoir characterization. Very often, it requires large number of reservoir simulation...

Parikh, Harshal

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Electromagnetic Heating Methods for Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most widely used method of thermal oil recovery is by injecting steam into the reservoir. A well-designed steam injection project is very efficient in recovering oil, however its applicability is limited in many situations. Simulation studies and field experience has shown that for low injectivity reservoirs, small thickness of the oil-bearing zone, and reservoir heterogeneity limits the performance of steam injection. This paper discusses alternative methods of transferring heat to heavy oil reservoirs, based on electromagnetic energy. They present a detailed analysis of low frequency electric resistive (ohmic) heating and higher frequency electromagnetic heating (radio and microwave frequency). They show the applicability of electromagnetic heating in two example reservoirs. The first reservoir model has thin sand zones separated by impermeable shale layers, and very viscous oil. They model preheating the reservoir with low frequency current using two horizontal electrodes, before injecting steam. The second reservoir model has very low permeability and moderately viscous oil. In this case they use a high frequency microwave antenna located near the producing well as the heat source. Simulation results presented in this paper show that in some cases, electromagnetic heating may be a good alternative to steam injection or maybe used in combination with steam to improve heavy oil production. They identify the parameters which are critical in electromagnetic heating. They also discuss past field applications of electromagnetic heating including technical challenges and limitations.

Sahni, A.; Kumar, M.; Knapp, R.B.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analytical models of the effective permeability of sand-shale reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......overall properties of anisotropic composites, J...permeability of sand-shale reservoirs J. F...of statistically anisotropic materials in terms...the case of sand-shale reservoirs, it...both isotropic and anisotropic grain structures...permeability of sand-shale reservoirs with......

J. F. McCarthy

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Colorado Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

104

INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal reservoirs (except those in the Imperial Valley)Geothermal resource and reservoir investigation of U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Leaseholds at East Mesa, Imperial Valley,

Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms M. R. ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms. 1. Reservoir Operation by Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms. M. R. Jalali1; A. Afshar2; and M. A....

Jalali

2000-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Louisiana State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade...

107

Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

108

ORIGINAL PAPER Photomineralization in a boreal hydroelectric reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Photomineralization in a boreal hydroelectric reservoir: a comparison with natural dioxide Á Dissolved organic matter Á Boreal hydroelectric reservoir Á Greenhouse gas production

Long, Bernard

109

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Predicting Reservoir System Quality and Performance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Predicting Reservoir System Quality and...

110

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Numerical reservoir simulation has been used to describe mechanism of methane gas desorption process, diffusion process, and fluid flow in a coalbed methane reservoir. The (more)

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

112

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

113

Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

114

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

115

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Abstract The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of...

116

Modeling wettability alteration in naturally fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for energy and new oil reservoirs around the world has increased rapidly while oil recovery from depleted reservoirs has become more difficult. Oil (more)

Goudarzi, Ali

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity Abstract The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource's connectivity, therefore making fracture characterization highly important. This study aims to develop methodologies to use resistivity measurements to infer fracture properties in geothermal fields. The resistivity distribution in the field can be estimated by measuring potential differences between various points and the data can then be used to infer fracture properties due to the contrast in resistivity between water and rock.

118

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sediment resuspension in a monomictic eutrophic reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the mixing period sediment traps were placed at 9 different levels of the water column in La Concepcin reservoir (Mlaga-Spain). During the exposure time a benthic nepheloid layer with high suspended matt...

J. A. Glvez; F. X. Niell

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sediment resuspension in a monomictic eutrophic reservoir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the mixing period sediment traps were placed at 9 different levels of the water column in La Concepcin reservoir (Mlaga-Spain). During the exposure time a benthic nepheloid layer with high suspended matt...

J. A. Glvez; F. X. Niell

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-"R- 68 Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Considering Fluid Adsorption and Composition Michael J. Economides September, 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program Contract No Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford

Stanford University

124

Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SGP-TR-99 Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs Constantinos V. Chrysikopoulos Paul Kruger June 1986 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD

Stanford University

125

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling f o r Geothermal Reservoirs and Power- plants. I'Fumaroles Hunt, 1970 Geothermal power James, 1978 FusionGood a lated perfo : Geothermal Power Systems Compared. 'I

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Modelling the GHG emission from hydroelectric reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mechanistic model has been constructed to compute the fluxes of CO2 and CH4 emitted from the surface of hydroelectric reservoirs. The structure of the model has been designed to be adaptable to hydroelectric re...

Normand Thrien; Ken Morrison

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reservoir Data 6-30-09.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection MSL - Mean Sea Level Wl - Water Injection Muddy 2,829 (307) 261-5000 (888) 599-2200 Reservoir Data -- Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) -- NPR-3Teapot Dome...

129

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

index in estimating reservoir performance. ? The optimization routine is done with VBA using Excel solver. Model Assumptions ? The reservoir is in stabilized flow under pseudo-steady state conditions at constant pressure with no aquifer influx... is matched with a type curve to predict field performance. Fetkovich Decline Type Curves 11 is based on analytical solutions to flow equations for production at constant BHP and include both transient and boundary dominated flow periods. These log...

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

Julien, Pierre Y.

133

Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reservoir characterization of thinly laminated heterolithic facies within shallow-marine sand bodies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shallow marine sandstones typically form high quality reservoirs but they can contain a significant proportion of extremely heterogeneous facies. Particularly significant are heterolithic (mixed interlaminated sand-mud) deposits which are common in estuarine/incised valley-fill reservoirs and other tidally-influenced depositional environments. The complex mm/cm-scale interfingering of sands and clays in these reservoirs is below the resolution of most logging tools, which poses major problems for the petrophysical evaluation, quantitative reservoir modelling and reservoir performance prediction. This study outlines an integrated geological/petrophysical framework for the reservoir characterization of heterolithic facies from the Jurassic of the North Sea Basin which utilizes well logs, cores, minipermeameter and analog outcrop data. The calibration of wireline logs (GR, LDT/CNL, EPT and dipmeter) with cores helps in establishing the relationship between the architecture of sand-shale laminations and their wireline log response/electrofacies. The routine sampling procedure for porosity/permeability measurement from cores will not accurately determine the average reservoir properties for these heterolithic intervals. The selection of measurement points is of vital importance for determining average reservoir properties. The minipermeameter measurements are especially useful for these thin bedded reservoirs and serve as a useful guide for reservoir zonation and evaluation of petrophysical properties from wireline logs. The incorporation of analog outcrop data helps further in establishing vertical and lateral communication relationships at field scale.

Gupta, R.; Johnson, H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Myking, B.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced reservoir characterization Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program Summary: and fracture analysis, multi-component seismic reservoir characterization, quantitative reservoir...

137

Surfactant-enhanced spontaneous imbibition process in highly fractured carbonate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Highly fractured carbonate reservoirs are a class of reservoirs characterized by high conductivity fractures surrounding low permeability matrix blocks. In these reservoirs, wettability alteration is (more)

Chen, Peila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Integral cesium reservoir: Design and transient operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed built and successfully tested in air (Homer et.al., 1995). One of the unique features of this converter was an integral cesium reservoir thermally coupled to the emitter. The reservoir consisted of fifteen cesiated graphite pins located in pockets situated in the emitter lead with thermal coupling to the emitter, collector and the emitter terminal; there were no auxiliary electric heaters on the reservoir. Test results are described for conditions in which the input thermal power to the converter was ramped up and down between 50% and 100% of full power in times as short as 50 sec, with data acquisition occurring every 12 sec. During the ramps the emitter and collector temperature profiles. the reservoir temperature and the electric output into a fixed load resistor are reported. The converter responded promptly to the power ramps without excessive overshoot and with no tendency to develop instabilities. This is the rust demonstration of the performance of a cesium-graphite integral reservoir in a fast transient

Smith, J.N. Jr.; Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wrobleski, W.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Depositional facies, textural characteristics, and reservoir properties of dolomites in Frobisher-Alida interval in southwest North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippian Frobisher-Alida interval is an upward-shoaling cycle that began with open-marine sedimentation and culminated with the deposition of a widespread sabkha-salina evaporite. This cycle is the most prolific oil-producing interval in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. Most Frobisher-Alida production in the southern Williston basin is from dolomite reservoirs. The six major facies defined in this paper are lithologic suites that represent sediments and precipitates deposited in similar environments. 20 figures, 5 tables.

Petty, D.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Shale Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Oil & Gas » Shale Gas » Shale Reservoir Characterization Shale Reservoir Characterization Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Geologist examining the base of the Marcellus Shale at an outcrop near Bedford, PA. Gas-producing shales are predominantly composed of consolidated clay-sized particles with a high organic content. High subsurface pressures and temperatures convert the organic matter to oil and gas, which may migrate to conventional petroleum traps and also remains within the shale. However, the clay content severely limits gas and fluid flow within the shales. It is, therefore, necessary to understand the mineral and organic content, occurrence of natural fractures, thermal maturity, shale volumes, porosity

142

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

143

New method for evaluating composite reservoir systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple new technique has been developed for evaluating interference test data in radially symmetric composite reservoirs. The technique is based on the realization that systematic variations in the apparent storage coefficient (calculated from semi-log analysis of the late-time data are indicative of a two-mobility (k/..mu..) reservoir. By analyzing variations in the apparent storage coefficient, both the mobility and size of the inner region can be calculated. The technique is particularly useful for evaluating heterogeneous geothermal systems where the intersection of several faults, or hydrothermal alteration has created a high permeability region in the center of the geothermal field. The technique is applied to an extensive interference test in the geothermal reservoir at Klamath Falls, Oregon. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Lai, C.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir: Its unique behaviour and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from First Eocene reservoir of Wafra field was studied through its past history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to the meteoric water which might have entered the reservoir through its outcrops to the west of the field. The correct value of the connate water salinity (23,000 ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to be followed in calculating the volumetric original oil in place for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined to overcome the complex behaviour of aquifer salinity. The change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time was studied and proved that water is dumping from an upper water bearing zone into First Eocene reservoir. Upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, was confirmed to occur behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir by the analysis of their temperature and noise logs.

Ghoniem, S.A.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Water salinity of First Eocene reservoir: Unique behavior and influence on reservoir engineering calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The salinity of the produced water from the First Eocene reservoir of the Wafra field was studied through its history. The change in the salinity of the initially produced water (from about 500 to 20,000 ppm NaCl) was attributed to meteoric water that might have entered the reservoir through outcrops west of the field. The correct value of the interstitial water salinity (23,000ppm) that should be used in estimating the original oil in place (OOIP) by the volumetric method was determined by three different approaches. In addition, a technique to overcome the complex behavior of aquifer salinity in calculating the volumetric OOIP for the First Eocene reservoir is outlined. A study of the change in the produced water salinity of the First Eocene reservoir with time proved that water is dumping from an upper water-bearing zone into the reservoir. Analysis of temperature and noise logs confirmed that this upper water dumping, which apparently has supported the reservoir pressure, occurred behind casing in many deeper wells penetrating the First Eocene reservoir.

Ghoniem, S.A.; Al-Zanki, F.H.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Dynamics of entropic measurement-induced nonlocality in structured reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) as the maximal increment of von Neumann entropy induced by the locally non-disturbing measurement, and study its behaviors in both the independent and common structured reservoirs. We present schemes for preserving the MIN, and show that for certain initial states the MIN, including the quantum correlations, can even be enhanced by the common reservoir. Additionally, we also show that the different measures of MIN may give different qualitative characterizations of nonlocal properties, i.e., it is rather measure dependent than state dependent. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Features of the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of MIN with other quantum correlation measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of MIN and other quantum correlations by common reservoir. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relativity of the geometric and entropic MIN measures.

Hu, Ming-Liang, E-mail: mingliang0301@163.com [School of Science, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710061 (China)] [School of Science, Xi'an University of Posts and Telecommunications, Xi'an 710061 (China); Fan, Heng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report summarizes the results of the work done in this project. The main objective was to quantify rock microstructures and their effects in terms of elastic impedances in order to quantify the seismic signatures of microstructures. Acoustic microscopy and ultrasonic measurements were used to quantify microstructures and their effects on elastic impedances in sands and shales. The project led to the development of technologies for quantitatively interpreting rock microstructure images, understanding the effects of sorting, compaction and stratification in sediments, and linking elastic data with geologic models to estimate reservoir properties. For the public, ultimately, better technologies for reservoir characterization translates to better reservoir development, reduced risks, and hence reduced energy costs.

Gary Mavko

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

Carlos A. Fernandez

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Prediction of Kizildere reservoir behavior under exploitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kizildere geothermal reservoir is under exploitation since 1984. During the four years of operation, electricity production showed a decline from the initially designed power output of 20.4 MW{sub e}. The scaling in wells necessitates periodic mechanical cleaning. However decline in well flow rates even after cleaning, indicate either decrease in productivity index due to scaling in fractures or due to rapid decline in reservoir pressure due to insufficient recharge and strong interference between wells. In this paper the results of a lumped parameter model prepared for Kizildere will be presented with the analysis of natural state of the field.

Okandan, Ender

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Pesticide use in Kentucky reservoir watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information on the types, uses, and amounts of pesticides applied to Kentucky Reservoir and its immediate watershed. Estimates for the quantities and types of the various pesticides used are based primarily on the land uses in the watershed. A listing of commonly used pesticides is included describing their uses, mode of action, and potential toxicological effects. This report will inform the the public and the Kentucky Reservoir Water Resources Task Force of the general extent of pesticide usage and is not an assessment of pesticide impacts. 10 refs., 5 figs., 9 tabs.

Butkus, S.R.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

155

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion...

Ajayi, Arashi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluating human fecal contamination sources in Kranji Reservoir Catchment, Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singapore government through its Public Utilities Board is interested in opening Kranji Reservoir to recreational use. However, water courses within the Kranji Reservoir catchment contain human fecal indicator bacteria ...

Nshimyimana, Jean Pierre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

158

Petroleum reservoir porosity versus depth: Influence of geological age  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in late Carboniferous sandstone reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal of the Geological Society of...carbonate reservoir quality: Examples from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya Basin: Marine and Petroleum Geology, v.-15, p...

S. N. Ehrenberg; P. H. Nadeau; . Steen

159

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements By MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES Engineering Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements Abstract Engineering solutions to the environmental impacts of hydropower operations on downstream aquatic ecosystem are studied

Lund, Jay R.

160

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reducing temperature uncertainties by stochastic geothermal reservoir modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......economically successful geothermal reservoirs. To this...An increased use of geothermal energy requires reliable estimates...exploration and development of geothermal reservoirs. Suitable...risk of failure and cost may be reduced and estimated......

C. Vogt; D. Mottaghy; A. Wolf; V. Rath; R. Pechnig; C. Clauser

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

163

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

164

Techniques of High Performance Reservoir Simulation for Unconventional Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 offshore Alaska 2010 5 high performance computing, execution of compositional simulation in parallel seems to be the apparently feasible way to tackle its computational demand. Although running reservoir simulation in parallel sounds extremely... attractive, developing an efficient parallel reservoir simulator is far more challenging than developing the underlying serial reservoir simulator. For decades there have remained many open problems associated with high performance computing and reservoir...

Wang, Yuhe

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Semi-analytical solutions for multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we develop, validate, and present five new approximate solutions for the case of a multilayer reservoir system - these solutions are: [ Solution p[wDj(tD)] Description 1 a[j] Constant p[wDj(tD)] Case 2 a[j tD] Linear p[wDj(tD)] Zero...

Lolon, Elyezer Pabibak

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

166

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

167

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Type curve analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs (infinite-acting reservoir case): a new approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis methods are sometimes inconclusive for pressure transient analysis of wells completed in naturally fractured reservoirs. This is due to wellbore storage effects which mask the early time "straight-line" that is expected on the semilog plot...

Angel Restrepo, Juan Alejandro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reservoir Simulation for Improving Water Flooding Performance in Low-Permeability Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the YSL oil field in Daqing, China with reservoir permeability 10-3 ?m2 that has been developed by water flooding. From the results of a preliminary estimate ... we have used as the basis for numerical...

Huiying Zhong; Hongjun Yin

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

173

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel Finite Element Simulation of Tracer Injection in Oil Reservoirs Alvaro L.G.A. Coutinho In this work, parallel finite element techniques for the simulation of tracer injection in oil reservoirs. Supercomputers have made it possible to consider global reservoir effects which can not be represented using

Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

174

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela...

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Genesis field, Gulf of Mexico: Recognizing reservoir compartments on geologic and production time scales in deep-water reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Factors for the Pleistocene Reservoirs of Genesis Field Reservoir EOD Reserves (MMBOE) Recovery Factor () Drive Mechanism Completions...49-63 Weak water drive 5 All completions are fracture packed. EOD environment of deposition. Table 2 Cumulative Production and...

Michael L. Sweet; Larry T. Sumpter

176

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

177

Prediction of reservoir properties using diagenetic analysis of a template unit: example from Upper Cretaceous sandstones in Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depositional and postdepositional histories of the Parkman formation in the Powder River basin, Wyoming, were studied in detail and compared with other Upper Cretaceous lenticular sandstone units of the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones. Petrographic analysis was done using light, cathodoluminescent, scanning, scanning transmission, and backscattered microscopic techniques. X-ray microanalysis was done using energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy systems. The primary diagenetic events observed in these Upper Cretaceous sandstones include ductile-grain deformation and original porosity reduction; formation of authigenic chlorite, kaolinite, illite, and smectite; quartz overgrowths; formation of authigenic feldspar; alteration of feldspar; carbonate cementation; and pyrite and iron oxide precipitation. The major effects upon reservoir properties include: porosity and permeability reduction due to formation of authigenic clays, quartz, and carbonate cement; and early formation of chlorite coatings preventing complete destruction of porosity by quartz overgrowths. Diagenetic alternations appear to be strongly influenced by depositional facies and chemistries of original interstitial waters. However, sources for authigenic silica and clays were predominantly exogenic, although some authigenic minerals had endogenic sources such as feldspar alteration to clay minerals. Authigenic minerals that have exogenic sources appear to have precipitated from fluids generated during diagenesis of the surrounding mud rocks. For this reason, major diagenetic trends in these lenticular sandstones are similar. A diagenetic model developed from the results of analysis of the Parkman formation was successfully used to predict reservoir properties in the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones.

Dogan, A.U.; Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Rapid Determination of Hydrocarbon Reservoir Quality Properties at the Wellsite by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (ED-XRF)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elemental analysis of reservoir cuttings can be obtained by ED-XRF in near real-time during oil and gas drilling. Elemental data can be used in stochastic models to predict lithology,...

Smith, Christopher

179

Multiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

individual scale, as an ensemble of porous media, with well defined properties (porosity and permeabilityMultiscale Modeling and Simulations of Flows in Naturally Fractured Karst Reservoirs Peter Popov1, vuggy, porus media is a challenging problem which occurs frequently in reservoir engineering

Popov, Peter

180

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Multicomponent 3-D characterization of a coalbed methane reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methane is produced from fractured coalbed reservoirs at Cedar Hill Field in the San Juan Basin. Fracturing and local stress are critical to production because of the absence of matrix permeability in the coals. Knowledge of the direction of open fractures, the degree of fracturing, reservoir pressure, and compartmentalization is required to understand the flow of fluids through the reservoir. A multicomponent 3-D seismic survey was acquired to aid in coalbed methane reservoir characterization. Coalbed reservoir heterogeneities, including isolated pressure cells, zones of increased fracture density, and variable fracture directions, have been interpreted through the analysis of the multicomponent data and integration with petrophysical and reservoir engineering studies. Strike-slip faults, which compartmentalize the reservoir, have been identified by structural interpretation of the 3-D P-wave seismic data. These faults form boundaries for pressure cells that have been identified by P-wave reflection amplitude anomalies.

Shuck, E.L. [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)] [Advance Geophysical Corp., Englewood, CO (United States); Davis, T.L.; Benson, R.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.] [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Title Electrochromically switched, gas-reservoir metal hydride devices with application to energy-efficient windows Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-1089E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Anders, André, Jonathan L. Slack, and Thomas J. Richardson Journal Thin Solid Films Volume 1 Date Published 08/2003 Call Number LBNL-1089E Abstract Proof-of-principle gas-reservoir MnNiMg electrochromic mirror devices have been investigated. In contrast to conventional electrochromic approaches, hydrogen is stored (at low concentration) in the gas volume between glass panes of the insulated glass units (IGUs). The elimination of a solid state ion storage layer simplifies the layer stack, enhances overall transmission, and reduces cost. The cyclic switching properties were demonstrated and system durability improved with the incorporation a thin Zr barrier layer between the MnNiMg layer and the Pd catalyst. Addition of 9% silver to the palladium catalyst further improved system durability. About 100 full cycles have been demonstrated before devices slow considerably. Degradation of device performance appears to be related to Pd catalyst mobility, rather than delamination or metal layer oxidation issues originally presumed likely to present significant challenges.

185

Geothermal reservoir well stimulation program. First-year progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) group planned and executed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA during 1979. Well RRGP-4 was stimulated using a dendritic (Kiel) hydraulic fracture technique and Well RRGP-5 was stimulated using a conventional massive hydraulic fracture technique. Both experiments were technically successful; however, the post-stimulation productivity of the wells was disappointing. Even though the artificially induced fractures probably successfully connected with the natural fracture system, reservoir performance data suggest that productivity remained low due to the fundamentally limited flow capacity of the natural fractures in the affected region of the reservoir. Other accomplishments during the first year of the program may be summarized as follows: An assessment was made of current well stimulation technology upon which to base geothermal applications. Numerous reservoirs were evaluated as potential candidates for field experiments. A recommended list of candidates was developed which includes Raft River, East Mesa, Westmorland, Baca, Brawley, The Geysers and Roosevelt Hot Springs. Stimulation materials (fracture fluids, proppants, RA tracer chemicals, etc.) were screened for high temperature properties, and promising materials selected for further laboratory testing. Numerical models were developed to aid in predicting and evaluating stimulation experiments. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

Chisholm, Ian

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Enhancing Reservoir Management in the Appalach  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Reservoir Management in the Appalachian Basin by Identifying Technical Barrier and Preferred Practices Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: September 1, 2001 Reporting Period End Date: September 15, 2003 Principal Author(s): Ronald R. McDowell Khashayar Aminian Katharine L. Avary John M. Bocan Michael Ed. Hohn Douglas G. Patchen September 2003 DE-FC26-01BC15273 West Virginia University Research Corporation West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (subcontractor) ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

188

Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Youngs modulus, and Poissons ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation conditions.

Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Salinity routing in reservoir system modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................39 Figure 3.6 Sulfate concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS..........................39 Figure 3.7 TDS concentration at Richmond gauge observed by USGS............................40 Figure 3.8 Chloride concentration at Richmond... and three major upper reservoirs in the Brazos River Basin.......36 Figure 3.4 TDS concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS..............................38 Figure 3.5 Chloride concentration at Seymour gauge observed by USGS...

Ha, Mi Ae

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

SEISMIC DETERMINATION OF RESERVOIR HETEROGENEITY: APPLICATION TO THE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data can be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. The study focused on West Coalinga Field in California. The project initially attempted to build reservoir models based on different geologic and geophysical data independently using different tools, then to compare the results, and ultimately to integrate them all. We learned, however, that this strategy was impractical. The different data and tools need to be integrated from the beginning because they are all interrelated. This report describes a new approach to geostatistical modeling and presents an integration of geology and geophysics to explain the formation of the complex Coalinga reservoir.

Matthias G. Imhof; James W. Castle

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cherokee Reservoir: supplement to factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several rates and/or measurements were assumed in preparation of the Factors Affecting Water Quality in Cherokee Reservoir report prepared by Iwanski, et al. (1980). The following discussions and data were generated to support future modeling efforts of Cherokee Reservoir water quality. These discussions are not wholly intended to define conclusions or new findings, but rather lend support to assumed parameters in the modeling effort. The data include: (1) long-term BOD analyses; (2) limiting nutrient studies algal assays; (3) phytoplankton biomass; (4) primary productivity; and (5) solids transport. 10 references, 3 figures, 5 tables. (ACR)

Poppe, W.L.

1981-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

193

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

194

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

195

Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Flood avalanches in a semiarid basin with a dense reservoir network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study investigates flood avalanches in a dense reservoir network in the semiarid north-eastern Brazil. The population living in this area strongly depends on the availability of the water from this network. Water is stored during intense wet-season rainfall events and evaporates from the reservoir surface during the dry season. These seasonal changes are the driving forces behind the water dynamics in the network. The reservoir network and its connectivity properties during flood avalanches are investigated with a model called ResNetM, which simulates each reservoir explicitly. It runs on the basis of daily calculated water balances for each reservoir. A spilling reservoir contributes with water to the reservoir downstream, which can trigger avalanches affecting, in some cases, large fractions of the network. The main focus is on the study of the relation between the total amount of water stored and the largest observable cluster of connected reservoirs that overspill in the same day. It is shown that th...

Peter, Samuel J; Arajo, N A M; Herrmann, H J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

198

Using precision gravity data in geothermal reservoir engineering modeling studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision gravity measurements taken at various times over a geothermal field can be used to derive information about influx into the reservoir. Output from a reservoir simulation program can be used to compute surface gravity fields and time histories. Comparison of such computer results with field-measured gravity data can add confidence to simulation models, and provide insight into reservoir processes. Such a comparison is made for the Bulalo field in the Philippines.

Atkinson, Paul G.; Pederseen, Jens R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dependent formation compressibility and water influx require extensive study of the reservoir core samples and aquifer characteristics that are not commonly conducted. Poston and Chen solved this problem by re-arranging the material balance equation... of water compressibility (c~) and formation compressibility (c/ ). Studies of geopressured gas reservoirs have shown such reservoirs to be generally associated with either interbedded shales and or an aquifer. Each of these conditions can provide...

Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimization of coalbed-methane-reservoir exploration and development strategies through integration of simulation and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique properties and complex characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, and their consequent operating strategies, call for an integrated approach to be used to explore for and develop coal plays and prospects economically. An integrated approach involves the use of sophisticated reservoir, wellbore, and facilities modeling combined with economics and decision-making criteria. A new CBM prospecting tool (CPT) was generated by combining single-well (multilayered) reservoir simulators with a gridded reservoir model, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and economic modules. The multilayered reservoir model is divided into pods, representing relatively uniform reservoir properties, and a 'type well' is created for each pod. At every MC iteration, type-well forecasts are generated for the pods and are coupled with economic modules. A set of decision criteria contingent upon economic outcomes and reservoir characteristics is used to advance prospect exploration from the initial exploration well to the pilot and development stages. A novel approach has been used to determine the optimal well spacing should prospect development be contemplated. CPT model outcomes include a distribution of after-tax net present value (ATNPV), mean ATNPV (expected value), chance of economic success (Pe), distribution of type-well and pod gas and water production, reserves, peak gas volume, and capita. Example application of CPT to a hypothetical prospect is provided. An integrated approach also has been used to assist with production optimization of developed reservoirs. For example, an infill-well locating tool (ILT) has been constructed to provide a quick-look evaluation of infill locations in a developed reservoir. An application of ILT to a CBM reservoir is provided.

Clarkson, C.R.; McGovern, J.M.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND AND EXPENDITURES: LOWER SNAKE RIVER RESERVOIRS John R. Mc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v SECTION ONE - OUTDOOR RECREATION DEMAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods

O'Laughlin, Jay

203

5641_FrozenReservoirs | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

parallel to the structure. These fractures could play a major role in enhancing vertical permeability and vertical connectivity in a reservoir that is otherwise highly...

204

Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations. Despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae continue to present problems. Cost effective, (more)

Stephens, Ryan A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

206

Texas State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

207

California State Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4102014 Next Release Date: 4302015 Referring Pages: Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

208

,"New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

209

,"Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2013...

210

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

211

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydraulics and Well Testing of...

212

Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document explains the cleanup activities and any use limitations for the land surrounding the Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Clinch River/Poplar Creek.

213

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

214

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

215

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Detection and Characterization of Natural...

216

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

217

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

218

Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

correlations. Downhole measurements of the tracer response exiting from discrete fracture zones permit further characterization of reservoir fluid flow behavior. Tracer...

219

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Abstract Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids....

220

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Prediction of coalbed methane reservoir performance with type curves.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoirs are dual-porosity systems that are characterized by (more)

Bhavsar, Amol Bhaskar.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??WATERJETTING: A NEW DRILLING TECHNIQUE IN COALBED METHANE RESERVOIRS Applications of waterjeting to drill horizontal wells for the purpose of degassing coalbeds prior to mining (more)

Funmilayo, Gbenga M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

,"U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

224

Impact of Langmuir isotherm on production behavior of CBM reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed Methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from the coal seams. CBM reservoir performance is also influenced by the interrelationship (more)

Arrey, Efundem Ndipanquang.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ?Continuum through Discontinuum...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Evolution and Induced Seismicity Derek Elsworth Pennsylvania State University Chemistry, Reservoir and Integrated Models May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any...

226

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

227

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SANANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; (7) Mobility control agents.

Unknown

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Shear-slip analysis in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineering ap plications using TOUGH-FLAC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN MULTIPHASE FLUID-FLOW RESERVOIR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONSin multiphase fluid-flow reservoir-engineering applications.in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineering applications.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Cappa, Frederic; Oldenburg, Curt; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

CO2 gas/oil ratio prediction in a multi-component reservoir by combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to producein a complex reservoir containing oil, water, hydrocarbonincluding oil, water and gas) and reservoir pressure. The

Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Assessment of halite-cemented reservoir zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the techniques used to identify the presence and distribution of halite-cemented layers in a sandstone oil reservoir. The distribution of these layers in the wells was found by matching the core data with two independent halite identifiers from the well logs. Numerical well models were used to assess the dimensions and spatial distribution of the halite-cemented layers. Multiple simulation runs in which the spatial distribution, the dimensions, and the vertical permeability were varied resulted in a stochastic model that best matched the production history. Gas and water coning are retarded by the halite-cemented layers if the perforations are properly located.

Huurdeman, A.J.M.; Floris, F.J.T.; Lutgert, J.E. (TNO Inst. of Applied Geoscience (NL)); Breunese, J.N. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands (NL)); Al-Asbahl, A.M.S. (Ministry of Oil and Mineral Resources (YE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Relative permeability of CBM reservoirs: Controls on curve shape  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relative permeability to gas and water for 2-phase flow coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs has long been known to exhibit a strong control on (gas and water) production profile characteristics. Despite its important control on both primary and enhanced recovery of CBM for coal seams that have not been fully dewatered, relative permeability in coal has received little attention in the literature in the past decade. There are few published laboratory-derived curves; these studies and their resulting data represent a small subset of the commercial CBM reservoirs and do not allow for a systematic investigation of the physical controls on relative permeability curve shape. Other methods for estimation of relative permeability curves include derivation from simulation history-matching, and production data analysis. Both of these methods will yield pseudo-relative permeability curves whose shapes could be affected by several dynamic CBM reservoir and operating characteristics. The purpose of the current work is to perform a systematic investigation of the controls on CBM relative permeability curve shape, including non-static fracture permeability and porosity, multi-layer effects and transient flow. To derive the relative permeability curves, effective permeability to gas and water are obtained from flow equations, flow rates and pressure data. Simulated cases are analyzed so that derived and input curves may be compared allowing for investigation of CBM reservoir properties on curve shape. One set of relative permeability curves that were input into the simulator were obtained from pore-scale modeling. Field cases from two basins are also examined and controls on derived relative permeability curve shape inferred. The results of this work should be useful for future CBM development and greenhouse gas sequestration studies, and it is hoped that it will spark additional research of this critical CBM flow property.

C.R. Clarkson; M. Rahmanian; A. Kantzas; K. Morad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A petrophysics and reservoir performance-based reservoir characterization of Womack Hill (Upper Smackover) Field (Alabama)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. We used a non-parametric regression algorithm (ACE) to develop correlations between the core and well log data. These correlations allow us to estimate reservoir permeability at the "flow unit...

Avila Urbaneja, Juan Carlos

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fractured gas well analysis: evaluation of in situ reservoir properties of low permeability gas wells stimulated by finite conductivity hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the time required f e' to reach pseudo-steady-state flow in finite acting reservoirs. In Runs 6-8, variation of the fracture penetration was achieved by using different fracture lengths, while holding the drainage radius constant at 2, 640 feet for each... Reservoir Pressure Fracture Conductivity Flow Rate Drainage Radius 10/o 0. 1 md 50 ft 640 acres 150 F 0. 65 5000 psia 0. 1 500 MCF/D 2, 640 ft Run ? Xf (ft) Xf/X Drawdown Time (Days) 132. 0 264. 0 528. 0 0. 05 0. 1 0. 2 30 90 50 17...

Makoju, Charles Adoiza

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Rabi multi-sector reservoir simulation model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To ensure optimum ultimate recovery of the 46 meter thick oil rim of the Rabi Field in Gabon, a full field simulation model was required. Due to it`s size and complexity, with local cusping, coning and geological circumstances dominating individual well behavior, a single full field model would be too large for existing hardware. A method was developed to simulate the full field with 5 separate sector models, whilst allowing the development in one sector model to have an effect on the boundary conditions of another sector. In this manner, the 13 x 4.5 km field could be simulated with a horizontal well spacing down to 175 meter. This paper focuses on the method used to attach single 3-phase tank cells to a sector simulation grid in order to represent non-simulated parts of the field. It also describes the history matching methodology and how to run a multisector model in forecasting mode. This method can be used for any reservoir, where size and complexity require large reservoir simulation models that normally could not be modeled within the constraints of available computer facilities. Detailed studies can be conducted on specific parts of a field, whilst allowing for dynamic flow and pressure effects caused by the rest of the field.

Bruijnzeels, C.; O`Halloran, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

238

Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

239

Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

Ma, Xiaodan

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Hierarchical Multiscale Approach to History Matching and Optimization for Reservoir Management in Mature Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir management typically focuses on maximizing oil and gas recovery from a reservoir based on facts and information while minimizing capital and operating investments. Modern reservoir management uses history-matched simulation model...

Park, Han-Young

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluid flow process in fractured reservoirs is controlled primarily by the connectivity of fractures. The presence of fractures in these reservoirs significantly affects the mechanism of fluid flow. They have led to problems in the reservoir which...

Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Thermo-Poroelastic Modeling of Reservoir Stimulation and Microseismicity Using Finite Element Method with Damage Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress and permeability variations around a wellbore and in the reservoir are of much interest in petroleum and geothermal reservoir development. Water injection causes significant changes in pore pressure, temperature, and stress in hot reservoirs...

Lee, Sang Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Research on oil recovery mechanisms in heavy oil reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties, (2) in-situ combustion, (3) additives to improve mobility control, (4) reservoir definition, and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx.

Kovscek, Anthony R.; Brigham, William E., Castanier, Louis M.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Flood Operation Rules for a Single Reservoir Licheng Dong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of California - Davis 2012-12-12 Abstract This paper examines the theoretical behavior ecosystems. 2. Simple Inflow Hydrographs Three main factors affect the reservoir's inflow flood volume and peak outflow (Ergish, 2010): 1) inflow hydrograph volume and shape; 2) controllable reservoir storage

Lund, Jay R.

245

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

WestVirginiaUniversity SPE 65675 Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure effective porosity (MPHI) and irreducible water saturation (MBVI) in the reservoir rock to accurately characterize effective porosity, fluid saturation and permeability. WestVirginiaUniversity #12WestVirginiaUniversity SPE 65675 SPE 65675 Reservoir Characterization Through Synthetic Logs Shahab

Mohaghegh, Shahab

247

Resolution of reservoir scale electrical anisotropy from marine CSEM data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combination of 1D and 3D forward and inverse solutions is used to quantify the sensitivity and resolution of conventional controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data collected using a horizontal electric dipole source to transverse electrical anisotropy located in a deep-water exploration reservoir target. Since strongly anisotropic shale layers have a vertical resistivity that can be comparable to many reservoirs, we examine how CSEM can discriminate confounding shale layers through their characteristically lower horizontal resistivity. Forward modeling demonstrates that the sensitivity to reservoir level anisotropy is very low compared to the sensitivity to isotropic reservoirs, especially when the reservoir is deeper than about 2 km below the seabed. However, for 1D models where the number of inversion parameters can be fixed to be only a few layers, both vertical and horizontal resistivity of the reservoir can be well resolved using a stochastic inversion. We find that the resolution of horizontal resistivity increases as the horizontal resistivity decreases. We show that this effect is explained by the presence of strong horizontal current density in anisotropic layers with low horizontal resistivity. Conversely, when the reservoir has a vertical to horizontal resistivity ratio of about 10 or less, the current density is vertically polarized and hence has little sensitivity to the horizontal resistivity. Resistivity anisotropy estimates from 3D inversion for 3D targets suggest that resolution of reservoir level anisotropy for 3D targets will require good a priori knowledge of the background sediment conductivity and structural boundaries.

Brown, V.; Hoversten, G.M.; Key, K.; Chen, J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evidence for an Ancient Osmium Isotopic Reservoir in Earth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ophiolites in the Klamath mountains have extremely...ancient platinum group element reservoir...Oregon Josephine Creek Klamath Mountains mass spectra...platinum platinum group plutonic rocks...ophiolites in the Klamath mountains have extremely...ancient platinum group element reservoir...

Anders Meibom; Robert Frei

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

SEDIMENTATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL RESERVOIR: COSMOGENIC NUCLIDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENTATION OF THE PANAMA CANAL RESERVOIR: COSMOGENIC NUCLIDE ESTIMATES OF BACKGROUND SEDIMENT, Livermore, CA 94550 The Panama Canal is an engineering marvel. Vital to the operation of the canal, the reservoir to the Panama Canal. In addition to water, the headwater basins supply sediment that reduces

Nichols, Kyle K.

250

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gradient-based Methods for Production Optimization of Oil Reservoirs Eka Suwartadi Doctoral Thesis oil reservoirs. Gradient- based optimization, which utilizes adjoint-based gradient computation optimization for water flooding in the secondary phase of oil recovery is the main topic in this thesis

Foss, Bjarne A.

251

Physical model of a fractured reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model of a fractured reservoir model of a fractured reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Physical model of a fractured reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The objectives of the physical modeling effort are to: (1) evaluate injection-backflow testing for fractured reservoirs under conditions of known reservoir parameters (porosity, fracture width, etc.); (2) study the mechanisms controlling solute transport in fracture systems; and (3) provide data for validation of numerical models that explicitly simulate solute migration in fracture systems. The fracture network is 0.57-m wide, 1.7-m long, and consists of two sets of fractures at right angles to one another with a fracture spacing of 10.2 cm. A series of

252

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

253

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

254

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control. Owners of dams and reservoirs are responsible for maintaining the safety of the structures,

255

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

256

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract N/A Authors Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province, Northern Dixie Valley, Nevada Citation Elaine J. Bell,Lawrence T. Larson,Russell W. Juncal. 1980. Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range Province,

257

Energy transport between two pure-dephasing reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A pure-dephasing reservoir acting on an individual quantum system induces loss of coherence without energy exchange. When acting on composite quantum systems, dephasing reservoirs can lead to a radically different behavior. Transport of energy between two pure-dephasing markovian reservoirs is predicted in this work. They are connected through a chain of coupled sites. The baths are kept in thermal equilibrium at distinct temperatures. Quantum coherence between sites is generated in the steady-state regime and results in the underlying mechanism sustaining the effect. A quantum model for the reservoirs is a necessary condition for the existence of stationary energy transport. A microscopic derivation of the non-unitary system-bath interaction is employed, valid in the ultrastrong inter-site coupling regime. The model assumes that each site-reservoir coupling is local.

T. Werlang; D. Valente

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

259

Simulation study to investigate development options for a super-heavy oil reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A reservoir simulation study was performed on a heavy oil reservoir with the main objective of evaluating possible development options beyond the existing cold production (more)

Diaz Franco, Jose Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

262

U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - ardross reservoir gridblock Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sections. Reservoir Reservoir gridblock Idealized gridblockSingle matrix block Fracture Matrix 12;SPE... gridblocks is applied for ... Source: Arbogast, Todd - Center for...

264

Sensitivity analysis of modeling parameters that affect the dual peaking behaviour in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane reservoir (CBM) performance is controlled by a complex set of reservoir, geologic, completion and operational parameters and the inter-relationships between those parameters. Therefore (more)

Okeke, Amarachukwu Ngozi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EVALUATION OF PERFORMANCE OF CYCLIC STEAM INJECTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS AN ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK APPLICATION.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With increasing demand on oil, it is important to improve the recovery factor of oil reservoirs. Naturally fractured reservoirs constitute a major portion of worlds (more)

Chintalapati, Santosh Phani Bhushan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG Emissions from Hydropower Reservoirs The role of hydropower reservoirs in contributing to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is poorly understood, but recent studies have indicated that GHG emissions; and over 5 weeks in August--September, the peak GHG emission period, during 2012. (Pacific Northwest

267

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity is needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contain approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley. This investigation involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred J.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the work this quarter has been to partition and high-grade the Greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play and to initiate resource assessment of the basin. The work plan for the quarter of July 1-September 30, 1998 comprised three tasks: (1) Refining the exploration process for deep, naturally fractured gas reservoirs; (2) Partitioning of the basin based on structure and areas of overpressure; (3) Examination of the Kinney and Canyon Creek fields with respect to the Cretaceous tight gas play and initiation of the resource assessment of the Vermilion sub-basin partition (which contains these two fields); and (4) Initiation analysis of the Deep Green River Partition with respect to the Stratos well and assessment of the resource in the partition.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

SEISMIC AND ROCK PHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have (1) Studied relationships between velocity and permeability. (2) Used independent experimental methods to measure the elastic moduli of clay minerals as functions of pressure and saturation. (3) Applied different statistical methods for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. (4) Analyzed the directional dependence of velocity and attenuation in different reservoir rocks (5) Compared Vp measured under hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic stress conditions in sands. (6) Studied stratification as a source of intrinsic anisotropy in sediments using Vp and statistical methods for characterizing textures in sands.

Gary Mavko

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T. [Mobile Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. This year the project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit; it contained an estimated 19.8 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place. Petrophysical characterization of the East Ford unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. Most methods of petrophysical analysis that had been developed during an earlier study of the Ford Geraldine unit were successfully transferred to the East Ford unit. The approach that was used to interpret water saturation from resistivity logs, however, had to be modified because in some East Ford wells the log-calculated water saturation was too high and inconsistent with observations made during the actual production. Log-porosity to core-porosity transforms and core-porosity to core-permeability transforms were derived from the East Ford reservoir. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobil-oil saturation, and other reservoir properties.

Dutton, S.P.; Flanders, W.A.; Guzman, J.I.; Zirczy, H.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Some mismatches occurred when simulating fractured reservoirs as homogeneous porous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The understanding of transport processes that occur in naturally fractured geothermal systems is far from being complete. Often, evaluation and numerical simulations of fractured geothermal reservoirs, are carried out by assuming equivalent porous media and homogeneous petrophysical properties within big matrix blocks. The purpose of this paper, is to present a comparison between results obtained from numerical studies of a naturally fractured reservoir treated as a simple porous medium and the simulation of some real aspects of the fractured reservoir. A general conclusion outlines the great practical importance of considering even approximately, the true nature of such systems. Our results show that the homogeneous simplified evaluation of the energy resource in a fractured system, could result in unrealistic estimates of the reservoir capacity to generate electricity.

Mario Cesar Suarez Arriaga; Fernando Samaniego V.; Fernando Rodriguez

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) Underground Gas Storage Reservoirs (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider West Virginia Department of Commerce Lays out guidelines for the conditions under which coal mining operations must notify state authorities of intentions to mine where underground gas

278

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

279

Tarmat behavior calculated for reservoir with sealing fault  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Minagish Oolite oil reservoir in Kuwait is one of many Middle East reservoirs characterized by the presence of a tarmat (heavy to tar-like crude) at the oil-water contact. Since a waterflood project is planned for the Minagish Oolite, which contains a radial pattern of faults, a study was made to consider tarmat behavior upon water injection below it when the injection well is located near a sealing fault. The study resulted in a technique to predict the time of tarmat breakdown, response time at the nearest observation well, and differential pressure at the tarmat anywhere in the reservoir.

Osman, M.E.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for future water in Texas by the Texas Department of Water Resources: Present use of lakes and reservoirs for water- oriented recreation demonstrates the need to include recreation as one of the many purposes of water 13 development projects... by the reservoir owner. 26 3. Another factor is that most reservoir owners do not let the1r land stand idle. Uses are found which either increase the benefits of the project' to the owner or public, or at least balance the costs of holding the land pending...

Ruesink, Lou Ellen

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to capture the alterations in reservoir properties (mainly porosity and permeability) due to changes water into a hot water reservoir will contract the rock, however the surrounding rock will constrain conditions are employed. In particular, porosity and permeability were coupled through the changes

Stanford University

282

INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

F. Jerry Lucia

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: Develop Improved Methods For Maintaining Permeable Fracture Volumes In EGS Reservoirs.

285

Robust Optimization of Oil Reservoir Flooding G.M. van Essen, M.J. Zandvliet,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Optimization of Oil Reservoir Flooding G.M. van Essen, M.J. Zandvliet, P.M.J. Van den Hof the reservoir to the subsurface. The injection wells inject water into the oil reservoir with the aim to push reservoirs, the oil-water front does not travel uniformly towards the pro- duction wells, but is usually

Van den Hof, Paul

286

Bayes Linear Uncertainty Analysis for Oil Reservoirs Based on Multiscale Computer Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayes Linear Uncertainty Analysis for Oil Reservoirs Based on Multiscale Computer Experiments, 2008 1 Introduction Reservoir simulators are important and widely-used tools for oil reservoir for reservoirs, where the model inputs are physical parameters, such as the permeability and porosity of various

Oakley, Jeremy

287

RESEARCH OIL RECOVERY MECHANISMS IN HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States continues to rely heavily on petroleum fossil fuels as a primary energy source, while domestic reserves dwindle. However, so-called heavy oil (10 to 20{sup o}API) remains an underutilized resource of tremendous potential. Heavy oils are much more viscous than conventional oils. As a result, they are difficult to produce with conventional recovery methods such as pressure depletion and water injection. Thermal recovery is especially important for this class of reservoirs because adding heat, usually via steam injection, generally reduces oil viscosity dramatically. This improves displacement efficiency. The research described here was directed toward improved understanding of thermal and heavy-oil production mechanisms and is categorized into: (1) flow and rock properties; (2) in-situ combustion; (3) additives to improve mobility control; (4) reservoir definition; and (5) support services. The scope of activities extended over a three-year period. Significant work was accomplished in the area of flow properties of steam, water, and oil in consolidated and unconsolidated porous media, transport in fractured porous media, foam generation and flow in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, the effects of displacement pattern geometry and mobility ratio on oil recovery, and analytical representation of water influx. Significant results are described.

Anthony R. Kovscek; William E. Brigham

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

289

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

290

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper aims to improve current understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in east-central California. The Coso reservoir is in active economic development, so that knowledge of the subsurface fracture system is of vital importance for an accurate evaluation of its geothermal potential and day-to-day production. To detect the geometry and density of fracture systems we applied the shear-wave splitting technique to a large number of

291

EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California 404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California Summary This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

292

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Abstract Borehole televiewer, temperature, and flowmeter datarecorded in six wells penetrating a geothermalreservoir associated with the Stillwater fault zone inDixie Valley, Nevada, were used to investigate therelationship between reservoir permeability and thecontemporary in situ stress field. Data from wellsdrilled into productive and nonproductive segments ofthe Stillwater fault zone indicate that permeability inall wells is dominated by a relatively small number offractures striking parallel to the local trend of

293

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

294

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

295

Sunset Reservoir Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Solar Power Plant Reservoir Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunset Reservoir Solar Power Plant Facility Sunset Reservoir Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Recurrent Energy Location San Francisco, California Coordinates 37.7749295°, -122.4194155° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7749295,"lon":-122.4194155,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

296

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with the geology of the area, which is well known. An east-west trending Bouguer gravity profile was constructed through the center of the heat flow anomaly described by Combs (1976). The best fit model for the observed gravity at

297

Shale Oil Production Performance from a Stimulated Reservoir Volume  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures has proven to be an effective strategy for shale gas reservoir exploitation. Some operators are successfully producing shale oil using the same strategy. Due to its higher viscosity and eventual...

Chaudhary, Anish Singh

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

Scattering Characteristics In Heterogeneous Fractured Reservoirs From Waveform Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Offset-dependent characteristics of seismic scattering are useful in the interpretation of fractured reservoirs. Synthetic seismograms generated by a 3-D finite difference modeling are used to study elastic wave propagation ...

Shen, Feng

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Role of Acidizing in Proppant Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most widely considered alternatives for application in carbonate reservoirs. Especially in areas that have high closure stress, the non-smoothly etched surface created by acid fracturing may not remain open upon closing, resulting in decrease...

Densirimongkol, Jurairat

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

Yang, Fei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

REVIEW PLAN John Redmond Dam Reservoir, Coffee County, Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;REVIEW PLAN John Redmond Dam Reservoir, Coffee County, Kansas Reallocation Study Tulsa...................................................................................................................11 12. REVIEW PLAN APPROVAL AND UPDATES........................................................................................11 13. REVIEW PLAN POINTS OF CONTACT

US Army Corps of Engineers

302

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs thermally recoverable by steam drive which are equal to or greater than 2500 feet deep and contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range. Data were collected from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Optimal Fuzzy Management of Reservoir based on Genetic Algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter deals with water resource management problems faced from an Automatic Control point of view. The motivation for the study is the need for an automated management policy for an artificial reservoir...

Alberto Cavallo; Armando Di Nardo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimising hydraulic fracture treatments in reservoirs under complex conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Growing global energy demand has prompted the exploitation of non-conventional resources such as Coal Bed Methane (CBM) and conventional resources such as gas-condensate reservoirs. Exploitation (more)

Valencia, Karen Joy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Problems of fluid flow in a deformable reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

itself and the surrounding rock mass. The change in the stress-strain state of the system is induced by pressure change in the layers of the reservoir. Numerical results qualitatively agree with observed field behavior. Such behavior includes (1...

Diyashev, Ildar

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs using a computer-oriented approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new computer-oriented approach for analyzing aquifer driven reservoirs incorporates both geological and historical pressure data to determine original hydrocarbons-in-place and to forecast production. This new approach does not rely entirely...

Flumerfelt, Raymond William

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Collection and Analysis of Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir Data from Testing and Operation of the Raft River 5 MW Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Collection...

308

Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs by focusing Gaussian beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Naturally fractured reservoirs occur worldwide, and they account for the bulk of global oil production. The most important impact of fractures is their influence on fluid flow. To maximize oil production, the characterization ...

Zheng, Yingcai

309

Reducing temperature uncertainties by stochastic geothermal reservoir modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Section 4) for a current geothermal district heating project in The Hague...Geothermal Reservoir A geothermal district heating project in The Hague...2008. The Den Haag Geothermal District Heating Project-3-D Models......

C. Vogt; D. Mottaghy; A. Wolf; V. Rath; R. Pechnig; C. Clauser

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Borehole Stability Analysis of Horizontal Drilling in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Serious wellbore instability occurs frequently during horizontal drilling in shale gas reservoirs. The conventional forecast model of in ... not suitable for wellbore stability analysis in laminated shale gas for...

Jun-Liang Yuan; Jin-Gen Deng; Qiang Tan; Bao-Hua Yu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approach for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. Authors C. Y. Sun, B. H. Niu, P. F. Wen, Y. Y. Huang, H. Y. Wang, X. W. Huang and J. Li Published Journal...

312

Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

313

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and...

314

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I; II; and III (tensile; shear; and tearing propagation of multiple fractures using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB); to predict geothermal reservoir stimulation.

315

Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explored. The power and utility of the phase and component streamlines have been demonstrated using synthetic examples and two field cases. The new formulation of streamline tracing provides additional information about the reservoir drive mechanisms...

Kumar, Sarwesh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Integrated seismic studies at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

studies at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Integrated seismic studies at the Rye Patch...

317

Reservoir Simulation Used to Plan Diatomite Developement in Mountainous Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Santa Barbara County, Santa Maria Pacific (an exploration and production company) is expanding their cyclic steam project in a diatomite reservoir. The hilly or mountainous topography and cut and fill restrictions have interfered with the company...

Powell, Richard

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydroacoustic Estimates of Fish Density Distributions in Cougar Reservoir, 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Day and night mobile hydroacoustic surveys were conducted once each month from April through December 2011 to quantify the horizontal and vertical distributions of fish throughout Cougar Reservoir, Lane County, Oregon.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Batten, George W.; Mitchell, T. D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of computer simulations for a set of six problems typical of geothermal reservoir engineering applications are presented. These results are compared to those obtained by others using similar geothermal reservoir simulators on the same problem set. The purpose of this code comparison is to check the performance of participating codes on a set of typical reservoir problems. The results provide a measure of the validity and appropriateness of the simulators in terms of major assumptions, governing equations, numerical accuracy, and computational procedures. A description is given of the general reservoir simulator - its major assumptions, mathematical formulation, and numerical techniques. Following the description of the model is the presentation of the results for the six problems. Included with the results for each problem is a discussion of the results; problem descriptions and result tabulations are included in appendixes. Each of the six problems specified in the contract was successfully simulated. (MHR)

Faust, C.R.; Mercer, J.W.; Miller, W.J.

1980-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Extracting maximum petrophysical and geological information from a limited reservoir database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characterization of old fields lacking sufficient core and log data is a challenging task. This paper describes a methodology that uses new and conventional tools to build a reliable reservoir model for the Sulimar Queen field. At the fine scale, permeability measured on a fine grid with a minipermeameter was used in conjunction with the petrographic data collected on multiple thin sections. The use of regression analysis and a newly developed fuzzy logic algorithm led to the identification of key petrographic elements which control permeability. At the log scale, old gamma ray logs were first rescaled/calibrated throughout the entire field for consistency and reliability using only four modem logs. Using data from one cored well and the rescaled gamma ray logs, correlations between core porosity, permeability, total water content and gamma ray were developed to complete the small scale characterization. At the reservoir scale, outcrop data and the rescaled gamma logs were used to define the reservoir structure over an area of ten square miles where only 36 wells were available. Given the structure, the rescaled gamma ray logs were used to build the reservoir volume by identifying the flow units and their continuity. Finally, history-matching results constrained to the primary production were used to estimate the dynamic reservoir properties such as relative permeabilities to complete the characterization. The obtained reservoir model was tested by forecasting the waterflood performance and which was in good agreement with the actual performance.

Ali, M.; Chawathe, A.; Ouenes, A. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing Phase 2 work comprises the development and field-testing of a real-time reservoir stimulation diagnostic system. Phase 3 work commenced in June 2001, and involved conducting research, development and field-testing of real-time enhanced dual-fluid stimulation processes. Experimental field-testing to date includes three well tests. Application of these real-time stimulation processes and diagnostic technologies has been technically successful with commercial production from the ''marginal'' reservoirs in the first two well tests. The third well test proved downhole-mixing is an efficient process for acid stimulation of a carbonate reservoir that produced oil and gas with 2200 psi bottomhole reservoir pressure, however, subsequent shut-in pressure testing indicated the reservoir was characterized by low-permeability. Realtimezone continues to seek patent protection in foreign markets to the benefit of both RTZ and NETL. Realtimezone and the NETL have licensed the United States patented to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies, from well testing conducted over the last 12-month work period and including well test scheduled for year-end of 2002. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer, public presentations and industry publications. Final Phase 3 test work will be focused on further field-testing the innovational process of blending stimulation fluids downhole. This system provides a number of advantages in comparison to older industry fracturing techniques and allows the operator to control reservoir fracture propagation and concentrations of proppant placed in the reservoir, in real-time. Another observed advantage is that lower friction pressures result, which results in lower pump treating pressures and safer reservoir hydraulic fracturing jobs.

George Scott III

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to compile data on reservoirs that contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range, contain at least ten million barrels of oil currently in place, and are non-carbonate in lithology. The reservoirs within these constraints were then analyzed in light of applicable recovery technology, either steam-drive or in situ combustion, and then ranked hierarchically as candidate reservoirs. The study is presented in three volumes. Volume I presents the project background and approach, the screening analysis, ranking criteria, and listing of candidate reservoirs. The economic and environmental aspects of heavy oil recovery are included in appendices to this volume. This study provides an extensive basis for heavy oil development, but should be extended to include carbonate reservoirs and tar sands. It is imperative to look at heavy oil reservoirs and projects on an individual basis; it was discovered that operators, and industrial and government analysts will lump heavy oil reservoirs as poor producers, however, it was found that upon detailed analysis, a large number, so categorized, were producing very well. A study also should be conducted on abandoned reservoirs. To utilize heavy oil, refiners will have to add various unit operations to their processes, such as hydrotreaters and hydrodesulfurizers and will require, in most cases, a lighter blending stock. A big problem in producing heavy oil is that of regulation; specifically, it was found that the regulatory constraints are so fluid and changing that one cannot settle on a favorable recovery and production plan with enough confidence in the regulatory requirements to commit capital to the project.

Kujawa, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Performance of petroleum reservoirs containing random vertical fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PERFORMANCE OF PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS CONTAINING RANDOM VERTICAL FRACTURES A Thesis By WILLIAM LYMAN HUSKEY Approved as to style and content by: Chairxnan o Coxnxnittee ead of Departxnent PERFORMANCE OF PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS CONTAINING RANDOM...: Petroleum Engineering TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SUMMARY Z. INTRODUCTION . 3. EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURE 4. PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS 5. CONCLUSIONS 6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . 44 7. REFERENCES 8. BIBLIOGRAPHY . 47 TABLE QF GRAPHS AND FIGURES...

Huskey, William Lyman

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Low permeability gas reservoir production using large hydraulic fractures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOVT PERMEABILITY GAS RESERVOIR PRODUCTION USING LARGE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES A Thesis by STEPHEN ALLEN HOLDITCH Approved as to style and content by: ( airman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Me er) (Member) (Membe r) (Member) (Member...) August 1970 111 ABSTRACT Low Permeability Gas Reservoir Production Using Large Hydraulic Fractures. (August 1970) Stephen Allen Holditch, B. S. , Texas ARM University Directed by: Dr, R. A. Morse There has been relatively little work published...

Holditch, Stephen A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

Targac, Gary Wayne

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The recovery of oil from carbonate reservoirs by fluid injection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hole 70 Neasured and Calculated Productivities Obtained on Wells Completed Through Perforations 39 Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughf low for Stratified Reservoirs- lj. O Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil... for Field A 12, Cumulative Oil Recovery Versus Total Water and Oil Throughflow for Field B 13, -20, Permeability Distribution Plots $5-52 The object of this project was to study the extent of the variations of the permeability in carbonate reservoirs...

Coleman, Dwayne Marvin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Optimization of Well Spacing in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE OPTIMIZATION OF WELL SPACING IN A COALBED METHANE RESERVOIR A Thesis by PAHALA DOMINICUS SINURAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE OPTIMIZATION OF WELL SPACING IN A COALBED METHANE RESERVOIR A Thesis by PAHALA DOMINICUS SINURAT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Sinurat, Pahala Dominicus

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Decoherence in a single trapped ion due to engineered reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decoherence in trapped ion induced by coupling the ion to the engineered reservoir is studied in this paper. The engineered reservoir is simulated by random variations in the trap frequency, and the trapped ion is treated as a two-level system driven by a far off-resonant plane wave laser field. The dependence of the decoherence rate on the amplitude of the superposition state is given.

X. X. Yi; D. L. Zhou; C. P. Sun

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

US production of natural gas from tight reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purposes of this report, tight gas reservoirs are defined as those that meet the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) definition of tight. They are generally characterized by an average reservoir rock permeability to gas of 0.1 millidarcy or less and, absent artificial stimulation of production, by production rates that do not exceed 5 barrels of oil per day and certain specified daily volumes of gas which increase with the depth of the reservoir. All of the statistics presented in this report pertain to wells that have been classified, from 1978 through 1991, as tight according to the FERC; i.e., they are ``legally tight`` reservoirs. Additional production from ``geologically tight`` reservoirs that have not been classified tight according to the FERC rules has been excluded. This category includes all producing wells drilled into legally designated tight gas reservoirs prior to 1978 and all producing wells drilled into physically tight gas reservoirs that have not been designated legally tight. Therefore, all gas production referenced herein is eligible for the Section 29 tax credit. Although the qualification period for the credit expired at the end of 1992, wells that were spudded (began to be drilled) between 1978 and May 1988, and from November 5, 1990, through year end 1992, are eligible for the tax credit for a subsequent period of 10 years. This report updates the EIA`s tight gas production information through 1991 and considers further the history and effect on tight gas production of the Federal Government`s regulatory and tax policy actions. It also provides some high points of the geologic background needed to understand the nature and location of low-permeability reservoirs.

Not Available

1993-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

330

Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

Unneberg, Arild

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Characterizing hydraulically fractured reservoirs using induced microearthquakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is a common method employed to increase the production of oil and gas fields. Recently, there has been increased interest in monitoring the microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing as a means of obtaining data to characterize reservoir changeS induced by the injection. Two types of microearthquakes have been observed during hydraulic fracturing. Tensile events have been observed and modeled as the parting of the surfaces of a fracture. A majority of the events observed have been shear-slip events, where two sides of a fault plane slip parallel to each other but in opposite directions. The locations of the microearthquakes can be analyzed to determine regions where significant seismic energy was released, which presumably are regions where injected fluid penetrated into the rock along pre-existing fractures or zones of weakness. The spatial patterns in the locations can be analyzed to fine regions where events cluster along planes, which are interpreted to be the dominant fluid flow paths. Imaging methods can also be applied to the travel time and waveform data to obtain direct evidence for the locations of the fractures or fracture zones. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Fehler, M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

Sattler, A.R.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reservoir characterization of a Permian Giant: Yates Field, West Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yates Field reservoir characterization project provided the geologic framework, data, and tools that support the ongoing reservoir management of Yates Field. Geologic and engineering data from 1800 wells with digital log data, 23,000 feet of quantified core analysis and description, and six decades of production data, were integrated, analyzed, and displayed in a format which could be used for field evaluation, management, and simulation. The Yates Field reservoir characterization products include: quantified, standardized, digital core descriptions for 118 cores in the field; 2-D digital cross section through every well in the field; 2-D structure and isochore maps for major and internal marker horizons, net and gross reservoir maps, net and gross shale maps, secondary calcite distribution maps, cave distribution maps, and fracture distribution maps; a 6.8 million cell 3-D geologic model of the complete reservoir that includes log, core, and production data. The reservoir characterization project resulted in a quantified description of the heterogeneous matrix and fracture network in Yates Field. It is the efficient, ongoing management of this classic dual-porosity system that has stabilized production from this sixty-eight year old, 4.2 billion barrel field.

Tinker, S.W. [Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (United States); Mruk, D.H. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Application of horizontal drilling to tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical fractures and lithologic heterogeneity are extremely important factors controlling gas flow rates and total gas recovery from tight (very low permeability) reservoirs. These reservoirs generally have in situ matrix permeabilities to gas of less than 0.1 md. Enhanced gas recovery methods have usually involved hydraulic fracturing; however, the induced vertical hydraulic fractures almost always parallel the natural fracture and may not be an efficient method to establish a good conduit to the wellbore. Horizontal drilling appears to be an optimum method to cut across many open vertical fractures. Horizontal holes will provide an efficient method to drain heterogeneous tight reservoirs even in unfractured rocks. Although many horizontal wells have now been completed in coalbed methane and oil reservoirs, very few have been drilled to exclusively evaluate tight gas reservoirs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded some horizontal and slanthole drilling in order to demonstrate the applicability of these techniques for gas development. Four DOE holes have been drilled in Devonian gas shales in the Appalachian basin, and one hole has been drilled in Upper Cretaceous tight sandstones in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The Colorado field experiment has provided valuable information on the abundance and openness of deeply buried vertical fractures in tight sandstones. These studies, plus higher gas prices, should help encourage industry to begin to further utilize horizontal drilling as a new exploitation method for tight gas reservoirs.

Spencer, C.W. (U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States)); Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brown, C.A. (Synder Oil Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Quantification of uncertainty in reservoir simulations influenced by varying input geological parameters, Maria Reservoir, CaHu Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to krig thickness layers, 2) morphology around well 14, 3) shelf edge orientation, 4) bathymetry ranges attributed for each facies, 5) variogram range used to simulate facies distribution, 6) extension of the erosion at top of the reservoir. The parameters...

Schepers, Karine Chrystel

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advances on Reduced Reservoir Representation for Fast Analysis of Oil Recovery Opportunities This seminar presents recent results of a strategy that uses a reduced representation of reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advances on Reduced Reservoir Representation for Fast Analysis of Oil Recovery Opportunities of reservoirs. The strategy facilitates the task of producing recovery projections on individual or a portfolio of reservoirs, by using space reduction techniques and analytical simulations. The drive for this type

Sukop, Mike

337

Integrated, multidisciplinary reservoir characterization, modeling and engineering leading to enhanced oil recovery from the Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pru Fee property is developed in a heavy oil, Class III (slope and basin clastic sand), reservoir of the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. Wells on the property were shut-in with an estimated 85% of the original oil remaining in place because the reservoir failed to respond to conventional cyclic steaming. Producibility problems are attributed to the close proximity of the property to the margin of the field. Specific problems include complex reservoir geometry, thinning pay, bottom water, and dipping beds. These problems are likely common at the margins of the Midway-Sunset and other Class III reservoirs. This project forms the first step in returning the property to production and explores strategies that might be applied elsewhere. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and engineering methods are integrated to design, simulate, and implement a pilot steam flood. A new drillhole provides good quality, core through the pay zone and a full suite of geophysical logs. Correlations between geological and petrophysical data are used to extrapolate reservoir conditions from older logs and yield a 3-dimensional petrophysical model. Numerical results illustrate how each producibility problem might influence production and provide a framework for designing the pilot steam flood. This first phase illustrates how a multidisciplinary team can use established technologies in developing the detailed petrophysical, geological, and numerical models needed to enhance oil recovery from marginal areas of Class III reservoirs.

Schamel, S.; Forster, C.; Deo, M. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Integrated, multidisciplinary reservoir characterization, modeling and engineering leading to enhanced oil recovery from the Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pru Fee property is developed in a heavy oil, Class III (slope and basin clastic sand), reservoir of the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. Wells on the property were shut-in with an estimated 85% of the original oil remaining in place because the reservoir failed to respond to conventional cyclic steaming. Producibility problems are attributed to the close proximity of the property to the margin of the field. Specific problems include complex reservoir geometry, thinning pay, bottom water, and dipping beds. These problems are likely common at the margins of the Midway-Sunset and other Class III reservoirs. This project forms the first step in returning the property to production and explores strategies that might be applied elsewhere. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and engineering methods are integrated to design, simulate, and implement a pilot steam flood. A new drillhole provides good quality, core through the pay zone and a full suite of geophysical logs. Correlations between geological and petrophysical data are used to extrapolate reservoir conditions from older logs and yield a 3-dimensional petrophysical model. Numerical results illustrate how each producibility problem might influence production and provide a framework for designing the pilot steam flood. This first phase illustrates how a multidisciplinary team can use established technologies in developing the detailed petrophysical, geological, and numerical models needed to enhance oil recovery from marginal areas of Class III reservoirs.

Schamel, S.; Forster, C.; Deo, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Deliverable 3.1.4 -- Final reservoir report and field-scale models Bluebell Field, Utah, Class 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project were to: (1) Simulate parts of the reservoir using the conventional dual-porosity, dual-permeability approach, generate progressively complex reservoir models and use the production history match results to quantify formation damage; (2) Examine the effect of the numerical aspects such as grid sizes and fracture properties on the simulations results; (3) Evaluate the effect of fluid thermodynamic properties on production; and (4) Study effect of inclusion of fractures on variability in production from stochastically generated reservoir models.

Deo, Milind D.

2000-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Damage tolerance of well-completion and stimulation techniques in coalbed methane reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs are characterized as naturally fractured, dual porosity, low permeability, and water saturated gas reservoirs. Initially, the gas, water and coal are at thermodynamic equilibrium under prevailing reservoir conditions. Dewatering is essential to promote gas production. This can be accomplished by suitable completion and stimulation techniques. This paper investigates the efficiency and performance of the openhole cavity, hydraulic fractures, frack and packs, and horizontal wells as potential completion methods which may reduce formation damage and increase the productivity in coalbed methane reservoirs. Considering the dual porosity nature of CBM reservoirs, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the formation damage tolerance of each completion and, stimulation approach. A new comparison parameter named as the normalized productivity index is defined as the ratio of the productivity index of a stimulated well to that of a nondamaged vertical well as a function of time. Typical scenarios have been considered to evaluate the CBM properties, including reservoir heterogeneity, anisotropy, and formation damage, for their effects on this index over the production time. The results for each stimulation technique show that the value of the index declines over the time of production with a rate which depends upon the applied technique and the prevailing reservoir conditions. The results also show that horizontal wells have the best performance if drilled orthogonal to the butt cleats. Open-hole cavity completions outperform vertical fractures if the fracture conductivity is reduced by any damage process. When vertical permeability is much lower than horizontal permeability, production of vertical wells will improve while productivity of horizontal wells will decrease.

Jahediesfanjani, H.; Civan, F. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

344

Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Oil composition variation and reservoir continuity: Unity field, Sudan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A suite of oils from stacked reservoirs in the Unity Field in Sudan has been analyzed by various geochemical techniques for molecular information to elucidate the geological processes which cause variations in oil composition and their resulting oil fingerprints in different reservoir units. Analyses of these highly paraffinic oils indicate that the chromatographic fingerprint variations are due to differences in the abundances of saturated compounds, including branched and cyclic alkanes. Neither aromatics nor NSO compounds have any significant effect on the observed fingerprint variations. This association of saturates, instead of aromatics and NSO compounds, with the fingerprint variations precludes rock-fluid interactions as a cause of the variations. Biomarker analyses show that variations in thermal maturity and organic facies of the source rock are responsible for the fingerprint variations. Thermal maturity increases with the depth of the reservoir, suggesting a multiple-charge process for the oils to fill these reservoirs over an extended period of time. Apparently the source rock generated and expelled progressively more mature oils and little mixing occurred during migration. Thus, knowledge of oil compositional variations from one reservoir to another, organic facies variation and source rock maturity combined with tectonic history may help explain charging and timing of oil emplacement.

R.J. Hwang; A.S. Ahmed; J.M. Moldowan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1987-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

349

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drillings. Annual technical progress report, June 13, 1996 to June 12, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, does not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. Other technologies, such as inter-well injection tracers and magnetic flow conditioners, can also aid in the efficient evaluation and operation of both injection and producing wells. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate useful and cost effective methods of exploitation of the shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin located in West Texas.

Nevans, Jerry W.; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal Exploration And Reservoir Monitoring Using Earthquakes And The Passive Seismic Method Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper reviews the use of earthquake studies in the field of geothermal exploration. Local, regional and teleseismic events can all provide useful information about a geothermal area on various scales. It is imperative that data collection is conducted in properly designed, realistic experiments. Ground noise is still of limited usefulness as a prospecting tool. The utility of the method cannot yet be assessed because of its undeveloped methodology and the paucity of case histories.

352

The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: The Northwest Geysers High-Temperature Reservoir- Evidence For Active Magmatic Degassing And Implications For The Origin Of The Geysers Geothermal Field Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Noble gas isotope abundances in steam from the Coldwater Creek field of the Northwest Geysers, California, show mixing between a nearly pure mid-ocean ridge (MOR) type magmatic gas with high 3He/4He and low radiogenic 40*Ar (R/Ra > 8.3 and 40*Ar/4He < 0.07), and a magmatic gas diluted with crustal gas (R/Ra 0.25). The

353

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Abstract Modern portable gravimeters can routinely achieve a5 ugal uncertainty with careful measurementprocedures involving multiple station occupations inthe same day, and stacking of readings over at least15 minutes during each occupation. Although furtherimprovements in gravimeter accuracy are feasible,other practical factors relating to repeat surveys ofgeothermal fields make such improvements oflimited value. The two most important factors arebenchmark elevation variations (3 ugal/cm) andgroundwater level fluctuations (5-10 ugal/m). Dualfrequency GPS receivers can give elevations

354

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Selecting The Optimal Logging Suite For Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation- Results From The Alum 25-29 Well, Nevada Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents the results of analysis of a state of the art set of wireline petrophysical and wellbore image logs recorded in the Alum 25-29 well, southwestern Nevada. The Alum well penetrated nearly 2000 ft (610 m) of volcano-clastic rocks and more than 1000 ft of basement, separated from the sediments by a shallowly dipping detachment fault. The logs were acquired both to characterize the site and also to select the

355

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pantex Sewage Reservoir (TX.03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

356

State of Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment - Summary E.L Majer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the

357

True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: True-Temperature Determination Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Parameters governing the resistivity in geothermal areas are analyzed. A method for the calculation of the true temperature of geothermal reservoirs is explained, and the effectiveness of the method is evidenced. Author(s): Jin Doo Jung Published: Geoexploration, 1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.1016/0016-7142(77)90002-3 Source: View Original Journal Article

358

Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Statistical study of seismicity associated with geothermal reservoirs in California Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related events are identified by the distribution of the interoccurrence times. The regions studied to date include the Imperial Valley, Coso, The Geysers, Lassen, and the San Jacinto fault. The spatial characteristics of the random and clustered components of the seismicity

359

Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to tidal and barometric effects to tidal and barometric effects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Reservoir response to tidal and barometric effects Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Solid earth tidal strain and surface loading due to fluctuations in barometric pressure have the effect, although extremely minute, of dilating or contracting the effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. If a well intersects the formation, the change in pore pressure can be measured with sensitive quartz pressure gauges. Mathematical models of the relevant fluid dynamics of the well-reservoir system have been generated and tested against conventional well pumping results or core data at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), California and at the Raft River,

360

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Advanced Hydrate Reservoir  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 Advanced Hydrate Reservoir Modeling Using Rock Physics Techniques Last Reviewed 11/29/2013 DE-FE0010160 Goal The primary goal of this research is to develop analytical techniques capable of quantitatively evaluating the nature of methane hydrate reservoir systems through modeling of their acoustic response using techniques that integrate rock physics theory, amplitude analysis, and spectral decomposition. Performers Fugro GeoConsulting, Inc., Houston TX Background Past efforts under the DOE-supported Gulf of Mexico Joint Industry project included the selection of well locations utilizing prospectivity analysis based primarily on a petroleum systems approach for gas hydrate using 3-D exploration seismic data and derivative analyses that produced predicted

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361

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The authors have analyzed the splitting of shear waves from microearthquakes recorded by a 16-station three-component seismic network at the Northwest Geysers geothermal field, Geysers, California, to determine the preferred orientation of subsurface fractures and cracks. Average polarization crack directions with standard deviation were computed for each station. Also, graphical fracture characterizations in the form of equal-area projections and rose diagrams were created to depict the

362

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reservoir simulation improves implementation of Midway Sunset steamflood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal reservoir simulation was utilized to understand, make development recommendations, and project the performance of the Monarch C steamflood in a portion of Mobil`s South Midway Sunset field. The Monarch, a thick sequence of complex turbidite deposition, is characterized by extreme geological heterogeneity (lithofacies-controlled permeability and saturation variation, and mudstone barrier layers). Steamflood performance in the Monarch is related directly to the reservoir quality, and the path of steam flow is significantly influenced by the numerous laterally extensive mudstone barriers. The fine grain clay-bearing sediments were deposited on the anticline, distal from the source, whereas the coarser grain sediments, with little clay, were deposited on the more proximal syncline and steep dip areas. Consequently, steamflood performance improves relative to the crest since reservoir quality improves (including oil saturation), clay content decreases, and structure (dip) becomes more pronounced.

Ellison, T.K.; Clayton, C.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reservoir characterization of the Smackover Formation in southwest Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation is found in an arcuate belt in the subsurface from south Texas to panhandle Florida. The Smackover is the most prolific hydrocarbon-producing formation in Alabama and is an important hydrocarbon reservoir from Florida to Texas. In this report Smackover hydrocarbon reservoirs in southwest Alabama are described. Also, the nine enhanced- and improved-recovery projects that have been undertaken in the Smackover of Alabama are evaluated. The report concludes with recommendations about potential future enhanced- and improved-recovery projects in Smackover reservoirs in Alabama and an estimate of the potential volume of liquid hydrocarbons recoverable by enhanced- and improved-recovery methods from the Smackover of Alabama.

Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Hall, D.R.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Salt tectonics, patterns of basin fill, and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt structures, which develop due to sediment loading, gravity creep, and/or buoyance, include boundary-fault grabens and half grabens, rollers, anticlines, domes and walls, diapirs, sills, massifs, and compressional toe structure. Associated features include fault systems and turtle structures. Of these, six directly relate to basin fill and all directly influence the distribution of reservoir facies. Salt structuring is initiated by sedimentation, which in turn is localized by salt withdrawal. Withdrawal produces individual salt structures, migrating sills, dissected massifs, and regional depocenters bordered by salt walls. Composite withdrawals dictate the patterns of basin fill. Relative rates of structural growth and sedimentation control the distribution of reservoir facies. When growth dominates, sands are channeled into lows. When sedimentation dominates and maintains flat surfaces, facies distribution is not impacted except where faulting develops. This paper presents techniques for using seismic data to determine the controls on salt structural growth and sedimentation and the patterns of basin fill and reservoir distribution.

Yorston, H.J.; Miles, A.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: 3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration And Assessment-Summary Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally

367

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

368

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

369

Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Mercury Speciation in Piscivorous Fish from Mining-impacted Reservoirs Mercury toxicity generates environmental concerns in diverse aquatic systems because methylmercury enters the water column in diverse ways then biomagnifies through food webs. At the apex of many freshwater food webs, piscivorous fish can then extend that trophic transfer and potential for neurotoxicity to wildlife and humans. Mining activities, particularly those associated with the San Francisco Bay region, can generate both point and non-point mercury sources. Replicate XANES analyses on largemouth bass and hybrid striped bass from Guadalupe Reservoir (GUA), California and Lahontan Reservoir (LAH), Nevada, were performed to determine predominant chemical species of mercury accumulated by high-trophic-level piscivores that are exposed to elevated mercury in both solution and particulate phases in the water column.

370

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report highlights the work that was done to characterize fractured geothermal reservoirs using production data. That includes methods that were developed to infer characteristic functions from production data and models that were designed to optimize reinjection scheduling into geothermal reservoirs, based on these characteristic functions. The characterization method provides a robust way of interpreting tracer and flow rate data from fractured reservoirs. The flow-rate data are used to infer the interwell connectivity, which describes how injected fluids are divided between producers in the reservoir. The tracer data are used to find the tracer kernel for each injector-producer connection. The tracer kernel describes the volume and dispersive properties of the interwell flow path. A combination of parametric and nonparametric regression methods were developed to estimate the tracer kernels for situations where data is collected at variable flow-rate or variable injected concentration conditions. The characteristic functions can be used to calibrate thermal transport models, which can in turn be used to predict the productivity of geothermal systems. This predictive model can be used to optimize injection scheduling in a geothermal reservoir, as is illustrated in this report.

Roland N. Horne, Kewen Li, Mohammed Alaskar, Morgan Ames, Carla Co, Egill Juliusson, Lilja Magnusdottir

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

Doligez, B.; Eschard, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France); Geffroy, F. [Centre de Geostatistique, Fontainebleau (France)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a ``heterogeneity matrix`` based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate magnetic resonance (MR) techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in two hydrocarbon reservoirs. This was accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using MR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurements were compared with petrographic analysis results to determine the relative roles of petrographic elements such as porosity type, mineralogy, texture, and distribution of clay and cement in creating permeability heterogeneity.

Parra, J.O.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

Quantitative Methods for Reservoir Characterization and Improved Recovery: Application to Heavy Oil Sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved application of advanced analytical property-distribution methods conditioned to continuous outcrop control for improved reservoir characterization and simulation. The investigation was performed in collaboration with Chevron Production Company U.S.A. as an industrial partner, and incorporates data from the Temblor Formation in Chevron's West Coalinga Field, California. Improved prediction of interwell reservoir heterogeneity was needed to increase productivity and to reduce recovery cost for California's heavy oil sands, which contained approximately 2.3 billion barrels of remaining reserves in the Temblor Formation and in other formations of the San Joaquin Valley.

Castle, James W.; Molz, Fred W.; Bridges, Robert A.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.; Lorinovich, Caitlin J.; Lu, Silong

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Methodology to Integrate Magnetic Resonance and Acoustic Measurements for Reservoir Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop an advanced imaging method, including pore scale imaging, to integrate NMR techniques and acoustic measurements to improve predictability of the pay zone in hydrocarbon reservoirs. This is accomplished by extracting the fluid property parameters using NMR laboratory measurements and the elastic parameters of the rock matrix from acoustic measurements to create poroelastic models of different parts of the reservoir. Laboratory measurement techniques and core imaging are being linked with a balanced petrographical analysis of the core and theoretical model.

Parra, Jorge O.; Hackert, Chris L.; Collier, Hughbert A.; Bennett, Michael

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery,10/96,659,264  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF RESERVOIR WETTABILITY AND ITS EFFECT ON OIL RECOVERY EVALUATION OF RESERVOIR WETTABILITY AND ITS EFFECT ON OIL RECOVERY First Annual Report by Jill S. Buckley Work Performed under Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC22-96ID13421 Reporting Period: July 1, 1996 - June 30, 1997 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Jerry Casteel, Project Manager National Petroleum Technology Center P.O. Box 3628 Tulsa OK 74101 Prepared by Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM 87801 ii ABSTRACT We report on the first year of the project, "Evaluation of Reservoir Wettability and its Effect on Oil Recovery." The objectives of this five-year project are (1) to achieve improved understanding of the surface and interfacial properties of crude oils and their interactions with

379

Numerical Investigation of Fractured Reservoir Response to Injection/Extraction Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In geothermal reservoirs and unconventional gas reservoirs with very low matrix permeability, fractures are the main routes of fluid flow and heat transport, so the fracture permeability change is important. In fact, reservoir development under...

Lee, Byungtark

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

Numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic data from fractured reservoirs including fluid flow and geochemical processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models. My seismic simulation study suggests that CO2 saturated reservoir shows approximately ten times more attenuation than brine saturated reservoir. Similarly, large P-wave velocity variation in CO2 saturated reservoir...

Shekhar, Ravi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulation of reservoir depletion and oil flow from themodel included the oil reservoir and the well with a toppressures of the deep oil reservoir, to a two-phase oil-gas

Oldenburg, C.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Conservation and Recreation This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to

383

Criteria for displacement by gas versus water in oil reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199... on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199...

Piper, Larry Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

384

Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Protecting entangled states of two ions by engineering reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a proposal for realizing local decoherence-free evolution of given entangled states of two two-level (TL) ions. For two TL ions coupled to a single heavily damped cavity, we can use engineering reservoir scheme to obtain a decoherence-free subspace which can be nonadiabatically controlled by the system and reservoir parameters. Then the local decoherence-free evolution of the entangled states are achieved. And we also discuss the relation between the geometric phases and the entanglement of the two ions under the nonadiabatic coherent evolution.

Dong Xue; Jian Zou; Lin-Guang Yang; Jun-Gang Li; Bin Shao

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Architecture and sedimentology of turbidite reservoirs from Miocene Moco T and Webster zones, Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirty-five turbidite sandstone bodies from the Moco T and Webster reservoir zones were delineated for enhanced oil recovery projects in Mobil's MOCO FEE property, south Midway-Sunset field. The recognition of these sand bodies is based on mappable geometries determined from wireline log correlations, log character, core facies, reservoir characteristics, and comparison to nearby age-equivalent outcrops. These turbidite sands are composed of unconsolidated arkosic late Miocene sandstones (Stevens equivalent, Monterey Formation). They were deposited normal to paleoslope and trend southwest-northeast in an intraslope basin. Reservoir quality in the sandstone is very good, with average porosities of 33% and permeabilities of 1 darcy.

Link, M.H.; Hall, B.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

High resolution sequence stratigraphic and reservoir characterization studies of D-07, D-08 and E-01 sands, Block 2 Meren field, offshore Niger Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Niger Delta. The upper Miocene D-07, D-08 and E-01 oil sands comprise a series of stacked hydrocarbon reservoirs in Block 2 of Meren field. These reservoir sandstones were deposited in offshore to upper shoreface environments. Seven depositional... (offshore marine facies). Lithofacies have distinct mean petrophysical properties, although there is overlap in the range of values. The highest quality reservoir deposits are cross-bedded sands that were deposited in high-energy upper shoreface...

Esan, Adegbenga Oluwafemi

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Heavy Oil Viscosity Under Reservoir Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research was to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes.

Gabitto, Jorge; Barrufet, Maria

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Methodological Approach For Reservoir Heterogeneity Characterization Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of rock properties. Characterization of porosity, permeability, oil, gas and water saturation of hydrocarbon bearing rocks is the focus of this technical paper. Calculating formation porosity and waterSPE 28394 A Methodological Approach For Reservoir Heterogeneity Characterization Using Artificial

Mohaghegh, Shahab

390

Reservoir oil bubblepoint pressures revisited; solution gasoil ratios and surface gas specific gravities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir oil bubblepoint pressures revisited; solution gas­oil ratios and surface gas specific, for bubblepoint pressure and other fluid properties, require use of stock-tank gas rate and specific gravity in estimating stock-tank vent gas rate and quality for compliance purposes. D 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All

Valkó, Peter

391

Integration of Geology, Rock-Physics, Logs, and Pre-stack Seismic for Reservoir Porosity Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objective of this paper is to obtain reservoir properties, such as porosity, both at the well locations and in the inter-well regions from seismic data and well logs. The seismic and well-log datasets are from an ...

Al Muhaidib, Abdulaziz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

Mohan Kelkar

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

394

Characterization of Thin-Bedded Reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico: An Integrated Approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An important fraction of the reservoirs in the Outer Continental Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico is comprised of thin-bedded deposits from channel-levee systems. These reservoirs are particularly difficult to describe. Not only is their architecture...

Lalande, Severine

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radon Transect Studies in Vapor- and Liquid-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This communication describes the transect analysis conducted at the vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and the liquid-dominated reservoirs at Cerro Prieto in Baja, California.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

Socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This investigative study presents results on the socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The amount of incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling in 37 carbonate reservoir units...

Jagoe, Bryan Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Novel Approach For the Simulation of Multiple Flow Mechanisms and Porosities in Shale Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the art of modeling fluid flow in shale gas reservoirs is dominated by dual porosity models that divide the reservoirs into matrix blocks that significantly contribute to fluid storage and fracture networks which principally control...

Yan, Bicheng

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent.

Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

High-Resolution Characterization of Reservoir Heterogeneity and Connectivity in Clastic Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study developed new concepts and interpretative methods for mapping reservoir heterogeneity and connectivity of a fault controlled Wilcox clastic reservoir in Texas, USA. The application of high-resolution seismic enhancement in this study...

Hull, Thomas Frederick

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Rock Physics-Based Carbonate Reservoir Pore Type Evaluation by Combining Geological, Petrophysical and Seismic Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model, similar to modern marine hydrological environments within carbonate islands. How to evaluate carbonate reservoir permeability heterogeneity from 3 D seismic data has been a dream for reservoir geoscientists, which is a key factor to optimize...

Dou, Qifeng

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Microbial risk assessment for recreational use of the Kranji Reservoir, Singapore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Utilities Board of Singapore is responsible for management of the Kranji drinking water reservoir and wishes to open the reservoir for recreational water use as part of their "Active, Beautiful, and Clean Waters ...

Dixon, Cameron Chaffee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Experimental Design in reservoir simulation: an integrated solution for uncertainty analysis, a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantification of uncertain parameters in oil reservoirs is one of the major issues of concern. In underdeveloped reservoirs, there are many uncertain parameters affecting production forecast which plays a mai...

Fatemeh Moeinikia; Nasser Alizadeh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of Reservoir Evaporation and Evaporation Suppression on Water Supply Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir storage is essential for developing dependable water supplies and is a major component of the river system water budget. The storage contents of reservoirs fluctuate greatly with variations in water use and climatic conditions that range...

Ayala, Rolando A

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessing Ecosystem Effects of Reservoir Operations Using Food WebEnergy Transfer and Water Quality Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated the effects on the reservoir food web of a new temperature control device (TCD) on the dam at Shasta Lake, California. We followed a linked modeling approach that used a specialized reservoir wate...

Laurel Saito; Brett M. Johnson; John Bartholow; R. Blair Hanna

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A comparison of Bayesian versus deterministic formulation for dynamic data integration into reservoir models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Into Reservoir Models. (Decmnber 200 I) Danny LL Rojas Paico, B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Peru Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Akhil Datta-Gupta The integration of dynamic data into reservoir models is known as automatic history matching...

Rojas Paico, Danny H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Data quality enhancement in oil reservoir operations : an application of IPMAP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents a study of data quality enhancement opportunities in upstream oil and gas industry. Information Product MAP (IPMAP) methodology is used in reservoir pressure and reservoir simulation data, to propose ...

Lin, Paul Hong-Yi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

FRAC-STIM: A Physics-Based Fracture Simulation, /reservoir Flow...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FRAC-STIM: A Physics-Based Fracture Simulation, reservoir Flow and Heat Transport Simulator(aka FALCON) FRAC-STIM: A Physics-Based Fracture Simulation, reservoir Flow and Heat...

408

Anomalously High Porosity and Permeability in Deeply Buried Sandstone Reservoirs: Origin and Predictability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal...from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya basin: Marine and Petroleum...reservoirs, Bothamsall oilfield, E. Midlands: Journal...from Abu Dhabi and the Amu Darya basin: Marine and Petroleum...

Salman Bloch; Robert H. Lander; Linda Bonnell

409

Summary of Hot-Dry-Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing 1978-1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat- transfer area grew from 8000 to 50 000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11...

410

Seismic characterization of reservoirs with variable fracture spacing by double focusing Gaussian beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractured reservoirs account for a majority of the oil production worldwide and often have low recovery rate. Fracture characterization is important in building reservoir flow models for enhanced oil recovery. Information ...

Zheng, Yingcai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Layered Pseudo-Steady-State Models for tight commingled gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 5 - Typical Production Rate Performance for a Two-Layer Commingled Reservoir with constant p?& 18 Fig. 6 - Typical Average Reservoir Pressure Performance for Two-Layer Commingled Reservoirs 19 Fig. 7 - Fetkovich Decline Curves 21 Fig. 8... ? Matching Single-Layer Rate Decline With Fetkovich Curves 23 Fig. 9 - Matching a Two-Layer Commingled Reservoir With Fetkovich Curves 24 Fig. 10 - Schematic Flow Chart of the Layered PSS Program 29 Fig. 11 - Matching the Rate for Case b (Optimization...

El-Banbi, Ahmed

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Reservoir Simulation and Uncertainty Analysis of Enhanced CBM Production Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coalbed methane is becoming one of the major natural gas resources. CO2 injection into CBM reservoirs

Mohaghegh, Shahab

414

Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research project is to investigate dispersion as a method of quantifying geological characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity in order to enhance crude oil recovery. The dispersion of flow of a reservoir rock (dispersion coefficient and dispersivity) was identified as one of the physical properties of a reservoir rock by measuring the mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. A rock was 100% saturated with a resident fluid and displaced by a miscible fluid of equal viscosity and equal density. Some specific experiments were performed with unequal densities. Produced fluid was analyzed by refractometer, nuclear reaction, electrical conductivity and X-ray scan. Several physical and flow characteristics were measured on the sand rock sample in order to establish correlations with the measured dispersion property. Absolute permeability, effective porosity, relative permeability, capillary pressure, the heterogeneity factor and electrical conductivity were used to better understand the flow system. Linear, transverse, 2-D and 3-D dispersions were measured and used to characterize the rock heterogeneity of the flow system. A new system of measuring dispersion was developed using a gas displacing gas system in a porous medium. An attempt was also made to determine the dispersion property of an actual reservoir from present day well log data on a producing well. 275 refs., 102 figs., 17 tabs.

Menzie, D.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A new approach to integrate seismic and production data in reservoir models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A great deal of effort is devoted to reducing the uncertainties in reservoir modeling. For example, seismic properties are used to improve the characterization of interwell properties by providing porosity maps constrained to seismic impedance. Another means to reduce uncertainties is to constrain the reservoir model to production data. This paper describes a new approach where the production and seismic data are simultaneously used to reduce the uncertainties. In this new approach, the primary geologic parameter that controls reservoir properties is identified. Next, the geophysical parameter that is sensitive to the dominant geologic parameter is determined. Then the geology and geophysics are linked using analytic correlations. Unfortunately, the initial guess resulted in a reservoir model that did not match the production history. Since the time required for trial and error matching of production history is exorbitant, an automatic history matching method based on a fast optimization method was used to find the correlating parameters. This new approach was illustrated with an actual field in the Williston Basin. Upscalling problems do not arise since the scale is imposed by the size of the seismic bin (66m, 219 ft) which is the size of the simulator gridblocks.

Ouenes, A.; Chawathe, A.; Weiss, W. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Solutions for vertically fractured injection wells in heterogeneous reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be found in the studies of Lefkovits, et al. 7, Cobb, er a!. 8 Tariq9, and Larsento. The current trend in studying layered reservoirs is the generalization of the solution procedure to account for as many different layer parameters as possible. Ehlig...

Spath, Jeffrey Bernard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Petro-electric modeling for CSEM reservoir characterization and monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Geophysics, Austin, Texas, USA. Presently BP North America Inc., Reservoir Geophysics R&D, Houston, Texas and recorded by ocean bottom EM receivers. Successful applications are documented in several studies (e authors in the literature. Wright et al. (2002) present time-lapse transient EM sur- veys over a shallow

Key, Kerry

418

INVERSION OF CONVERTED-WAVE SEISMIC DATA FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin of northwest Colorado. The reservoir consists of lenticular fluvial sands, shales, and coals, the Thomsen anisotropy parameters are es- timated at the UMV Shale interval from a joint PP/PS traveltime inversion. An anisotropic AVO modeling study based on the elastic parameters extracted at the study well

419

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

RIFLE GAP RESERVOIR FISHERY INVESTIGATION Photo: Willow Hibbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in western Colorado, hosts a popular recreational fishery. Historically, stocked rainbow and brown trout have Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University Tel: 970-491-5002 email, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University March 2009 #12;Rifle Gap Reservoir Fishery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250C, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

422

Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of remaining recoverable hydrocarbons in the RD-1 compartment. It is estimated that about 6.7 billion cubic feet of gas might remain within this reservoir waiting to be recovered. A seismic amplitude anomaly response from the QH and RD sands is interpreted...

Casey, Michael Chase

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

423

THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study A THESIS SUBMITTED ON THE STRESS-STRAIN THEORY AND THE EARTH TIDE MECHANISM 4 2.1 Stress-Strain Theory 4 2.2 General Information on Tides 14 3. THE EFFECTS OF EARTH TIDES ON OPEN WELL-AQUIFER SYSTEMS: STATE OF THE ART 22 3.1 Static

Stanford University

424

Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Newbery, J.D.H. [Conoco, UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic petrophysics: An applied science for reservoir geophysics WAYNE D. PENNINGTON, Michigan a number of seismic attributes, using either prestack or poststack data, or even both in combination's intuition and, per- haps, wishful thinking, as a guide. This short paper introduces a new term "seismic

426

Hierarchical Economic Optimization of Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Economic Optimization of Oil Production from Petroleum Reservoirs Gijs M. van Essen-dirk.jansen@shell.com). Abstract: In oil production waterflooding is a popular recovery technology, which involves the injection, the oil-water front may not move uniformly towards the production wells, but has a rather irregular shape

Van den Hof, Paul

427

Chapter 2 Lake and reservoir water uses and abuses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Reservoirs are beneficial for human water needs, sometimes for one particular purpose, but frequently for multiple simultaneous purposes (multipurpose use). In contrast, lakes are natural waterbodies, often without designated human water uses. However, the use of their water is recently becoming more intensive and multipurpose, particularly for lakes in heavily-populated countries and intensively-utilized regions. This multipurpose and extensive use can often lead to abuse and conflicts, to a reduced ability to supply water of good quality, aesthetic and safe for human consumption. This chapter distinguishes twelve types of lake and reservoir functions. These include drinking water, irrigation, flood control, fish production and production of other useful organisms, mining, fire- and ice-ponds, and urban reservoirs. The deterioration of lakes and reservoirs is difficult to classify and two major groups are distinguished. One is based on their improper usageabuses of the waterbodies, classified according to sources or reasons of the deterioration. The other is based on the agents and compounds causing the deteriorationpollution.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

NANOSENSORS AS RESERVOIR ENGINEERING TOOLS TO MAP IN-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................. 1 1.1.1. The Role of Geothermal Energy........................................................ IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS By Morgan Ames June 2011 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy (under contract number DE-FG36-08GO18192). Stanford University Stanford

Stanford University

429

EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANFORD-DOE CONTRACT DE-AT03-80SF11459 #12;EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION improvement and degradation of total energy recovery. placement of reservoir f l u i d can mean support of waste water disposal and %proved re- source recovery. I n order t o correctly apportion importance

Stanford University

430

Salt tectonics, patterns of basin fill, and reservoir distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt structures, which develop due to sediment loading, gravity creep, and/or buoyancy, include boundary-fault grabens and half grabens, rollers, anticlines, domes and walls, diapirs, sills, massifs, and compressional toe structures. Associated features include fault systems and turtle structures. Of these, six directly relate to basin fill and all directly influence the distribution of reservoir facies. Salt structuring is initiated by sedimentation, which in turn is localized by salt withdrawal. Withdrawal produces individual salt structures, migrating sills, dissected massifs, and regional depocenters bordered by salt walls. Composite withdrawals dictate the patterns of basin fill. Relative rates of structural growth and sedimentation control the distribution of reservoir facies. When growth dominates, sands are channeled into lows. When sedimentation dominates and maintains flat surfaces, facies distribution is not impacted except where faulting develops. Turtle structures, developed by the inversion of peripheral synclines, can move sands into favorable structural position and/or serve as platforms for carbonate reservoir development. Salt growth varies with type structure, stage of development, and rate of sedimentation. Sedimentation at a specific location depends on basin position, sediment transport system, sea level stand, and rate of salt withdrawal. This paper presents techniques for using seismic data to determine the controls on salt structural growth and sedimentation and the patterns of basin fill and reservoir distribution.

Yorston, H.J.; Miles, A.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gas in psia pressure of gas in psia at time t constant production rate of gas in moles per year production rate at time t in moles per year ideal gas constant constant rate of water injection in cubic feet of the reservoir in cubic feet, below which gas production ceases initial reservoir volume in cubic feet reservoir

Waterman, Michael S.

432

Documenting Visual Quality Controls on the Evaluation of Petroleum Reservoir-rocks through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) processes control the distribution of porosity and permeability within petroleum reservoir rocks section in a time unit. The values and distribution of porosity and permeability within reservoir rocks and prediction of the quality (porosity, permeability) of petroleum reservoirs during their exploration

Oliveira, Manuel M.

433

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied curves as a basis for analysis of future well tests for geothermal reservoirs. c ii #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS

Stanford University

434

Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic and mechanical measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydromechanical interactions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferred from hydraulic, France Abstract Hydromechanical coupled processes in a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir rock were of hydraulic loading/unloading of a water reservoir in which fluid flow occurs mainly inside a heterogeneous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric * Hydroelectric reservoirs cover an area of 3.4 ? 105 km2 and comprise about 20% of all reservoirs. In addition dioxide and methane from hydroelectric reservoirs, on the basis of data from 85 globally distributed

436

Autonomic Optimization of an Oil Reservoir using Decentralized Services Vincent Matossian and Manish Parashar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomic Optimization of an Oil Reservoir using Decentralized Services Vincent Matossian the autonomic optimization of an oil reservoir. 1 Introduction The Grid[1] is rapidly emerging as the dominant, formations of galaxies, subsurface flows in oil reservoirs and aquifers, and dynamic response of materials

Parashar, Manish

437

Accurate Subgrid Models for Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have a strong influence on flow and transport in oil reservoirs. In this work, a new modelAccurate Subgrid Models for Two-Phase Flow in Heterogeneous Reservoirs Yalchin R. Efendiev, SPE for the representation of subgrid terms is introduced and applied to two-phase reservoir flows. The model entails

Efendiev, Yalchin

438

Laboratory experiments simulating fire flooding through a fractured reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-permeability heavy-oil reservoirs are considered to be poor prospects for in-situ-combustion recovery methods. The low-permeability, high-viscosity heavy oils, combined, make air injection through the formation insufficient to support combustion in the formation. The objective of this research is to show results obtained through burn tests on whole cores and fractured cores relating these results to heavy-oil reservoirs. These tests were performed to determine the technical feasibility of recovering heavy oil by the in-situ-combustion process from reservoirs which are shallow and contain no reservoir energy. These tests were conducted on cores obtained from a heavy-oil reservoir near Bartlett, Kansas. The tests were performed in a thin-walled core holder with a built-in heater to start combustion. Air was measured and injected through the heater and into the core. The produced fluids (oil and water) were obtained and measured and the resulting effluent gas was measured and analyzed on a chromatograph to determine the constituents of the produced gas. The injected air pressure was determined and temperature logs were plotted during the entire test. It was determined from the results of the tests on competent cores that 78 percent of the oil was removed from the cores as a result of the in-situ-combustion process on competent cores while 16 percent was used as fuel for combustion. The results from the tests on fractured cores show that 33 percent of the oil was removed from the cores as a result of the in-situ-combustion process while 45 percent was used as fuel for combustion. The results from the tests on fractured cores held apart by propping agents show that 16 percent of the oil was removed from the cores as a result of the in-situ-combustion process, while 38 percent was used as fuel to support combustion. 46 figures, 56 tables.

Miller, J.S.; Jones, R.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

2001-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

Raj Kumar; Keith Brown; T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

T. Scott Hickman; James J. Justice

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

444

APPLICATION OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE RECOVERY AND ECONOMICS IN A LOWER QUALITY SHALLOW SHELF SAN ANDRES RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three-dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Crosswell bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents.

T. Scott Hickman

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reservoir characterization of the Upper and Lower Repetto reservoirs of the Santa Clara field-federal waters, offshore California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are based on the analysis of field production data. These reservoir characterization approaches include: The application of the Fetkovich/McCray decline type curve to estimate original oil-in-place, drainage area, flow capacity, and a skin factor for each...

Roco, Craig Emmitt

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this past quarter, work continued on: the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement; the optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optical control methods; and in the area of chemical additives, work continued on the behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this quarter work continued on: development of relative permeabilities during steam injection; optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optimal control methods; and behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Cement distribution in a carbonate reservoir: recognition of a palaeo oilwater contact and its relationship to reservoir quality in the Humbly Grove field, onshore, UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of mineral cements, total porosity, microporosity and permeability have been determined for the Humbly Grove oolitic carbonate reservoir (Middle Jurassic Great Oolite Formation, Weald Basin, onshore UK) using a combination of optical petrography, electron microscopy, fluid inclusion analysis, quantitative XRD, wireline data analysis and core analysis data. Grainstone reservoir facies have porosities ranging between 5 and 24%, but are mostly between 11 and 24%. Permeabilities vary from Jurassic reservoirs of the Weald Basin.

Emma C Heasley; Richard H Worden; James P Hendry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Analysis and evaluation of interwell seismic logging techniques for reservoir characterization. [Quarterly report], April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this three-year research program is to investigate interwell seismic logging techniques for indirectly interpreting oil and gas reservoir geology and rock physical properties. This work involves a balanced study of advanced theoretical and numerical modeling of seismic waves transmitted between pairs of reservoir wells combined with experimental dam acquisition and processing of measurements at controlled sites as well as in full-scale reservoirs. This reservoir probing concept is aimed at demonstrating high-resolution measurements and detailed interpretation of heterogeneous hydrocarbon-bearing formations. In this quarterly report technical progress is summarized for Task 3, data processing and analysis of: preliminary interpretation of interwell seismic data from wells 5-7 and 7-7 at the Gypsy Test Site; and the response of a thin layer in an anistropic shale.

Parra, J.O.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA's Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA's reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

452

Implications of outcrop geology for reservoirs in the Neogene productive series: Apsheron peninsula, Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neogene sediments of eastern Azerbaijan and western Turkmenistan contain significant hydrocarbon reserves in deltaic reservoirs. Sedimentary logging of these reservoirs at outcrop in Azerbaijan has outlined four facies associations that encompass a range of paleoenvironments, from alluvial braided river sandstones and conglomerates to delta-front siltstones and mudstones. The facies associations suggest a river-dominated braid delta and are arranged into an architecture controlled by base-level changes: parasequences, parasequence sets, and sequence boundaries are key elements. The facies associations and stratigraphic architecture, together with outcrop observations of cementation and faulting, are summarized in terms of four idealized reservoir models: fluvial, delta plain, proximal delta front, and distal delta front. Each reservoir model has distinctive grain-size and shale distributions. Comparison of nearby oil fields with the studied outcrops suggests that the outcrops form good analogs from which to model reservoir architecture, barriers and baffles to fluid flow, reservoir heterogeneity, and reservoir quality variations.

Reynolds, A.D.; Bowman, M.B.J.; Henton, J. [BP Exploration, Middlesex (United Kingdom)] [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Reservoir characteristics of Putnam zone (Silurian Interlake Formation) lithofacies, southwestern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reservoirs in the Putnam zone (lower Interlake Formation) in the southwestern part of the Williston basin include oolitic-pellet dolomite grainstone, fossil-pellet grainstone, and a wide spectrum of reef-related, fossil-corral dolomite packstones and coral-stromatoporoid rudstone/boundstones. Each of these potential reservoirs has a unique pore system and, thus a different set of petrophysical properties which define their reservoir characteristics. Oolitic grainstones have a homogeneous intercrystalline-micro-crystalline pore system, whereas the fossil-pellet dolomite grainstone facies consists of separate mesovugs dispersed in well-interconnected intercrystalline porosity. Capillary pressure curves indicate that pore-throat heterogeneity is greater, and entry pressures lower, for reefal lithofacies than for pelletal grainstones. These curves also demonstrate why many of the producing fields tend to have high water cuts. In many oolitic-pellet grainstone units, irreducible water saturations of 10% would not be reached until a hydrocarbon column of 700 ft was reached. High water production characteristics are therefore expected because Red River/Interlake structures attain only 50-100 ft of closure. This, however, does not mean that Putnam is not an economic zone, especially as a secondary objective. Wells in Putnam and Crane fields, for instance, have reserves in excess of 300,000 bbl of oil. The reservoirs here may be dominated by the reef-related facies, which have an extremely high relative permeability to oil.

Inden, R. (LSSI, Denver, CO (United States)); Oglesby, C. (Bass Enterprises, Fort Worth, TX (United States)); Byrnes, A. (Geocore, Loveland, CO (United States)); Cluff, B. (The Discovery Group, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

IMPROVING CO2 EFFICIENCY FOR RECOVERING OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third annual report of ''Improving CO{sub 2} Efficiency for Recovery Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs'' presents results of laboratory studies with related analytical models for improved oil recovery. All studies were designed to optimize utilization and extend the practice of CO{sub 2} flooding to a wider range of reservoirs. Chapter 1 describes the behavior at low concentrations of the surfactant Chaser International CD1045{trademark} (CD) versus different salinity, pressure and temperature. Results of studies on the effects of pH and polymer (hydrolyzed polyacrylamide?HPAM) and CO{sub 2} foam stability after adsorption in the core are also reported. Calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) transport mechanisms through sandstone, description of the adsorption of CD and CD/CLS onto three porous media (sandstone, limestone and dolomite) and five minerals, and the effect of adsorption on foam stability are also reported. In Chapter 2, the adsorption kinetics of CLS in porous Berea sandstone and non-porous minerals are compared by monitoring adsorption density change with time. Results show that adsorption requires a much longer time for the porous versus non-porous medium. CLS adsorption onto sandstone can be divided into three regions: adsorption controlled by dispersion, adsorption controlled by diffusion and adsorption equilibrium. NaI tracer used to characterize the sandstone had similar trends to earlier results for the CLS desorption process, suggesting a dual porosity model to simulate flow through Berea sandstone. The kinetics and equilibrium test for CD adsorption onto five non-porous minerals and three porous media are reported in Chapter 3. CD adsorption and desorption onto non-porous minerals can be established in less than one hour with adsorption densities ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 mg of CD per g of mineral in decreasing order of montmorillonite, dolomite, kaolinite, silica and calcite. The surfactant adsorption onto three porous media takes much longer than one hour, with Berea sandstone requiring the longest time. In Chapter 4, comparisons of static adsorption of CLS, CD, and CLS/CD mixtures onto five pure minerals showed that the presence of CLS decreased the adsorption of CD onto the five minerals by 20 to 70%. Dynamic CLS/CD mixture adsorption tests onto Berea sandstone and Indian limestone cores showed that competitive adsorption between CD and CLS generally takes several days to reach equilibrium. Foam stability and interfacial tension tests on both injected and effluent samples were performed which showed that both foam stability and IFT decreased due to adsorption. Also it appears that there is a chromatographic effect on the surfactants in flow through porous media. Progress was realized in developing general equations for stress sensitivity on non-Darcy parameters (permeability and non-Darcy coefficient), and the multiphase flow induced by a high flow rate was confirmed as a mechanism for injectivity loss in CO{sub 2} flooding. In Chapter 5, a general equation is defined based on 60 general equations of permeability stress sensitivity and non-Darcy coefficient stress sensitivity and definitions of nominal permeability, nominal non-Darcy coefficient, permeability stress sensitivity, and non-Darcy coefficient stress sensitivity. The equations of stress sensitivity are independent of pressure, temperature, and rock properties and existing empirical correlations of the nominal permeability and nominal non-Darcy coefficient can be used when laboratory data are not available. This provides a tool to quantify the change of permeability and non-Darcy coefficient due to change of effective stress resulted from reservoir injection and/or production.

Reid B. Grigg; Robert K. Svec; Zhengwen Zeng; Baojun Bai; Yi Liu

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

456

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT Complex reservoir geometries can influence the results obtained

Stanford University

457

Inflow performance relationships for solution-gas-drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this theoretical study, a numerical model was used to examine the influence of pressure level and skin factor on the inflow performance relationships (IPR's) of wells producing under solution-gas-drive systems. Examination of the synthetic deliverability curves suggests that the exponent of the deliverability curve is a function of time and that the exponent is usually greater than unity. The implication of this observation to field data is discussed. The accuracy of procedures given in the literature to predict oilwell deliverabilities is also examined. It is shown that these methods can be used to predict future performance provided that the exponent of the deliverability curve is known and that extrapolations over large time ranges are avoided. If single-point tests are used to predict future performance (such tests assume that the exponent of the deliverability curve is constant), then errors in predictions will be minimized. Although relative permeability and fluid property data are required, the Muskat material-balance equation and the assumption that GOR is independent of distance can be used to predict future production rates. This method avoids problems associated with other methods in the literature and always yields reliable results. New methods to modify the IPR curve to incorporate changes in skin factor are presented. A new flow-efficiency definition based on the structure of the deliverability equations for solution-gas-drive reservoirs is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the currently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells.

Camacho-V, R.G.; Raghavan, R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

New Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Reservoir Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Reservoir Characterization Oliver C. Mullins Schlumberger-Doll Research, 1 Hampshire St., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Crude oils consist of gases, liquids and solids, the asphaltenes. The gas and liquid constituents of crude oil are chemically well understood and their theoretical frame work can be satisfactorily treated by cubic equations of state. In contrast, the asphaltene have been grossly misunderstood precluding any theoretical treatment of asphaltene gradients in reservoirs. In recent years, asphaltene science has undergone a renaissance with many of the advances being subsumed in the "Yen-Mullins model" (named by Professor Zare at Stanford U.) which consists of asphaltene molecules, nanoaggregates and clusters of

459

Whiteface Reservoir, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiteface Reservoir, Minnesota: Energy Resources Whiteface Reservoir, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.1543922°, -92.1872565° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.1543922,"lon":-92.1872565,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Simple numerical simulation for liquid dominated geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical model for geothermal reservoir has been developed. The model used is based on an idealized, two-dimensional case, where the porous medium is isotropic, nonhomogeneous, filled with saturated liquid. The fluids are assumed to have constant and temperature dependent viscosity. A Boussinesq approximation and Darcy`s law are used. The model will utilize a simple hypothetical geothermal system, i.e. graben within horsts structure, with three layers of different permeabilities. Vorticity plays an importance roles in the natural convection process, and its generation and development do not depend only on the buoyancy, but also on the magnitude and direction relation between the flow velocity and the local gradient of permeability to viscosity ratio. This model is currently used together with a physical, scaled-down reservoir model to help conceptual modeling.

Wintolo, D.; Sutrisno; Sudjamiko [Gadjah Mada Univ., Yogyakarta (Indonesia)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Simple numerical simulation for liquid dominated geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical model for geothermal reservoir has been developed. The model used is based on an idealized, two-dimensional case, where the porous medium is isotropic, nonhomogeneous, filled with saturated liquid. The fluids are assumed to have constant and temperature dependent viscosity. A Boussinesq approximation and Darcys law are used. The model will utilize a simple hypothetical geothermal system, i.e. graben within horsts structure, with three layers of different permeabilities. Vorticity plays an importance roles in the natural convection process, and its generation and development do not depend only on the buoyancy, but also on the magnitude and direction relation between the flow velocity and the local gradient of permeability to viscosity ratio. This model is currently used together with a physical, scaled-down reservoir model to help conceptual modeling.

Wintolo, Djoko; Sutrisno; Sudjatmiko; Sudarman, S.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydraulic fracturing in a sedimentary geothermal reservoir: Results and implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field experiments in a geothermal research well were conducted to enhance the inflow performance of a clastic sedimentary reservoir section. Due to depths exceeding 4050m, bottom hole temperatures exceeding 140C, and open hole section (dual zone), technically demanding and somewhat unprecedented conditions had to be managed. The fracturing operations were successful. Fractures were created in two isolated borehole intervals and the inflow behaviour of the reservoir was decisively enhanced. The effective pressures applied for fracture initiation and propagation were only slightly above in situ pore pressures. Nevertheless, the stimulation ratio predicted by fracture performance modelling could not be achieved. Multiple reasons could be identified that account for the mismatch. An insufficient fracture tie-back, as well as chemical and mechanical processes during closure, led to reduced fracture conductivities and therefore diminished productivity. The insights gained are the basis for further fracture design concepts at the given and geologic comparable sites.

B. Legarth; E. Huenges; G. Zimmermann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Use of adaptive matching filters to improve reservoir definition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in seismic resolution through better seismic acquisition and processing coupled with geometric improvements provided by 3-D surveys should allow better depiction of reservoir settings. To more fully benefit from these data improvements, is is desirable to translate the seismic acoustic attributes into a form that has more lithologic meaning. Tuning and thin bed effects etc. are automatically taken into account, and the acoustic data rendered into rock terms by matched filtering. The advantage of the present method is that the matching filter is allowed to adapt over time, but only slowly. The result is adaptive filters that give better prediction of lithologic characteristics in areas adjacent to the control data. Slowly adaptive matching filters can provide better prediction of reservoir characteristics between control points (wells). Such techniques are particularly suitable in multiwell settings where it is possible to frequently calibrate the filters.

DuBose, J.B. Jr; Blackwelder, B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during the first year of the project, ''Using Chemicals to Optimize Conformance Control in Fractured Reservoirs.'' This research project has three objectives. The first objective is to develop a capability to predict and optimize the ability of gels to reduce permeability to water more than that to oil or gas. The second objective is to develop procedures for optimizing blocking agent placement in wells where hydraulic fractures cause channeling problems. The third objective is to develop procedures to optimize blocking agent placement in naturally fractured reservoirs. This research project consists of three tasks, each of which addresses one of the above objectives. Our work is directed at both injection wells and production wells and at vertical, horizontal, and highly deviated wells.

Seright, Randall S.; Liang, Jenn-Tai; Schrader, Richard; Hagstrom II, John; Liu, Jin; Wavrik, Kathryn

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

On Leakage from Geologic Storage Reservoirs of CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large amounts of CO2 would need to be injected underground to achieve a significant reduction of atmospheric emissions. The large areal extent expected for CO2 plumes makes it likely that caprock imperfections will be encountered, such as fault zones or fractures, which may allow some CO2 to escape from the primary storage reservoir. Leakage of CO2 could also occur along wellbores. Concerns with escape of CO2 from a primary geologic storage reservoir include (1) acidification of groundwater resources, (2) asphyxiation hazard when leaking CO2 is discharged at the land surface, (3) increase in atmospheric concentrations of CO2, and (4) damage from a high-energy, eruptive discharge (if such discharge is physically possible). In order to gain public acceptance for geologic storage as a viable technology for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2, it is necessary to address these issues and demonstrate that CO2 can be injected and stored safely in geologic formations.

Pruess, Karsten

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

466

Research on Oil Recovery Mechanisms in Heavy Oil Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to increase recovery of heavy oils. Towards that goal studies are being conducted in how to assess the influence of temperature and pressure on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in site combustion process; to develop and understand mechanisms of surfactants on for the reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; and to improve techniques of formation evaluation.

Louis M. Castanier; William E. Brigham

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

MULTIGRID METHODS FOR FULLY IMPLICIT OIL RESERVOIR J. Molenaar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and water in reservoir rock. This displacement process is modeled by two basic equations (see e.g. [1 ff ¯ ff ; ff = w; o; (3) with k the rock permeability, k ff (S ff ) the phase relative permeability for both phases OE @S ff @t +r \\Delta q ff +Q ff = 0; ff = w; o; (4) with OE the porosity of the rock and Q

468

Continuous Model Updating and Forecasting for a Naturally Fractured Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS MODEL UPDATING AND FORECASTING FOR A NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR A Thesis by HISHAM HASSAN S. ALMOHAMMADI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... guidance and support throughout my time here in Texas A&M University. I also would like to thank my committee members, Dr. Eduardo Gildin and Dr. Michael Sherman, for providing valued insight and help during the course of this research. I am indebted...

Almohammadi, Hisham

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

A manual for evaluation and exploitation of carbonate reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different stages of exploration/exploitation: before drilling, during drilling, and after drilling. The selection of the appropriate carbonate reservoir model should be made first considering information obtained before and during drilling. Rocks.... . . . . . . 53 . . . 56 . . . . . 57 . . . . 60 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Page Fig. 24, Three different rock types, their hydrocarbon distribution, and their capillary pressure curve types. . Fig. 25. a Effect of pore-to-throat size on recovery...

Cordova, Pedro Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taste and Odor Problems in Clinton Lake Reservoir's Drinking Water Diana L. Restrepo-Osorio (McNair Scholar) Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, INTRODUCTION Water is a requirement for human health and welfare; however..., an exceedingly large number of people around the world lack reliable sources of drinking water 1 . According to the World Health Organization, approximately 3.5 million people die every year, generally in developing countries, from diseases linked to poor...

Restrepo-Osorio, Dianna L.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Simulation of paraffin damage due to natural cooling in reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the well bore. The precipitated paraffin particles form a suspension with the reservoir fluids. The suspended solid particles tend to be carried towards the wellbore by the liquid stream. Some of these particles deposit in the pore spaces... that the rate of removal of suspended solids is equal to the concentration of suspended solids times a deposition coefficient. The deposition coefficient is obtained by fitting experimental data. This method, introduced by Iwasaki' in 1937 is widely used...

Peddibhotla, Sriram

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

D-optimal design for Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of major oilfields in China have reached high water cut stage, but still, they contribute to more than 70% of domestic oil production. How to extract more oil from mature oilfields has become a hot topic in petroleum engineering. Carbon dioxide flooding is a winwin strategy because it can enhance oil recovery and simultaneously reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. In order to evaluate the potentials of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs, various 3-D heterogeneous geological models were built based on Guan 104 fault block in Dagang Oilfield to perform reservoir simulations. The D-optimal design was applied to build and verify the Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs. Five quantitative variables were considered, including average horizontal permeability, permeability variation coefficient, ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, net thickness of formation and percentage of recoverable reserves by water flooding. The process of weighting emphasized the contributions of linear terms, quadratic terms and first-order interactions of five quantitative parameters to improved recovery factor and Net Present Value of CO2 flooding. Using the Rapid Assessment Model of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs, significant first-order interactions were sorted out and type curves were established and analyzed for the evaluation of technical and economic efficiency of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs. Aimed at oil reservoirs with the similar geological conditions and fluid properties as Guan 104 fault block, the Rapid Assessment Model and type curves of CO2 flooding in high water cut oil reservoirs can be applied to predict improved recovery factor and Net Present Value of water-alternating-CO2 flooding at different conditions of reservoir parameters and development parameter. The approach could serve as a guide for the application and spread of CO2-EOR projects.

Zhaojie Song; Zhiping Li; Chunsheng Yu; Jirui Hou; Mingzhen Wei; Baojun Bai; Yunpeng Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first of a three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The objectives of the study are to (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions where fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. Simulation studies were conducted with a dual porosity simulator capable of simulating the performance of vertical and horizontal wells. Each simulator was initialized using properties typical of the Austin Chalk reservoir in Pearsall Field, Texas. Simulations of both vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicate that the simulator is predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results to-date confirm that horizontal wells can increase both oil recovery rate and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. The year one simulation results will provide the baseline for the ongoing study which will evaluate the performance degradation caused by the sensitivity of fracture permeability to pressure change, and investigate fluid injection pressure maintenance as a means to improve oil recovery performance. The study is likely to conclude that fracture closure decreases oil recovery and that pressure support achieved through fluid injection could be beneficial in improving recovery.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.19166667,"lon":-120.385,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

475

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

476

Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Models, Integrating Reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calls for integration of static and dynamic measurements into the reservoir model. Full field reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado complex process called that usually works well in the hand of an experienced team of engineers and geoscientists. Characteristics

Mohaghegh, Shahab

477

Productivity evaluation and influential factor analysis for Sarvak reservoir in South Azadegan oil field, Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Production pattern of oil wells and influential factors on productivity for the massive carbonate reservoir in the Middle East were researched by productivity evaluation on Sarvak and analysis of properties impact on production. Based on dynamic performance of Sarvak production test, the relationship between daily oil production, tubing pressure, cumulative oil production and choke size was analyzed and reasonable productivity prediction model was established by applying Poettman model, and the effect of physical properties and fluid parameters on productivity were analyzed further by numerical simulation. The study shows that daily oil production is linearly correlated with oil pressure under certain working regime, and daily oil production is power law correlated with choke sizes before and after working regime adjustment. The average designed single well productivity should be about 270 m3/d by depletion to ensure a three-year plateau period. Sarvak is a blocky carbonate reservoir, when developed with horizontal wells, interbeds distributed between layers and permeability property have the strongest impact on production of horizontal wells. So, highly deviated wells should be used to reduce the effect of interbeds and acidizing should be considered to improve the reservoir physical properties.

Hui LIU; Rui GUO; Junchang DONG; Li LIU; Yang LIU; Yingjie YI

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

W. W. Weiss

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

480

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir properties reservoir" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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